Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen’s Silicon Valley estate is on sale for $41 million — take a look inside

The Atherton, California estate of late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen is on the market for $41.48 million. Allen’s sister, Jody Allen, now owns the home under a trust, according to property records. Located in Silicon Valley, Atherton is a hot-spot for venture capitalists and tech executives. And according to Bloomberg’s 2019 richest places index, Atherton is the richest place in America. Billionaires like former Google executive Eric Schmidt, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg have lived there, acc


The Atherton, California estate of late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen is on the market for $41.48 million.
Allen’s sister, Jody Allen, now owns the home under a trust, according to property records.
Located in Silicon Valley, Atherton is a hot-spot for venture capitalists and tech executives.
And according to Bloomberg’s 2019 richest places index, Atherton is the richest place in America.
Billionaires like former Google executive Eric Schmidt, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg have lived there, acc
Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen’s Silicon Valley estate is on sale for $41 million — take a look inside Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, venture, sister, richest, valley, allen, million, according, trust, silicon, paul, estate, atherton, inside, look, sale, cofounder, microsoft


Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's Silicon Valley estate is on sale for $41 million — take a look inside

The Atherton, California estate of late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen is on the market for $41.48 million. Allen passed away in October of 2018 at the age of 65.

In 2013, Allen purchased the home for $27 million. Allen’s sister, Jody Allen, now owns the home under a trust, according to property records.

Located in Silicon Valley, Atherton is a hot-spot for venture capitalists and tech executives. And according to Bloomberg’s 2019 richest places index, Atherton is the richest place in America. Billionaires like former Google executive Eric Schmidt, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg have lived there, according to Bloomberg.

Allen’s 21,030-square-foot home has seven bedrooms and 13 bathrooms. Take a look inside.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: taylor locke
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, venture, sister, richest, valley, allen, million, according, trust, silicon, paul, estate, atherton, inside, look, sale, cofounder, microsoft


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Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes launches $10 million Anti-Monopoly Fund

Facebook co-founder-turned-critic Chris Hughes is continuing his fight against what he sees as the company’s monopoly power, announcing a new $10 million Anti-Monopoly Fund on Thursday. The fund, an initiative of Hughes’ Economic Security Project, will back existing and new academic research, policy and organizing work concerning market power. The project will extend its focus beyond Facebook and Big Tech to combat market dominance across industries with investments until March 2021. “We are at


Facebook co-founder-turned-critic Chris Hughes is continuing his fight against what he sees as the company’s monopoly power, announcing a new $10 million Anti-Monopoly Fund on Thursday.
The fund, an initiative of Hughes’ Economic Security Project, will back existing and new academic research, policy and organizing work concerning market power.
The project will extend its focus beyond Facebook and Big Tech to combat market dominance across industries with investments until March 2021.
“We are at
Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes launches $10 million Anti-Monopoly Fund Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, launches, antimonopoly, facebook, tech, fund, big, million, hughes, times, cofounder, market, antitrust, industry, power, chris, work


Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes launches $10 million Anti-Monopoly Fund

Facebook co-founder-turned-critic Chris Hughes is continuing his fight against what he sees as the company’s monopoly power, announcing a new $10 million Anti-Monopoly Fund on Thursday.

The fund, an initiative of Hughes’ Economic Security Project, will back existing and new academic research, policy and organizing work concerning market power. The project will extend its focus beyond Facebook and Big Tech to combat market dominance across industries with investments until March 2021. Partners for the initiative include the Ford Foundation, Knight Foundation and George Soros-backed Open Society Foundations, among others, according to a press release.

“We are at a pivotal moment where cultural and political momentum are aligned to rein in the unchecked behavior of Big Tech,” Hughes said in a statement alongside the fund’s announcement. “In addition to the necessary scrutiny of the tech industry, there is also a need and opportunity to take meaningful action on monopoly power across industries that’s led to corporate interests in the driver’s seat of our political and economic system for far too long.”

Hughes publicly called to break up Facebook in a May New York Times op-ed, saying, “The most problematic aspect of Facebook’s power is [CEO] Mark [Zuckerberg]’s unilateral control over speech.” Hughes left the company to work for Barack Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign and said in the Times piece that he liquidated his Facebook shares in 2012 and no longer owns shares of any social media company.

The launch comes as Facebook fields antitrust inquiries from the Federal Trade Commission, the House Judiciary Committee, several state attorneys general and potentially the Department of Justice, which has pledged to conduct a broad review of market power in the tech industry. Google also faces its own slew of probes, and Amazon and Apple have both also received questions from the House Judiciary Committee into their practices.

As the investigations get started, Facebook has continued to stir up D.C. officials with plans to implement end-to-end encryption across its messaging services and to launch a new cryptocurrency called libra. Zuckerberg will face lawmakers next week to discuss the company’s cryptocurrency plans and will undoubtedly be asked about how the currency could add to Facebook’s power.

Facebook declined to comment on the fund.

Concerns about Big Tech’s power have spilled over into the presidential race. At Tuesday night’s Democratic debate, the nine candidates who responded to a question about antitrust action against the industry differed on their approaches, but shared fears of tech firms’ unregulated power.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

WATCH: How US antitrust law works, and what it means for Big Tech


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, launches, antimonopoly, facebook, tech, fund, big, million, hughes, times, cofounder, market, antitrust, industry, power, chris, work


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Co-founder of a multibillion-dollar company: Here’s how to get ahead in your career

Self-made millionaire and chief technology officer of Confluent Neha Narkhede got her first computer when she was eight years old and living in India. Narkhede moved to the U.S. in 2006 to get her master’s in computer science from Georgia Tech. After working as a software engineer at LinkedIn, she co-founded streaming platform Confluent in 2014 with two of her LinkedIn coworkers. For women trying to get ahead in a male-dominated field, like tech, it helps to “be a little deaf,” she tells CNBC Ma


Self-made millionaire and chief technology officer of Confluent Neha Narkhede got her first computer when she was eight years old and living in India. Narkhede moved to the U.S. in 2006 to get her master’s in computer science from Georgia Tech. After working as a software engineer at LinkedIn, she co-founded streaming platform Confluent in 2014 with two of her LinkedIn coworkers. For women trying to get ahead in a male-dominated field, like tech, it helps to “be a little deaf,” she tells CNBC Ma
Co-founder of a multibillion-dollar company: Here’s how to get ahead in your career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfmade, women, quite, thats, multibilliondollar, narkhede, tech, computer, heres, linkedin, ahead, company, little, india, career, cofounder


Co-founder of a multibillion-dollar company: Here's how to get ahead in your career

Self-made millionaire and chief technology officer of Confluent Neha Narkhede got her first computer when she was eight years old and living in India. She’s been hooked on tech ever since.

“It was unique in those times back in India to have a computer and so somewhere, deep down, I was very appreciative,” she recalled on an episode of “Behind the Tech with Kevin Scott.” “And then it became the tool that fueled my curiosity.”

Narkhede moved to the U.S. in 2006 to get her master’s in computer science from Georgia Tech. After working as a software engineer at LinkedIn, she co-founded streaming platform Confluent in 2014 with two of her LinkedIn coworkers. Today, the company is valued at $2.5 billion.

For women trying to get ahead in a male-dominated field, like tech, it helps to “be a little deaf,” she tells CNBC Make It. “You want to preserve your grit and your sense of ability among quite a lot of skepticism that feeds in from the outside. Being a little deaf helps quite a bit — it’s a survival strategy.”

Along those same lines, “If you encounter something that looks like a ceiling, assume it’s a glass ceiling and try to smash it — but if it turns out to be a stone or concrete one, move on,” she adds. “That’s what I do.”

It’s also important to “develop a ton of grit,” says Narkhede, who made Forbes’ 2019 list of America’s richest self-made women. “That’s the one quality that has helped me navigate this field to reach the other side, where you can share your story and inspire the next generation of female leaders.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, selfmade, women, quite, thats, multibilliondollar, narkhede, tech, computer, heres, linkedin, ahead, company, little, india, career, cofounder


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SmileDirectClub is now the worst unicorn IPO of 2019, down nearly 60% from its debut

Jordan Katzman, co-founder of SmileDirectClub Inc., left, and Alex Fenkell, co-founder of SmileDirectClub Inc., watch traders during the company’s initial public offering (IPO) at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019. Shares of SmileDirectClub plummeted 12.9% on Monday after California Gov. Bill 1519, which he extended through January of 2024, gives the Dental Board of California oversight over all dental operations within the state. The stock is now down almost 6


Jordan Katzman, co-founder of SmileDirectClub Inc., left, and Alex Fenkell, co-founder of SmileDirectClub Inc., watch traders during the company’s initial public offering (IPO) at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019. Shares of SmileDirectClub plummeted 12.9% on Monday after California Gov. Bill 1519, which he extended through January of 2024, gives the Dental Board of California oversight over all dental operations within the state. The stock is now down almost 6
SmileDirectClub is now the worst unicorn IPO of 2019, down nearly 60% from its debut Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, nearly, 2019, unicorn, dental, cofounder, bill, sept, stock, went, ipo, california, debut, public, smiledirectclub


SmileDirectClub is now the worst unicorn IPO of 2019, down nearly 60% from its debut

Jordan Katzman, co-founder of SmileDirectClub Inc., left, and Alex Fenkell, co-founder of SmileDirectClub Inc., watch traders during the company’s initial public offering (IPO) at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019.

Shares of SmileDirectClub plummeted 12.9% on Monday after California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill that protects consumers who use teledentistry products. Bill 1519, which he extended through January of 2024, gives the Dental Board of California oversight over all dental operations within the state.

The stock is now down almost 60% since it went public just over a month ago, making it the worst-performing IPO this year among companies that went public with a valuation over $1 billion. The stock began trading on Sept. 12. Lyft is the second-worst unicorn performer since its IPO, down about 45%.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: pippa stevens
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, nearly, 2019, unicorn, dental, cofounder, bill, sept, stock, went, ipo, california, debut, public, smiledirectclub


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Billionaire Salesforce co-founder Marc Benioff says capitalism is dead and needs a reboot

Marc Benioff, Co-CEO of SalesForce speaking at the WEF in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 22, 2019. “But now everybody, including the tech companies and even those CEOs who initially were disagreeing with me, agree. “Over 20 years ago, when we started Salesforce, this was our idea,” Benioff said. “We’d start a company with a new technology model, a new business model, and a new capitalism model.” He was hinting at some of the problems big tech companies are already seeing.


Marc Benioff, Co-CEO of SalesForce speaking at the WEF in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 22, 2019. “But now everybody, including the tech companies and even those CEOs who initially were disagreeing with me, agree. “Over 20 years ago, when we started Salesforce, this was our idea,” Benioff said. “We’d start a company with a new technology model, a new business model, and a new capitalism model.” He was hinting at some of the problems big tech companies are already seeing.
Billionaire Salesforce co-founder Marc Benioff says capitalism is dead and needs a reboot Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: matt rosoff, https, wwwlinkedincom in mattrosoff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, cofounder, company, theyre, companies, ive, going, business, capitalism, reboot, needs, salesforce, billionaire, marc, benioff, dead


Billionaire Salesforce co-founder Marc Benioff says capitalism is dead and needs a reboot

Marc Benioff, Co-CEO of SalesForce speaking at the WEF in Davos, Switzerland on Jan. 22, 2019. Adam Galica | CNBC

Marc Benioff rubs some people the wrong way. He’s too much. Too loud and too opinionated. The company he co-founded, Salesforce, has grown from two people in a San Francisco house in 1999 to a $130 billion company with more than $13 billion in annual revenue, making it one of the great triumphs of modern capitalism and turning Benioff into a billionaire six times over. And yet, he has the nerve to criticize the tech industry for being too powerful, and the gall to say that today’s version of capitalism is too focused on profits. At Davos in January 2018, Benioff made some enemies in the room by saying that if CEOs don’t take action to restore trust in their companies, regulators must jump in. “People were shocked that a tech CEO would say such a thing, that we need more regulation in technology,” Benioff told CNBC in a recent interview. “But now everybody, including the tech companies and even those CEOs who initially were disagreeing with me, agree. Because the reality is, if these companies don’t step into these new values proactively, then the government’s going to have to shift them into those values.” Benioff’s new book, “Trailblazer,” will be similarly polarizing. While portions of it read like a typical business book, with insidery anecdotes, like the story of why he decided not to buy Twitter, and hard-won bits of wisdom, other parts read like an Elizabeth Warren speech: Modern capitalism is dead, companies are too focused on shareholder returns and sometimes higher taxes are necessary. It’s quite a shift for a former Republican turned independent.

New models

But Benioff insists that he hasn’t really changed. Rather, he’s simply trying to spread the same values that he instilled in Salesforce two decades ago — and the ones that have worked both for the company and communities where it operates. “Over 20 years ago, when we started Salesforce, this was our idea,” Benioff said. “We’d start a company with a new technology model, a new business model, and a new capitalism model.” He was referring to Salesforce’s practice of donating 1% of its profits, product value and employees’ time to nonprofits. When you look beyond shareholders, “Your customer’s not a product, they’re a stakeholder,” Benioff said. “Your employee’s not a cog in your wheel, they’re a stakeholder. And kids aren’t people you’re driving by on your way to work, they’re a stakeholder. And homeless aren’t people you’re walking by, they’re your stakeholders.” Benioff’s point is that corporate executives must recognize this in order for their companies to survive. He has little patience for the argument that this approach only works when business is good, but harder to justify during a recession or when times are rough. “I didn’t just become a CEO last year, I’ve ridden through a few recessions, I’ve been through economic downturns, I’ve had tough moments,” he said. “I’ve been through everything you can go through as a CEO. You have to do it this way. If you don’t, you’re not going to survive.” He was hinting at some of the problems big tech companies are already seeing. “Their employees are going to walk out, and they are” walking out, he said. “Customers will walk out, and they are. That’s where you have to say, OK, I’m going to have to hold myself to a new standard and create a company where people want to work, that people want to do business with, a company that the community wants them to be doing business with.”

The narrative has started to play out over the last two years. Until about 2017, tech could do no wrong. Silicon Valley was full of innovators making the world a better place, and any bad patches were dismissed as exceptions. Of late, public sentiment has turned, regulators are circling and presidential candidates are campaigning on breaking up tech giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon. “There was a halo left over from people like Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard, and other very good people in the tech industry who did very good things,” Benioff said. “A lot of people went to Packard Children’s Hospital or the Monterey Bay Aquarium and said, ‘Wow, he’s really left a big halo on our community.’ But then all of a sudden they’re like, ‘Hold on, you did what with my data? You did what with that election? You did what with your profits?’ That’s when all of a sudden people said, ‘Wow, maybe this is not Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard running these companies.’ Maybe this is a different generation of leader that is prioritizing power, and control, and sheer profitability, and capitalism without guardrails over the communities they’re participating in.” He also says that a broader view of value is vital for recruiting and retaining millennials and younger workers. “We are moving into a world where they understand that and certainly the generation after them that’s been educated that we’re going to have more plastic in the ocean than fish in 2050,” he said. “That our homeless situation is increasing, and that there’s more inequality, and that our public schools need to be supported.”

‘We have to do it now’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14  Authors: matt rosoff, https, wwwlinkedincom in mattrosoff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, cofounder, company, theyre, companies, ive, going, business, capitalism, reboot, needs, salesforce, billionaire, marc, benioff, dead


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Only 15% of Americans can identify Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a photo

Despite being CEO of one of the most well-known tech companies in the world and having 4.2 million Twitter followers, only 15% of 4,272 adults who answered a Pew Research Center survey about digital knowledge were able to identify Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey from a photo. The survey question asked people who the “technology leader” photographed was and presented a few multiple-choice options. When the data were further broken down, 23% of survey respondents who had a bachelor’s degree or


Despite being CEO of one of the most well-known tech companies in the world and having 4.2 million Twitter followers, only 15% of 4,272 adults who answered a Pew Research Center survey about digital knowledge were able to identify Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey from a photo. The survey question asked people who the “technology leader” photographed was and presented a few multiple-choice options. When the data were further broken down, 23% of survey respondents who had a bachelor’s degree or
Only 15% of Americans can identify Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a photo Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, jack, asked, ceo, survey, answered, twitter, tech, americans, question, cofounder, identify, dorsey


Only 15% of Americans can identify Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a photo

Do you know who this man is?

Despite being CEO of one of the most well-known tech companies in the world and having 4.2 million Twitter followers, only 15% of 4,272 adults who answered a Pew Research Center survey about digital knowledge were able to identify Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey from a photo.

The survey question asked people who the “technology leader” photographed was and presented a few multiple-choice options. The selections included high-profile founders such as Elon Musk, co-founder of Telsa, as well as Google co-founder Sergey Brin and Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick.

A whopping 77% of people said they didn’t know Dorsey, while 7% guessed incorrectly. This question yielded the most amount of “unsure” responses in the entire survey.

When the data were further broken down, 23% of survey respondents who had a bachelor’s degree or higher were able to clock Dorsey in the photo. Age was another factor that influenced their awareness: 20% of those ages 18 to 29 answered correctly, compared to only 7% of people ages 65 and up.

The photo in question was from Dorsey’s April 2019 TED Talk. In it, he’s wearing a black beanie, and has a long beard.

Dorsey was the only tech leader respondents were asked to identify. But those surveyed also lacked knowledge about other prominent social media platforms. Only 29% of Americans knew that messaging app WhatsApp and Instagram are owned by Facebook, for example.

The rest of the survey contained more general questions about internet use. For example, the survey asked people how “private browsing” works, what “net neutrality” means and what two-factor authentication looks like on a web page.

Younger adults (defined as 18 to 29) answered more questions correctly than those in the 65-plus group, suggesting that they might be more internet literate.

These findings are part of a larger Pew Research Center survey called the American Trends Panel.

Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, jack, asked, ceo, survey, answered, twitter, tech, americans, question, cofounder, identify, dorsey


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Tesla co-founder Marc Tarpenning joins Pierre Omidyar’s Spero Ventures

When Marc Tarpenning and Martin Eberhard co-founded Tesla in 2003, they started an electric vehicle revolution that is still transforming the auto industry, and shifting energy consumption toward renewables. Now, Tarpenning has joined eBay founder Pierre Omidyar’s venture firm, Spero Ventures, to back the next generation of start-ups focused on sustainability. Mobility, battery-tech and manufacturing remain obsessions for Tarpenning, given the years he spent making electric cars that would be as


When Marc Tarpenning and Martin Eberhard co-founded Tesla in 2003, they started an electric vehicle revolution that is still transforming the auto industry, and shifting energy consumption toward renewables. Now, Tarpenning has joined eBay founder Pierre Omidyar’s venture firm, Spero Ventures, to back the next generation of start-ups focused on sustainability. Mobility, battery-tech and manufacturing remain obsessions for Tarpenning, given the years he spent making electric cars that would be as
Tesla co-founder Marc Tarpenning joins Pierre Omidyar’s Spero Ventures Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ventures, places, electric, world, things, marc, cars, spero, omidyars, land, pierre, cofounder, startups, joins, wonderful, future, tesla, tarpenning


Tesla co-founder Marc Tarpenning joins Pierre Omidyar's Spero Ventures

When Marc Tarpenning and Martin Eberhard co-founded Tesla in 2003, they started an electric vehicle revolution that is still transforming the auto industry, and shifting energy consumption toward renewables.

Now, Tarpenning has joined eBay founder Pierre Omidyar’s venture firm, Spero Ventures, to back the next generation of start-ups focused on sustainability.

Mobility, battery-tech and manufacturing remain obsessions for Tarpenning, given the years he spent making electric cars that would be as appealing as other top sports cars. But the investor and engineer is now looking to fund start-ups solving problems around food, water and land use with emerging technologies.

Tarpenning lights up discussing materials science that could make plastic obsolete, and deliver packaging with far fewer external impacts. He is from California’s Central Valley, and says the land around him makes him think constantly about finding smarter ways to use and source water.

The long-time inventor says he favors a vision of the future that is more like “Star Trek” than “Blade Runner.” But he hopes to see at least one thing that may seem counter-intuitive — denser cities.

“In California, most of the people live on 5 to 6% of the land, all around the coasts and in places you may expect,” Tarpenning said.

“Imagine if the places in between were much wilder, and a world where other living things on this planet have a much bigger say. I’d like to see cities with all the wonderful amenities, but wild landscape in between. So I look for things that drag us into that future. To do that, you have to rethink everything, like agriculture, how we feed ourselves, and of course, how we get around.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-03  Authors: lora kolodny
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ventures, places, electric, world, things, marc, cars, spero, omidyars, land, pierre, cofounder, startups, joins, wonderful, future, tesla, tarpenning


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Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph shares the 8 ‘rules for success’ his dad gave him when he was 21

When Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph graduated from Hamilton College with a degree in geography, his dad passed along some words of wisdom. “When I was 21 years old, fresh out of college and about to start my first job, my father gave me a handwritten list of instructions,” the entrepreneur and author writes on LinkedIn. Randolph, now 61, still has the list today: “I’ve passed them on to my own children and the original copy hangs next to my bathroom mirror.” Here’s are “Randolph’s Rules for Su


When Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph graduated from Hamilton College with a degree in geography, his dad passed along some words of wisdom. “When I was 21 years old, fresh out of college and about to start my first job, my father gave me a handwritten list of instructions,” the entrepreneur and author writes on LinkedIn. Randolph, now 61, still has the list today: “I’ve passed them on to my own children and the original copy hangs next to my bathroom mirror.” Here’s are “Randolph’s Rules for Su
Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph shares the 8 ‘rules for success’ his dad gave him when he was 21 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gave, entrepreneur, success, writes, netflix, cofounder, marc, college, rules, randolph, shares, dont, passed, zero, worst, york, dad, list


Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph shares the 8 'rules for success' his dad gave him when he was 21

When Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph graduated from Hamilton College with a degree in geography, his dad passed along some words of wisdom.

“When I was 21 years old, fresh out of college and about to start my first job, my father gave me a handwritten list of instructions,” the entrepreneur and author writes on LinkedIn.

Randolph, now 61, still has the list today: “I’ve passed them on to my own children and the original copy hangs next to my bathroom mirror.”

Here’s are “Randolph’s Rules for Success”:

Do at least 10% more than you are asked. Never, ever, to anybody present as fact opinions on things you don’t know. Takes great care and discipline. Be courteous and considerate always — up and down. Don’t knock, don’t complain — stick to constructive, serious criticism. Don’t be afraid to make decisions when you have the facts on which to make them. Quantify where possible. Be open-minded but skeptical. Be prompt.

His dad’s advice didn’t turn him into an overnight success by any means. Randolph, who says he never thought he’d be a tech entrepreneur, started as a failed realtor, he writes on his blog: “When I was 23, I was quite possibly the worst real estate agent in New York. I was working for my mother’s agency in Chappaqua, and no one was buying houses. In eight months, I made zero sales. I rented one apartment.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gave, entrepreneur, success, writes, netflix, cofounder, marc, college, rules, randolph, shares, dont, passed, zero, worst, york, dad, list


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All co-founders of Facebook’s big acquisitions are gone now

A visitor tries out the Oculus Gear VR virtual reality goggles at the Facebook Innovation Hub on February 24, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Facebook just lost the last remaining co-founder from one of its biggest and most important acquisitions. Oculus co-founder Nate Mitchell announced Tuesday that he’s departing the virtual reality company after seven years. “After seven incredible years, I’ve decided to move on from Oculus / Facebook,” Mitchell wrote in a post on Reddit. Facebook acquired Oculus f


A visitor tries out the Oculus Gear VR virtual reality goggles at the Facebook Innovation Hub on February 24, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Facebook just lost the last remaining co-founder from one of its biggest and most important acquisitions. Oculus co-founder Nate Mitchell announced Tuesday that he’s departing the virtual reality company after seven years. “After seven incredible years, I’ve decided to move on from Oculus / Facebook,” Mitchell wrote in a post on Reddit. Facebook acquired Oculus f
All co-founders of Facebook’s big acquisitions are gone now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, acquisitions, facebooks, reality, virtual, big, seven, incredible, mitchell, hes, gone, cofounder, oculus, facebook, cofounders, company


All co-founders of Facebook's big acquisitions are gone now

A visitor tries out the Oculus Gear VR virtual reality goggles at the Facebook Innovation Hub on February 24, 2016 in Berlin, Germany.

Facebook just lost the last remaining co-founder from one of its biggest and most important acquisitions.

Oculus co-founder Nate Mitchell announced Tuesday that he’s departing the virtual reality company after seven years. Mitchell headed up virtual reality product development at Facebook.

“After seven incredible years, I’ve decided to move on from Oculus / Facebook,” Mitchell wrote in a post on Reddit. “I expect the incredible team at Facebook to continue to surprise and delight us on this mission to build the next computing platform. I can’t wait to see what comes next.”

Mitchell said he’s now taking some time off “to travel, be with family and recharge.” His departure follows the exit of co-founder Palmer Luckey in 2017, who now runs defense start-up Anduril Industries. Brendan Iribe, the former CEO and a co-founder of Oculus, also exited the company in 2018.

Facebook acquired Oculus for $2 billion in 2014 in a move that represented a major bet on virtual reality. Since then, Oculus has released several iterations of its headsets, most recently launching a fourth-generation standalone version for $399.

Mitchell’s departure marks the latest example of a co-founder departing the company after Facebook acquired it. Last April, Jan Koum, cofounder of Facebook-owned WhatsApp, said he was leaving the company. Instagram co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger departed the social media app last September.

Representatives from Facebook were not immediately available for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-13  Authors: annie palmer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, acquisitions, facebooks, reality, virtual, big, seven, incredible, mitchell, hes, gone, cofounder, oculus, facebook, cofounders, company


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Dish Network and its billionaire co-founder Charlie Ergen finally have a plan

For nearly a decade, Dish Network hasn’t really had a plan. It has bought billions of dollars of wireless spectrum but hasn’t actually put it to use. “We’d like to own a wireless network,” Ergen said in 2013. Ergen has negotiated with the Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission to give him two more years to build a 5G network. Then it would move to phase two to meet later deadlines by building a 5G network.


For nearly a decade, Dish Network hasn’t really had a plan. It has bought billions of dollars of wireless spectrum but hasn’t actually put it to use. “We’d like to own a wireless network,” Ergen said in 2013. Ergen has negotiated with the Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission to give him two more years to build a 5G network. Then it would move to phase two to meet later deadlines by building a 5G network.
Dish Network and its billionaire co-founder Charlie Ergen finally have a plan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cofounder, dish, spectrum, 5g, mobile, network, wireless, plan, ergen, finally, charlie, deadline, deal, billionaire


Dish Network and its billionaire co-founder Charlie Ergen finally have a plan

For nearly a decade, Dish Network hasn’t really had a plan. Today, it has one.

Yes, Dish has had ideas about a plan. It has bought billions of dollars of wireless spectrum but hasn’t actually put it to use. It tried to buy Sprint in 2013. It thought about buying T-Mobile. It considered merging with DirecTV. It looked at buying bankrupt wireless broadband company LightSquared.

But for the most part, Dish co-founder and Chairman Charlie Ergen has talked about the company’s “optionality ” without committing to anything, all the while fighting a 2020 build-out deadline the U.S. government placed on it to actually build a network and put its spectrum to use.

The only thing Ergen has consistently discussed is an overarching goal to transition his aging satellite TV provider into a mobile wireless distributor that doubled as a digital video operator. Dish owns Sling TV, its over-the-top internet video service, and has about 2.5 million subscribers. Dish has just below 10 million satellite TV customers and loses hundreds of thousands of subscribers each quarter as subscribers cancel video service in the face of ballooning costs.

“We’d like to own a wireless network,” Ergen said in 2013. “About five years ago, I realized that the model as we knew it was going to get us to over $100 a month for programming costs, in which case things were going to change. That’s when we decided the wireless side was probably a place we needed to go.”

That’s all changed now. Ergen has negotiated with the Department of Justice and Federal Communications Commission to give him two more years to build a 5G network. Dish must build a 5G network that covers 20% of the country by June 2022 and 70% of the U.S. population by June 2023. If it doesn’t, Dish will have to pay the U.S. Treasury as much as $2.2 billion.

Dish’s old plan, as CNBC explained here, centered on meeting an FCC 2020 deadline by building a so-called narrowband internet of things (IoT) network that would connect “people and sensors and microprocessors.” Then it would move to phase two to meet later deadlines by building a 5G network. Many analysts speculated Ergen would likely just sell his spectrum or the entire company instead of building out a 5G network, which would cost the company tens of billions of dollars.

That entire proposal is now out the window if the Sprint-T-Mobile merger closes. (The deal is still in question. It’s being challenged by 13 state attorneys general and a trial has been scheduled for October, though it may be delayed). The 2020 deadline will no longer exist, replaced by the new 2022 and 2023 timelines.

And Dish will scrap its IoT plan and focus purely on 5G, which the government has always wanted in the first place, according to a person familiar with the matter. (Dish hasn’t totally abandoned its old plan yet because the deal still hasn’t closed).

That’s why regulators hand picked Dish to be the third party that was most likely to provide real competition to AT&T, Verizon and a merged Sprint-T-Mobile. Dish already has the spectrum, and regulators already had Dish locked up by a deadline he may or may not have met. Ergen has successfully pushed that deadline back two years, giving him more time to find a partner to help fund the cost of building a new competitive network. Dish is paying $5 billion for a combination of divested assets including spectrum Boost Mobile and Virgin Mobile, all of which will be divested by the new T-Mobile. T-Mobile and Sprint must also provide Dish with 20,000 cell sites and hundreds of retail locations.

Reuters reported this week that cable company Charter submitted a bid to play Dish’s role as the interloper that would buy Boost Mobile and other divested assets, and the DOJ never even responded. Dish’s patience, or possibly intransigence, with the use of its hoards of spectrum helped it become the government’s top choice to be the nation’s new number four carrier.

But just how competitive Dish will actually be remains an open question as the state attorneys general lawsuit moves forward, said MoffettNathason telecommunications analyst Craig Moffett.

“Will this satisfy the State AGs? My guess is that it won’t,” Moffett said. “And unanswered in anything we’ve seen so far is whether the staff at the DOJ supports the current deal, or if the deal was approved by Bureau Chief [Makan] Delrahim without staff-level support. That will be important for understanding the prospects of the lawsuit.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cofounder, dish, spectrum, 5g, mobile, network, wireless, plan, ergen, finally, charlie, deadline, deal, billionaire


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