This state is home to the best cities for renters

Downtown Scottsdale and suburbs of Phoenix, Arizona, with the White Tank Mountain Range in the background. Your next rental destination just might be in the Sun Belt. Scottsdale, Arizona, is the best place for renters, according to an analysis by WalletHub. The personal finance website studied 182 U.S. cities, and evaluated them based on the affordability of the rental market and the quality of life. Considerations under the “quality of life” include driver-friendliness, the availability of recr


Downtown Scottsdale and suburbs of Phoenix, Arizona, with the White Tank Mountain Range in the background. Your next rental destination just might be in the Sun Belt. Scottsdale, Arizona, is the best place for renters, according to an analysis by WalletHub. The personal finance website studied 182 U.S. cities, and evaluated them based on the affordability of the rental market and the quality of life. Considerations under the “quality of life” include driver-friendliness, the availability of recr
This state is home to the best cities for renters Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suburbs, state, studied, white, best, cities, website, wallethubthe, tank, scottsdale, renters, arizona, rental, quality


This state is home to the best cities for renters

Downtown Scottsdale and suburbs of Phoenix, Arizona, with the White Tank Mountain Range in the background.

Your next rental destination just might be in the Sun Belt.

Scottsdale, Arizona, is the best place for renters, according to an analysis by WalletHub.

The personal finance website studied 182 U.S. cities, and evaluated them based on the affordability of the rental market and the quality of life.

Considerations under the “quality of life” include driver-friendliness, the availability of recreational activities and the quality of public schools.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, suburbs, state, studied, white, best, cities, website, wallethubthe, tank, scottsdale, renters, arizona, rental, quality


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Barry lost some bite, but these 10 cities could lose billions in housing to floods by 2050

of rain in places as it stormed up the Mississippi River Valley from Louisiana and Alabama to Arkansas and as far north as Ontario, Canada, this week. Although the weather system did less damage than initially feared, some experts say that, thanks to climate change, things will only get worse going forward. Andreas Prein, project scientist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, recently told the New York Times that climate change is upping both the frequency and intensity of heavy ra


of rain in places as it stormed up the Mississippi River Valley from Louisiana and Alabama to Arkansas and as far north as Ontario, Canada, this week. Although the weather system did less damage than initially feared, some experts say that, thanks to climate change, things will only get worse going forward. Andreas Prein, project scientist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, recently told the New York Times that climate change is upping both the frequency and intensity of heavy ra
Barry lost some bite, but these 10 cities could lose billions in housing to floods by 2050 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, zillow, weather, housing, billions, barry, worth, things, risk, homes, bite, lose, 2050, lost, affected, flooding, floods, cities, change, climate


Barry lost some bite, but these 10 cities could lose billions in housing to floods by 2050

Hurricane Barry dumped more than 23 in. of rain in places as it stormed up the Mississippi River Valley from Louisiana and Alabama to Arkansas and as far north as Ontario, Canada, this week. Although the weather system did less damage than initially feared, some experts say that, thanks to climate change, things will only get worse going forward.

Andreas Prein, project scientist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, recently told the New York Times that climate change is upping both the frequency and intensity of heavy rainfall storms.

Where does that leave homeowners? Within three decades more than 386,000 homes in coastal areas of the U.S. will be at risk of permanent submersion or regular flooding due to climate change, according to a recent study by real estate website Zillow and nonprofit weather news site Climate Central.

About 40% of the American population may be affected to some degree. Those residences are collectively worth nearly $210 billion in 2018 dollars, according to Zillow; in the top 10 cities likely affected, losses could total more than $34 billion. Things look even more grim further out in time: By 2100 some 2.5 million homes nationwide, worth about $1.3 trillion altogether, could be at risk if the scientific data and resulting computer models are correct.

Here are the 10 cities predicted to be worst affected by 2050, along with the amount of local housing affected by flooding and its value.

Source: Zillow.com

Updated 18 July 2019. Originally published 14 March 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
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San Francisco to be as hot as Portugal and NYC like Virginia Beach by 2050, scientists say

San Francisco could be as hot as Portugal and New York would feel like Virginia Beach by 2050 if the findings of a major new climate change study are correct. New York City’s climate would be up to 4 degrees warmer in 2050, resembling Virginia Beach as it is today, and Seattle will be closer to San Francisco in 2019. In Europe, cities were expected to be 3.5 degrees warmer in summer and 4.7 degrees warmer in winter by 2050. “If carbon emissions remain unabated … the costs of climate change under


San Francisco could be as hot as Portugal and New York would feel like Virginia Beach by 2050 if the findings of a major new climate change study are correct. New York City’s climate would be up to 4 degrees warmer in 2050, resembling Virginia Beach as it is today, and Seattle will be closer to San Francisco in 2019. In Europe, cities were expected to be 3.5 degrees warmer in summer and 4.7 degrees warmer in winter by 2050. “If carbon emissions remain unabated … the costs of climate change under
San Francisco to be as hot as Portugal and NYC like Virginia Beach by 2050, scientists say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, degrees, temperature, warmer, scientists, francisco, 2050, cities, world, nyc, san, portugal, conditions, virginia, today, say, beach, climate, change, hot


San Francisco to be as hot as Portugal and NYC like Virginia Beach by 2050, scientists say

San Francisco could be as hot as Portugal and New York would feel like Virginia Beach by 2050 if the findings of a major new climate change study are correct.

Researchers from thinktank The Crowther Lab assessed how 520 cities around the world would look by 2050 in an “optimistic scenario,” where the implementation of policies will have stabilized CO2 emissions and the mean global temperature will have increased by 1.4 degrees Celsius.

In the U.S., Washington, D.C. would have a climate like modern-day Nashville by 2050, the analysis found, while San Francisco’s climate will be more like the current climate in Portuguese capital Lisbon. New York City’s climate would be up to 4 degrees warmer in 2050, resembling Virginia Beach as it is today, and Seattle will be closer to San Francisco in 2019.

London’s climate would be more akin to Barcelona today, the report predicted, while Madrid’s will be closer to modern-day Marrakech.

The analysis showed that more than three-quarters of cities around the world will experience “a striking change of climate conditions,” even in the optimistic scenario. Researchers claimed that one in five cities – including Kuala Lumpur, Jakarta, and Singapore – are likely to exist in a climatic conditions that don’t currently exist on the planet today, with wild swings between drought and heavy rainfall.

Although tropical regions will experience smaller changes in temperature, their wettest months will become 5% wetter and their driest months 14% drier, according to the analysis. Droughts in the region will become more severe, the report claimed.

The most dramatic shift is predicted for cities with northern latitudes, which would see their climates in 2050 resembling the current conditions in cities more than 600 miles to their south.

In Europe, cities were expected to be 3.5 degrees warmer in summer and 4.7 degrees warmer in winter by 2050.

“If carbon emissions remain unabated … the costs of climate change under a business as usual scenario will exceed $12 trillion by 2050,” the report’s authors said. “We believe that it is through this comparison with current cities and their known struggles with their climate conditions that the need to act becomes tangible.”

Climate change has been flagged as an urgent issue that poses a social and economic threat.

The UN warns that without action, the world’s average surface temperature is likely to surpass 3 degrees Celsius this century.

Earlier this year, a World Economic Forum survey identified extreme weather events and the failure to mitigate climate change as two of the biggest global risks.

Meanwhile, IMF chief and nominee for the European Central Bank presidency Christine Lagarde previously warned: “If we don’t do anything about climate change now, in 50 years’ time we will be toasted, roasted and grilled.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, degrees, temperature, warmer, scientists, francisco, 2050, cities, world, nyc, san, portugal, conditions, virginia, today, say, beach, climate, change, hot


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These cities have the worst traffic for the Fourth of July

New York City, Boston, Houston and Seattle are all projected to see delays at least three times longer than normal at the busiest travel times. The day and time with the largest delay multiplier varies by city, but Wednesday, July 3, is expected to be the worst day for travel delays overall. More than 80% of travelers will be driving, according to AAA, with 41.4 million people expected to hit the roads. The explosion at the Pennsylvania Energy Solutions refinery could cause prices to rise throug


New York City, Boston, Houston and Seattle are all projected to see delays at least three times longer than normal at the busiest travel times. The day and time with the largest delay multiplier varies by city, but Wednesday, July 3, is expected to be the worst day for travel delays overall. More than 80% of travelers will be driving, according to AAA, with 41.4 million people expected to hit the roads. The explosion at the Pennsylvania Energy Solutions refinery could cause prices to rise throug
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: jesse pound john w schoen, jesse pound, john w schoen, elijah shama
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delays, traffic, worst, prices, travel, cities, increase, according, fourth, times, aaa, gas, expected


These cities have the worst traffic for the Fourth of July

The number of drivers for the Fourth of July is expected to rise by more than 4% this year, and some cities will be three times more congested than on normal days, according to AAA and analytics company INRIX.

New York City, Boston, Houston and Seattle are all projected to see delays at least three times longer than normal at the busiest travel times. The day and time with the largest delay multiplier varies by city, but Wednesday, July 3, is expected to be the worst day for travel delays overall.

More than 80% of travelers will be driving, according to AAA, with 41.4 million people expected to hit the roads. AAA projects delays to increase by 9% nationally.

“Although travel times are expected to nominally increase throughout the week, hands down, Wednesday afternoon will be the worst time to be on the road,” Trevor Reed, transportation analyst at INRIX, said in a statement.

The explosion at the Pennsylvania Energy Solutions refinery could cause prices to rise through the summer, said AAA gas price expert Jeanette Casselano, but gas prices are still down year over year.

“Motorists in the Northeast and surrounding regions are likely to see gas prices moderately increase this summer due to the PES refinery closure,” Casselano said in a statement to CNBC on Thursday. “However, the recent bump in the national average, 3 cents since Monday, is mostly attributed to high demand and the upcoming holiday weekend.”

Boston and Chicago — which is projected to see two times longer delays — are also both top-10 destinations for July 4th, according to AAA advanced bookings. Orlando, Florida is the top destination.

Click on the map below to see an interactive version showing details of delays in major metro areas.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: jesse pound john w schoen, jesse pound, john w schoen, elijah shama
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, delays, traffic, worst, prices, travel, cities, increase, according, fourth, times, aaa, gas, expected


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Cities across America are seeing an uptick in ransomware attacks

Cities across America are seeing an uptick in ransomware attacks2:10 PM ET Fri, 28 June 2019CNBC’s Kate Fazzini joins “The Exchange” to discuss how ransomware attacks are hitting cities across America and how they work.


Cities across America are seeing an uptick in ransomware attacks2:10 PM ET Fri, 28 June 2019CNBC’s Kate Fazzini joins “The Exchange” to discuss how ransomware attacks are hitting cities across America and how they work.
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Cities across America are seeing an uptick in ransomware attacks

Cities across America are seeing an uptick in ransomware attacks

2:10 PM ET Fri, 28 June 2019

CNBC’s Kate Fazzini joins “The Exchange” to discuss how ransomware attacks are hitting cities across America and how they work.


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Here are the cities with the biggest share of 65-and-older workers

In some cities, though, the 65-and-older crowd is more of a presence in the workforce than others. To identify where those older workers are clocking in the most, retirement community operator Provisional Living analyzed Census Bureau data from cities with total populations of 200,000 or more. Additionally, because some spots have smaller older populations than others, Provisional Living did its ranking based on the share of the 65-and-older group who are working. Separately, Provisional Living


In some cities, though, the 65-and-older crowd is more of a presence in the workforce than others. To identify where those older workers are clocking in the most, retirement community operator Provisional Living analyzed Census Bureau data from cities with total populations of 200,000 or more. Additionally, because some spots have smaller older populations than others, Provisional Living did its ranking based on the share of the 65-and-older group who are working. Separately, Provisional Living
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: sarah obrien john w schoen, sarah obrien, john w schoen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, age, provisional, older, work, 65, reach, share, workers, living, working, biggest, 65andolder, cities


Here are the cities with the biggest share of 65-and-older workers

It’s no secret that Americans are staying on the job longer, or returning to work after retiring. In some cities, though, the 65-and-older crowd is more of a presence in the workforce than others.

To identify where those older workers are clocking in the most, retirement community operator Provisional Living analyzed Census Bureau data from cities with total populations of 200,000 or more. While that includes the nation’s largest metro areas, fewer than half of the cities that ranked in the top 25 have at least 500,000 residents.

Additionally, because some spots have smaller older populations than others, Provisional Living did its ranking based on the share of the 65-and-older group who are working.

For example, in Anchorage, Alaska, 24% of its 28,100 older residents are working, while in Los Angeles — which ranks 20th on the list — the share is 20.6% of 463,000 older workers.

Separately, Provisional Living ranked cities that have shown the biggest increase in how many people age 65 and older are working.

Every day, roughly 10,000 baby boomers reach age 65. And while the majority of them have retired already, the ranks who work beyond that milestone has been steadily growing.

Nationally, just above 20% of people age 65 or older are working or looking for work, double the 10% doing so in 1985, according to a recent report from the investment management firm United Income.

By 2026, about 30% of people ages 65 to 74 are expected be working either full- or part-time, compared with 17.5% in 1996, government forecasts show. Among the 70-and-older cohort, that share is projected to reach 10.8% in 2026, more than double what it was 30 years earlier (4.7%).

Financial advisors typically recommend that if your post-65 life is going to include paid work, you should make sure you evaluate whether the income could affect other areas of your financial life that tend to be particular to older Americans, including Social Security and Medicare.

More from Personal Finance:

Medigap changes coming next year for future 65-year-olds

Investors favor US stocks amid political tensions overseas

Overdraft fees could jump if consumer watchdog eases rule

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: sarah obrien john w schoen, sarah obrien, john w schoen
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Hong Kong named the most expensive city in the world for expats

Eight of the 10 most expensive cities were in Asia. Hong Kong was placed top for 2019 for a second consecutive year, with Tokyo, Singapore, Seoul and Zurich rounding out the top five. Hong Kong is the most expensive city in the world for people working abroad, new research has found, with Asian cities continuing to dominate as the priciest locations for expats. 10 most expensive cities for expatsAt the other end of the scale, the least expensive cities for expats this year are Tunis in Tunisia,


Eight of the 10 most expensive cities were in Asia. Hong Kong was placed top for 2019 for a second consecutive year, with Tokyo, Singapore, Seoul and Zurich rounding out the top five. Hong Kong is the most expensive city in the world for people working abroad, new research has found, with Asian cities continuing to dominate as the priciest locations for expats. 10 most expensive cities for expatsAt the other end of the scale, the least expensive cities for expats this year are Tunis in Tunisia,
Hong Kong named the most expensive city in the world for expats Cached Page below :
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cost, expensive, pakistan, 2019, expats, named, zurich, night, city, kong, hong, cities, world, uzbekistan


Hong Kong named the most expensive city in the world for expats

Eight of the 10 most expensive cities were in Asia. Hong Kong was placed top for 2019 for a second consecutive year, with Tokyo, Singapore, Seoul and Zurich rounding out the top five.

Research published Wednesday by HR consultancy Mercer compared the cost of more than 200 items in 209 cities around the world.

Hong Kong is the most expensive city in the world for people working abroad, new research has found, with Asian cities continuing to dominate as the priciest locations for expats.

10 most expensive cities for expats

At the other end of the scale, the least expensive cities for expats this year are Tunis in Tunisia, Tashkent in Uzbekistan, and Karachi in Pakistan, according to the research.

10 cheapest cities for expats

Tunis, Tunisia Tashkent, Uzbekistan Karachi, Pakistan Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan Windhoek, Namibia Banjul, Gambia Islamabad, Pakistan Tbilisi, Georgia Skopje, Macedonia Managua, Nicaragua

According to Mercer, Asia’s dominance of the top 10 was largely due to strong housing markets.

High demand and short supply have driven property prices in Hong Kong to “unaffordable” levels in recent years, with the territory planning to build an $80 billion artificial island to help fix the crisis. The report’s authors also noted that Hong Kong’s currency was pegged to the U.S. dollar, which drove up the cost of living locally.

The items analyzed in the report ranged from alcohol, clothing and food to entertainment and housing.

A regular Big Mac meal from McDonald’s was most expensive in Zurich, Switzerland, with a cost of almost $15. Hong Kong was the most expensive location when it came to buying gasoline or a cup of coffee in a “fashionable cafe,” while Londoners paid the most for movie tickets.

The report also analyzed how living costs have changed in recent years.

In eight of the 17 Chinese cities surveyed, the price of an international brand of beer increased between 2014 and 2019, which the report’s authors linked to the country’s rapid economic growth.

A night out in China — which covered two movie tickets, two steak dinners and two coffees — rose from $136 in 2009 to $163 in 2019, according to the report.

Meanwhile, in Mexico City, the cost of a night out increased by more than 40% over the same period, with the research showing a date night would cost $90 in the Mexican capital this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cost, expensive, pakistan, 2019, expats, named, zurich, night, city, kong, hong, cities, world, uzbekistan


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The cities where you can earn $100,000 and still feel broke

A six-figure joint income isn’t enough for a family of three to live comfortably in some parts of the U.S.That’s according to a new analysis from credit card comparison site MagnifyMoney, which used data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Location Affordability Index and the 2012-2016 American Community Survey to calculate basic living expenses for a household earning $100,000 per year in the 100 largest metro areas in the U.S. The analysis found that there are many citi


A six-figure joint income isn’t enough for a family of three to live comfortably in some parts of the U.S.That’s according to a new analysis from credit card comparison site MagnifyMoney, which used data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Location Affordability Index and the 2012-2016 American Community Survey to calculate basic living expenses for a household earning $100,000 per year in the 100 largest metro areas in the U.S. The analysis found that there are many citi
The cities where you can earn $100,000 and still feel broke Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, expenses, location, analysis, 100000, cities, broke, earn, loan, student, according, earning, income, feel, month


The cities where you can earn $100,000 and still feel broke

A six-figure joint income isn’t enough for a family of three to live comfortably in some parts of the U.S.

That’s according to a new analysis from credit card comparison site MagnifyMoney, which used data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Location Affordability Index and the 2012-2016 American Community Survey to calculate basic living expenses for a household earning $100,000 per year in the 100 largest metro areas in the U.S.

The analysis found that there are many cities in the U.S. where families of three — dual income parents and one child in day care — earning six figures would struggle to have any disposable income left at the end of the month, after necessities such as housing, transportation, retirement savings, childcare, student loan bills, etc., were accounted for. Magnify Money assumed the couple is saving $500 a month into a 401(k) account and paying $393 a month in student loan debt (the median payment according to the Federal Reserve). All the other expenses varied based on location.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, expenses, location, analysis, 100000, cities, broke, earn, loan, student, according, earning, income, feel, month


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These 15 cities boast the best 20-year returns on home values

Depending where you live, staying put in your home for the last two decades could be paying off well. As in really well. While the median nationwide home value is about 90% higher now than it was in 1999 — $226,800 compared with about $119,000 — some spots boast values that have jumped far more than that. In some places, the gain is more than 300% or even 400%. However, that doesn’t take into consideration other housing costs that can eat into profits: property taxes, maintenance or improvements


Depending where you live, staying put in your home for the last two decades could be paying off well. As in really well. While the median nationwide home value is about 90% higher now than it was in 1999 — $226,800 compared with about $119,000 — some spots boast values that have jumped far more than that. In some places, the gain is more than 300% or even 400%. However, that doesn’t take into consideration other housing costs that can eat into profits: property taxes, maintenance or improvements
These 15 cities boast the best 20-year returns on home values Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: sarah obrien, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, jim r bounds
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, value, spots, 15, returns, boast, staying, profits, wellwhile, property, thatin, really, values, 20year, taxes, cities


These 15 cities boast the best 20-year returns on home values

Depending where you live, staying put in your home for the last two decades could be paying off well. As in really well.

While the median nationwide home value is about 90% higher now than it was in 1999 — $226,800 compared with about $119,000 — some spots boast values that have jumped far more than that.

In some places, the gain is more than 300% or even 400%. However, that doesn’t take into consideration other housing costs that can eat into profits: property taxes, maintenance or improvements.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: sarah obrien, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, jim r bounds
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, value, spots, 15, returns, boast, staying, profits, wellwhile, property, thatin, really, values, 20year, taxes, cities


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