US companies are canceling investment into China at a faster clip, survey shows

However, survey respondents did note an overall improvement in nearly all issues of concern — including intellectual property protection and forced technology transfer. The proportion of businesses that said the Chinese government treats foreign and local companies equally also rose from 34% to 40% in the latest survey. But retaliatory tariffs from both sides are hitting revenues and causing some American firms to change their China strategy, the AmCham survey showed. Just over half of the surve


However, survey respondents did note an overall improvement in nearly all issues of concern — including intellectual property protection and forced technology transfer. The proportion of businesses that said the Chinese government treats foreign and local companies equally also rose from 34% to 40% in the latest survey. But retaliatory tariffs from both sides are hitting revenues and causing some American firms to change their China strategy, the AmCham survey showed. Just over half of the surve
US companies are canceling investment into China at a faster clip, survey shows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-11  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, canceling, tariffs, clip, shows, companies, investment, trade, china, respondents, report, faster, american, local, foreign, survey


US companies are canceling investment into China at a faster clip, survey shows

Chinese shipping containers are stored beside a US flag after they were unloaded at the Port of Los Angeles in Long Beach, California on May 14, 2019. – Global markets remain on red alert over a trade war between the two superpowers China and the US, that most observers warn could shatter global economic growth, and hurt demand for commodities like oil. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images) MARK RALSTON | AFP | Getty Images

Some American companies in China are speeding up their move away from the mainland as increasing tariffs continue to hurt their businesses. That’s according to a survey released by the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai on Wednesday. More than a quarter of the respondents – or 26.5% – said that in the past year, they have redirected investments originally planned for China to other regions. That’s an increase of 6.9 percentage points from last year, the AmCham report said, noting that technology, hardware, software and services industries had the highest level of changes in investment destination. The research, conducted in partnership with PwC, surveyed 333 members of the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai. It was conducted from June 27 to July 25 — during the period when U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping agreed to resume trade talks, and before the latest escalation in retaliatory tariffs. U.S. firms in the mainland also said restrictions to accessing the local market have made it difficult for them to carry out their business, the report said. Asked about the best possible scenarios in ongoing trade negotiations, more than 40% of respondents said greater access to the domestic market would be the most important outcome to help their businesses succeed. That was followed by more than 28% that ranked improved intellectual property protection as key. The third most hoped-for outcome of the trade talks was “increased purchases of U.S. goods,” at 14.3%, the survey showed. That’s in contrast to the Trump administration’s latest efforts to pressure China into buying more American products, especially in agriculture.

Barred from market access

One of the longstanding complaints U.S. companies have about operating in China is that many industries are closed to foreign businesses. In the sectors that are open, it is difficult to compete with state-owned enterprises or privately owned companies that may benefit from local connections or policies, they say. Allegations of forced transfer of critical technology to Chinese partners and lack of intellectual property protection are just some of the challenges U.S. businesses cite for operating in China. The latest AmCham survey found accessing the local market remained one of the key problems companies faced, with more than half the respondents — or 56.4% — saying that obtaining licenses was not easy.

Still, with no sign of a trade agreement, 2019 will be a difficult year; without a trade deal, 2020 may be worse. AmCham Shanghai and PwC survey

By industry, the one that most sought improved market access was the banking, finance and insurance sector. The high 81% of respondents in that sector seeking a better business environment contrasts with Beijing’s announcements in the last 18 months that it will be relaxing foreign ownership rules in the financial sector. Some measures include allowing majority foreign ownership of a local securities venture and increased foreign ownership of local stocks. However, survey respondents did note an overall improvement in nearly all issues of concern — including intellectual property protection and forced technology transfer. The proportion of businesses that said the Chinese government treats foreign and local companies equally also rose from 34% to 40% in the latest survey.

Tariffs hurting US firms

The U.S. business presence in China remains strong, with American companies and their affiliates raking in more than $450 billion in sales in the Asian country, according to an August report from research firm Gavekal Dragonomics. The analysis also pointed out that sales figure is more than twice the value of U.S. exports of goods and services to China. But retaliatory tariffs from both sides are hitting revenues and causing some American firms to change their China strategy, the AmCham survey showed. If Washington were to impose all the duties as threatened, essentially all Chinese goods exported to the U.S. will be subject to tariffs by the end of the year. In response to the increasing American duties, Beijing has countered with tariffs of its own on U.S. exports to China.

Just over half of the survey respondents said revenue has decreased as a result of the increased tariffs. One third of them attributed a drop of between 1% and 10% of revenue to the higher duties. Overall profitability did not decline in 2018, the report said. But more respondents said revenue and margins declined last year, especially compared with operations in other countries. Pessimism levels shot up by 14 percentage points to about 21% — respondents felt less optimistic about the outlook for 2019 due in part to a slowing domestic economy.

Bright spots remain in China

The survey, however, did find some areas of optimism among respondents in China. The pharmaceuticals, medical devices and life sciences category ranked among the industries with the most respondents reporting revenue growth last year. That sector also came in second among those most optimistic about 2019. The AmCham report said the positive outlook was “likely due to government policy changes, including accelerated approvals of foreign drugs.” More than two-thirds of companies in food and agriculture planned to increase investment in 2019, the most of any industry, the report said. Retail and consumer companies also intended to invest more in China, especially in smaller cities where many analysts still see a major growth opportunity. However, businesses are getting ready for a drawn out trade war between the two economic giants. Of those surveyed, 35% expect trade tensions to continue for another 1 to 3 years, while nearly 13% say it will go on for 3 to 6 years. About 17%, however, were even more pessimistic, and predict that the trade conflict will drag on indefinitely. The report added: “Still, with no sign of a trade agreement, 2019 will be a difficult year; without a trade deal, 2020 may be worse.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-11  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, canceling, tariffs, clip, shows, companies, investment, trade, china, respondents, report, faster, american, local, foreign, survey


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Roger Stone and the DOJ are fighting in court over a clip from ‘The Godfather Part II’

Longtime Republican strategist and former Trump campaign advisor Roger Stone wants a clip from “The Godfather Part II” to sleep with the fishes — at least during his upcoming trial. “I kept saying Michael Corleone did this, Michael Corleone did that, so I said, yeah, sure,” Pentangeli says, downplaying his earlier comments, in which he accused Corleone of crimes. Stone, who was indicted in January on charges including witness tampering, says the clip will make him out to be a “murderous mafioso.


Longtime Republican strategist and former Trump campaign advisor Roger Stone wants a clip from “The Godfather Part II” to sleep with the fishes — at least during his upcoming trial. “I kept saying Michael Corleone did this, Michael Corleone did that, so I said, yeah, sure,” Pentangeli says, downplaying his earlier comments, in which he accused Corleone of crimes. Stone, who was indicted in January on charges including witness tampering, says the clip will make him out to be a “murderous mafioso.
Roger Stone and the DOJ are fighting in court over a clip from ‘The Godfather Part II’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, michael, ii, doj, court, clip, department, video, pentangeli, justice, stone, tampering, godfather, corleone, witness, fighting, roger


Roger Stone and the DOJ are fighting in court over a clip from 'The Godfather Part II'

Longtime Republican strategist and former Trump campaign advisor Roger Stone wants a clip from “The Godfather Part II” to sleep with the fishes — at least during his upcoming trial.

The conservative provocateur and the Department of Justice have been sparring for a month over whether jurors can be shown a 4-minute-and-20-second clip from the film.

The video shows Corleone family mob leader Frank Pentangeli lying to Congress — and abandoning his plans to incriminate Michael Corleone — during a dramatic hearing in which Corleone makes an appearance in the audience.

“I don’t know nothing about that,” Pentangeli says in response to a question about Corleone’s connections to organized crime. “Oh — I was in the olive oil business with his father but that was a long time ago.”

“I kept saying Michael Corleone did this, Michael Corleone did that, so I said, yeah, sure,” Pentangeli says, downplaying his earlier comments, in which he accused Corleone of crimes.

Stone, who was indicted in January on charges including witness tampering, says the clip will make him out to be a “murderous mafioso.” The Justice Department calls the video “directly relevant to the charge.”

The Justice Department charged Stone in January with obstruction, false statements and witness tampering in a 24-page indictment that cites the 1974 crime drama.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, michael, ii, doj, court, clip, department, video, pentangeli, justice, stone, tampering, godfather, corleone, witness, fighting, roger


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REM publisher asks Twitter to remove video tweeted by Trump over song use

The creator of the video that the president tweeted Friday, self-proclaimed Trump supporter @CarpeDonktum, accused Twitter of censorship after the clip became unplayable on the platform. Trump’s tweet with the video clip had been pinned to the top of his account’s page by Friday afternoon. In November, Trump tweeted an image of himself featuring the text overlay “Sanctions are coming,” which HBO took as a clear reference to its “Game of Thrones” series. bassist Mike Mills took notice of the use


The creator of the video that the president tweeted Friday, self-proclaimed Trump supporter @CarpeDonktum, accused Twitter of censorship after the clip became unplayable on the platform. Trump’s tweet with the video clip had been pinned to the top of his account’s page by Friday afternoon. In November, Trump tweeted an image of himself featuring the text overlay “Sanctions are coming,” which HBO took as a clear reference to its “Game of Thrones” series. bassist Mike Mills took notice of the use
REM publisher asks Twitter to remove video tweeted by Trump over song use Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: kevin breuninger, dave j hogan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, remove, rem, video, asks, music, twitter, tweeted, song, trump, publisher, clip, publishing, using, taken


REM publisher asks Twitter to remove video tweeted by Trump over song use

A satirical video using music from rock band R.E.M., which was shared by the Twitter account of President Donald Trump, has been removed from the social media site after the publisher of the band’s songs complained.

A lawyer for Universal Music Publishing Group had reached out to Twitter on Friday asking that the video, which was first posted by another user, be taken down from the platform, according to a source familiar with the situation, who asked to remain anonymous.

The clip, which runs more than two minutes in length, plays audio from R.E.M.’s early-’90s hit single “Everybody Hurts” over excerpts from Trump’s Feb. 5 State of the Union address.

But, as of the early hours Saturday ET, Twitter users could not play the video posted by Trump, and many saw a message that read, “This video has been removed in response to a report from the copyright holder.”

The creator of the video that the president tweeted Friday, self-proclaimed Trump supporter @CarpeDonktum, accused Twitter of censorship after the clip became unplayable on the platform.

The clip, clearly meant to mock a selection of lawmakers in Congress, cuts lines from Trump’s speech together with reaction shots of stern-looking politicians whom Trump has criticized in the past. They include Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah.

Trump’s tweet with the video clip had been pinned to the top of his account’s page by Friday afternoon. But it appeared to have been un-pinned by Saturday.

The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s questions about the president’s tweet. A spokesman for Twitter did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request to confirm the video’s removal.

Trump has drawn criticism for using copyrighted content before: The Rolling Stones’ “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” was often used at the end of Trump campaign rallies and has been used at Trump events since he became president. The band urged Trump to stop using the song, to no avail.

In November, Trump tweeted an image of himself featuring the text overlay “Sanctions are coming,” which HBO took as a clear reference to its “Game of Thrones” series. HBO said at the time that they “would prefer our trademark not be misappropriated for political purposes,” but the president’s tweet was not taken down.

R.E.M. bassist Mike Mills took notice of the use of his band’s song in the video that Trump tweeted Friday.

“Measures have been taken to stop it,” Mills tweeted, adding that Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey needs “to get on this.”

Mills said that the president had retweeted the video from Twitter account @CarpeDonktum, who is credited in the video. That account defended using potentially copyrighted material in its own content.

Mills, for his part, celebrated the removal of the video with a tweet calling back to a regular campaign promise from Trump.

R.E.M. reached a publishing agreement with Universal Music Publishing Group in March 2016.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: kevin breuninger, dave j hogan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, remove, rem, video, asks, music, twitter, tweeted, song, trump, publisher, clip, publishing, using, taken


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REM publisher asks Twitter to remove video tweeted by Trump over song use

The creator of the video that the president tweeted Friday, self-proclaimed Trump supporter @CarpeDonktum, accused Twitter of censorship after the clip became unplayable on the platform. Trump’s tweet with the video clip had been pinned to the top of his account’s page by Friday afternoon. In November, Trump tweeted an image of himself featuring the text overlay “Sanctions are coming,” which HBO took as a clear reference to its “Game of Thrones” series. bassist Mike Mills took notice of the use


The creator of the video that the president tweeted Friday, self-proclaimed Trump supporter @CarpeDonktum, accused Twitter of censorship after the clip became unplayable on the platform. Trump’s tweet with the video clip had been pinned to the top of his account’s page by Friday afternoon. In November, Trump tweeted an image of himself featuring the text overlay “Sanctions are coming,” which HBO took as a clear reference to its “Game of Thrones” series. bassist Mike Mills took notice of the use
REM publisher asks Twitter to remove video tweeted by Trump over song use Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: kevin breuninger, dave j hogan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, remove, rem, video, asks, music, twitter, tweeted, song, trump, publisher, clip, publishing, using, taken


REM publisher asks Twitter to remove video tweeted by Trump over song use

A satirical video using music from rock band R.E.M., which was shared by the Twitter account of President Donald Trump, has been removed from the social media site after the publisher of the band’s songs complained.

A lawyer for Universal Music Publishing Group had reached out to Twitter on Friday asking that the video, which was first posted by another user, be taken down from the platform, according to a source familiar with the situation, who asked to remain anonymous.

The clip, which runs more than two minutes in length, plays audio from R.E.M.’s early-’90s hit single “Everybody Hurts” over excerpts from Trump’s Feb. 5 State of the Union address.

But, as of the early hours Saturday ET, Twitter users could not play the video posted by Trump, and many saw a message that read, “This video has been removed in response to a report from the copyright holder.”

The creator of the video that the president tweeted Friday, self-proclaimed Trump supporter @CarpeDonktum, accused Twitter of censorship after the clip became unplayable on the platform.

The clip, clearly meant to mock a selection of lawmakers in Congress, cuts lines from Trump’s speech together with reaction shots of stern-looking politicians whom Trump has criticized in the past. They include Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., and Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah.

Trump’s tweet with the video clip had been pinned to the top of his account’s page by Friday afternoon. But it appeared to have been un-pinned by Saturday.

The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s questions about the president’s tweet. A spokesman for Twitter did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request to confirm the video’s removal.

Trump has drawn criticism for using copyrighted content before: The Rolling Stones’ “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” was often used at the end of Trump campaign rallies and has been used at Trump events since he became president. The band urged Trump to stop using the song, to no avail.

In November, Trump tweeted an image of himself featuring the text overlay “Sanctions are coming,” which HBO took as a clear reference to its “Game of Thrones” series. HBO said at the time that they “would prefer our trademark not be misappropriated for political purposes,” but the president’s tweet was not taken down.

R.E.M. bassist Mike Mills took notice of the use of his band’s song in the video that Trump tweeted Friday.

“Measures have been taken to stop it,” Mills tweeted, adding that Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey needs “to get on this.”

Mills said that the president had retweeted the video from Twitter account @CarpeDonktum, who is credited in the video. That account defended using potentially copyrighted material in its own content.

Mills, for his part, celebrated the removal of the video with a tweet calling back to a regular campaign promise from Trump.

R.E.M. reached a publishing agreement with Universal Music Publishing Group in March 2016.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: kevin breuninger, dave j hogan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, remove, rem, video, asks, music, twitter, tweeted, song, trump, publisher, clip, publishing, using, taken


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A tiny Rockefeller money clip just sold for $75,000

As a sign of just how crazy the bidding has become for items in the Peggy and David Rockefeller Collection at Christie’s, a money clip that was estimated to sell for between $800 to $1,200 just sold at the online auction. The tiny money clip has a picture of Rockefeller Center and is engraved on the back with the initials “L.S.R. The money clip is made of 14-karat gold and was only 4 centimeters by 4 centimeters. The Rockefeller sale will continue with other live and online auctions this week. T


As a sign of just how crazy the bidding has become for items in the Peggy and David Rockefeller Collection at Christie’s, a money clip that was estimated to sell for between $800 to $1,200 just sold at the online auction. The tiny money clip has a picture of Rockefeller Center and is engraved on the back with the initials “L.S.R. The money clip is made of 14-karat gold and was only 4 centimeters by 4 centimeters. The Rockefeller sale will continue with other live and online auctions this week. T
A tiny Rockefeller money clip just sold for $75,000 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-09  Authors: robert frank, source, christie s, johannes schmitt-tegge picture-alliance dpa, ap images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rockefeller, clip, money, upas, sold, sale, auction, collection, 75000, winning, tiny, week, online


A tiny Rockefeller money clip just sold for $75,000

If you want a piece of the Rockefellers, be prepared to pay up.

As a sign of just how crazy the bidding has become for items in the Peggy and David Rockefeller Collection at Christie’s, a money clip that was estimated to sell for between $800 to $1,200 just sold at the online auction. The winning bid: $75,000.

The tiny money clip has a picture of Rockefeller Center and is engraved on the back with the initials “L.S.R. 1954” – for Laurance Rockefeller.

The money clip is made of 14-karat gold and was only 4 centimeters by 4 centimeters.

Whoever bought it clearly has plenty of cash to put in the clip. But more than likely, they will keep it on display.

The Rockefeller sale will continue with other live and online auctions this week. The sale has already topped $646 million, making it the most expensive auction of a single collection ever.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-09  Authors: robert frank, source, christie s, johannes schmitt-tegge picture-alliance dpa, ap images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rockefeller, clip, money, upas, sold, sale, auction, collection, 75000, winning, tiny, week, online


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Fake video news is coming, and this clip of Obama ‘insulting’ Trump shows how dangerous it could be

It’s a highly edited video that digitally alters footage of Obama to make his mouth mimic a voice actor’s movements. The clip eventually shows a split screen of Obama and Peele, revealing the ruse. “You Won’t Believe What Obama Says in this Video” was created using Adobe After Effects and FakeApp, an application that lets you “faceswap” videos. BuzzFeed used about two minutes of Obama footage with Peele’s mouth edited in and 10 minutes of real Obama footage. It ran FakeApp on the clip for a tota


It’s a highly edited video that digitally alters footage of Obama to make his mouth mimic a voice actor’s movements. The clip eventually shows a split screen of Obama and Peele, revealing the ruse. “You Won’t Believe What Obama Says in this Video” was created using Adobe After Effects and FakeApp, an application that lets you “faceswap” videos. BuzzFeed used about two minutes of Obama footage with Peele’s mouth edited in and 10 minutes of real Obama footage. It ran FakeApp on the clip for a tota
Fake video news is coming, and this clip of Obama ‘insulting’ Trump shows how dangerous it could be Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-17  Authors: michelle castillo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shows, trump, peretti, insulting, coming, peele, fake, obama, clip, footage, real, wrote, videos, dangerous, buzzfeed, need, video


Fake video news is coming, and this clip of Obama 'insulting' Trump shows how dangerous it could be

The video is not an actual recording of Obama. It’s a highly edited video that digitally alters footage of Obama to make his mouth mimic a voice actor’s movements. The audio of the speech was recorded by Oscar-winning filmmaker Jordan Peele.

The clip eventually shows a split screen of Obama and Peele, revealing the ruse.

“This is a dangerous time,” Peele says, still impersonating Obama. “Moving forward we need to be more vigilant with what we trust from the internet. It’s a time where we need to rely on trusted news sources.”

Peele and BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti created the PSA to show how easy it is to manipulate videos, furthering the spread of misinformation and fake news. “You Won’t Believe What Obama Says in this Video” was created using Adobe After Effects and FakeApp, an application that lets you “faceswap” videos. Peele, who has impersonated Obama before, wrote and performed his script.

BuzzFeed used about two minutes of Obama footage with Peele’s mouth edited in and 10 minutes of real Obama footage. It ran FakeApp on the clip for a total of 60 hours to fine tune the video.

“We’ve [BuzzFeed] covered counterfeit news websites that say the Pope endorsed Trump that look kinda like real news but because it’s text people have started to become more wary,” Peretti wrote on BuzzFeed. “And now we’re starting to see tech that allows people to put words into the mouths of public figures that look like they must be real because it’s video and video doesn’t lie!”

Disclosure: CNBC parent NBCUniversal is an investor in BuzzFeed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-17  Authors: michelle castillo
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, shows, trump, peretti, insulting, coming, peele, fake, obama, clip, footage, real, wrote, videos, dangerous, buzzfeed, need, video


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