Chinese state media blasts US bill that pushes for tougher response to Muslim detainment camps

This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region. Chinese official media excoriated the United States and called for harsh reprisals in editorials on Thursday after the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation requiring a stronger response to Beijing’s treatment of its Uighur Muslim minority. The bill still has to be approved by the Republican-controlled Senate before being sen


This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region.
Chinese official media excoriated the United States and called for harsh reprisals in editorials on Thursday after the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation requiring a stronger response to Beijing’s treatment of its Uighur Muslim minority.
The bill still has to be approved by the Republican-controlled Senate before being sen
Chinese state media blasts US bill that pushes for tougher response to Muslim detainment camps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, response, bill, tougher, legislation, media, xinjiang, pushes, trump, chinas, detainment, uighurs, uighur, say, blasts, sign, state, camps, muslim, chinese, house


Chinese state media blasts US bill that pushes for tougher response to Muslim detainment camps

This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region.

Chinese official media excoriated the United States and called for harsh reprisals in editorials on Thursday after the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation requiring a stronger response to Beijing’s treatment of its Uighur Muslim minority.

The commentaries follow warnings from China on Wednesday that the legislation could affect bilateral cooperation, including a near-term deal to end the two countries’ trade war.

A front-page editorial in the ruling Communist Party’s People’s Daily newspaper said the passage of the U.S. legislation “harbors evil intent and is extremely sinister”.

“Underestimating the determination and will of the Chinese people is doomed to fail,” it said.

By a vote of 407 to 1, the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday approved the Uighur bill, which would require the Trump administration to toughen its response to China’s crackdown in Xinjiang, a region in China’s far west.

The bill still has to be approved by the Republican-controlled Senate before being sent to U.S. President Donald Trump to sign into law.

The White House has yet to say whether Trump would sign or veto the bill, which contains a provision allowing the president to waive sanctions if he determines that to be in the national interest.

U.N. experts and activists say China has detained possibly one million Uighurs in mass detention camps in Xinjiang.

China says the camps are part of an anti-terror crackdown and are providing vocational training. It denies any mistreatment of Uighurs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, response, bill, tougher, legislation, media, xinjiang, pushes, trump, chinas, detainment, uighurs, uighur, say, blasts, sign, state, camps, muslim, chinese, house


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China may ban US officials from region with Muslim detainment camps

This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region. China might ban all U.S. diplomatic passport-holders from entering the country’s western Xinjiang autonomous region, Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin said on Tuesday. U.N. experts and activists say at least 1 million Uighurs, and members of other largely Muslim minority groups, have been detained in camps in the remote Xinjiang reg


This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region.
China might ban all U.S. diplomatic passport-holders from entering the country’s western Xinjiang autonomous region, Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin said on Tuesday.
U.N. experts and activists say at least 1 million Uighurs, and members of other largely Muslim minority groups, have been detained in camps in the remote Xinjiang reg
China may ban US officials from region with Muslim detainment camps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ban, camps, xinjiang, vocational, officials, western, china, say, chinas, muslim, xijin, detainment, region


China may ban US officials from region with Muslim detainment camps

This photo taken on June 4, 2019 shows the Chinese flag flying over the Juma mosque in the restored old city area of Kashgar, in China’s western Xinjiang region.

China might ban all U.S. diplomatic passport-holders from entering the country’s western Xinjiang autonomous region, Global Times Editor-in-Chief Hu Xijin said on Tuesday.

Hu said in a tweet that China is also considering visa restrictions against U.S. officials and lawmakers with “odious performance” on the Xinjiang issue, in retaliation to legislation being prepared by the U.S. Congress. He did not say how he had obtained the information.

U.N. experts and activists say at least 1 million Uighurs, and members of other largely Muslim minority groups, have been detained in camps in the remote Xinjiang region. Top U.S. officials including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo have criticized China publicly on the situation there.

China has denied mistreatment at the camps, which Beijing says provide vocational training to help eliminate religious extremism and teach new skills to people of the region. It has repeatedly demanded that U.S. and other foreign states critical of its policies in Xinjiang end their interference in China’s domestic affairs.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ban, camps, xinjiang, vocational, officials, western, china, say, chinas, muslim, xijin, detainment, region


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China’s military might has now become a top issue for NATO

But now, another rising military power is in its sights: China. However, many experts and leaders within the group think the alliance should now be focusing on new and emerging military powers, like China. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that the country is “coming closer.” According to NATO’s own estimate, China had the second-largest global defense budget in 2018. Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that NATO did not want to “create new adversaries” and that “as long as NATO


But now, another rising military power is in its sights: China.
However, many experts and leaders within the group think the alliance should now be focusing on new and emerging military powers, like China.
NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that the country is “coming closer.”
According to NATO’s own estimate, China had the second-largest global defense budget in 2018.
Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that NATO did not want to “create new adversaries” and that “as long as NATO
China’s military might has now become a top issue for NATO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: holly ellyatt david reid, holly ellyatt, david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, stoltenberg, budget, chinas, china, power, nato, world, military, told, issue


China's military might has now become a top issue for NATO

The Beijing corps of the Chinese People’s Armed Police takes an oath during a ceremony on January 2, 2018, in Beijing, China, as annual military training activities begin. Zhao Shiwei | VCG | Getty Images

NATO, the 29-member military alliance, was set up 70 years ago to counter the threat posed by the-then Soviet Union. But now, another rising military power is in its sights: China. As heads of state and government gather in the U.K. Tuesday for a two-day meeting of the alliance, shifting geopolitical relationships and emerging challenges will be in focus for the fractious group. Previous meetings have been dominated by the alliance’s old foe Russia, following Moscow’s annexation of Crimea from Ukraine in 2014. However, many experts and leaders within the group think the alliance should now be focusing on new and emerging military powers, like China. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that the country is “coming closer.” “What we see is that the rising power of China is shifting the global balance of power and the rises of China — the economic rise, the military rise — provides some opportunities but also some serious challenges,” Stoltenberg told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble in London. “We have to address the fact that China is coming closer to us, investing heavily in infrastructure. We see them in Africa, we see them in the Arctic, we see them in cyber space and China now has the second-largest defense budget in the world,” he said.

According to NATO’s own estimate, China had the second-largest global defense budget in 2018. In March, China set its 2019 defense spending at 7.5% higher than a year ago, raising spending to 1.19 trillion yuan ($177.61 billion), according to known figures (some believe the actual figure could be higher). Still, it lags a long way behind the U.S. In April, the U.S. Defense Department asked Congress for $718 billion in its fiscal 2020 budget, an increase of $33 billion or about 5% over what Congress enacted for fiscal 2019. The U.S. and NATO, are watching China closely. Stoltenberg told CNBC Monday that NATO did not want to “create new adversaries” and that “as long as NATO allies stand together, we are strong and we are safe … We are by far the strongest military power in the world.” Sino-U.S. tensions are of course already high as a trade dispute between the nations, which has led to billions of dollars’ worth of import tariffs on each others’ goods, remains unresolved. U.S. Permanent Representative to NATO, Ambassador Kay Bailey Hutchison, told CNBC Monday that the rest of the world had let China get by with not meeting World Trade Organization (WTO) standards, but that it was now time to bring China “into the rules-based order.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: holly ellyatt david reid, holly ellyatt, david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, stoltenberg, budget, chinas, china, power, nato, world, military, told, issue


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The U.S. can’t use Cold War tactics to engage with China, says former NSA head Michael Rogers

Navy Adm. Michael Rogers, commander of the US Cyber Command, director of the National Security Agency and chief of Central Security Services. Rogers discussed the multi-faceted problems facing the U.S. over China technology in an interview that aired Tuesday on the cybersecurity podcast Task Force 7 Radio . After World War II, Rogers said, “It was the West who developed the core technologies that powered this economic growth. They didn’t have the global economic impact or capabilities that we ha


Navy Adm. Michael Rogers, commander of the US Cyber Command, director of the National Security Agency and chief of Central Security Services.
Rogers discussed the multi-faceted problems facing the U.S. over China technology in an interview that aired Tuesday on the cybersecurity podcast Task Force 7 Radio .
After World War II, Rogers said, “It was the West who developed the core technologies that powered this economic growth.
They didn’t have the global economic impact or capabilities that we ha
The U.S. can’t use Cold War tactics to engage with China, says former NSA head Michael Rogers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, rogers, chinas, engage, economic, war, head, cold, technology, cant, michael, security, companies, global, nsa, political, technological, tactics


The U.S. can't use Cold War tactics to engage with China, says former NSA head Michael Rogers

Navy Adm. Michael Rogers, commander of the US Cyber Command, director of the National Security Agency and chief of Central Security Services.

He said China’s main goal is to achieve 21st century technological dominance, and explained some of the tactics that are hard to counter, such as IP theft, government subsidies of tech companies, and linking corporate interests to education and government research. He also offered some concrete suggestions on how to counter China’s efforts while maintaining an American business philosophy.

Rogers discussed the multi-faceted problems facing the U.S. over China technology in an interview that aired Tuesday on the cybersecurity podcast Task Force 7 Radio .

The companies denied the claims then and have continued to deny them through 2019, but the information in the report precipitated 2019’s mounting legal actions against the company, including controversial bans of many Chinese-made technology goods in the U.S .

Rogers co-wrote a 50-page report in 2012 that which outlined what intelligence agencies said was the long-term partnership between those companies and Beijing’s Communist government.

Admiral Michael Rogers, former head of the U.S. National Security Agency and U.S. Cyber Command, was instrumental in some of the early intelligence reporting that put Chinese tech giants Huawei and ZTE on the radar of the intelligence community and Congress.

To deal with China effectively, U.S. businesspeople should understand the country’s goal is to achieve dominance in the technologies that will be important in the 21st century.

After World War II, Rogers said, “It was the West who developed the core technologies that powered this economic growth. That gave gave the west this military advantage which then translated into significant diplomatic and political power,” he said.

That power also came from developing global technological standards that allowed the U.S. to retain a global leadership position in technology, and then ushering in the creation of global technology corporations that could dominate in a variety of technology sectors.

China is looking to this model, but for the next generation of technological advances, Rogers said, and is therefore spending resources on quantum computing, 5G networking, biotechnology, nanotechnology and other key technologies.

Their thought process is: “We are going to develop those key technologies, we are going to get global bodies to adopt our technological standards, and then we’re going to develop Chinese companies that can out-compete the Western companies of the past.”Entering China’s ‘Gray Zone’

Rogers warned that when business or political leaders differentiate between national security and economic impacts they may be missing the point: “In the 21st Century, the two are very much intertwined.”

“Many of our potential adversaries are very focused on conflict in the ‘gray zone,'” Rogers said, or “gaining advantage on the United States that does not trip an armed response from the United States.”

This view is best illustrated by the current state of trade talks with China, which have vacillated based on conflicting views on China’s alleged thefts of intellectual property from U.S. companies or the disputed status of China’s tech giants as agents of the government.

It’s the economic part of the equation that makes China so challenging, Rogers said.

“The last time we had a near-competitor who we viewed as a potential adversary, in terms of a nation-state, was the Soviet Union. They were largely a political, diplomatic and a military challenge. They were never an economic challenge. They were never going to surpass the United States economically. They didn’t have the global economic impact or capabilities that we had. They never had those kind of things as options,” Rogers said.

“Fast forward to now: China also represents a significant diplomatic, political and military challenge. But what makes it so different is it combines all of that with this significant economic capability. We have also not had a near-peer economically who is also such a competitor, or potential adversary,” in those other ways, Rogers said.

But he cautioned that it would not be productive for political or business forces to default to treating China as an enemy.

“That takes us down a road that I don’t think is in our nation’s best interest,” he said.

He also said comparing our current trade, privacy or security stand-offs with China to a “Cold War” is also unhelpful.

“I would say that’s not a good analogy, rather, I would say that we are now competing against a nation-state that has a range of capabilities that we have not had to deal with before,” he said.

In particular, he argued, attempting a “containment” strategy probably wouldn’t work as it did with Soviet Union, he said, referring to a series of U.S. foreign policy decisions starting in the 1940s that focused on minimizing the spread of Soviet ideology and power.

“That’s a very flawed methodology. It has a low probability of success,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, rogers, chinas, engage, economic, war, head, cold, technology, cant, michael, security, companies, global, nsa, political, technological, tactics


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A private survey shows China’s manufacturing activity expanded more than expected in November

A private survey on Monday showed China’s manufacturing activity expanded more than expected in November as the Caixin/Markit manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) came in at 51.8. Caixin and IHS Markit said the PMI data signaled a “further modest improvement” in the health of China’s manufacturing sector attributed to “solid increases” in output and new business. China’s official PMI was 50.2 in November, up from 49.3 in October to hit its highest level since March, China’s National Bu


A private survey on Monday showed China’s manufacturing activity expanded more than expected in November as the Caixin/Markit manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) came in at 51.8.
Caixin and IHS Markit said the PMI data signaled a “further modest improvement” in the health of China’s manufacturing sector attributed to “solid increases” in output and new business.
China’s official PMI was 50.2 in November, up from 49.3 in October to hit its highest level since March, China’s National Bu
A private survey shows China’s manufacturing activity expanded more than expected in November Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expanded, expected, evanspritchard, chinas, survey, pmi, zhong, manufacturing, activity, trade, remained, data, improvement, private, shows


A private survey shows China's manufacturing activity expanded more than expected in November

Workers make toys for export at a plant on July 16, 2019 in Lianyungang, Jiangsu Province of China.

A private survey on Monday showed China’s manufacturing activity expanded more than expected in November as the Caixin/Markit manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) came in at 51.8.

Caixin and IHS Markit said in a joint press release that the pace of improvement was the strongest since December 2016.

The index was expected to have fallen to 51.4 in November from 51.7 in October, according to economists polled by Reuters.

PMI readings above 50 indicate expansion, while those below that level signal contraction.

Caixin and IHS Markit said the PMI data signaled a “further modest improvement” in the health of China’s manufacturing sector attributed to “solid increases” in output and new business. Employment in the sector also remained broadly stable, they added.

China’s official PMI was 50.2 in November, up from 49.3 in October to hit its highest level since March, China’s National Bureau of Statistics said on Saturday.

The official PMI survey typically polls a large proportion of big businesses and state-owned enterprises. The Caixin indicator features a bigger mix of small- and medium-sized firms.

“The synchronized improvement in the survey data does point toward some uptick in growth last month,” said Julian Evans-Pritchard, senior China economist at Capital Economics, a consultancy.

The data come as U.S. and China remained locked in a long-drawn trade dispute that has weighed on sentiment.

In November, “business confidence remained subdued, as concerns about policies and market conditions persisted, and their willingness to replenish stocks remained limited,” wrote Zhengsheng Zhong, director of macroeconomic analysis at CEBM Group, a subsidiary of Caixin.

“This is a major constraint on economic recovery, which requires continuous policy support,” Zhong added.

But, investors around the world have been eagerly awaiting the signing of a trade agreement since Trump said in October that the U.S. had come to a “very substantial phase one deal” with China.

“If trade negotiations between China and the U.S. can progress in the next phase and business confidence can be repaired effectively, manufacturing production and investment is likely to see a solid improvement,” Zhong said.

Capital Economic’s Evans-Pritchard was less upbeat.

“With credit growth slowing and property construction still expanding at an unsustainable rate, we doubt (the data) signals the bottom of the current economic cycle,” Evans-Pritchard said in a note on Monday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: huileng tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expanded, expected, evanspritchard, chinas, survey, pmi, zhong, manufacturing, activity, trade, remained, data, improvement, private, shows


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China’s factory activity unexpectedly returns to growth in November

Employees work on the production line of a robot vacuum cleaner factory of Matsutek in Shenzhen, China August 9, 2019. Factory activity in China unexpectedly returned to growth in November for the first time in seven months, as domestic demand picked up on Beijing’s accelerated stimulus measures to steady growth. More U.S. tariffs are looming within weeks and Beijing and Washington are still haggling over the first phase of a trade deal. With China’s economic growth cooling to near 30-year lows


Employees work on the production line of a robot vacuum cleaner factory of Matsutek in Shenzhen, China August 9, 2019.
Factory activity in China unexpectedly returned to growth in November for the first time in seven months, as domestic demand picked up on Beijing’s accelerated stimulus measures to steady growth.
More U.S. tariffs are looming within weeks and Beijing and Washington are still haggling over the first phase of a trade deal.
With China’s economic growth cooling to near 30-year lows
China’s factory activity unexpectedly returns to growth in November Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, returns, activity, economic, chinas, factory, trade, phase, growth, beijing, stimulus, unexpectedly, urged, pmi


China's factory activity unexpectedly returns to growth in November

Employees work on the production line of a robot vacuum cleaner factory of Matsutek in Shenzhen, China August 9, 2019.

Factory activity in China unexpectedly returned to growth in November for the first time in seven months, as domestic demand picked up on Beijing’s accelerated stimulus measures to steady growth.

But gains were slight, and export demand remained sluggish. More U.S. tariffs are looming within weeks and Beijing and Washington are still haggling over the first phase of a trade deal.

With China’s economic growth cooling to near 30-year lows and industrial profits shrinking, speculation is mounting that Beijing needs to roll out stimulus more quickly and more aggressively, even if it risks adding to a pile of debt.

The Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) bounced back to 50.2 in November, its highest since March, China’s National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said on Saturday, above the 50-point mark that separates growth from contraction on a monthly basis.

The result compared with 49.3 in October. A Reuters poll showed analysts expected the November PMI to come in at 49.5.

The official factory gauge pointed to an improvement in China’s vast manufacturing sector last month. Total new orders bounced back to expansionary territory with the sub-index rising to 51.3, the highest level seen since April.

That indicates domestic consumption firmed up after Beijing repeatedly urged local governments to kick stimulus up a gear to meet economic goals before year-end. Factory output also rose to 52.6 in November, marking the strongest pace since March.

“In the short term, we may have already passed the low point where the economy hit the bottom,” Zhang Deli, a macro analyst with Lianxun Securities, wrote in a note.

Beijing has front-loaded 1 trillion yuan ($142 billion) of a 2020 local government special bonds quota to this year and has urged that they be issued and used as early as possible to boost infrastructure investment. Some analysts say that could be a sign that the government is worried about downward economic pressure.

Zhang attributed to the better-than-expected November PMI to a government push on infrastructure investment, less property market control, and a de-escalation in U.S.-China trade tension in October, when both sides said they had substantially reached a “Phase 1” agreement and the United States delayed a tariff increase scheduled to take place on October 15.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-30
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, returns, activity, economic, chinas, factory, trade, phase, growth, beijing, stimulus, unexpectedly, urged, pmi


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China’s overseas financial links deepen despite trade tensions with US

U.S. one-hundred dollar banknotes and Chinese one-hundred yuan banknotes are arranged for a photograph in Hong Kong on April 15, 2019. Foreign money is still betting on China, regardless of a slowdown in its economic growth, or tense trade negotiations with the United States. “Beyond financial considerations, this issuance also reflects China’s ongoing efforts to integrate itself into global financial markets, and delivers a strong message that it welcomes foreign investors.” The Chinese governm


U.S. one-hundred dollar banknotes and Chinese one-hundred yuan banknotes are arranged for a photograph in Hong Kong on April 15, 2019.
Foreign money is still betting on China, regardless of a slowdown in its economic growth, or tense trade negotiations with the United States.
“Beyond financial considerations, this issuance also reflects China’s ongoing efforts to integrate itself into global financial markets, and delivers a strong message that it welcomes foreign investors.”
The Chinese governm
China’s overseas financial links deepen despite trade tensions with US Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinas, trade, yuan, foreign, overseas, investors, china, international, financial, tensions, deepen, chinese, despite, issuance, local, links


China's overseas financial links deepen despite trade tensions with US

U.S. one-hundred dollar banknotes and Chinese one-hundred yuan banknotes are arranged for a photograph in Hong Kong on April 15, 2019.

Foreign money is still betting on China, regardless of a slowdown in its economic growth, or tense trade negotiations with the United States.

As global bond yields remain low, investors clamored for China’s biggest ever international sovereign bond sale on Tuesday, with orders for the $6 billion raise reaching 3.6 times the issuance, according to China’s Ministry of Finance.

“We still have a lot of investors who have confidence in investing in China,” Frank Zheng, head of international fixed income at China Asset Management Company, said in a phone interview Thursday, according to a CNBC translation of his Mandarin-language remarks.

The issuance yields for the four tranches of bonds ranged from 1.929% for a three-year term to 2.881% for a 20-year term, the finance ministry said.

“The tight spreads achieved provides a very positive signal on China’s fundamentals from an international investor’s perspective,” Rong Ren Goh, portfolio manager in Eastspring Investments’ fixed income team, said in an email. “Beyond financial considerations, this issuance also reflects China’s ongoing efforts to integrate itself into global financial markets, and delivers a strong message that it welcomes foreign investors.”

The Chinese government has picked up the pace of a long-touted opening of the local financial industry to foreign investors, peeling back limits on foreign stakes and quotas for foreign securities investment. The moves come as Beijing is under pressure from the U.S. to improve foreign access to Chinese markets, and needs to attract more capital into the local market.

Zhao Bowen, research director at Beijing-based Blue Stone Asset Management, pointed out that in the third quarter, China’s non-reserve financial assets broke a trend of running a surplus and instead posted a significant deficit that was greater than the current account surplus. Zhao also noted how trade tensions with the U.S. pushed the yuan weaker, giving Beijing more incentive to attract foreign capital.

While the majority of China’s debt (which has soared to a more-than-300% debt-to-GDP ratio) is denominated in local currency, Beijing needs U.S. dollars and other major foreign currencies for doing business with other countries, as the internationalization of the yuan makes slow progress.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinas, trade, yuan, foreign, overseas, investors, china, international, financial, tensions, deepen, chinese, despite, issuance, local, links


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How smart ideas are helping to accommodate China’s renewable energy drive

A burgeoning economic, political and military power, China is also aiming to lay down a marker on the renewable energy sector. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), China added 1.6 gigawatts (GW) of capacity in 2018. “The technical characteristics of different energy systems are quite different,” Zhang Ning, from Tsinghua University’s Department of Electrical Engineering, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.” “We can use it to indirectly store electricity so that we can accommodate mor


A burgeoning economic, political and military power, China is also aiming to lay down a marker on the renewable energy sector.
According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), China added 1.6 gigawatts (GW) of capacity in 2018.
“The technical characteristics of different energy systems are quite different,” Zhang Ning, from Tsinghua University’s Department of Electrical Engineering, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.”
“We can use it to indirectly store electricity so that we can accommodate mor
How smart ideas are helping to accommodate China’s renewable energy drive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, smart, drive, used, electricity, ideas, 2018, renewable, accommodate, energy, added, china, helping, power, chinas, systems


How smart ideas are helping to accommodate China's renewable energy drive

A burgeoning economic, political and military power, China is also aiming to lay down a marker on the renewable energy sector.

Take offshore wind energy. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), China added 1.6 gigawatts (GW) of capacity in 2018. To put things in perspective, the U.K., Belgium, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands combined added 2.7 GW in 2018.

And when it comes to solar photovoltaic capacity, China also leads the way, adding 44 GW in 2018. This may be lower than 2017, when 53 GW were added, but China still outstrips its nearest rivals by some way: the U.S. added roughly 10.5 GW in 2018, the IEA says.

Capacity refers to the maximum amount that installations can produce, not what they are currently generating.

While China’s renewable energy expansion is large-scale, it also presents challenges, including the curtailment of sources such as wind power thanks to a lack of flexibility in the power system.

The development and integration of multi-energy systems and solutions could be one tool used to tackle this problem.

“The technical characteristics of different energy systems are quite different,” Zhang Ning, from Tsinghua University’s Department of Electrical Engineering, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy.”

He explained that while electricity was easy to transmit and use, it needed to be balanced in real-time, adding that batteries — which could be used for this — were expensive.

“However, gas and heating systems (are)… significantly cheaper than storing electricity,” he added. “We can use it to indirectly store electricity so that we can accommodate more renewable energy.”

Methods such as this could become increasingly important in the years ahead, especially when one considers how China is developing renewable energy.

“According to the research of our five year projects by 2030, more than 35% of the energy demand will be supplied by … renewables,” Chongqing Kang, the dean of Tsinghua University’s electrical engineering department, said. “The number will reach 60% to 70% by… 2050,” he added.

On the topic of multi-energy systems and how they can be used to minimize the curtailment of renewable energy, Benson Ireri, from the World Resources Institute, highlighted some of the roles they could play.

“One of them, of course, is in terms of enhancing the flexibility of grid and power system supply, so that then the integration of renewables is much more easier and it’s much more comfortable,” he explained.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, smart, drive, used, electricity, ideas, 2018, renewable, accommodate, energy, added, china, helping, power, chinas, systems


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China’s latest tactic: Call America racist

Of all the angry responses to President Trump’s decision to sign bills supporting the Hong Kong protest movement, the oddest one of all is an online campaign to label America as racist. But what really stands out is the timing, coming just a few hours after President Trump’s signing of the Hong Kong bill. It’s just too hard for them to retreat from any position that decries racism in America. When you think about the racism debate in America Zhao isn’t clutching at a wedge issue, he’s tapping in


Of all the angry responses to President Trump’s decision to sign bills supporting the Hong Kong protest movement, the oddest one of all is an online campaign to label America as racist.
But what really stands out is the timing, coming just a few hours after President Trump’s signing of the Hong Kong bill.
It’s just too hard for them to retreat from any position that decries racism in America.
When you think about the racism debate in America Zhao isn’t clutching at a wedge issue, he’s tapping in
China’s latest tactic: Call America racist Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, racial, zhao, racism, latest, president, tactic, america, effort, american, trump, racist, chinas, smollett, trumps


China's latest tactic: Call America racist

Of all the angry responses to President Trump’s decision to sign bills supporting the Hong Kong protest movement, the oddest one of all is an online campaign to label America as racist.

It’s coming straight from China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in the form of Lijian Zhao’s Twitter feed. Zhao is the deputy director general at the ministry’s Information Department, so this is obviously an officially sanctioned move by Beijing.

Early Thanksgiving morning, Zhao launched into a six-part tweet thread listing accusations and data about racial disparities in the U.S., with a shot at President Trump for added measure.

Zhao’s personal reflections stand out strongly in the midst of his usual heavy flow of retweets of official Chinese government statements. But what really stands out is the timing, coming just a few hours after President Trump’s signing of the Hong Kong bill. It couldn’t be much clearer that Beijing is hoping to dilute the impact of a rare bipartisan effort by Congress and the Trump administration to highlight China’s human rights abuses.

On first glance, this may seem like a pretty brilliant plan. Zhao’s twitter comments very closely mirror the American left’s long-running complaints about racism in this country. He was even shrewd enough to add references to mass shootings and President Trump’s controversial comments against the so-called “squad” of four freshman female congresswomen who are each members of racial minority communities.

Choosing racism as the wedge issue seems wise. While it would be foolish for anyone to discount the still very strong currents of racism in American society, there is a strong debate among respected leaders of both sides of the aisle about just how severe the racial divide is.

Anyone who doubts the perception of racism in this country isn’t very strong just needs to look at the still-developing Jussie Smollett case in Chicago. Even after the evidence showed that Smollett staged a purported racial attack against himself, most politicians who supported him haven’t rescinded their public comments in support of Smollett that were filled with angry arguments about racism and President Trump. It’s not that those politicians still believe Smollett was really attacked. It’s just too hard for them to retreat from any position that decries racism in America. When you think about the racism debate in America Zhao isn’t clutching at a wedge issue, he’s tapping into a live wire.

But will it work?

The tactic has a mixed and disputed record of success. When the U.S. started a massive military buildup under President Reagan in the 1980s, the USSR promoted videos of homeless people in America as a way to tap into the left’s opposition to defense spending at the perceived expense of spending to help the poor. But none of that stopped the Reagan policy and that U.S. military buildup that Moscow couldn’t keep up with was a key factor in ending the Cold War.

Going further back in history, imperial Japan adopted a campaign that mixed promoting Depression-era complaints about U.S. economic inequality along with a healthy dose of 1930s American isolationism in hopes of discouraging U.S. troops during World War II. The most notorious mouthpiece for that effort was a woman nicknamed “Tokyo Rose,” who was actually an American-born citizen of Japanese descent who was living in Japan during the war. The Japanese quickly recognized her and her American accent as an invaluable propaganda resource, and she eventually became the host of a radio show broadcast across the Pacific that mixed taunts, anti-war commentary, and popular music. The effort backfired, as most historians found that American GIs simply found her show to be a welcome diversion from the monotony of wartime duty.

Despite these past failures, Zhao can be forgiven for thinking this effort to bring the racism divide into the mix could tilt the U.S.-China human rights and trade disputes in Beijing’s favor. A key wildcard now is that the U.S. is much more divided on partisan lines than it was in the Reagan era or World War II.

It’s also a presidential election year, where two of President Trump’s Democratic rivals have already sent multiple signals that they’d be more dovish with China. Joe Biden has repeatedly slammed the Trump trade policy and has even said that China is not in competition with the U.S. Mike Bloomberg recently said that China is not a dictatorship and its Communist Party is “listening to the people on matters like environmentalism. If Biden and Bloomberg want to improve their poll numbers with minority Democrats, clinging to complaints about the racial divide could be a winning formula.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, racial, zhao, racism, latest, president, tactic, america, effort, american, trump, racist, chinas, smollett, trumps


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