Nature-based solutions? Here’s what they are and why you should care

This discussion is taking place against the backdrop of a “global energy transition,” a shift from fossil fuel based energy sources to renewable ones. Taking all of the above into account, something called “nature-based solutions” (NBS) could have a role to play in the years ahead. The EU has described nature-based solutions as “actions which are inspired by, supported by or copied from nature.” Speaking to CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy,” Stewart Maginnis, global director of the Nature-based Soluti


This discussion is taking place against the backdrop of a “global energy transition,” a shift from fossil fuel based energy sources to renewable ones.
Taking all of the above into account, something called “nature-based solutions” (NBS) could have a role to play in the years ahead.
The EU has described nature-based solutions as “actions which are inspired by, supported by or copied from nature.”
Speaking to CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy,” Stewart Maginnis, global director of the Nature-based Soluti
Nature-based solutions? Here’s what they are and why you should care Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sustainable, solutions, energy, heres, climate, nbs, naturebased, nature, planet, global, making, care


Nature-based solutions? Here's what they are and why you should care

It’s over four years since the Paris Agreement was reached at the UN’s COP21 climate summit. It was in the French capital that world leaders committed to making sure global warming stayed “well below” 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. They also agreed to pursue efforts to limit the temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius. In the time that’s passed, the debate on climate change has intensified a great deal. Today, it’s one of the most talked about and polarizing issues on the planet. While activists decry what they perceive to be a lack of action when it comes to tackling the “climate emergency”, national governments and big businesses claim they are making significant efforts. This discussion is taking place against the backdrop of a “global energy transition,” a shift from fossil fuel based energy sources to renewable ones. How fast this change will happen — and to what extent — is another part of the debate.

Could nature hold the key?

Taking all of the above into account, something called “nature-based solutions” (NBS) could have a role to play in the years ahead. The EU has described nature-based solutions as “actions which are inspired by, supported by or copied from nature.” An example is the installation and cultivation of green roofs and walls in urban areas to boost air quality. Speaking to CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy,” Stewart Maginnis, global director of the Nature-based Solutions Group at the International Union for Conservation of Nature, explained that these solutions were “rooted in the benefits that nature provides.” “Real, tangible benefits like sequestering carbon, stabilizing soil, regulating water flow,” he added, explaining that NBS came from well managed or restored ecosystems like forests, wetlands and grasslands.

A bridge to a more sustainable planet?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-14  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sustainable, solutions, energy, heres, climate, nbs, naturebased, nature, planet, global, making, care


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Earth just had its hottest January on record as climate change accelerates

A woman gestures as she attends a protest urging authorities to take emergency measures against climate change, in Paris, France, September 21, 2019. The Earth had its hottest January in recorded history last month, continuing an alarming upward trend as the climate crisis accelerates, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The past five years have been the five hottest on record, and the past decade was also the hottest on record. 2020 will likely to rank among the fi


A woman gestures as she attends a protest urging authorities to take emergency measures against climate change, in Paris, France, September 21, 2019.
The Earth had its hottest January in recorded history last month, continuing an alarming upward trend as the climate crisis accelerates, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
The past five years have been the five hottest on record, and the past decade was also the hottest on record.
2020 will likely to rank among the fi
Earth just had its hottest January on record as climate change accelerates Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-13  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, trend, past, earth, accelerates, temperatures, change, celsius, record, degrees, hottest, climate


Earth just had its hottest January on record as climate change accelerates

A woman gestures as she attends a protest urging authorities to take emergency measures against climate change, in Paris, France, September 21, 2019.

The Earth had its hottest January in recorded history last month, continuing an alarming upward trend as the climate crisis accelerates, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Global land and ocean temperatures in January exceeded all temperatures recorded in the past 141 years of data at 2.05 degrees Fahrenheit, or 1.13 degrees Celsius, above the 20th century average. Record hot temperatures were seen in parts of Central and South America, Asia, Scandinavia, the Indian and Atlantic Oceans and the central and western Pacific Ocean.

The record continues a rising trend in temperatures as carbon dioxide emissions trap heat in the atmosphere and warm the planet. The four hottest Januaries on record have all occurred since 2016, and the 10 hottest Januaries have all occurred since 2002, NOAA said.

The past five years have been the five hottest on record, and the past decade was also the hottest on record. 2019 was the second-hottest year on record behind 2016, at more than 1 degree Fahrenheit, or about 0.6 degree Celsius, above the average between 1981 and 2010, according to Copernicus Climate Change Service.

2020 will likely to rank among the five warmest years on record, according to an analysis by scientists from the National Centers for Environmental Information.

Human-caused climate change has not shown any signs of decline. But United Nations scientists warn that warming starting at 2 degrees Celsius could trigger a global food crisis, as well as exacerbate flooding, widespread heatwaves and displacement of people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-13  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, according, trend, past, earth, accelerates, temperatures, change, celsius, record, degrees, hottest, climate


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Scientists are using Twitter to measure the impact of climate change

This means it’s difficult to measure the impact of changing water levels on specific areas. Additionally, the consequences of higher water levels vary across regions. To monitor changes in Twitter activity, they defined a “remarkable threshold” for coastal flooding as when county-specific Twitter posts increased by 25%. They then compared this data with official flood records. “Minor tidal flooding that is remarkable to residents happens at a tide height different from that defining minor coasta


This means it’s difficult to measure the impact of changing water levels on specific areas.
Additionally, the consequences of higher water levels vary across regions.
To monitor changes in Twitter activity, they defined a “remarkable threshold” for coastal flooding as when county-specific Twitter posts increased by 25%.
They then compared this data with official flood records.
“Minor tidal flooding that is remarkable to residents happens at a tide height different from that defining minor coasta
Scientists are using Twitter to measure the impact of climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-09  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, using, measure, water, twitter, flood, scientists, flooding, change, nuisance, impact, minor, million, levels, official, climate


Scientists are using Twitter to measure the impact of climate change

Minor and recurring floods — also known as nuisance flooding — may be more frequent than official figures would suggest, according to a new study published by Nature Communications. The study focusing on flood levels along the U.S. East and Gulf Coasts found that 22 counties experience nuisance flooding at water levels much lower than what an official gauge would register as a flood. Cities in the counties include New York, Miami and Boston, which have a combined population of over 13 million people. “Our analysis implies that large populations might currently be exposed to nuisance flooding not identified via standard measures,” said the report by Frances C. Moore of the University of California, Davis’ Department of Environmental Science and Policy and Nick Obradovich of the Max Plank Institute for Human Development in Berlin.

Flooded street on Sept. 29, 2015. in Miami Beach, Florida, which engaged in a five-year, $400 million storm water pump program. Joe Raedle | Getty Images News | Getty Images

To conduct their analysis, the scientists turned to Twitter. As the climate crisis intensifies and natural disasters become more frequent and powerful, scientists are increasingly turning to social media as a way to assess the damage and impact on a more localized scale. In this case, Twitter was useful because the 3,700 miles of the East and Gulf Coasts have only about 132 tidal gauge stations. This means it’s difficult to measure the impact of changing water levels on specific areas. “The extent of flooding may be highly variable within a small geographic area, depending on local topography,” the scientists said. Additionally, the consequences of higher water levels vary across regions. For instance, two areas could experience the same amount of flooding, but one could include a frequently trafficked road, while the other could be on farmland. Given the geographic reach of Twitter, as well as the volume and location-specific nature of tweets, the platform can be used to track “nuisance coastal flooding that is both more regular and less consequential,” the researchers said. Because the consequences of this type of flood are annoying rather than deadly, they’re not always measured or recorded.

Two cars are caught by a wave coming over the seawall as heavy seas come ashore in Winthrop, Mass., in 2018. Michael Dwyer | AP

The scientists analyzed 5 million tweets between March 2014 and November 2016 that mentioned flood-related terms and were located in a county along the shoreline. To monitor changes in Twitter activity, they defined a “remarkable threshold” for coastal flooding as when county-specific Twitter posts increased by 25%. They then compared this data with official flood records. “Minor tidal flooding that is remarkable to residents happens at a tide height different from that defining minor coastal flooding,” the scientists concluded. The researchers noted that while flooding caused by high tides and storm surges is already increasing, it’s set to become “more frequent and severe as sea-levels rise globally.”

A woman crosses a flooded street in 2015. Jim Watson | AFP | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-09  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, using, measure, water, twitter, flood, scientists, flooding, change, nuisance, impact, minor, million, levels, official, climate


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Stock performance study shows companies should take environmental and social factors seriously

The firm found that in two thirds of “high ESG controversy” cases a company’s stock experienced “sustained underperformance,” trailing the global index by an average of 12% over the course of the following 2 years. As the ESG and sustainable investing movement grows, Societe Generale quantified the potentially large consequences for companies that don’t follow suit. Traders on the floor of the New York Stock ExchangeThe firm based its analysis on 80 past ESG controversies, dating back to 2005 an


The firm found that in two thirds of “high ESG controversy” cases a company’s stock experienced “sustained underperformance,” trailing the global index by an average of 12% over the course of the following 2 years.
As the ESG and sustainable investing movement grows, Societe Generale quantified the potentially large consequences for companies that don’t follow suit.
Traders on the floor of the New York Stock ExchangeThe firm based its analysis on 80 past ESG controversies, dating back to 2005 an
Stock performance study shows companies should take environmental and social factors seriously Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, world, stock, companies, underperformance, seriously, investing, firm, climate, esg, study, controversy, performance, environmental, factors, shows, global


Stock performance study shows companies should take environmental and social factors seriously

The firm defined a “controversy” as “when a company’s activity has unintended and/or undesired negative environmental and/or social effects on stakeholders, with corresponding reputational risk,” adding that it’s the “extreme ESG downside risk, with at times a massively negative impact on company share prices.”

The firm found that in two thirds of “high ESG controversy” cases a company’s stock experienced “sustained underperformance,” trailing the global index by an average of 12% over the course of the following 2 years.

As the ESG and sustainable investing movement grows, Societe Generale quantified the potentially large consequences for companies that don’t follow suit.

Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange

The firm based its analysis on 80 past ESG controversies, dating back to 2005 and spanning regions and sectors.

“A controversy event will halt the rise in a stock price, and for a sustained period: a solid two years … Prior to the high controversy occurring, these companies were typically performing in line with the market,” analysts led by Charles de Boissezon said.

In addition to underperforming the MSCI World Index by 12%, the stocks typically lagged their regional sector by 4%.

The firm noted that a stock’s drop can contribute significantly to the performance of its regional sector, which is why the underperformance relative to the global benchmark was more extreme.

ESG investing strategies grew to more than $30 trillion in 2018, according to Global Sustainable Investment Alliance, and that number is set to keep rising as consumer tastes shift and investors demand more transparency. By many accounts, companies can no longer afford to ignore these factors.

Sustainable investing was a key theme at this year’s World Economic Forum in Davos, with a number of world leaders and CEOs stressing the urgency of the climate crisis.

“All investors are saying, ‘I want you to invest in companies doing right by society,'” Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan said at Davos. “We have $25 billion in ESG funds, and more is going there.”

This follows BlackRock CEO Larry Fink’s comments in January that the climate crisis is about to trigger “a fundamental reshaping of finance” as issues like climate change “become a defining factor in companies’ long-term prospects.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, social, world, stock, companies, underperformance, seriously, investing, firm, climate, esg, study, controversy, performance, environmental, factors, shows, global


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Antarctica registers hottest temperature ever at nearly 65 degrees Fahrenheit

A frozen section of the Ross Sea at the Scott Base in Antarctica on November 12, 2016. Antarctica just set its hottest temperature ever recorded at 64.9 degrees Fahrenheit as climate change continues to accelerate, according to measurements from an Argentinian research station thermometer. It beats the continent’s previous record of 63.5 degrees tallied in March 2015, and comes shortly after the Earth saw its hottest January on record and hottest decade on record in the 2010s. Antarctica’s recor


A frozen section of the Ross Sea at the Scott Base in Antarctica on November 12, 2016.
Antarctica just set its hottest temperature ever recorded at 64.9 degrees Fahrenheit as climate change continues to accelerate, according to measurements from an Argentinian research station thermometer.
It beats the continent’s previous record of 63.5 degrees tallied in March 2015, and comes shortly after the Earth saw its hottest January on record and hottest decade on record in the 2010s.
Antarctica’s recor
Antarctica registers hottest temperature ever at nearly 65 degrees Fahrenheit Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peninsula, antarctica, climate, nearly, glaciers, meteorological, registers, degrees, record, ice, sea, hottest, fahrenheit, temperature, world


Antarctica registers hottest temperature ever at nearly 65 degrees Fahrenheit

A frozen section of the Ross Sea at the Scott Base in Antarctica on November 12, 2016.

Antarctica just set its hottest temperature ever recorded at 64.9 degrees Fahrenheit as climate change continues to accelerate, according to measurements from an Argentinian research station thermometer.

The reading was taken at the Esperanza Base along Antarctica’s Trinity Peninsula on Thursday. It beats the continent’s previous record of 63.5 degrees tallied in March 2015, and comes shortly after the Earth saw its hottest January on record and hottest decade on record in the 2010s.

Scientists say that they see no end to the way climate change continues to shatter temperature records across the world, including in Antarctica, which is one of the fastest-warming regions in the world.

Antarctica’s record-breaking temperature has not yet been verified by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), which will have a committee confirm the new Esperanza record.

“Everything we have seen thus far indicates a likely legitimate record, but we will of course begin a formal evaluation of the record once we have full data from SMN and on the meteorological conditions surrounding the event,” said WMO’s Weather and Climate Extremes rapporteur Randall Cerveny.

Research shows that Antarctica’s glaciers are rapidly melting as the planet warms, releasing enough water to significantly raise global sea levels. The amount of ice lost each year from the Antarctic ice sheet increased at least sixfold between 1979 and 2017, according to the WMO.

Roughly 87% of glaciers along the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula have retreated over the last half-century, with most showing an accelerated retreat in the last 12 years. The peninsula is expected to see additional extreme warmth in the upcoming days.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-07  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, peninsula, antarctica, climate, nearly, glaciers, meteorological, registers, degrees, record, ice, sea, hottest, fahrenheit, temperature, world


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Cramer worries about Casper’s staggering losses in the ‘post-WeWork apocalypse’ IPO climate

The company’s shares opened at $14.50, a more than 20% increase from the offering price. “The losses here are staggering” for the business, Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.” However, Casper ended up pricing its IPO on Wednesday evening at $12 per share, giving the company a market value of $476 million. “You cut and cut and cut; you can get a deal to work, any deal to work,” he added. If the shares are priced too high on their first day, they could fall and create less-than-ideal optics.


The company’s shares opened at $14.50, a more than 20% increase from the offering price.
“The losses here are staggering” for the business, Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.”
However, Casper ended up pricing its IPO on Wednesday evening at $12 per share, giving the company a market value of $476 million.
“You cut and cut and cut; you can get a deal to work, any deal to work,” he added.
If the shares are priced too high on their first day, they could fall and create less-than-ideal optics.
Cramer worries about Casper’s staggering losses in the ‘post-WeWork apocalypse’ IPO climate Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, casper, shares, cut, staggering, caspers, apocalypse, million, ipo, offering, squawk, priced, work, price, postwework, cramer, opened, worries, losses


Cramer worries about Casper's staggering losses in the 'post-WeWork apocalypse' IPO climate

CNBC’s Jim Cramer expressed concerns about the fundamentals of Casper Sleep’s business ahead of the online mattress start-up’s Thursday debut as a publicly traded stock.

The company’s shares opened at $14.50, a more than 20% increase from the offering price.

“The losses here are staggering” for the business, Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street.”

Casper, which started out selling mattresses on the internet five years ago, had a loss of $92.1 million in 2018 and $73.4 million in 2017 on net revenues of $357.9 million in 2018 and $250.9 million in 2017. Casper has both high-profile investors, such as actor Leonardo DiCaprio, and high-profile partnerships with retailers such as Costco and Amazon.

The New York-based company announced plans for an initial public offering in early January and had initially planned to price its shares between $17 and $19.

However, Casper ended up pricing its IPO on Wednesday evening at $12 per share, giving the company a market value of $476 million. That’s dramatically lower than the $1.1 billion valuation from its latest round of private funding.

“They may have priced it to move,” the “Mad Money” host said, referencing a strategy in which companies lower their offering price in hopes of creating a first-day pop, which indeed happened.

“You cut and cut and cut; you can get a deal to work, any deal to work,” he added. If the shares are priced too high on their first day, they could fall and create less-than-ideal optics.

Philip Krim, 36, co-founder and CEO of Casper, later told CNBC on Thursday that “valuations are moments in time” and his focus is on the future and growing the company.

Appearing on “Squawk Alley” shortly after the stock opened higher, Krim said: “I feel awesome. It’s been a great day. It’s an awesome milestone for Casper. So I’m pumped.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-06  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, casper, shares, cut, staggering, caspers, apocalypse, million, ipo, offering, squawk, priced, work, price, postwework, cramer, opened, worries, losses


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Siemens reports slight profit fall as climate activists target annual meeting

MUNICH, GERMANY – FEBRUARY 05: Activists protest outside Olympiahalle shortly before the annual general shareholders meeting of German engineering conglomerate Siemens AG on February 5, 2020 in Munich, Germany. The meeting is taking place amidst protests outside. Demonstrators are calling on Siemens to withdraw from its planned participation in the Carmichael coal mine project in Australia. Siemens plans to carve out its gas and power division and merge it with its 59% stake in Siemens Gamesa Re


MUNICH, GERMANY – FEBRUARY 05: Activists protest outside Olympiahalle shortly before the annual general shareholders meeting of German engineering conglomerate Siemens AG on February 5, 2020 in Munich, Germany.
The meeting is taking place amidst protests outside.
Demonstrators are calling on Siemens to withdraw from its planned participation in the Carmichael coal mine project in Australia.
Siemens plans to carve out its gas and power division and merge it with its 59% stake in Siemens Gamesa Re
Siemens reports slight profit fall as climate activists target annual meeting Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, profit, slight, annual, protests, energy, coal, reports, target, german, adani, siemens, climate, project, outside, activists, meeting, munich, fall


Siemens reports slight profit fall as climate activists target annual meeting

MUNICH, GERMANY – FEBRUARY 05: Activists protest outside Olympiahalle shortly before the annual general shareholders meeting of German engineering conglomerate Siemens AG on February 5, 2020 in Munich, Germany. The meeting is taking place amidst protests outside. Demonstrators are calling on Siemens to withdraw from its planned participation in the Carmichael coal mine project in Australia. (Photo by Getty Images) Getty Images

Siemens reported a 3% fall in net profit in its fiscal first quarter, weighed down by weakness in the auto and energy sectors, as it begins a shareholder meeting blighted by protests. Net profit for the period from October to December 2019 came in at 1.09 billion euros ($1.2 billion) with orders at 24.76 billion euros, down 2% from the same period in the previous year. The Munich-based conglomerate confirmed its full-year outlook for “moderate growth in comparable revenue, net of currency translation and portfolio effects.” On a comparable basis excluding currency translation and portfolio effects, orders declined 4% from the previous year and revenue was down 1%, but the order backlog reached a new high of 149 million euros. CEO Joe Kaeser said in the earnings report that the slower first fiscal quarter was expected, with energy weakness reinforcing the company’s priorities. Siemens plans to carve out its gas and power division and merge it with its 59% stake in Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy to create Siemens Energy, which will be listed on the German stock exchange in September as planned. Siemens shares edged 0.2% lower Wednesday morning, while Siemens Gamesa climbed 2.3% and Siemens Health added 1.6%.

Testy shareholder meeting

The German multinational also had its annual shareholder meeting in Munich Wednesday, where it faced protests over Siemens’ association with Australian coal mine operator Adani and its controversial Carmichael project. Earlier this week, 19 health groups advocating climate change action published an open letter to Siemens urging it to end its commercial relationship with Adani, after the company confirmed in January that it would go ahead with its reported $30 million contract to provide signaling technology to the coal mine’s railway. The mine has also faced opposition from Australian indigenous groups after claiming that the project was supported by the indigenous population.

An environmental activist protests with a flame-shaped placard reading “Stop Adani” during a demonstration outside the Olympic hall in Munich, where German engineering giant Siemens holds his annual shareholder’s meeting, on February 5, 2020. Outraged by the group’s sticking to a contract to supply rail equipment to a massive Adani Australian coal mining project, demonstrators were rallying outside the Munich Olympiahalle. (Photo by Christof STACHE / AFP) (Photo by CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP via Getty Images) CHRISTOF STACHE


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, profit, slight, annual, protests, energy, coal, reports, target, german, adani, siemens, climate, project, outside, activists, meeting, munich, fall


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BP shuts down London HQ on CEO’s first day amid climate protests

A BP company logo is displayed on a fuel pump on the forecourt of a gas station operated by BP Plc in London, U.K.BP temporarily shut down its London headquarters on Wednesday after climate activists attempted to block the entrance to the building on Chief Executive Bernard Looney’s first day in office, a spokesman said. More than 100 Greenpeace activists attempted to place 500 solar panels in front of BP’s central London Headquarters in St James’ Square, blocking the building’s entrances with o


A BP company logo is displayed on a fuel pump on the forecourt of a gas station operated by BP Plc in London, U.K.BP temporarily shut down its London headquarters on Wednesday after climate activists attempted to block the entrance to the building on Chief Executive Bernard Looney’s first day in office, a spokesman said.
More than 100 Greenpeace activists attempted to place 500 solar panels in front of BP’s central London Headquarters in St James’ Square, blocking the building’s entrances with o
BP shuts down London HQ on CEO’s first day amid climate protests Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, london, amid, temporarily, station, ukbp, protests, ceos, headquarters, day, shuts, climate, activists, statementin, attempted


BP shuts down London HQ on CEO's first day amid climate protests

A BP company logo is displayed on a fuel pump on the forecourt of a gas station operated by BP Plc in London, U.K.

BP temporarily shut down its London headquarters on Wednesday after climate activists attempted to block the entrance to the building on Chief Executive Bernard Looney’s first day in office, a spokesman said.

More than 100 Greenpeace activists attempted to place 500 solar panels in front of BP’s central London Headquarters in St James’ Square, blocking the building’s entrances with oil barrels, the group said in a statement.

In a statement, BP said Looney shares the “deep concerns” of the climate protesters.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-02-05
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, london, amid, temporarily, station, ukbp, protests, ceos, headquarters, day, shuts, climate, activists, statementin, attempted


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Climate change is threatening sports stadiums and arenas, and teams like the Yankees and Dolphins are battling back

Teams and stadiums across country are dealing with flooding, extreme storms, excessive heat and smoke from wildfires. “The last three years in September, we’ve had climate issues, whether they’re hurricane threats. We had to actually move a game,” said Tom Garfinkel, CEO of the Miami Dolphins football team. It is home to 10 professional sports teams, 26 minor league teams and 60 college sports programs. At Davenport, Iowa’s minor league stadium — Modern Woodmen Park — overflowing rivers last May


Teams and stadiums across country are dealing with flooding, extreme storms, excessive heat and smoke from wildfires.
“The last three years in September, we’ve had climate issues, whether they’re hurricane threats.
We had to actually move a game,” said Tom Garfinkel, CEO of the Miami Dolphins football team.
It is home to 10 professional sports teams, 26 minor league teams and 60 college sports programs.
At Davenport, Iowa’s minor league stadium — Modern Woodmen Park — overflowing rivers last May
Climate change is threatening sports stadiums and arenas, and teams like the Yankees and Dolphins are battling back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: diana olick, in dianaolick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, teams, dolphins, climate, change, threatening, game, football, arenas, stadiums, florida, yankees, league, miami, battling, stadium, weve, 2017


Climate change is threatening sports stadiums and arenas, and teams like the Yankees and Dolphins are battling back

Miami’s Hard Rock Stadium will host about 65,000 fans on Super Bowl Sunday. While the biggest battle in football will last just one evening, the fight that stadium faces from the effects of climate change will go on indefinitely.

It is not alone. Teams and stadiums across country are dealing with flooding, extreme storms, excessive heat and smoke from wildfires.

“The last three years in September, we’ve had climate issues, whether they’re hurricane threats. We had to actually move a game,” said Tom Garfinkel, CEO of the Miami Dolphins football team. “We’ve had lightning strikes that we’ve never had in 30 years here, where we had to delay a game. It was the longest game in the history of the NFL.”

The Dolphins paid $500 million to renovate the open-air stadium, just in time for Hurricane Irma in 2017. Then in 2018, a random rainfall caused the field to flood during a college game at the stadium.

And that’s just one stadium. In Florida, the sports industry contributes $57.4 billion and 580,000 jobs to the state economy annually, according to a 2017 survey by the Florida Sports Foundation. It is home to 10 professional sports teams, 26 minor league teams and 60 college sports programs.

American Airlines Arena, where the Miami Heat basketball franchise plays, sits right on the edge of Miami’s Biscayne Bay.

“The Arena will begin to flood with only two feet of sea level rise. I’m talking 20 years or less,” said Henry Briceno, a professor at Florida International University who studies the impact of climate change on water. He expects a similar fate for the Hard Rock Stadium at a three feet rise, and said he was appalled to hear that a major league soccer expansion team, backed by soccer icon David Beckham, is proposing a new stadium be built near the Miami airport.

“I don’t know if those guys know that they are building in the future Atlantis,” said Briceno.

The risks extend far beyond Florida. In San Diego, the Padres’ Petco Park flooded in 2017, while Western Michigan University’s football stadium was overwhelmed last June, when record rainfall turned it into a massive swimming pool. At Davenport, Iowa’s minor league stadium — Modern Woodmen Park — overflowing rivers last May turned it from a field of dreams into an island.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: diana olick, in dianaolick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, teams, dolphins, climate, change, threatening, game, football, arenas, stadiums, florida, yankees, league, miami, battling, stadium, weve, 2017


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Hundreds of Amazon employees risk firing to protest the company’s climate policies

More than 340 Amazon employees are protesting the company’s external communications policy. The employees signed onto a Medium post published Sunday by advocacy group Amazon Employees for Climate Justice. It includes signatures and quotes from Amazon employees, all of whom are named, across several divisions of the company. The protest was intended to show support for two Amazon employees who the company threatened to terminate for publicly criticizing its climate policies. The day after Bezos’


More than 340 Amazon employees are protesting the company’s external communications policy.
The employees signed onto a Medium post published Sunday by advocacy group Amazon Employees for Climate Justice.
It includes signatures and quotes from Amazon employees, all of whom are named, across several divisions of the company.
The protest was intended to show support for two Amazon employees who the company threatened to terminate for publicly criticizing its climate policies.
The day after Bezos’
Hundreds of Amazon employees risk firing to protest the company’s climate policies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firing, amazons, climate, protest, employees, post, companys, external, issues, hundreds, amazon, company, communications, policies, risk


Hundreds of Amazon employees risk firing to protest the company's climate policies

More than 340 Amazon employees are protesting the company’s external communications policy.

The employees signed onto a Medium post published Sunday by advocacy group Amazon Employees for Climate Justice. It includes signatures and quotes from Amazon employees, all of whom are named, across several divisions of the company.

By participating in the post, the employees are all defying Amazon’s external communications policy, which forbids employees from speaking about the company’s business without approval from management.

“Amazon participates in the global economy, where it has a substantial impact on many issues,” Michael Sokolov, a principal engineer at Amazon, said in the post. “Expecting its employees to maintain silence on these issues, and Amazon’s impact on them, is really a reprehensible overreach, and I am proud to take this opportunity to demonstrate my unwillingness to comply.”

The protest was intended to show support for two Amazon employees who the company threatened to terminate for publicly criticizing its climate policies. Maren Costa, a user experience designer, and Jamie Kowalski, a software development engineer, were warned that doing so was in violation of Amazon’s external communications policy.

Earlier this month, Costa and Emily Cunningham, another user experience designer, appeared in a video from Senator Bernie Sanders, which took a swipe at CEO Jeff Bezos’ climate policies.

Amazon said it encourages employees to engage with teams inside the company on issues like sustainability. Employees can also voice their opinions by submitting questions at Amazon’s all-hands meetings or joining internal interest groups, as well as attending lunches and office hours held by Amazon executives, in which discussions are confidential, the company said.

“While all employees are welcome to engage constructively with any of the many teams inside Amazon that work on sustainability and other topics, we do enforce our external communications policy and will not allow employees to publicly disparage or misrepresent the company or the hard work of their colleagues who are developing solutions to these hard problems,” Amazon spokesperson Jaci Anderson told CNBC in a statement.

Anderson added that “of course” Amazon is passionate about the issue of climate change.

Scott Ogle, a queue management analyst at Amazon, wrote in the post that the company’s “role in the climate crisis is staggering and alarming.” Ogle added that Amazon’s public stance on the climate “does not add up” with its cloud-computing division, Amazon Web Services (AWS), working with the oil and gas industries.

The employees aren’t just protesting Amazon’s stance on climate issues. Software development engineer Max Eliaser said Amazon should shut down Ring, the smart doorbell company it acquired in February of 2018. Ring has faced pushback over the past year for its partnerships with law enforcement agencies and privacy concerns. Earlier this month, Ring acknowledged it fired four employees for abusing their access to customers’ video feeds.

“The deployment of connected home security cameras that allow footage to be queried centrally are simply not compatible with a free society,” Eliaser said in the post. “The privacy issues are not fixable with regulation and there is no balance that can be struck. Ring should be shut down immediately and not brought back.”

Employees also called out AWS doing business with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which has been routinely criticized for mistreatment of asylum seekers and refugees. Others criticized the “brutal labor conditions” in Amazon’s warehouses. It’s an issue that has been highlighted repeatedly, including in a recent Reveal investigation, which found that serious injuries are much higher at Amazon facilities compared to national averages.

Amazon employees have increasingly pressured the company to address its environmental impact. At Amazon’s annual shareholders meeting in May, thousands of employees submitted a proposal asking CEO Jeff Bezos to develop a comprehensive climate change plan and reduce its carbon footprint, though it was ultimately rejected. The proposal was based on an employee letter published in April that accused Amazon of donating to climate-delaying legislators and urged the company to transition away from fossil fuels.

The employee group said in a release that Amazon’s response to their demands has been “mixed.” In September, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced that Amazon aims to rely on renewable energy entirely by 2030 and have net zero carbon emissions by 2040. The plans were largely viewed as a response to employees’ demands.

The day after Bezos’ announcement, more than 1,000 employees walked out as part of the Global Climate Strike and to protest Amazon’s climate policies.

The employee group claims Amazon changed its external communications policy when it learned employees were planning to stage the walkout. However, Anderson, the Amazon spokesperson, previously told CNBC the company’s policy isn’t new and that it was revised to make it easier for employees to submit requests to speak publicly.

Amazon isn’t the only tech giant to face employee unrest. Google has seen internal tensions grow over the past several years, as employees have protested issues like the company’s government partnerships and its handling of sexual misconduct, among other things.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-27  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, firing, amazons, climate, protest, employees, post, companys, external, issues, hundreds, amazon, company, communications, policies, risk


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