How being a female tech founder prepared this CEO to fight the medical system when she got cancer

Leila Janah, a social impact entrepreneur, was diagnosed with cancer at 36 Leila JanahLeila Janah, 36, thought she was doing everything right. But in the spring, she discovered a lump that turned out to be a type of cancer called a sarcoma. Sarcomas account for about 1 percent of adult cancers, and she has a particularly rare variety that showed up in her reproductive system. For Janah, going public with her experience has helped her find both high-quality doctors and potential treatments, which


Leila Janah, a social impact entrepreneur, was diagnosed with cancer at 36 Leila JanahLeila Janah, 36, thought she was doing everything right. But in the spring, she discovered a lump that turned out to be a type of cancer called a sarcoma. Sarcomas account for about 1 percent of adult cancers, and she has a particularly rare variety that showed up in her reproductive system. For Janah, going public with her experience has helped her find both high-quality doctors and potential treatments, which
How being a female tech founder prepared this CEO to fight the medical system when she got cancer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-13  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, medical, janah, tech, health, fight, doctors, ceo, patients, share, thats, female, cancer, founder, system, prepared, access


How being a female tech founder prepared this CEO to fight the medical system when she got cancer

Leila Janah, a social impact entrepreneur, was diagnosed with cancer at 36 Leila Janah

Leila Janah, 36, thought she was doing everything right. She started two tech companies with a strong sense of social mission, and she balanced that by exercising every day, eating well and seeing the doctor for regular check-ups. The last thing she expected was a cancer diagnosis. But in the spring, she discovered a lump that turned out to be a type of cancer called a sarcoma. Sarcomas account for about 1 percent of adult cancers, and she has a particularly rare variety that showed up in her reproductive system. In the months since her diagnosis, Janah has shared her experiences as a patient on social media, despite the potential risks that come from investors and customers being aware of her health challenges. In the U.S. health care system, there are many barriers that prevent patients from accessing the treatment they need, whether it’s the cost, lack of specialists or the shortage of resources. For Janah, going public with her experience has helped her find both high-quality doctors and potential treatments, which could save her life. In a phone interview, Janah said her entrepreneurial experiences have helped her navigate the complexities of the health care system, in part because she’s had a lot of practice advocating for herself as a female founder in Silicon Valley. “I’ve had to be pushy,” Janah said. “If there’s anything this experience has taught me, it’s to not take no for an answer.”

‘I’m conditioned to trust my gut’

Before she was diagnosed, Janah had a feeling something that there was wrong. Her lump, which doctors reassured her was likely benign given her age and lack of symptoms, felt “ominous,” she said. “Because of my work with start-ups, I’m conditioned to trust my gut,” she said, as entrepreneurs are often told that their ideas lack merit, or they won’t work by people in positions of authority. “And that’s especially true when something feels wrong.” Janah insisted on further medical tests, and the results came back quickly. It was cancer. And it was rare and aggressive. So finding out sooner rather than later probably made a big difference. Another lesson learned from her entrepreneurial career was to try to get as many opinions as possible, and then bring in a team to evaluate her options. “That’s basically what you to when you’re shopping for a financing round,” she said. But she quickly hit a wall. Her doctors all offered conflicting advice, which she suspects is because her cancer is so rare that there aren’t many previous cases to draw from. Despite her best efforts, she couldn’t get them to agree to a conference call together to discuss her case. Another challenge was in pulling her medical information into one place, including charts, labs and imaging, so that she could make sure all her doctors had access to the same ground truth. That’s not surprising. Even today, it’s a laborious process for hospitals and clinics to exchange patient health information. Doctors still rely on legacy technologies, like fax machines and CD-ROMs, and their IT systems were not set up to make it easy to share data. At one point, Janah had to FedEx her imaging from California to New York because it was faster than getting two Manhattan-based hospitals to share a file. For a tech entrepreneur, that’s been a particular source of frustration. “The admin has been the hardest thing,” she said. “I’ve got two medical experts who disagree, but they can’t even share a CT scan between two different hospitals down the street from each other.”

At that point, Janah took matters into her own hands again. She saw that her busy specialists would all be attending a high-profile cancer conference, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, dubbed ASCO, in the fall. So she decided to fly out to Chicago on her own dime. She also hoped to meet with some of the executives behind a venture-backed bio-tech start-up called Epizyme. Epizyme has a drug in development called Tazemetostat, which is designed for sarcoma patients. It remains an experimental drug, meaning it has not been approved by federal regulators. Patients can access such drugs on a case-by-case basis, and it’s a hotly debated issue among bio-ethicists about whether promising therapies that are still in late-stage clinical trials should be made available. Janah’s trip was a success. She was granted access to the drug through the company’s Expanded Access Program, and she was able to get her doctors on the same page about her course of treatment. An Epizyme spokesperson declined to comment on her case, but did confirm that she met the criteria established by its policy.

Entrepreneurial patients, experimental drugs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-13  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, medical, janah, tech, health, fight, doctors, ceo, patients, share, thats, female, cancer, founder, system, prepared, access


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23andMe is moving into Apple’s territory with a pilot to pull in medical data, not just DNA

DNA-testing start-up 23andMe is experimenting with a new way to collect a lot more health data from millions of its users than just their DNA. The company is now asking a subset of customers if they’d be willing to incorporate their lab results, prescription information and medical history, after they’ve received the results from the genetic test. 23andMe, which has sold about 10 million at-home DNA testing kits, will be able to access that data if users let the company connect outside medical p


DNA-testing start-up 23andMe is experimenting with a new way to collect a lot more health data from millions of its users than just their DNA. The company is now asking a subset of customers if they’d be willing to incorporate their lab results, prescription information and medical history, after they’ve received the results from the genetic test. 23andMe, which has sold about 10 million at-home DNA testing kits, will be able to access that data if users let the company connect outside medical p
23andMe is moving into Apple’s territory with a pilot to pull in medical data, not just DNA Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dna, way, information, pull, pilot, data, apples, health, territory, results, moving, medical, users, 23andme, company, service


23andMe is moving into Apple's territory with a pilot to pull in medical data, not just DNA

DNA-testing start-up 23andMe is experimenting with a new way to collect a lot more health data from millions of its users than just their DNA.

The company is now asking a subset of customers if they’d be willing to incorporate their lab results, prescription information and medical history, after they’ve received the results from the genetic test. 23andMe, which has sold about 10 million at-home DNA testing kits, will be able to access that data if users let the company connect outside medical providers using a third-party medical data network called Human API.

CNBC viewed the service in action earlier this week and the company confirmed that it’s a beta program that will be gradually rolled out to all users, but declined to comment further on its plans. The service is still being piloted, said a person familiar with the matter, and the product could change depending on how it’s received.

Such a move would bring the 23andMe squarely into Apple’s territory.

Apple, in recent years, has developed its own health records service, which aims to aggregate medical information including lab tests and prescriptions into the Health app on the iPhone.

One missing component from Apple’s program, however, is genetics data, which might present an opportunity for 23andMe to reach people who care about getting a deeper analysis of how their genetic information might impact their risk of disease.

23andMe’s pitch to users is that the service is an easy way to access health data, especially if it’s scattered across multiple systems, get new insights about their health, and assist with research. (Click the image to enlarge.)


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dna, way, information, pull, pilot, data, apples, health, territory, results, moving, medical, users, 23andme, company, service


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Illumina plunges after slashing revenue expectations

Shares of Illumina dropped more than 16% in extended trading after the genetics company slashed its full-year guidance and previewed disappointing second-quarter revenue. Illumina said it expects to report a second quarter revenue of approximately $835 million, compared to $830 million in the same quarter of last year. For the full year, Illumina said it now expects revenue to grow about 6%. That’s far below its previous projection for about 13% to 14% revenue growth in fiscal 2019. Illumina exp


Shares of Illumina dropped more than 16% in extended trading after the genetics company slashed its full-year guidance and previewed disappointing second-quarter revenue. Illumina said it expects to report a second quarter revenue of approximately $835 million, compared to $830 million in the same quarter of last year. For the full year, Illumina said it now expects revenue to grow about 6%. That’s far below its previous projection for about 13% to 14% revenue growth in fiscal 2019. Illumina exp
Illumina plunges after slashing revenue expectations Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: mallika mitra, christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slashing, million, plunges, expects, secondquarter, second, expectations, illumina, results, report, quarter, growth, revenue


Illumina plunges after slashing revenue expectations

Shares of Illumina dropped more than 16% in extended trading after the genetics company slashed its full-year guidance and previewed disappointing second-quarter revenue.

Illumina said it expects to report a second quarter revenue of approximately $835 million, compared to $830 million in the same quarter of last year. Analysts had projected $887.9 million in revenue, according to Refinitiv consensus estimates.

For the full year, Illumina said it now expects revenue to grow about 6%. That’s far below its previous projection for about 13% to 14% revenue growth in fiscal 2019.

The company said the second quarter results were impacted by population genomics initiatives which did not close in the second half of June as expected. Illumina also reported weakness in the direct-to-consumer market.

“We are obviously disappointed with our second quarter financial results. Our preliminary analysis suggests that these challenges are transitory and do not reflect a macro change to the fundamentals of our business,” said Francis deSouza, president and CEO of Illumina. “Despite our shortfall this quarter, we remain as enthusiastic about the long-term growth prospects for our markets as we have ever been, and are committed to setting the industry’s bar for consistency and execution in the dynamic and rapidly growing world of genomics.”

Illumina expects to report its full second-quarter results on July 29.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: mallika mitra, christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slashing, million, plunges, expects, secondquarter, second, expectations, illumina, results, report, quarter, growth, revenue


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Health insurer Anthem has hired a bunch of Apple employees to help it modernize

In the past few months, Anthem has hired Warris Bokhari from Apple Health, as well as Toni Trujillo Vian (a 24-year Apple vet), and senior machine learning researcher Stefanos Giampanis, according to LinkedIn and two people familiar with the matter. As Anthem scoops up talent from Apple and other tech companies, Apple has been recruiting heavily from the medical sector. It’s currently focusing on aggregating clinical information via Health Records, developing biosensors for the Apple Watch, and


In the past few months, Anthem has hired Warris Bokhari from Apple Health, as well as Toni Trujillo Vian (a 24-year Apple vet), and senior machine learning researcher Stefanos Giampanis, according to LinkedIn and two people familiar with the matter. As Anthem scoops up talent from Apple and other tech companies, Apple has been recruiting heavily from the medical sector. It’s currently focusing on aggregating clinical information via Health Records, developing biosensors for the Apple Watch, and
Health insurer Anthem has hired a bunch of Apple employees to help it modernize Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, modernize, help, apple, hired, anthem, medical, technology, digital, tech, product, bunch, efforts, insurer, employees, previously


Health insurer Anthem has hired a bunch of Apple employees to help it modernize

Gail Koziara Boudreaux attends The Women’s Sports Foundation’s 39th Annual Salute To Women In Sports And The Girls They Inspire Awards Gala on October 17, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Women’s Sports Foundation)

Health insurance isn’t exactly known for its consumer-friendliness. But Anthem, one of the largest insurers, is looking to change that with a slew of recent hires from the company best known for its commitment to user-friendly design: Apple.

In Silicon Valley, technology companies like Apple and Alphabet are increasingly trying to bring their technology to the health sector and are building out dedicated teams of medical experts. They’re chasing a $3.5 trillion market that’s been slow to adapt and change, believing that their expertise in user-friendly design can help improve the experience for consumers. Traditional health companies, like insurers and hospitals, are reacting by partnering with tech giants but are also adapting their own offerings and touting their digital friendliness.

In the past few months, Anthem has hired Warris Bokhari from Apple Health, as well as Toni Trujillo Vian (a 24-year Apple vet), and senior machine learning researcher Stefanos Giampanis, according to LinkedIn and two people familiar with the matter.

The health insurer also hired Ted Goldstein, a former Apple vice president from 2002 to 2007, to run its AI and health data efforts, about six months ago, and some lower-level folks like Berick Bacani, a former Apple operations specialist, as a UX designer on the digital team.

The focus on hiring from Apple dates back a few years: Anthem’s vice president of commercial Aneesh Kumar, who has been at the company for a few years started his career in the 1990s as a product manager at Apple. And Rajeev Ronanki, the company’s chief digital officer, previously worked at the consulting firm Deloitte on health innovation-related projects.

It’s not just Apple employees migrating over to Anthem. Another high-profile recruit from the technology world is Udi Manber, who previously headed up Google’s search efforts and is now a technical advisor at Anthem.

As Anthem scoops up talent from Apple and other tech companies, Apple has been recruiting heavily from the medical sector.

Scattered across its health teams, Apple has installed dozens of doctors to offer advice and steer product decisions. It’s currently focusing on aggregating clinical information via Health Records, developing biosensors for the Apple Watch, and health apps for things like reproductive health and sleep monitoring.

Apple CEO Tim Cook has previously said that he believes the company’s “greatest contribution to mankind” will be its efforts in health. The health team currently reports to Apple COO Jeff Williams, who has a strong personal interest in the sector.

Meanwhile, Anthem CEO Gail Boudreaux has emphasized the company’s continued investment in its digital offerings, including putting budget behind its consumer tech and artificial intelligence teams.

The company is working on a number of different tech projects, such as a partnership with the health-tech start-up Doc.ai to detect allergy patterns, and Act Wise, a website for health plans to better manage their employees’ medical benefits.

Anthem competitor UnitedHealth has also touted its commitment to digital technology. It has a “consumer digital health platform ” called Rally, and one team there focuses on providing rewards for people who meet their health goals. Aetna, another health insurer owned by CVS, is working with Apple on an effort to reward members for meeting health-related milestones via their Apple Watch.

Anthem and Apple did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

WATCH: Apple pushes further in to health care by selling diabetes product in its stores


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, modernize, help, apple, hired, anthem, medical, technology, digital, tech, product, bunch, efforts, insurer, employees, previously


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Microsoft joins hospital chain Providence to build ‘hospital of the future’

Microsoft is working with Providence St. Joseph Health, a U.S. hospital chain, on building a new high-tech hospital. Providence St. Joseph CEO Rod Hochman said the chain would adapt an existing facility in the Seattle area, near Microsoft’s headquarters. The two companies have discussed their vision for a “hospital of the future” for months, Hochman said, including during several one-on-ones with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Another focus is on improving health care and lowering costs by working


Microsoft is working with Providence St. Joseph Health, a U.S. hospital chain, on building a new high-tech hospital. Providence St. Joseph CEO Rod Hochman said the chain would adapt an existing facility in the Seattle area, near Microsoft’s headquarters. The two companies have discussed their vision for a “hospital of the future” for months, Hochman said, including during several one-on-ones with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Another focus is on improving health care and lowering costs by working
Microsoft joins hospital chain Providence to build ‘hospital of the future’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chain, working, joins, trying, companies, health, amazon, build, microsoft, hochman, hospital, providence, healthcare, care, future


Microsoft joins hospital chain Providence to build 'hospital of the future'

Microsoft is working with Providence St. Joseph Health, a U.S. hospital chain, on building a new high-tech hospital.

Providence St. Joseph CEO Rod Hochman said the chain would adapt an existing facility in the Seattle area, near Microsoft’s headquarters.

The two companies have discussed their vision for a “hospital of the future” for months, Hochman said, including during several one-on-ones with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella.

The move is part of Microsoft’s latest run at the health-care business after previous efforts, including hospital IT software called Amalga, failed to gain much traction. Meanwhile Apple, Amazon and Alphabet are also looking into the $3.5 trillion sector, but with different areas of focus, ranging from clinical trials to medical devices.

The strategic priorities for the new effort involve improving the electronic medical record so that it’s easier for doctors, nurses and other health providers to find and share information. The companies also plan to use technology like natural language processing and machine learning to help clinicians diagnose and treat patients.

Another focus is on improving health care and lowering costs by working closely with Seattle’s largest employers. Amazon, another Seattle company, is also looking to focus on the employer experience through its partnership with J.P. Morgan and Berkshire Hathaway. That effort was recently dubbed “Haven.”

The project is still in an early phase, with many details undecided, said Hochman, declining to share details on the exact size on the number of beds or scale of the operation. But he insisted that both companies are putting significant “human capital and dollars” into the effort.

“We decided to go big with this partnership,” he said. “This isn’t about just buying software from them.”

Hochman said he decided to team up with Microsoft because it has positioned itself as a partner, rather than a potential competitor.

“Between Apple, Google and Amazon, they all have their strengths,” he said. “And it’s not to say that there won’t be projects with all three, but I’d make the distinction with Microsoft that they’re not trying to do health care themselves. They aren’t trying to be in the health-care business, but are trying to make it better.”

Providence, which owns hospitals in Washington and six other states, has been working for years to position itself as a digitally savvy health system. In recent years, it has snapped up senior leaders from nearby technology companies, including from Microsoft and Amazon. Its chief digital officer, Aaron Martin, previously worked on Amazon’s Kindle service, and its chief information officer, B.J. Moore, worked at Microsoft for more than two decades.

Providence and other health systems are increasingly under pressure to monitor for patients once they’re discharged, as well as to improve how both patients and health providers are treated.

“We can’t be a box that takes care of patients with emergency rooms attached,” said Hochman. “We have to evolve to become information centers, with sophisticated outpatient and inpatient care. It’ll be interesting to see how many (health systems) make it through that transition.”

Microsoft has made other runs at the health-care space, but has not had much success to date. In 2006, it acquired health-care intelligence software called Azyxxi, originally developed by Washington Hospital, and in 2007 it acquired additional tools from a privately held hospital system in Thailand. But these tools, sold under the umbrella name Amalga, never really took off and Microsoft ultimately shut down some of the projects and merged others into a joint venture with GE, before eventually divesting.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chain, working, joins, trying, companies, health, amazon, build, microsoft, hochman, hospital, providence, healthcare, care, future


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Nursing mothers are selling and donating their milk using Facebook groups, and experts have mixed views about it

The problem is particularly acute for parents of sick or premature infants, who may not be able to digest formula as well as human milk. So to find parents who wanted it, Davis joined several private groups on Facebook that are dedicated to human breast milk exchange. Others are open pages, like the Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network, which has more than 80,000 likes. No controlsMost of the groups that have popped up on Facebook specialize in donated milk from mothers like Davis. It’s poss


The problem is particularly acute for parents of sick or premature infants, who may not be able to digest formula as well as human milk. So to find parents who wanted it, Davis joined several private groups on Facebook that are dedicated to human breast milk exchange. Others are open pages, like the Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network, which has more than 80,000 likes. No controlsMost of the groups that have popped up on Facebook specialize in donated milk from mothers like Davis. It’s poss
Nursing mothers are selling and donating their milk using Facebook groups, and experts have mixed views about it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, human, davis, mixed, breast, babies, son, mothers, milk, groups, donated, selling, using, san, views, experts, nursing, donor


Nursing mothers are selling and donating their milk using Facebook groups, and experts have mixed views about it

Bojan Fatur | E+ | Getty Images

Within weeks of giving birth, first-time mother Kyra Davis realized she was producing more milk than her baby needed. So she began storing it in her fridge and freezer at her San Francisco home. Davis had heard about the well-documented shortages at donor banks across the country. The problem is particularly acute for parents of sick or premature infants, who may not be able to digest formula as well as human milk. So to find parents who wanted it, Davis joined several private groups on Facebook that are dedicated to human breast milk exchange. Some of these Facebook groups are closed, meaning that outsiders can view them but cannot join without approval, such as Human Milk For Babies, a group that has more than two thousand members and promotes donation rather than sales of milk, and Buy, Sell, and Donate Breast Milk, with more than 5,000 members. Others are open pages, like the Human Milk 4 Human Babies Global Network, which has more than 80,000 likes.

Kyra Davis and her son Jude Kyra Davis

Davis is now donating her milk to about 7 or 8 families, most of whom she met on Facebook. They’ll pick up 50 ounces or more from her — enough to feed very young babies for at least two days, in most cases — and will often bring small tokens of their appreciation, like a home-cooked meal. Davis does not accept payment for her milk and has donated it in the Bay Area and in Hawaii, where she was recently on vacation. In an interview, Davis said she was driven by a desire to give back. When her infant, Jude, was in the neo-natal intensive care unit at the University of California San Francisco, she was given a “high suction” hospital grade pump to stimulate her supply. She put her energies into that, and her milk came in strongly and quickly. So she thought about donating it to the bank there, but felt overwhelmed by all the logistical hurdles when her son was still in recovery. The American Academy of Pediatrics has made human milk a standard of care for premature babies. But in many cases, the lack of supply has means that the milk is reserved for only the most premature infants. It struck Davis while in the hospital that if she had struggled to produce milk, Jude might not be at the top of the list, as he wasn’t born early.

No controls

Most of the groups that have popped up on Facebook specialize in donated milk from mothers like Davis. But some offer to sell their oversupply for upwards of $3 an ounce. And outside of Facebook, so-called “underground” websites have proliferated that take advantage of the growing demand for breast milk, with some selling it for up to $16 per ounce. That would represent hundreds of dollars a month in out-of-pocket expenses for a family, meaning only wealthy parents could afford it. Davis says she is committed to her own health and well-being, and has stuck to the guidelines about things like alcohol consumption while breastfeeding. She’s also careful about how she stores her milk to prevent contamination. But some medical experts fear that not everyone is as vigilant. Susan Crowe, an obstetrician who sits on the board of a breast milk bank in San Jose, Calif., noted when researchers in 2015 studied samples of breast milk purchased online, they uncovered that about 10 percent had been tainted with cow’s milk. The researchers speculated that it was a way for the sellers to make more money. Crowe said there haven’t been many studies like donated versus sold milk. It’s possible, she noted, that risks are lower for donated milk because the motives are different. But she also explained that at donor banks, breast milk has been pasteurized and tested for infectious diseases, and there are numerous other guardrails in place to ensure it is safe for the infant. With donor milk acquired on Facebook, there are no such guarantees. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics and U.S. Food and Drug administration recommend against internet-based milk-sharing sites, according to the Center for Disease Control, and guide mothers to donation-based human milk banks instead. Meanwhile, some investors are beginning to see an opportunity in the space. Vanessa Larco, a venture capitalist at New Enterprise Associates, experienced her own struggles with breastfeeding after her own son was born. She’s developed an interest in infant nutrition as a result, and has been thinking deeply about opportunities to bridge the gap by making it easier for women to access safe and high-quality donor breast milk when supplies are running low. “I’m deeply passionate about this and have been thinking deeply about the right way to do it,” she said.

‘Breast is best’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-07  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, human, davis, mixed, breast, babies, son, mothers, milk, groups, donated, selling, using, san, views, experts, nursing, donor


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Google internet balloon spinoff Loon still looking for its wings

The company behind the effort, Loon, says its balloons will reach Kenya in the coming weeks for its first commercial trial. Hatched in 2011, Loon aims to bring connectivity to remote parts of the world by floating solar-powered networking gear over areas where cell towers would be too expensive to build. But executives at five other wireless carriers courted by Loon across four continents told Reuters that Loon is not a fit currently, and may never be. Hervé Suquet, chief technology and informat


The company behind the effort, Loon, says its balloons will reach Kenya in the coming weeks for its first commercial trial. Hatched in 2011, Loon aims to bring connectivity to remote parts of the world by floating solar-powered networking gear over areas where cell towers would be too expensive to build. But executives at five other wireless carriers courted by Loon across four continents told Reuters that Loon is not a fit currently, and may never be. Hervé Suquet, chief technology and informat
Google internet balloon spinoff Loon still looking for its wings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, loon, trial, spinoff, cell, internet, wings, test, telkom, looking, balloon, technology, balloons, google, westgarth, towers, wireless


Google internet balloon spinoff Loon still looking for its wings

Google’s bet on balloons to deliver cell service soon faces a crucial test amid doubts about the viability of the technology by some potential customers.

The company behind the effort, Loon, says its balloons will reach Kenya in the coming weeks for its first commercial trial. The test with Telkom Kenya, the nation’s No. 3 carrier, will let mountain villagers buy 4G service at market-rate prices for an undefined period. Kenya’s aviation authority said its final approval would be signed this month.

Hatched in 2011, Loon aims to bring connectivity to remote parts of the world by floating solar-powered networking gear over areas where cell towers would be too expensive to build.

Its tennis-court-sized helium balloons have demonstrated utility. Over the last three years, Loon successfully let wireless carriers in Peru and Puerto Rico use balloons for free to supplant cell phone towers downed by natural disasters.

Kenyan officials are enthusiastic as they try to bring more citizens online.

But executives at five other wireless carriers courted by Loon across four continents told Reuters that Loon is not a fit currently, and may never be. Those companies, including Telkom Indonesia, Vodafone New Zealand and French giant Orange SA, say Loon must demonstrate its technology is reliable, safe and profitable for carriers.

Hervé Suquet, chief technology and information officer for Orange Middle East and Africa, said Loon needs to prove itself in Kenya.

“If the results are positive, we would then be potentially interested,” he said in a statement.

Kuwait-based carrier Zain Group said it, too, is watching the Kenyan trial closely.

Stakes are high for Google’s parent Alphabet. It has touted a few small subsidiaries, including Loon, as being crucial to its next act: diversifying beyond ad sales. But its self-described “other bets,” such as self-driving car company Waymo, generate 0.4% of revenue.

Another cloud is a lawsuit alleging Google swiped a competitor’s balloon ideas in 2008. A trial in federal court is slated to begin August 2 in San Jose, California. If it loses, Loon would pay jury-determined damages to Chandler, Arizona-based Space Data, which sells communications balloons to the U.S. military.

Loon said it will “vigorously defend” itself.

Alastair Westgarth, chief executive of the Alphabet subsidiary officially formed last July, expressed confidence in its strategy. “Multiple” additional entities are close to signing contracts with Loon, he said. The company’s workforce has tripled to over 200 employees in the last year.

Loon also attracted outside funding. An arm of Japanese telecoms firm SoftBank developing internet drones invested $125 million as part of a partnership this year. It has accelerated Loon’s previously unreported interest in industrial applications, such as serving farms and off-shore oil wells.

“With years of technical development, over 35 million kilometers flown, and hundreds of thousands of people connected, we have a big head start and are well positioned to connect a lot of people and seize the opportunities that come with it,” Westgarth said in a statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, loon, trial, spinoff, cell, internet, wings, test, telkom, looking, balloon, technology, balloons, google, westgarth, towers, wireless


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Google’s next battleground as it gets into health care will be privacy, lawsuit shows

Since Feinberg’s hiring, several units have been folded into Google Health, including Deep Mind’s health division, which was previously based in London. The lawsuit shows a major challenge for Google and other large technology companies marching into health care. Personal health information can be transferred between organizations as part of a so-called business associate agreement, said Lucia Savage, a health privacy lawyer with the digital health company Omada Health. These agreements ensure t


Since Feinberg’s hiring, several units have been folded into Google Health, including Deep Mind’s health division, which was previously based in London. The lawsuit shows a major challenge for Google and other large technology companies marching into health care. Personal health information can be transferred between organizations as part of a so-called business associate agreement, said Lucia Savage, a health privacy lawyer with the digital health company Omada Health. These agreements ensure t
Google’s next battleground as it gets into health care will be privacy, lawsuit shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, data, company, battleground, companies, chicago, information, privacy, shows, medical, patient, university, lawsuit, care, googles, gets, google


Google's next battleground as it gets into health care will be privacy, lawsuit shows

Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google, speaks to the media before the opening of the Berlin representation of Google Germany in Berlin on January 22, 2019.

In the wake of that, the company recently hired a health system executive, David Feinberg, to streamline its health efforts and create more unity among the various teams. Since Feinberg’s hiring, several units have been folded into Google Health, including Deep Mind’s health division, which was previously based in London. DeepMind has stressed that no patient data has been linked with Google products or services.

The lawsuit shows a major challenge for Google and other large technology companies marching into health care. These companies are facing looming regulation from Washington and increased scrutiny about whether the proper steps have been taken to safeguard data, especially in how the company allows third-party marketers to target users with ads. It also faced an outcry when a U.K. government privacy watchdog said a hospital had illegally sent 1.6 million records to Google DeepMind for a new health care app.

A new lawsuit against Google and the University of Chicago Medical Center alleges that researchers did not strip out date stamps or doctor’s notes buried within hundreds of thousands of patient medical records, and that this information could be used to identify a patient.

What the case says

Google and the University of Chicago have been partnering since 2017 in research aimed at what they said would “create predictive models that could help prevent unplanned hospital readmissions, avoid costly complications and save lives.”

The complaint was filed Wednesday on behalf of Matt Dinerstein, a patient with the University of Chicago Medical Center.

It argues that dates of service can be used to identify subjects, because “Google — as one of the most prolific data mining companies — is uniquely able to determine the identity of every medical record the University released.”

In other words, because Google already knows people’s location, their searches and their interests, theoretically that information could be used with dates of service to identify a specific individual.

It then accuses the university of consumer fraud and fraudulent business practices because it did not keep his private records confidential.

In a statement, Google said: “We believe our healthcare research could help save lives in the future, which is why we take privacy seriously and follow all relevant rules and regulations in our handling of health data. In particular, we take compliance with HIPAA seriously, including in the receipt and use of the limited data set provided by the University of Chicago. ”

The medical center said the lawsuit’s claims are without merit.

“That research partnership was appropriate and legal and the claims asserted in this case are baseless and a disservice to the Medical Center’s fundamental mission of improving the lives of its patients,” a spokesperson said. “The University and the Medical Center will vigorously defend this action in court.”

HIPAA, the federal privacy rule for health records and information, clearly outlines two methods for de-identifying data. One of them, the so-called “safe harbor” method, specifies that “all elements of dates,” should not be shared, in order for a company to claim that the patient health information data is, in fact, de-identified. That includes dates of service, which the University of Chicago shared with Google.

There’s another method, called “expert determination,” where a statistician or other expert claims that it’s unlikely that the data could be used to re-identify a person.

But there are times when health systems can transfer patient information.

Personal health information can be transferred between organizations as part of a so-called business associate agreement, said Lucia Savage, a health privacy lawyer with the digital health company Omada Health. These agreements ensure that personal health information is provided in a secure manner. And there are guidelines around the use of limited data sets in medical research.

That requires a company like Google to sign a data-use agreement with a health provider, and it specifies that really specific data like names and telephone numbers cannot be shared. In this case, Google would be required to safeguard the data, said David Harlow, a principal with The Harlow Group. And the lawsuit would need to prove that it did not.

But as tech companies march into health care, and see value in data, that could prompt debate about the proper uses of patient information. In some cases, that might mean more oversight of companies that sell it to third-parties or form collaborations with Big Pharma.

Ultimately, Google and other tech companies will need to determine whether they view their role in health as bolstering medical research to potentially save lives, or whether they will look to take advantage of the $3.5 trillion health-care sector in unforeseen ways.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, data, company, battleground, companies, chicago, information, privacy, shows, medical, patient, university, lawsuit, care, googles, gets, google


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Digital health start-up Livongo files to go public

Digital health start-up Livongo filed its S-1 for its initial public offering on Friday. But its revenue growth is accelerating, with $32.06 million in revenue for the first quarter of 2019, versus $12.46 million in revenue in the year-ago quarter. Livongo reported a net loss of $14.96 million for the first quarter of 2019, versus a net loss of $4.22 million in the year-ago quarter. That’s up from the 68,536 enrolled diabetes members it had in the year-ago quarter. The digital health sector has


Digital health start-up Livongo filed its S-1 for its initial public offering on Friday. But its revenue growth is accelerating, with $32.06 million in revenue for the first quarter of 2019, versus $12.46 million in revenue in the year-ago quarter. Livongo reported a net loss of $14.96 million for the first quarter of 2019, versus a net loss of $4.22 million in the year-ago quarter. That’s up from the 68,536 enrolled diabetes members it had in the year-ago quarter. The digital health sector has
Digital health start-up Livongo files to go public Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, company, public, livongo, diabetes, revenue, startup, files, quarter, digital, yearago, sector, 2019, million, loss


Digital health start-up Livongo files to go public

Digital health start-up Livongo filed its S-1 for its initial public offering on Friday.

Livongo, which is one of the first companies to exit in the burgeoning health-technology sector, reported $68.4 million in revenue for the full year of 2018. But its revenue growth is accelerating, with $32.06 million in revenue for the first quarter of 2019, versus $12.46 million in revenue in the year-ago quarter. However, losses are growing too. Livongo reported a net loss of $14.96 million for the first quarter of 2019, versus a net loss of $4.22 million in the year-ago quarter.

The company also said it had 164,168 enrolled diabetes members for the glucose monitors and test strips it provides as of March 31, 2019. That’s up from the 68,536 enrolled diabetes members it had in the year-ago quarter.

The digital health sector has seen a massive uptick in venture investment, as more investors see opportunity to bring modern tools to the $3.5 trillion medical sector. But it’s been notoriously challenging for these companies to exit, so the industry will be closely watching Livongo’s initial public offering.

The company got its start in 2012 with an offering that included glucose monitors and test strips for people with diabetes. It has subsequently expanded its scope to other medical conditions, including behavioral health and weight loss. It has previously said that it has more than 600 self-insured employers and health plans signed up as customers, who cover the cost of the service for their members.

More than 32 million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes.

The company was founded by the venture firm General Catalyst’s Hemant Taneja, who is also an early investor in Snap, and former AllScripts CEO Glen Tullman. Its CEO is Zane Berke, a former executive at health IT company Cerner.

The start-up reportedly hired Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase & Co as underwriters for its IPO.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, health, company, public, livongo, diabetes, revenue, startup, files, quarter, digital, yearago, sector, 2019, million, loss


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Apple continues expanding into health care by selling a consumer-focused diabetes monitor in stores

Some Apple retail locations now sell a glucose monitor that integrates with the iPhone to give people with diabetes a way to track their blood sugar through Apple’s Health app. One Drop is an aesthetically designed blood glucose monitor with an associated iPhone app that integrates with Apple’s Health app, as well as a separate Apple Watch app. Earlier this year, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the company’s health products will be Apple’s “greatest contribution to mankind. ” Apple has experimented with


Some Apple retail locations now sell a glucose monitor that integrates with the iPhone to give people with diabetes a way to track their blood sugar through Apple’s Health app. One Drop is an aesthetically designed blood glucose monitor with an associated iPhone app that integrates with Apple’s Health app, as well as a separate Apple Watch app. Earlier this year, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the company’s health products will be Apple’s “greatest contribution to mankind. ” Apple has experimented with
Apple continues expanding into health care by selling a consumer-focused diabetes monitor in stores Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: christina farr kif leswing, christina farr, kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consumerfocused, iphone, app, expanding, drop, store, monitor, care, health, stores, selling, glucose, continues, products, apple, diabetes


Apple continues expanding into health care by selling a consumer-focused diabetes monitor in stores

Some Apple retail locations now sell a glucose monitor that integrates with the iPhone to give people with diabetes a way to track their blood sugar through Apple’s Health app.

One Drop is an aesthetically designed blood glucose monitor with an associated iPhone app that integrates with Apple’s Health app, as well as a separate Apple Watch app. It’s the only diabetes product that Apple is currently selling in its physical stores, although it previously carried One Drop online and carried a Sanofi monitor in 2012.

The introduction of OneDrop is a prime example of how Apple is breaking into the health space by selling consumer-oriented products and integrating the data from them in its Health app, making the iPhone and Apple Watch hubs for people’s personal health.

Apple hasn’t been shy about its interest in creating products and services to address the health market. Earlier this year, Apple CEO Tim Cook said the company’s health products will be Apple’s “greatest contribution to mankind. ” Apple has experimented with creating its own glucose monitor, and Apple CEO Tim Cook has been spotted testing a continuous glucose monitor, although he’s not known to have diabetes. (One Drop isn’t continuous. It requires a finger prick before every individual reading.)

Apple’s health team and the merchandisers who select products for the store are different divisions at Apple. But the inclusion of One Drop in the store is a sign that Apple products are increasingly capable of performing health-related tasks.

“I think it’s great to have more consumer-friendly medical devices in the Apple Store,” said Aaron Neinstein, an endocrinologist at UC San Francisco, who treats patients with diabetes. “One Drop has embraced the fact that they’re part of people’s lives, and that includes their smartphone, and I wish other more traditional device makers would follow suit.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: christina farr kif leswing, christina farr, kif leswing
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consumerfocused, iphone, app, expanding, drop, store, monitor, care, health, stores, selling, glucose, continues, products, apple, diabetes


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