Hong Kong ‘Occupy’ leaders sentenced to jail for pro-democracy protests

Ranging in age from their 30s to 70s, the nine defendants span generations of Hong Kong citizens who have been agitating for full democracy. In Taiwan’s capital Taipei, youthful supporters rallied to denounce the convictions and growing pressure from Beijing on both their self-ruled island and Hong Kong. “Occupy Central is not a crime,” they chanted, as well as the “The Hong Kong government is unjustified.” “The fact that you care about Hong Kong means you care about your own fate. “Your support


Ranging in age from their 30s to 70s, the nine defendants span generations of Hong Kong citizens who have been agitating for full democracy. In Taiwan’s capital Taipei, youthful supporters rallied to denounce the convictions and growing pressure from Beijing on both their self-ruled island and Hong Kong. “Occupy Central is not a crime,” they chanted, as well as the “The Hong Kong government is unjustified.” “The fact that you care about Hong Kong means you care about your own fate. “Your support
Hong Kong ‘Occupy’ leaders sentenced to jail for pro-democracy protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: justin chin, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sentenced, prodemocracy, jail, suspended, seen, occupy, protests, leaders, chinese, kong, months, hong, chan, sentences, sentencing


Hong Kong 'Occupy' leaders sentenced to jail for pro-democracy protests

A court in Hong Kong handed down prison sentences of up to 16 months Wednesday to eight leaders of massive 2014 pro-democracy protests on charges of public nuisance offenses.

The sentences are seen as an effort by the government of the semi-autonomous Chinese territory to draw a line under the protests amid pressure from Beijing.

Ranging in age from their 30s to 70s, the nine defendants span generations of Hong Kong citizens who have been agitating for full democracy. The defendants had all pleaded not guilty, calling the prosecutions politically motivated.

Three protest leaders were given 16 months, one of them suspended for two years, two received eights months in prison and two were given suspended eight-month sentences. Another was ordered to perform 200 hours of community service. One other defendant, Tanya Chan, had her sentencing postponed because of the need to undergo surgery.

It was not immediately clear if they planned to appeal.

“Thank you for the sentencing,” Raphael Wong, given eight months, told Judge Johnny Chan. “Our determination on fighting for genuine universal suffrage will not change.”

While the charges carried potential sentences of up to seven years, they were still seen as unusually harsh by activists in what they called an attempt to intimidate them into silence.

“The long sentences send a chilling warning to all that there will be serious consequences for advocating for democracy,” said Maya Wang, Hong Kong-based chief researcher for China at Human Rights Watch.

“The Beijing and Hong Kong authorities appear intent on eliminating the only pocket of freedoms on Chinese soil,” Wang said. She cited a law against booing the Chinese national anthem and moves to amend the extradition law that could see suspects sent to China where they’d be unlikely to receive a fair trial.

Supporters and family members applauded the defendants as they entered the courtroom, then stood outside sobbing after the hearing before breaking into chants.

Those convicted included law professor Benny Tai, retired sociology professor Chan Kin-man and pastor Chu Yiu-ming, who all received 16 months though Chu’s was suspended for two years. The others include two current and one former lawmaker, two student leaders and a political activist.

Chan, who will be sentenced June 10, said prior to the hearing that she hadn’t lost faith in what the movement stood for. “Although it’s an uphill battle, it’s not easy, it’s time for us to make sure that we are strong enough to face different kind of challenges,” Chan said.

The nine were leaders of the “Occupy Central” campaign, which was organized as a nonviolent sit-in that became known as the “Umbrella Movement” after a symbol of defiance against police adopted by the street protests.

Protesters demanded the right to freely nominate candidates for Hong Kong’s leader who would then be elected by all of the territory’s roughly 5 million voters. However, they failed to win any concessions from the government, and Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam was chosen in 2017 from among a slate of candidates approved by Beijing and elected by a 1,200- member pro-China electoral body.

Hong Kong, a former British colony, was handed over to Chinese rule in 1997 under an agreement in which China promised the city could retain its own laws, economic system and civil rights for 50 years.

However, Chinese President and Communist Party leader Xi Jinping has been seen as extending his crackdown on civil liberties to Hong Kong, drawing criticism from commercial and legal associations as well as political, human rights and media groups.

“In the verdict, the judge commented we are naive, believing that by having a occupy movement we can attain democracy. But what is more naive than believing in one country two systems?” Chan Kin-man said before the sentences were issued.

In Taiwan’s capital Taipei, youthful supporters rallied to denounce the convictions and growing pressure from Beijing on both their self-ruled island and Hong Kong.

China has demanded Taiwan agree to its claim to the island as Chinese territory, to be annexed by force if necessary, and accept a “one country, two systems,” framework for governing along the lines of that in place in Hong Kong.

“Occupy Central is not a crime,” they chanted, as well as the “The Hong Kong government is unjustified.”

“The fact that you care about Hong Kong means you care about your own fate. I think this is very important,” Tien-chi Martin-Liao, a member of Independent Chinese PEN Center, said in an address following the sentencing hearing.

“Your support will be felt in the hearts of those persecuted in Hong Kong, and those who live there,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: justin chin, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sentenced, prodemocracy, jail, suspended, seen, occupy, protests, leaders, chinese, kong, months, hong, chan, sentences, sentencing


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‘Chinese people love and long for peace,’ President Xi says as major naval parade kicks off

The Chinese people love peace and countries should not threaten each other with the use of force, President Xi Jinping said on Tuesday as he kicked off a large-scale naval parade marking 70 years since the founding of China’s navy. Meeting foreign naval officers in the eastern Chinese city of Qingdao, Xi said the navies of the world should work together to protect maritime peace and order. Xi is expected to review the naval parade from sea later in the day, though it is unclear whether poor weat


The Chinese people love peace and countries should not threaten each other with the use of force, President Xi Jinping said on Tuesday as he kicked off a large-scale naval parade marking 70 years since the founding of China’s navy. Meeting foreign naval officers in the eastern Chinese city of Qingdao, Xi said the navies of the world should work together to protect maritime peace and order. Xi is expected to review the naval parade from sea later in the day, though it is unclear whether poor weat
‘Chinese people love and long for peace,’ President Xi says as major naval parade kicks off Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: artyom ivanov, tass, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sea, kicks, xi, countries, major, naval, love, chinese, china, parade, long, foreign, peace, force, president


'Chinese people love and long for peace,' President Xi says as major naval parade kicks off

The Chinese people love peace and countries should not threaten each other with the use of force, President Xi Jinping said on Tuesday as he kicked off a large-scale naval parade marking 70 years since the founding of China’s navy.

Xi is overseeing a sweeping plan to refurbish the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) by developing everything from stealth jets to aircraft carriers as China ramps up its presence in the disputed South China Sea and around self-ruled Taiwan, which have rattled nerves around the region and in Washington.

The navy has been a key beneficiary of the modernization plan, with China looking to project power far from the country’s shores and protect its trading routes and citizens overseas.

Meeting foreign naval officers in the eastern Chinese city of Qingdao, Xi said the navies of the world should work together to protect maritime peace and order.

“The Chinese people love and long for peace, and will unswervingly follow the path of peaceful development,” Xi added, in remarks carried by the official Xinhua news agency, after foreign reporters were asked by Xi to leave the room.

“Everyone should respect each other, treat each other as equals, enhance mutual trust, strengthen maritime dialogue and exchanges, and deepen pragmatic cooperation between navies,” he added.

“There must be more discussions and consultations between countries, and there cannot be resorts to force or threats of force at the slightest pretext,” Xi said.

“All countries should adhere to equal consultations, improve crisis communication mechanisms, strengthen regional security cooperation, and promote the proper settlement of maritime-related disputes.”

Xi is expected to review the naval parade from sea later in the day, though it is unclear whether poor weather in Qingdao — with mist and driving rain — could affect the event.

The parade will feature 32 Chinese vessels and 39 aircraft, as well as warships from 13 foreign countries including India, Japan, Vietnam and Australia.

China has said it will display for the first time new nuclear submarines and warships.

China has frequently had to rebuff concerns about its military intentions, especially as military spending continues to scale new heights.

Beijing says it has nothing to hide, and invited a small number of foreign media onboard a naval ship to watch the parade, including from Reuters.

China’s last naval battles were with the Vietnamese in the South China Sea in 1974 and 1988, though these were relatively minor skirmishes.

Chinese navy ships have also participated in international anti-piracy patrols off Somalia’s coast since late 2008.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: artyom ivanov, tass, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sea, kicks, xi, countries, major, naval, love, chinese, china, parade, long, foreign, peace, force, president


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Microsoft employees add support to Chinese tech workers protesting ‘grueling’ overtime culture

Some Microsoft employees have used their company’s own platform to support Chinese tech workers who are expected to carry out 12-hour workdays with just one day off a week. In March, tech workers in China first published the “996.icu” project, aimed at highlighting the sector’s “grueling and illegal” work schedule. On Monday, software engineers from Microsoft, Google, Facebook and others signed a letter of support for Chinese workers. The letter, co-signed by 100 tech workers, says that the work


Some Microsoft employees have used their company’s own platform to support Chinese tech workers who are expected to carry out 12-hour workdays with just one day off a week. In March, tech workers in China first published the “996.icu” project, aimed at highlighting the sector’s “grueling and illegal” work schedule. On Monday, software engineers from Microsoft, Google, Facebook and others signed a letter of support for Chinese workers. The letter, co-signed by 100 tech workers, says that the work
Microsoft employees add support to Chinese tech workers protesting ‘grueling’ overtime culture Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: david reid, ngampol thongsai, eyeem, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, microsoft, grueling, culture, chinese, tech, overtime, protesting, github, project, letter, 996icu, repository, support, workers


Microsoft employees add support to Chinese tech workers protesting 'grueling' overtime culture

Some Microsoft employees have used their company’s own platform to support Chinese tech workers who are expected to carry out 12-hour workdays with just one day off a week.

In March, tech workers in China first published the “996.icu” project, aimed at highlighting the sector’s “grueling and illegal” work schedule. 996 stands for 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week, while the ICU refers to the possibility of ending up in the intensive care unit of a hospital due to exhaustion.

The project is a collection, or repository, of alleged evidence of long hours and wrongful working conditions.

Despite such long hours being officially illegal in China, Alibaba founder Jack Ma has previously hailed the 996 culture as a “huge blessing” for the country. However, it seems his appetite for extended work is now being met with resistance from outside China.

On Monday, software engineers from Microsoft, Google, Facebook and others signed a letter of support for Chinese workers. The online letter was added to the 996.icu project on the web-based code-sharing service, GitHub.

The letter, co-signed by 100 tech workers, says that the workers of Microsoft and GitHub “stand in solidarity with tech workers in China.” It also warned that Chinese internet firms are already attempting to censor the protest.

“Since going viral, Chinese domestic browsers, such as those by Tencent and Alibaba, have restricted access to the 996.icu repository on their web browsers, warning users that the repository contains illegal or malicious content.” Spokespersons for Tencent and Alibaba were not immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC.

Microsoft bought GitHub in 2018 for a reported $7.5 billion and the employees call on the two firms not to remove the content.

“We must entertain the possibility that Microsoft and GitHub will be pressured to remove the repository as well,” it read. A spokesperson for the Washington-based firm also wasn’t immediately available when contacted by CNBC.

As a sign of wide support, 996.icu has been “starred” by GitHub readers more than 230,000 times, making it one of the most popular repositories in the site’s history.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: david reid, ngampol thongsai, eyeem, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, microsoft, grueling, culture, chinese, tech, overtime, protesting, github, project, letter, 996icu, repository, support, workers


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Microsoft employees add support to Chinese tech workers protesting ‘grueling’ overtime culture

Some Microsoft employees have used their company’s own platform to support Chinese tech workers who are expected to carry out 12-hour workdays with just one day off a week. In March, tech workers in China first published the “996.icu” project, aimed at highlighting the sector’s “grueling and illegal” work schedule. On Monday, software engineers from Microsoft, Google, Facebook and others signed a letter of support for Chinese workers. The letter, co-signed by 100 tech workers, says that the work


Some Microsoft employees have used their company’s own platform to support Chinese tech workers who are expected to carry out 12-hour workdays with just one day off a week. In March, tech workers in China first published the “996.icu” project, aimed at highlighting the sector’s “grueling and illegal” work schedule. On Monday, software engineers from Microsoft, Google, Facebook and others signed a letter of support for Chinese workers. The letter, co-signed by 100 tech workers, says that the work
Microsoft employees add support to Chinese tech workers protesting ‘grueling’ overtime culture Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: david reid, ngampol thongsai, eyeem, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, microsoft, grueling, culture, chinese, tech, overtime, protesting, github, project, letter, 996icu, repository, support, workers


Microsoft employees add support to Chinese tech workers protesting 'grueling' overtime culture

Some Microsoft employees have used their company’s own platform to support Chinese tech workers who are expected to carry out 12-hour workdays with just one day off a week.

In March, tech workers in China first published the “996.icu” project, aimed at highlighting the sector’s “grueling and illegal” work schedule. 996 stands for 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., six days a week, while the ICU refers to the possibility of ending up in the intensive care unit of a hospital due to exhaustion.

The project is a collection, or repository, of alleged evidence of long hours and wrongful working conditions.

Despite such long hours being officially illegal in China, Alibaba founder Jack Ma has previously hailed the 996 culture as a “huge blessing” for the country. However, it seems his appetite for extended work is now being met with resistance from outside China.

On Monday, software engineers from Microsoft, Google, Facebook and others signed a letter of support for Chinese workers. The online letter was added to the 996.icu project on the web-based code-sharing service, GitHub.

The letter, co-signed by 100 tech workers, says that the workers of Microsoft and GitHub “stand in solidarity with tech workers in China.” It also warned that Chinese internet firms are already attempting to censor the protest.

“Since going viral, Chinese domestic browsers, such as those by Tencent and Alibaba, have restricted access to the 996.icu repository on their web browsers, warning users that the repository contains illegal or malicious content.” Spokespersons for Tencent and Alibaba were not immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC.

Microsoft bought GitHub in 2018 for a reported $7.5 billion and the employees call on the two firms not to remove the content.

“We must entertain the possibility that Microsoft and GitHub will be pressured to remove the repository as well,” it read. A spokesperson for the Washington-based firm also wasn’t immediately available when contacted by CNBC.

As a sign of wide support, 996.icu has been “starred” by GitHub readers more than 230,000 times, making it one of the most popular repositories in the site’s history.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: david reid, ngampol thongsai, eyeem, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, employees, microsoft, grueling, culture, chinese, tech, overtime, protesting, github, project, letter, 996icu, repository, support, workers


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An emerging crisis in China could give US the upper hand in trade talks

“We are not sure if the market appreciates how a worsening epidemic of African swine fever for China’s massive pig population could further force China’s hand on a broader trade war compromise,” Gilardi said. The only commodity outperforming lean hogs is RBOB gasoline, which is up about 60% year to date. U.S. and Chinese officials have indicated recently that both sides are coming close to a trade deal. Earlier this month, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He said a new consensus has been reached in the


“We are not sure if the market appreciates how a worsening epidemic of African swine fever for China’s massive pig population could further force China’s hand on a broader trade war compromise,” Gilardi said. The only commodity outperforming lean hogs is RBOB gasoline, which is up about 60% year to date. U.S. and Chinese officials have indicated recently that both sides are coming close to a trade deal. Earlier this month, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He said a new consensus has been reached in the
An emerging crisis in China could give US the upper hand in trade talks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lead, gilardi, chinese, hand, war, pressure, upper, negotiations, crisis, pork, swine, trade, talks, emerging, chinas, china


An emerging crisis in China could give US the upper hand in trade talks

This could lead to even higher hog prices, which are already putting pressure on the Chinese consumer and could force China to make concessions in its negotiations with the U.S., analyst Ross Gilardi wrote in a note to clients.

“We are not sure if the market appreciates how a worsening epidemic of African swine fever for China’s massive pig population could further force China’s hand on a broader trade war compromise,” Gilardi said. “The growing threat is rampant pork price inflation for the masses, which puts more pressure on China to lift 62% import tariffs on US pork even though US pork imports are already up sharply versus pre-trade war levels.”

Lean-hog futures have rallied 52.4% this year and are among the best-performing commodities of 2019. The only commodity outperforming lean hogs is RBOB gasoline, which is up about 60% year to date. Meanwhile, the S&P 500 is only up about 16.4% this year.

U.S. and Chinese officials have indicated recently that both sides are coming close to a trade deal. Earlier this month, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He said a new consensus has been reached in the negotiations, according to China’s state news website Xinhua. In March, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the two countries had “constructive” trade talks.

Still, the African swine flu crisis is “seemingly weakening” China’s hand and “could also lead it to relax US soybean restrictions, which would be helpful to the US farmer, and be good for equipment demand,” Gilardi said.

—CNBC’s Michael Bloom contributed to this report.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lead, gilardi, chinese, hand, war, pressure, upper, negotiations, crisis, pork, swine, trade, talks, emerging, chinas, china


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China reportedly uses satellites built and financed by US companies to connect military operations

The report found that bandwidth on the satellites is used to connect Chinese soldiers at South China Sea outposts, to boost propaganda broadcasts and to help state police fight protesters. The United Sates has trade laws that essentially prevent U.S. companies from selling satellites directly to China or Chinese companies. However, those trade laws do not regulate how the bandwidth on those satellites is used once they begin operations – a loophole China has reportedly utilized to rent, rather t


The report found that bandwidth on the satellites is used to connect Chinese soldiers at South China Sea outposts, to boost propaganda broadcasts and to help state police fight protesters. The United Sates has trade laws that essentially prevent U.S. companies from selling satellites directly to China or Chinese companies. However, those trade laws do not regulate how the bandwidth on those satellites is used once they begin operations – a loophole China has reportedly utilized to rent, rather t
China reportedly uses satellites built and financed by US companies to connect military operations Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: michael sheetz, str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, chinese, uses, group, told, satellites, companies, reportedly, built, operations, used, services, military, trade, connect, state, financed, china


China reportedly uses satellites built and financed by US companies to connect military operations

China makes use of nine satellites in orbit around the Earth, built by Boeing and Maxar Technologies-owned SSL and financed through investment firm Carlyle Group, to boost Chinese government capabilities, the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday.

The report found that bandwidth on the satellites is used to connect Chinese soldiers at South China Sea outposts, to boost propaganda broadcasts and to help state police fight protesters. In the final case, China’s police force used satellite bandwidth to quell protests in Xinjiang, an area where the government has been sharply criticized for the forced relocation of of Uighurs, a Muslim ethnic minority in the province. China is said to have relocated as many as one million Uighurs into internment camps.

The United Sates has trade laws that essentially prevent U.S. companies from selling satellites directly to China or Chinese companies. However, those trade laws do not regulate how the bandwidth on those satellites is used once they begin operations – a loophole China has reportedly utilized to rent, rather than buy, the services of American-built satellites.

The State Department said the U.S. “strongly urges companies to implement stringent safeguards to ensure that their commercial activities do not contribute to China’s human-rights abuses,” in a statement to the WSJ.

The key to circumventing those trade laws is a Hong Kong-based company called Asia Satellite Telecommunications, the report said, which is jointly owned by Carlyle Group and Chinese state-controlled Citic Group. The report explained how AsiaSat was then able to buy satellites from Boeing and SSL, while Carlyle submitted compliance reports to the U.S. government. In turn, Citic Group then sold some services of the AsiaSat satellites to Chinese government operators. The uses of those services ranged from propaganda telecommunications to communicating with Chinese soldiers at remote outposts.

Boeing told CNBC in a statement that the company “follows the lead of the U.S. Government with respect to the use of export controlled items.”

Citic has said the satellites have been used to help Chinese police communicate while fighting protests in both Tibet and Xinjiang. Additionally, China’s intelligence agency, the Ministry of State Security, is reportedly listed among Citic’s users “for emergency responses.” AsiaSat told the WSJ that it did not know how Chinese authorities have used the satellites’ capabilities in response to protests and that the company was unable to see what was transmitted.

Boeing was building a tenth satellite that would help the Chinese version of GPS satellites, a navigation system that could have both civilian and military uses. Boeing told the WSJ that this latest satellite’s development is on hold.

Read the full Wall Street Journal report here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: michael sheetz, str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, chinese, uses, group, told, satellites, companies, reportedly, built, operations, used, services, military, trade, connect, state, financed, china


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Leica says it wasn’t behind ad depicting Tiananmen Square protests

A promotional video for camera maker Leica showing photojournalists covering global conflicts — including the deadly Tiananmen Square protests in China in 1989 — has resulted in the company’s name being banned on Chinese social media and the marketer denying responsibility for the video. The ad was released by Brazilian ad agency F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi, according to the South China Morning Post. Leica told the Morning Post the video was not commissioned by the company. By Friday morning, the


A promotional video for camera maker Leica showing photojournalists covering global conflicts — including the deadly Tiananmen Square protests in China in 1989 — has resulted in the company’s name being banned on Chinese social media and the marketer denying responsibility for the video. The ad was released by Brazilian ad agency F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi, according to the South China Morning Post. Leica told the Morning Post the video was not commissioned by the company. By Friday morning, the
Leica says it wasn’t behind ad depicting Tiananmen Square protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: megan graham, source, leica
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, chinese, square, agency, social, told, tiananmen, ad, protests, morning, media, depicting, video, wasnt, leica


Leica says it wasn't behind ad depicting Tiananmen Square protests

A promotional video for camera maker Leica showing photojournalists covering global conflicts — including the deadly Tiananmen Square protests in China in 1989 — has resulted in the company’s name being banned on Chinese social media and the marketer denying responsibility for the video.

The five-minute film is called “The Hunt.” It depicts photographers covering conflicts, including one capturing images of the “Tank Man,” who stood in front of a convoy of Chinese military tanks the day after the Tiananmen Square massacre in which Chinese military attacked pro-democracy demonstrators. That subject has been widely censored in China. The video concludes with the image of Leica’s logo.

The ad was released by Brazilian ad agency F/Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi, according to the South China Morning Post. The agency told the publication it had developed the film with Leica representatives in Brazil and said it “would never harm its huge reputation by creating, producing and airing a work without the proper approval of its client.”

The agency said it has worked with Leica in Brazil since 2012.

Leica told the Morning Post the video was not commissioned by the company. Leica and F/Nazca did not immediately respond for requests for comment from CNBC.

By Friday morning, the Chinese social media site Weibo had banned the word “Leica” in Mandarin and English.

Some social media posters wondered whether Chinese tech giant Huawei, which works with Leica on smartphone camera lenses, would be pulled into the controversy. Huawei declined to comment on the video.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-22  Authors: megan graham, source, leica
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, chinese, square, agency, social, told, tiananmen, ad, protests, morning, media, depicting, video, wasnt, leica


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Chinese electric sports car Qiantu K50 by Mullen coming to US roads next year

An estimated 40 battery-electric vehicles are on display at this week’s New York International Auto Show, and contrary to their popular image as slow and stodgy, many of them put an emphasis on performance, including the new Qiantu K50 by Mullen. With its twin electric motors drawing power from a lithium-ion battery pack, the K50 can punch out 430 horsepower and 560 pound-feet of torque, enough to launch it from 0 to 60 in just 4.3 seconds, with an electronically limited top speed of 112 mph. Al


An estimated 40 battery-electric vehicles are on display at this week’s New York International Auto Show, and contrary to their popular image as slow and stodgy, many of them put an emphasis on performance, including the new Qiantu K50 by Mullen. With its twin electric motors drawing power from a lithium-ion battery pack, the K50 can punch out 430 horsepower and 560 pound-feet of torque, enough to launch it from 0 to 60 in just 4.3 seconds, with an electronically limited top speed of 112 mph. Al
Chinese electric sports car Qiantu K50 by Mullen coming to US roads next year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: paul a eisenstein, haze fan, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roads, car, york, twomonth, k50, coming, twin, stodgy, vehicles, weeks, mullen, chinese, qiantu, electric, technologies, torque


Chinese electric sports car Qiantu K50 by Mullen coming to US roads next year

An estimated 40 battery-electric vehicles are on display at this week’s New York International Auto Show, and contrary to their popular image as slow and stodgy, many of them put an emphasis on performance, including the new Qiantu K50 by Mullen.

With its twin electric motors drawing power from a lithium-ion battery pack, the K50 can punch out 430 horsepower and 560 pound-feet of torque, enough to launch it from 0 to 60 in just 4.3 seconds, with an electronically limited top speed of 112 mph.

Already on sale in China, there is a two-month backlog of orders, said David Michery, founder and CEO of California-based Mullen Technologies, a start-up partnering with Chinese automaker Qiantu Motor to bring the K50 to the U.S. market next year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-18  Authors: paul a eisenstein, haze fan, adam jeffery
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roads, car, york, twomonth, k50, coming, twin, stodgy, vehicles, weeks, mullen, chinese, qiantu, electric, technologies, torque


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Amazon plans to close its marketplace for Chinese consumers

Amazon expects to close fulfillment centers and wind down its support for domestic-selling merchants in China in the next 90 days, one of the people said. Amazon Web Services, its cloud unit that sells data storage and computing power to enterprises, will remain as well. The company’s China marketplace, which has stocked products from Chinese as well as overseas merchants, struggled to gain a foothold in the country’s fiercely competitive e-commerce market. Consumer insights firm iResearch Globa


Amazon expects to close fulfillment centers and wind down its support for domestic-selling merchants in China in the next 90 days, one of the people said. Amazon Web Services, its cloud unit that sells data storage and computing power to enterprises, will remain as well. The company’s China marketplace, which has stocked products from Chinese as well as overseas merchants, struggled to gain a foothold in the country’s fiercely competitive e-commerce market. Consumer insights firm iResearch Globa
Amazon plans to close its marketplace for Chinese consumers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: chip somodevilla, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, services, marketplace, consumers, chinese, online, china, merchants, amazon, united, able, worlds, close, plans


Amazon plans to close its marketplace for Chinese consumers

Amazon plans to close its domestic marketplace business in China by mid-July, people familiar with the matter told Reuters on Wednesday, focusing efforts on its more lucrative businesses selling overseas goods and cloud services in the world’s most populous country.

Shoppers in China will no longer be able to buy goods from other third-party merchants in the country, but they still will be able to order from the United States, United Kingdom, Denmark and Japan via Amazon’s global store. Amazon expects to close fulfillment centers and wind down its support for domestic-selling merchants in China in the next 90 days, one of the people said.

Consumers in China will still be able to purchase Kindle e-readers and online content, the sources said on condition of anonymity. Amazon Web Services, its cloud unit that sells data storage and computing power to enterprises, will remain as well.

The company’s China marketplace, which has stocked products from Chinese as well as overseas merchants, struggled to gain a foothold in the country’s fiercely competitive e-commerce market. Consumer insights firm iResearch Global said that Alibaba’s Tmall marketplace and JD.com held 81.9 percent of the Chinese market last year.

Amazon, the world’s largest online retailer, bought local Chinese online shopping website Joyo.com in 2004 for $75 million and rebranded it as Amazon China in 2011.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: chip somodevilla, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, services, marketplace, consumers, chinese, online, china, merchants, amazon, united, able, worlds, close, plans


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Amazon plans to close its marketplace for Chinese consumers

Amazon expects to close fulfillment centers and wind down its support for domestic-selling merchants in China in the next 90 days, one of the people said. Amazon Web Services, its cloud unit that sells data storage and computing power to enterprises, will remain as well. The company’s China marketplace, which has stocked products from Chinese as well as overseas merchants, struggled to gain a foothold in the country’s fiercely competitive e-commerce market. Consumer insights firm iResearch Globa


Amazon expects to close fulfillment centers and wind down its support for domestic-selling merchants in China in the next 90 days, one of the people said. Amazon Web Services, its cloud unit that sells data storage and computing power to enterprises, will remain as well. The company’s China marketplace, which has stocked products from Chinese as well as overseas merchants, struggled to gain a foothold in the country’s fiercely competitive e-commerce market. Consumer insights firm iResearch Globa
Amazon plans to close its marketplace for Chinese consumers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: chip somodevilla, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, services, marketplace, consumers, chinese, online, china, merchants, amazon, united, able, worlds, close, plans


Amazon plans to close its marketplace for Chinese consumers

Amazon plans to close its domestic marketplace business in China by mid-July, people familiar with the matter told Reuters on Wednesday, focusing efforts on its more lucrative businesses selling overseas goods and cloud services in the world’s most populous country.

Shoppers in China will no longer be able to buy goods from other third-party merchants in the country, but they still will be able to order from the United States, United Kingdom, Denmark and Japan via Amazon’s global store. Amazon expects to close fulfillment centers and wind down its support for domestic-selling merchants in China in the next 90 days, one of the people said.

Consumers in China will still be able to purchase Kindle e-readers and online content, the sources said on condition of anonymity. Amazon Web Services, its cloud unit that sells data storage and computing power to enterprises, will remain as well.

The company’s China marketplace, which has stocked products from Chinese as well as overseas merchants, struggled to gain a foothold in the country’s fiercely competitive e-commerce market. Consumer insights firm iResearch Global said that Alibaba’s Tmall marketplace and JD.com held 81.9 percent of the Chinese market last year.

Amazon, the world’s largest online retailer, bought local Chinese online shopping website Joyo.com in 2004 for $75 million and rebranded it as Amazon China in 2011.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: How Amazon paid $0 federal income tax in 2018


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: chip somodevilla, getty images news, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, services, marketplace, consumers, chinese, online, china, merchants, amazon, united, able, worlds, close, plans


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