Trump tours devastation wrought by ‘monster’ California wildfire

At least 71 people died across Northern California, and authorities are trying to locate more than 1,000 people, though not all are believed missing. Wearing a camouflage “USA” hat, Trump gazed solemnly at the devastation in Paradise. Trump long has struggled to convey empathy to victims of national disasters and tragedies. Nature and humans share blame for the wildfires, but fire scientists are divided as to whether forest management played a major role. Jerry Brown and Gov-elect Gavin Newsom,


At least 71 people died across Northern California, and authorities are trying to locate more than 1,000 people, though not all are believed missing. Wearing a camouflage “USA” hat, Trump gazed solemnly at the devastation in Paradise. Trump long has struggled to convey empathy to victims of national disasters and tragedies. Nature and humans share blame for the wildfires, but fire scientists are divided as to whether forest management played a major role. Jerry Brown and Gov-elect Gavin Newsom,
Trump tours devastation wrought by ‘monster’ California wildfire Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-17  Authors: eric thayer, reuters leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrought, california, president, management, long, fires, climate, devastation, really, think, monster, forest, tours, trump, wildfire


Trump tours devastation wrought by 'monster' California wildfire

The president has long voiced skepticism about man’s impact on the climate and has been reluctant to assign blame to a warming earth for the increase in the frequency and intensity of natural disasters.

At least 71 people died across Northern California, and authorities are trying to locate more than 1,000 people, though not all are believed missing. More than 5,500 fire personnel were battling the blaze that covered 228 square miles (590 square kilometers) and was about 50 percent contained, officials said.

For Trump, it was a day to comfort a state grieving from twin tragedies, wildfires in both Northern and Southern California as well as a mass shooting at a popular college bar north of Los Angeles.

Wearing a camouflage “USA” hat, Trump gazed solemnly at the devastation in Paradise.

Several burned-out buses and cars were nearby. Trees were burned, their branches bare and twisted. Homes were totally gone; some foundations remained, as did a chimney and, in front of one house, a Mickey Mouse lawn ornament. The fire was reported to have moved through the area at 80 mph.

“It’s going to work out well, but right now we want to take of the people that are so badly hurt,” Trump said visiting what remained of the Skyway Villa Mobile Home and RV Park. He noted “there are areas you can’t even get to them yet” and the sheer number of people unaccounted for.

“I think people have to see this really to understand it,” Trump said.

The president later toured an operation centers, met with response commanders and praised the work of firefighters, law enforcement and representatives of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

“We’ve never seen anything like this in California,” he said. “It’s total devastation.”

Trump took a helicopter tour en route to Chico before he toured Paradise. A full cover of haze and the smell of smoke greeted the president upon his arrival at Beale Air Force Base near Sacramento.

“They’re out there fighting and they’re fighting like hell,” Trump said of the first responders.

He pledged that Washington would do its part by coming to the Golden State’s aid and urged the House’s Republican leader, Rep. Kevin McCarthy of California, a Trump ally and frequent White House visitor, to “come to the office” to help secure the needed funding.

Trump, who left Washington early Saturday and didn’t expect to return to the White House until well past midnight, planned to travel several hundred miles south to visit with victims of a recent country music bar shooting. A gunman killed a dozen people at the Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks on Nov. 7 before committing suicide.

Trump long has struggled to convey empathy to victims of national disasters and tragedies. His first reaction to the fires came in a tweet last week that drew criticism as unnecessarily critical and tone-deaf given the devastation: “There is no reason for these massive, deadly and costly forest fires in California except that forest management is so poor. Billions of dollars are given each year, with so many lives lost, all because of gross mismanagement of the forests.”

Nature and humans share blame for the wildfires, but fire scientists are divided as to whether forest management played a major role. Nature provides the dangerous winds that have whipped the fires, the state has been in a drought and human-caused climate change over the long haul is killing and drying the shrubs and trees that provide the fuel.

He stuck to that theme in his remarks just before departing on Saturday when he outlined what he planned to discuss with Gov. Jerry Brown and Gov-elect Gavin Newsom, both Democrats: “We will be talking about forest management. … The one thing is that everybody now knows that this is what we have to be doing and there’s no question about it. It should have been done many years ago, but I think everybody’s on the right side.”

Trump, who has long feuded with the political leaders of heavily Democratic California over issues such as immigration and voting, also has threatened to withhold federal payments to the state. After being criticized for his response, Trump has shifted gears, expressing words of encouragement to first responders and those of sympathy for hit victims.

But when he was asked by Fox News in an interview set to air Sunday whether climate change played a role in the number of serious fires, he said “maybe it contributes a little bit. The big problem we have is management.”

Brown and Newsom welcomed the president’s visit, with the governor suggesting they set aside political differences since it “now is a time to pull together for the people of California.”

Brown, a fierce advocate of addressing climate change, did not respond to Trump’s statement that he has not changed his mind on the matter but pointed to several causes and they need to deal with them.

“If you really look at the facts, from a really open point of view, there are a lot of elements to be considered,” Brown said after Trump spoke. “The president came, he saw and I’m looking forward over the next months and beyond to really understand this threat of fire, the whole matter of drought and all the rest of it. It’s not one thing, it’s a lot of things and I think that if we just open our minds and look at things we’ll get more stuff done.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-17  Authors: eric thayer, reuters leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrought, california, president, management, long, fires, climate, devastation, really, think, monster, forest, tours, trump, wildfire


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Amazon’s HQ2 in Queens will be ‘square in the danger zone for frequent flooding’

It gets warmer, it means the air can hold more moisture and we get bigger downpours,” said Strauss of Climate Central. From 2005 to 2014, Queens saw an additional 31 days of coastal flooding due to climate change, researchers say. Long Island City is already becoming a hot spot for New York City, and Amazon will speed that change exponentially. New York City is also running out of large spaces for developments like this one, which likely played into the choice. Like other waterfront buildings, t


It gets warmer, it means the air can hold more moisture and we get bigger downpours,” said Strauss of Climate Central. From 2005 to 2014, Queens saw an additional 31 days of coastal flooding due to climate change, researchers say. Long Island City is already becoming a hot spot for New York City, and Amazon will speed that change exponentially. New York City is also running out of large spaces for developments like this one, which likely played into the choice. Like other waterfront buildings, t
Amazon’s HQ2 in Queens will be ‘square in the danger zone for frequent flooding’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: diana olick, eduardo munoz, yana paskova, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, frequent, amazons, plans, continue, danger, york, city, expect, square, queens, zone, climate, strauss, likely, flooding, hq2, headquarters


Amazon's HQ2 in Queens will be 'square in the danger zone for frequent flooding'

“And the truth is, heavy rain has already increased by 50 percent in the Northeast. So we can expect that trend to continue. It gets warmer, it means the air can hold more moisture and we get bigger downpours,” said Strauss of Climate Central.

From 2005 to 2014, Queens saw an additional 31 days of coastal flooding due to climate change, researchers say. If Queens experienced a 6-foot flood, which scientists expect by the end of this century, that would put $13 billion worth of property at risk of damage, including about 34,000 homes, according to Climate Central and Zillow.

Companies and residential developers continue to build on the water because that is simply where people want to live and work. Long Island City is already becoming a hot spot for New York City, and Amazon will speed that change exponentially. New York City is also running out of large spaces for developments like this one, which likely played into the choice.

Amazon is more than likely considering all these risks as it plans its new headquarters, although a spokesman for the company said they could not comment on any plans. Like other waterfront buildings, the new headquarters will have to be built as a stronghold — resilient against weather and water.

“But then you have to ask how easy will it be to get to and from their headquarters, what’s happening to the surrounding neighborhood? And they’re going to need the city’s help to fortify the whole area,” Strauss said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: diana olick, eduardo munoz, yana paskova, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, frequent, amazons, plans, continue, danger, york, city, expect, square, queens, zone, climate, strauss, likely, flooding, hq2, headquarters


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

At UN climate talks, Trump team plans sideshow on coal

The Trump administration plans to set up a side-event promoting fossil fuels at the annual U.N. climate talks next month, repeating a strategy that infuriated global-warming activists during last year’s talks, according to three people with knowledge of the matter. The White House and the State Department did not respond to requests for comment. The administration’s resistance has come against a backdrop of increasingly urgent warnings from scientists about the threats posed by greenhouse gas em


The Trump administration plans to set up a side-event promoting fossil fuels at the annual U.N. climate talks next month, repeating a strategy that infuriated global-warming activists during last year’s talks, according to three people with knowledge of the matter. The White House and the State Department did not respond to requests for comment. The administration’s resistance has come against a backdrop of increasingly urgent warnings from scientists about the threats posed by greenhouse gas em
At UN climate talks, Trump team plans sideshow on coal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: dominick reuter, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, trump, climate, fossil, energy, talks, plans, coal, department, sources, state, fuels, sideshow, administration, paris


At UN climate talks, Trump team plans sideshow on coal

The Trump administration plans to set up a side-event promoting fossil fuels at the annual U.N. climate talks next month, repeating a strategy that infuriated global-warming activists during last year’s talks, according to three people with knowledge of the matter.

As with the 2017 gathering in Bonn, Germany, the administration plans to highlight the benefits of technologies that more efficiently burn fuels including coal, the sources said.

This year’s talks in Katowice, Poland – located in a mining region that is among the most polluted in Europe – are intended to hammer out a rule book to the 2015 Paris agreement on climate change, which set a sweeping goal of ending the fossil-fuel era this century by spurring a trillion-dollar transition to cleaner energy sources such as solar and wind power.

Even as the Trump administration aims to promote energy strategies that could detract from those international goals, it also plans to let State Department officials continue negotiating the climate accord – a recognition that the next U.S. president may drop the nation’s opposition to the pact.

“The White House seems to have taken the view that it’s important to let technocrats complete the work of the rule book. It’s in the U.S. national interest to be at the table and see an outcome that emphasizes transparency, holds countries accountable,” said one of the sources, who is familiar with State Department plans.

The White House and the State Department did not respond to requests for comment.

The United States, the world’s top oil and gas producer, is the only country to have announced its intention to formally withdraw from the Paris accord.

The administration’s resistance has come against a backdrop of increasingly urgent warnings from scientists about the threats posed by greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels. The panel will come less than two months after the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned in a report that the world’s use of coal for generating power will need to be nearly eliminated by mid-century – to between 1 and 7 percent of the global mix, from around 40 percent now – to help prevent deadly droughts, storms and floods brought on by climate change.

“Quite frankly, the U.S. is the only party to the convention that appears to be willing to push a rational discussion on the role of cleaner, more efficient fossil (fuels) and the role of civilian nuclear energy,” said one of the sources, who is involved in the planning of the event for Katowice, likely to be held on Dec. 10.

The source, who did not want to be named due to the sensitive nature of the issue, said the event will be dominated by proponents of coal and natural gas and likely advanced nuclear power, too. The panel will also likely feature a U.S. Energy Department representative. At this point plans do not include a renewable power industry representative, the source said.

The event is expected to be led by Wells Griffith, Trump’s international energy and climate adviser, the sources added. Griffith’s main energy policy experience involves a year at a political job at the Department of Energy and helping to set up a deal last year to supply Ukraine with U.S. coal after the country lost control of mines to Russian-backed separatists.

Two-tiered approach

Trump last year announced his intent to leave the Paris agreement, calling it harmful to the U.S. economy and casting doubt on the climate science underpinning the accord.

As per U.N. rules, Trump’s administration will not be able to leave the pact until a day after the 2020 presidential election, and U.S. officials recognize that finishing the rule book and making sure developing countries such as China are held to verifiable emissions cuts are in the national interest.

Last year, the fossil fuels event set up by the White House drew widespread protest and condemnation from climate activists. Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg wrote on Twitter that “Promoting coal at a climate summit is like promoting tobacco at a cancer summit.”

At the same time, 40 career officials from the State Department and other agencies continued their work on the Paris pact’s rule book. U.S. envoys to the Bonn talks were viewed by their counterparts as constructive and helpful, feeding hopes that the United States could eventually be drawn back into the accord, a possibility that Trump has held open.

But much has changed since last year.

Several Trump administration officials who supported keeping the United States in the Paris pact, although under different terms, have left the administration. They include top economic adviser Gary Cohn, national security adviser H.R. McMaster, and climate and energy adviser George David Banks. Now, economic adviser Larry Kudlow and national security adviser John Bolton are opponents of the Paris agreement, and Banks has been replaced by Griffith.

Ex-CIA director Mike Pompeo, a vocal critic of efforts to combat global warming by past U.S. administrations, has become Secretary of State, replacing former Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson, who supported U.S. participation in the Paris agreement.

That places Trump’s team more squarely behind his “energy dominance” agenda of boosting U.S. fossil fuel output and exports, in part by promoting low-emission technology for fossil fuels to other nations.

The Energy Department has touted technologies including small scale “modular” coal plants that could burn the fuel more efficiently and step in when clouds and calm weather limit solar and wind power.

Environmentalists should not get excited that any State Department cooperation in Poland signals the Trump administration is eyeing a return to the Paris agreement, one of the sources said.

“It’s making sure U.S. interests are paramount, nothing more, nothing less.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: dominick reuter, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, trump, climate, fossil, energy, talks, plans, coal, department, sources, state, fuels, sideshow, administration, paris


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Elon Musk: Tesla’s work ‘supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion’

It’s “very important for the future of the world,” Musk told Recode’s Kara Swisher in an interview Wednesday at Tesla’s Palo Alto, California headquarters. “This supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion, it doesn’t matter. “The other option would have been, Tesla dies,” Musk told Swisher. According to Musk, without Tesla there would still be a transition to sustainable energy, but it would take much longer. (“I did my absolute best,” Musk told Swisher of the councils.)


It’s “very important for the future of the world,” Musk told Recode’s Kara Swisher in an interview Wednesday at Tesla’s Palo Alto, California headquarters. “This supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion, it doesn’t matter. “The other option would have been, Tesla dies,” Musk told Swisher. According to Musk, without Tesla there would still be a transition to sustainable energy, but it would take much longer. (“I did my absolute best,” Musk told Swisher of the councils.)
Elon Musk: Tesla’s work ‘supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-05  Authors: catherine clifford, david mcnew, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, elon, supersedes, teslas, world, work, religion, political, energy, musk, important, sustainable, tesla, creed, told, race, change, parties


Elon Musk: Tesla's work 'supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion'

The political divide between Democrats and Republicans in the United States has become particularly divisive ahead of the midterm elections Tuesday.

However, according to Elon Musk, the CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, the work he is doing with Tesla and its role in advancing sustainable transportation is more important than politics — or just about anything else.

It’s “very important for the future of the world,” Musk told Recode’s Kara Swisher in an interview Wednesday at Tesla’s Palo Alto, California headquarters. “It’s very important for all life on Earth.

“This supersedes political parties, race, creed, religion, it doesn’t matter. If we do not solve the environment, we’re all damned,” Musk said.

It is for that reason that Musk and his team have put forth an “excruciating effort,” he said, often working over a hundred hours a week in order to ramp up production of Tesla’s Model 3 vehicle, which had fallen behind.

“The other option would have been, Tesla dies,” Musk told Swisher.

“Tesla cannot die. Tesla is incredibly important for the future of sustainable transport and energy generation. The fundamental purpose, the fundamental good that Tesla provides, is accelerating the advent of sustainable transport and energy production.”

Electric vehicles reduce the emissions that contribute to climate change. In October, the United Nation’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report saying that limiting global warming “would require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society.”

According to Musk, without Tesla there would still be a transition to sustainable energy, but it would take much longer. “History will judge this, obviously, but I would say on the order of 10 years, maybe 20 years,” he said. “This could be all the difference in the world.”

Now, Tesla is “doing pretty well,” said Musk, despite its Model 3 production issues.

“Tesla’s not staring death in the face. We’re in, I think, a pretty good position,” Musk said. “Up until around September, we were really faced with … ‘We’re gonna die,’ constantly. I feel like we’re no longer in the staring-death-in-the-face situation.”

Musk himself previously stepped into the political arena when he joined three advisory councils on business, manufacturing jobs and infrastructure for President Donald Trump in December 2016. Musk withdrew from the councils in June 2017, however, when Trump backed out of the Paris climate accord, a 2015 agree among various world leaders to fight climate change. (“I did my absolute best,” Musk told Swisher of the councils.)

See also:

Elon Musk: ‘You’re gonna go a little bonkers if you work 120 hours a week’

Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic set to fly a 747 jet with fuel made from factory pollution

This 23-year-old founded a company with self-driving car tech that’s giving Tesla some competition


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-05  Authors: catherine clifford, david mcnew, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, elon, supersedes, teslas, world, work, religion, political, energy, musk, important, sustainable, tesla, creed, told, race, change, parties


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

EU teams up with Bill Gates to launch $115.2 million clean energy investment fund

The European Commission has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Bill Gates-led Breakthrough Energy to set up a joint investment fund called Breakthrough Energy Europe (BEE). In a statement Wednesday, the Commission said the 100 million-euro ($115.2 million) fund would be used to help “innovative European companies develop and bring radically new clean energy technologies to the market.” Breakthrough Energy Ventures is an investor-led fund with over $1 billion in committed capital to bu


The European Commission has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Bill Gates-led Breakthrough Energy to set up a joint investment fund called Breakthrough Energy Europe (BEE). In a statement Wednesday, the Commission said the 100 million-euro ($115.2 million) fund would be used to help “innovative European companies develop and bring radically new clean energy technologies to the market.” Breakthrough Energy Ventures is an investor-led fund with over $1 billion in committed capital to bu
EU teams up with Bill Gates to launch $115.2 million clean energy investment fund Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: anmar frangoul, charly triballeau, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fund, statement, teams, eu, bill, companies, breakthrough, launch, climate, gates, change, energy, investment, europe, technologies, million, commission, clean


EU teams up with Bill Gates to launch $115.2 million clean energy investment fund

The European Commission has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Bill Gates-led Breakthrough Energy to set up a joint investment fund called Breakthrough Energy Europe (BEE).

In a statement Wednesday, the Commission said the 100 million-euro ($115.2 million) fund would be used to help “innovative European companies develop and bring radically new clean energy technologies to the market.”

Breakthrough Energy Ventures is an investor-led fund with over $1 billion in committed capital to build “cutting edge companies” to help stop climate change. Its chairman is Bill Gates.

In a statement Wednesday, Gates said that new technologies were needed to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. Europe, Gates added, had demonstrated valuable leadership by making “impressive” investments in research and development.

“The scientists and entrepreneurs who are developing innovations to address climate change need capital to build companies that can deliver those innovations to the global market,” he said. “Breakthrough Energy Europe is designed to provide that capital.”

The Commission said the new fund would focus on cutting greenhouse gas emissions and the promotion of energy efficiency in “the areas of electricity, transport, agriculture, manufacturing, and buildings.” It described BEE as a pilot project that could act as a model for similar initiatives in other thematic areas.

The Commission’s president, Jean-Claude Juncker, said that pooling public and private investment in new and innovative clean energy technology was “key to enabling long-term solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. If Europe is to have a future that can guarantee the well-being of all its citizens, it will need to be climate-friendly and sustainable.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-18  Authors: anmar frangoul, charly triballeau, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fund, statement, teams, eu, bill, companies, breakthrough, launch, climate, gates, change, energy, investment, europe, technologies, million, commission, clean


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

By 2050, many ‘fundamental assumptions’ about the business world will change: UN program head

In addition, “inequality as we are observing right now across the world is becoming a major destabilizer,” he added. “In the world of business you often have to rely on ‘givens’. You can virtually throw away every scenario about your business and your future markets, your supply chains out of the window. Because by 2050, we will have a world in which many of the fundamental assumptions” may not hold, Steiner warned. Sustainable Development Goals can provide a framework for businesses to better h


In addition, “inequality as we are observing right now across the world is becoming a major destabilizer,” he added. “In the world of business you often have to rely on ‘givens’. You can virtually throw away every scenario about your business and your future markets, your supply chains out of the window. Because by 2050, we will have a world in which many of the fundamental assumptions” may not hold, Steiner warned. Sustainable Development Goals can provide a framework for businesses to better h
By 2050, many ‘fundamental assumptions’ about the business world will change: UN program head Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: harini v, sefa karacan, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goals, assumptions, business, future, climate, market, 2050, head, world, markets, steiner, framework, change, development, fundamental, program


By 2050, many 'fundamental assumptions' about the business world will change: UN program head

Companies have “a very clear vested interest” to embrace sustainable development as a functioning economy and stable political system are important for the businesses, Steiner said.

In addition, “inequality as we are observing right now across the world is becoming a major destabilizer,” he added.

Rapid climate changes could also disrupt existing market conditions often taken for granted by corporate leaders, he said.

A recent UN climate change report predicted that world temperatures are on track to rise by around 3 degrees Celsius — a number that is substantially above the target to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

“In the world of business you often have to rely on ‘givens’. You can virtually throw away every scenario about your business and your future markets, your supply chains out of the window. Because by 2050, we will have a world in which many of the fundamental assumptions” may not hold, Steiner warned.

Sustainable Development Goals can provide a framework for businesses to better handle unpredictable market changes in the future, he said. SDGs refer to targets set by the UN to address global challenges such as climate change, poverty and environmental degradation by 2030.

By addressing some of the 17 goals, firms will have a framework to better understand the different business environments and markets they would have to adjust to in the future, Steiner said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: harini v, sefa karacan, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, goals, assumptions, business, future, climate, market, 2050, head, world, markets, steiner, framework, change, development, fundamental, program


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Beer lovers face price spikes, shortages as climate changes: study

Less barley will mean beer shortages and price spikes. Under the hottest scenario, China will suffer the most shortages this century, followed by the United States, Germany, and Russia, it said. “Climate change will affect all of us, not only people who are in India or African countries,” Guan said. The study did not consider climate change’s affects on other staple ingredients of beer such as hops. Many companies realize the risks of climate on barley, 17 percent of which is used to make beer.


Less barley will mean beer shortages and price spikes. Under the hottest scenario, China will suffer the most shortages this century, followed by the United States, Germany, and Russia, it said. “Climate change will affect all of us, not only people who are in India or African countries,” Guan said. The study did not consider climate change’s affects on other staple ingredients of beer such as hops. Many companies realize the risks of climate on barley, 17 percent of which is used to make beer.
Beer lovers face price spikes, shortages as climate changes: study Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: daniel maurer, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, beer, states, countries, guan, barley, united, changes, price, lovers, study, face, spikes, used, shortages, climate


Beer lovers face price spikes, shortages as climate changes: study

Climate change will brew trouble for beer lovers in coming decades as it shrinks yields of barley, the top grain used to make the world’s most popular alcoholic drink, a study published on Monday said.

Extreme weather events featuring both heat waves and droughts will occur as often as every two or three years in the second half of the century if temperatures rise at current rates, the study said.

Average global barley yields during extreme events are expected to drop between 3 and 17 percent, depending on the conditions, said the study, published in the journal Nature Plants.

Less barley will mean beer shortages and price spikes. Under the hottest scenario, China will suffer the most shortages this century, followed by the United States, Germany, and Russia, it said.

Prices will spike the most in Ireland, Italy, Canada and Poland. During the extreme climate events, prices for a 500 milliliter bottle, slightly more than a pint, in Ireland will rise from about $2.50 to $5.00.

Dabo Guan, a professor of climate change economics at the University of East Anglia and the study’s lead author, said beer issues pale in comparison to other climate induced problems, including food security, storm damage and fresh water scarcity. But the threats to a beverage people have enjoyed for thousands of years is an indicator that even consumers in developed countries cannot escape the effects of a changing planet.

“Climate change will affect all of us, not only people who are in India or African countries,” Guan said.

The study did not consider climate change’s affects on other staple ingredients of beer such as hops.

Consumers in developed countries who want to avoid shortages would be wise to support policies reducing emissions of gases scientists blame for warming the planet, Guan said.

Last year U.S. President Donald Trump announced his intention to pull the United States out of the 2015 Paris pact on climate, doubting the extent to which human activity is warming the planet.

Many companies realize the risks of climate on barley, 17 percent of which is used to make beer. Many countries keep emergency reserves of staple crops such as corn, rice and wheat to stave off price spikes and shortages. But most do not do so for barley, making it vulnerable to climate.

Anheuser-Busch, the worlds biggest brewer, said this year it would cut its greenhouse gas emissions by a quarter by 2025.

Jess Newman, the head of U.S. agronomy for Anheuser-Busch, said the company was experimenting with developing drought-resistant barley and working with farmers to reduce their need for water by, for example, encouraging them to place irrigation sprinklers closer to the ground.

“It’s definitely an incremental process but we have many varieties in the pipeline,” Newman said when asked how close the company was to breeding a drought-resistant barley in the United States. For several years, Anheuser-Busch has used a winter barley in Idaho that gets moisture from melting snow, cutting the need for irrigation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-15  Authors: daniel maurer, picture alliance, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, beer, states, countries, guan, barley, united, changes, price, lovers, study, face, spikes, used, shortages, climate


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Renewable energy needs to speed up to meet climate goals, IEA warns

The world needs to ramp up adoption of renewable energy, especially beyond the electric power sector — or else it will fall behind in the battle against climate change, the International Energy Agency said on Sunday. In a new report, the Paris-based policy adviser forecasts that renewable energy sources will provide 30 percent of the world’s total electric power generation by 2023. But electricity is just one piece of the pie: Five years from now, renewables will only account for 12.4 percent of


The world needs to ramp up adoption of renewable energy, especially beyond the electric power sector — or else it will fall behind in the battle against climate change, the International Energy Agency said on Sunday. In a new report, the Paris-based policy adviser forecasts that renewable energy sources will provide 30 percent of the world’s total electric power generation by 2023. But electricity is just one piece of the pie: Five years from now, renewables will only account for 12.4 percent of
Renewable energy needs to speed up to meet climate goals, IEA warns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-07  Authors: tom dichristopher, connie j spinardi, getty images, eyematrix
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, power, total, climate, electric, heat, energy, worlds, report, renewables, needs, speed, goals, meet, warns, renewable, iea


Renewable energy needs to speed up to meet climate goals, IEA warns

The world needs to ramp up adoption of renewable energy, especially beyond the electric power sector — or else it will fall behind in the battle against climate change, the International Energy Agency said on Sunday.

In a new report, the Paris-based policy adviser forecasts that renewable energy sources will provide 30 percent of the world’s total electric power generation by 2023. But electricity is just one piece of the pie: Five years from now, renewables will only account for 12.4 percent of the world’s total energy demand, the IEA said.

IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol said the low penetration of renewables for transportation and heat in homes and industry — where most of the world’s energy is consumed — is a major “blind spot” that needs to be addressed.

“Indeed, their role in heat and transport is often overlooked even though decarbonising these sectors is a key priority to achieve our long-term climate and sustainability goals,” Birol wrote in the IEA’s 2018 report on renewable energy.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-07  Authors: tom dichristopher, connie j spinardi, getty images, eyematrix
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, power, total, climate, electric, heat, energy, worlds, report, renewables, needs, speed, goals, meet, warns, renewable, iea


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

‘Irresponsible fiscal policy’ is a major concern in the current political climate, says CIO

“Irresponsible fiscal policy” is on the rise as governments increasingly try to appeal to angry voters, according to a chief investment officer overseeing international macroeconomic trends. “One of the main factors that we look at throughout emerging markets and the developed markets, take Italy for example, is the rise of populism leading to irresponsible fiscal policy. Probably one of the most important political variables we have to look at,” Hasenstab told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” It pledged to


“Irresponsible fiscal policy” is on the rise as governments increasingly try to appeal to angry voters, according to a chief investment officer overseeing international macroeconomic trends. “One of the main factors that we look at throughout emerging markets and the developed markets, take Italy for example, is the rise of populism leading to irresponsible fiscal policy. Probably one of the most important political variables we have to look at,” Hasenstab told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” It pledged to
‘Irresponsible fiscal policy’ is a major concern in the current political climate, says CIO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, major, climate, look, current, rise, concern, cio, populism, markets, policy, italy, political, templeton, fiscal, irresponsible, officer


'Irresponsible fiscal policy' is a major concern in the current political climate, says CIO

“Irresponsible fiscal policy” is on the rise as governments increasingly try to appeal to angry voters, according to a chief investment officer overseeing international macroeconomic trends.

Speaking with CNBC on Tuesday, Michael Hasenstab, chief investment officer at Templeton Global Macro, a unit under Franklin Templeton Investments, called the trend a response to populism — a term with varied definitions — and emphasized that political risk had become a pressing investment consideration.

“One of the main factors that we look at throughout emerging markets and the developed markets, take Italy for example, is the rise of populism leading to irresponsible fiscal policy. Probably one of the most important political variables we have to look at,” Hasenstab told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

He added, though, that such trends are not present everywhere, and “that creates an opportunity to look at the politics, and identify those countries that are not on that deteriorating path.”

A new government took power in Italy this year led by a coalition formed by the anti-establishment Five Star Movement and the right-wing League party. It pledged to embark on tax cuts, guaranteed basic monthly wages for the poor, and committed to other spending in the already-debt-ridden country.

Germany’s mainstream political parties, for their part, have been under pressure from a rising challenge from the far-right. The country’s government recently set out measures to tackle a drastic shortage of affordable housing, a problem that detractors have argued was caused by an influx of migrants.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-04  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investment, major, climate, look, current, rise, concern, cio, populism, markets, policy, italy, political, templeton, fiscal, irresponsible, officer


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post