‘Google is not a patriotic company,’ says co-founder of data-mining company Palantir

Joe Lonsdale said on CNBC on Monday that his fellow Palantir co-founder Peter Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Alphabet’s Google. “Google is not a patriotic company,” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC. Google, responding to Thiel’s comments, said, “As we have said before, we do not work with the Chinese military.” The environment at Google is very “academic,” Lonsdale said, where people want to share their work across the world. Lonsdale on M


Joe Lonsdale said on CNBC on Monday that his fellow Palantir co-founder Peter Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Alphabet’s Google. “Google is not a patriotic company,” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC. Google, responding to Thiel’s comments, said, “As we have said before, we do not work with the Chinese military.” The environment at Google is very “academic,” Lonsdale said, where people want to share their work across the world. Lonsdale on M
‘Google is not a patriotic company,’ says co-founder of data-mining company Palantir Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, palantir, datamining, google, patriotic, company, thiel, lonsdale, chinese, valley, cofounder, talk, taking, speaking


'Google is not a patriotic company,' says co-founder of data-mining company Palantir

Joe Lonsdale said on CNBC on Monday that his fellow Palantir co-founder Peter Thiel was “courageous” for speaking out against Alphabet’s Google.

“Google is not a patriotic company,” said Lonsdale, also a founding partner of technology investment firm 8VC.

Lonsdale was responding to the criticism levied since Thiel on Sunday said the FBI and the CIA should investigate whether Google has been infiltrated by Chinese intelligence.

Thiel, also a Facebook board member and a supporter of Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, was speaking at the National Conservatism Conference in Washington, D.C., and Axios reported on his speech.

“Everyone in [Silicon] Valley knows that the Chinese government is very involved,” Lonsdale told “Squawk Alley” in an interview, though he didn’t point to any clear evidence. “It’s something we don’t talk about a lot. It was very courageous of [Thiel] to talk about it.”

Google, responding to Thiel’s comments, said, “As we have said before, we do not work with the Chinese military.”

The environment at Google is very “academic,” Lonsdale said, where people want to share their work across the world. “There’s nationalists in China coming and taking whatever they can learn and taking it back and using it for their own nationalist purposes.”

Lonsdale also commented on Google’s contract with the Defense Department, which expired earlier this year and was not renewed. “When Google made the choice ‘we’re not going to help the U.S., but we’re going to continue to work in China,’ it was very clear,” Lonsdale said of the company’s patriotism.

Silicon Valley-based Palantir, the data analytics miner, has worked with many agencies of the U.S. government, including the Defense Department, CIA and FBI. Lonsdale on Monday called Palantir “probably the most patriotic in the Valley.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, palantir, datamining, google, patriotic, company, thiel, lonsdale, chinese, valley, cofounder, talk, taking, speaking


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Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college

“If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.” It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future. But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college. “If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, tha


“If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.” It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future. But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college. “If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, tha
Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taking, institute, work, equation, students, clayton, school, student, christensen, college, borrow, youre, going, cofounder, schools, reveals, debt


Clayton Christensen Institute co-founder: This equation reveals how much you should borrow for college

“You really want to be mindful that you’re not crossing that threshold of payments that are just going to crush your income because they’re taking up, say, 20, 30% of your monthly paycheck,” he says. “If you’re in that realm, you’re going to have problems in the long-run.”

It’s a smart way to avoid taking on more debt than graduates will be able to handle paying back in the future.

“As students look at the equation for how much they should borrow when they go to college, they ought to be thinking of the total debt that they take on as not being more than 10 to 15% of what their earnings are going to be when they leave college,” says Horn.

But Michael Horn, economist and co-founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, tells CNBC Make It that there’s a simple way students can predict roughly how much they can afford to borrow for college.

The cost of attending college today is a daunting prospect. According to the College Board’s 2018 Trends in College Pricing Report , from 1988 to 2018, sticker prices tripled at public four-year schools and doubled at public two-year and private non-profit four-year schools, and many students use some kind of student loan to finance their degrees.

Students should think about what they want to study, research how much graduates at a given school in that major make, and not take on more than 10 to 15% of that amount in debt.

For example, according to PayScale, the average salary for an individual with a Bachelor of Engineering degree from New York University is about $91,296 per year. That means a student could plan to take on up to $13,694 (roughly 15% of their projected future salary) in loans to finance this degree.

However, the average salary for a worker with a Bachelor of Social Work degree from New York University is about $50,008 per year, so based on Horn’s recommendation, students should only take on about $7,501 in loans. Additionally, many social work opportunities require students to earn additional accreditation such as a master’s degree, and students should consider these costs as well.

Of course, this math is dependent on a student having a clear understanding of what they plan to pursue after college, something that can be challenging for many young people. Other factors students need to consider include a school’s reputation for graduating successful alumni, as well as its rate of on-time graduations.

“If you’re taking out $80,000 in debt to go to law school for example, and you’re going to a top law school, that’s probably a reasonable investment,” says Horn. “If you’re going to a bottom-third law school, a question you ought to be asking yourself is, ‘Is this worth it?’

“The most crippling debt is when you don’t complete. If [students] don’t complete, it can be crippling because they’re not going to have the wage bump from getting that college credential and so you’re going to be earning roughly as much as someone with a high school diploma is, but you have taken out $10,000 in debt.”

Horn emphasizes that debt totals have a significant impact on the financial lives of borrowers.

“Paying not just the debt back but also the interest on top of it, that can be really punishing to make the books work as you’re trying to think through raising a family, owning a home maybe in the future and other life decisions.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, taking, institute, work, equation, students, clayton, school, student, christensen, college, borrow, youre, going, cofounder, schools, reveals, debt


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Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak: Get off Facebook

“There are many different kinds of people, and [for] some, the benefits of Facebook are worth the loss of privacy,” Wozniak told TMZ . Or Facebook and its competitors should give the option of privacy, suggested Wozniak. “Users provide every detail of their life to Facebook and … Facebook makes a lot of advertising money off this,” he told USA Today in April. Alexa has already been in the news a lot, ” Wozniak said. Amazon told Bloomberg at the time that employees listen to “an extremely small


“There are many different kinds of people, and [for] some, the benefits of Facebook are worth the loss of privacy,” Wozniak told TMZ . Or Facebook and its competitors should give the option of privacy, suggested Wozniak. “Users provide every detail of their life to Facebook and … Facebook makes a lot of advertising money off this,” he told USA Today in April. Alexa has already been in the news a lot, ” Wozniak said. Amazon told Bloomberg at the time that employees listen to “an extremely small
Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak: Get off Facebook Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, apple, tmz, told, cofounder, lot, amazon, steve, wozniak, dont, listen, privacy, facebook


Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak: Get off Facebook

“There are many different kinds of people, and [for] some, the benefits of Facebook are worth the loss of privacy,” Wozniak told TMZ . “But to many like myself, my recommendation is — to most people — is you should figure out a way to get off Facebook.”

The 68-year-old engineer and entrepreneur said as much to TMZ in Washington D.C. on Friday .

Or Facebook and its competitors should give the option of privacy, suggested Wozniak.

“People think they have a level of privacy they don’t. Why don’t they give me a choice?” Wozniak tells TMZ. “Let me pay a certain amount, and you’ll keep my data more secure and private then everybody else handing it to advertisers.”

Facebook did not immediately respond to CNBC Make It’s request for comment.

In April, 2018, Wozniak himself removed his Facebook account.

“I am in the process of leaving Facebook. It’s brought me more negatives than positives. Apple has more secure ways to share things about yourself. I can still deal with old school email and text messages,” he wrote before he deactivated his account, USA Today reported.

“Users provide every detail of their life to Facebook and … Facebook makes a lot of advertising money off this,” he told USA Today in April. “The profits are all based on the user’s info, but the users get none of the profits back.”

“I don’t think we can stop it, though. But everything about you… I mean, they can measure your heartbeat with lasers now, they can listen to you with a lot of devices. Who knows if my cellphone’s listening right now. Alexa has already been in the news a lot, ” Wozniak said.

(In April, Bloomberg found thousands of Amazon employees listen to what people say when they speak to their Alexa virtual assistant, which is built into devices like the Amazon Echo. Amazon told Bloomberg at the time that employees listen to “an extremely small sample” to improve user experience.)

Fellow Apple bigwig, Tim Cook, CEO of the company, has also pointed fingers at much of the Silicon Valley tech cohort.

“Lately it seems this industry is becoming better known for a less noble innovation – the belief you can claim credit without accepting responsibility,” Cook said in a Stanford University commencement address in June.

“We see it every day now with every data breach, every privacy violation, every blind eye turned to hate speech, fake news poisoning out national conversation, the false miracles in exchange for a single drop of your blood.”

Cook continued: “It feels a bit crazy that anyone should have to say this, but if you built a chaos factory, you can’t dodge responsibility for the chaos.”

See also:

Ex-Apple exec: If I were Mark Zuckerberg, here’s what I’d do to get Facebook out of trouble

Here’s what happened when Steve Jobs called to buy this founder’s start-up

4 keys to launching a successful business, according to this entrepreneur who sold Siri to Steve Jobs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, apple, tmz, told, cofounder, lot, amazon, steve, wozniak, dont, listen, privacy, facebook


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Wikipedia co-founder slams Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter and the ‘appalling’ internet

Larry Sanger co-founded Wikipedia in 2001 — and he’s not happy with how the internet has evolved in the nearly two decades since then. “It’s appalling frankly,” he said in an interview with CNBC this week. Sanger’s main gripe is with big social media platforms, especially Facebook and Twitter. These companies, he says, exploit users’ personal data to make profits, at the expense of “massive violations” of privacy and security. “They can shape your experience, they can control what you see, when


Larry Sanger co-founded Wikipedia in 2001 — and he’s not happy with how the internet has evolved in the nearly two decades since then. “It’s appalling frankly,” he said in an interview with CNBC this week. Sanger’s main gripe is with big social media platforms, especially Facebook and Twitter. These companies, he says, exploit users’ personal data to make profits, at the expense of “massive violations” of privacy and security. “They can shape your experience, they can control what you see, when
Wikipedia co-founder slams Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter and the ‘appalling’ internet Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wikipedia, weeksangers, thenits, slams, social, users, appalling, shape, sanger, cofounder, securitythey, internet, violations, mark, twitter, zuckerberg


Wikipedia co-founder slams Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter and the 'appalling' internet

Larry Sanger co-founded Wikipedia in 2001 — and he’s not happy with how the internet has evolved in the nearly two decades since then.

“It’s appalling frankly,” he said in an interview with CNBC this week.

Sanger’s main gripe is with big social media platforms, especially Facebook and Twitter. These companies, he says, exploit users’ personal data to make profits, at the expense of “massive violations” of privacy and security.

“They can shape your experience, they can control what you see, when you see it and you become essentially a cog in their machine,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wikipedia, weeksangers, thenits, slams, social, users, appalling, shape, sanger, cofounder, securitythey, internet, violations, mark, twitter, zuckerberg


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Watch CNBC’s full interview with Facebook Co-Founder Chris Hughes

Watch CNBC’s full interview with Facebook Co-Founder Chris Hughes17 Hours AgoFacebook co-founder Chris Hughes joins “Squawk Box” to discuss why he’s calling for the break up of the company, what needs to be reformed in the tax code, and how the U.S. needs to address income inequality.


Watch CNBC’s full interview with Facebook Co-Founder Chris Hughes17 Hours AgoFacebook co-founder Chris Hughes joins “Squawk Box” to discuss why he’s calling for the break up of the company, what needs to be reformed in the tax code, and how the U.S. needs to address income inequality.
Watch CNBC’s full interview with Facebook Co-Founder Chris Hughes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: olivia michael
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interview, hughes, squawk, joins, tax, inequality, cofounder, cnbcs, reformed, watch, needs, facebook, chris


Watch CNBC's full interview with Facebook Co-Founder Chris Hughes

Watch CNBC’s full interview with Facebook Co-Founder Chris Hughes

17 Hours Ago

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes joins “Squawk Box” to discuss why he’s calling for the break up of the company, what needs to be reformed in the tax code, and how the U.S. needs to address income inequality.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: olivia michael
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, interview, hughes, squawk, joins, tax, inequality, cofounder, cnbcs, reformed, watch, needs, facebook, chris


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Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes on his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes on his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg18 Hours AgoFacebook co-founder Chris Hughes joins “Squawk Box” to discuss how his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg might have been affected by his calls to break up the company.


Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes on his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg18 Hours AgoFacebook co-founder Chris Hughes joins “Squawk Box” to discuss how his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg might have been affected by his calls to break up the company.
Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes on his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hours, zuckerberg18, hughes, squawk, joins, cofounder, relationship, zuckerberg, mark, facebook, chris


Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes on his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes on his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg

18 Hours Ago

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes joins “Squawk Box” to discuss how his relationship with Mark Zuckerberg might have been affected by his calls to break up the company.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17
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Bill Gates and Travis Kalanick invest in A.I. chip start-up using light to move data

The seven-person company’s goal is to build a chip that can substitute for 3,000 boards containing Google’s latest Tensor Processing Unit AI chips, or TPUs. “We know this works because we already have working silicon,” Gomez claimed. Google’s entry into the AI silicon business was itself a bold development. He sees the company’s use of silicon photonics as a way to distinguish from AI chip start-ups with similar aspirations, like Graphcore. Silicon photonics enables fast data transfer with light


The seven-person company’s goal is to build a chip that can substitute for 3,000 boards containing Google’s latest Tensor Processing Unit AI chips, or TPUs. “We know this works because we already have working silicon,” Gomez claimed. Google’s entry into the AI silicon business was itself a bold development. He sees the company’s use of silicon photonics as a way to distinguish from AI chip start-ups with similar aspirations, like Graphcore. Silicon photonics enables fast data transfer with light
Bill Gates and Travis Kalanick invest in A.I. chip start-up using light to move data Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gomez, kalanick, travis, luminous, cofounder, startup, invest, gates, bill, silicon, chips, chip, startups, photonics, data, using, companies, light, ai


Bill Gates and Travis Kalanick invest in A.I. chip start-up using light to move data

Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft, during an interview at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, on Jan. 22, 2016.

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick’s 101100 fund and current Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi have invested in Luminous, a small start-up building an artificial intelligence chip.

The investment shows key figures in the technology industry believe there is still an opportunity for a new standard to emerge when it comes to hardware for AI, which can be incorporated into a variety of software applications.

Several start-ups have been working on next-generation hardware in recent years as AI has become trendy. Intel bought one, called Nervana, in 2016. Early Nervana investor Ali Partovi of Neo is investing in Luminous, which is based in Palo Alto, California.

“I always prefer to bet on a talented young team over a big established company. While there’s certainly a ton of risk, that’s what makes it worth investing now: if the race was already over, it would be too late to invest,” Partovi told CNBC via email.

Current companies are struggling to make big gains with chips that can run AI models, Luminous co-founder and CEO Marcus Gomez told CNBC in an interview on Monday. The seven-person company’s goal is to build a chip that can substitute for 3,000 boards containing Google’s latest Tensor Processing Unit AI chips, or TPUs.

“We know this works because we already have working silicon,” Gomez claimed.

Google’s entry into the AI silicon business was itself a bold development. The company took matters into its own hands, rather than relying on the Nvidia graphics cards that have become popular among AI researchers for training AI models with vast supplies of data. Google’s public cloud now features its own TPUs; the company hasn’t started selling these chips to other companies.

Luminous does want to sell its chips to different types of companies. Cloud providers like Google or Amazon Web Services could buy them. In addition, companies that make drones, robots or self-driving cars could work them into their systems, said Gomez who has worked at Google and Match Group’s Tinder.

At Tinder he would start training an AI model on a cloud in the morning and check to see if it was done in the evening, he said. People should be able to train models in minutes, not hours or days, Gomez said.

He sees the company’s use of silicon photonics as a way to distinguish from AI chip start-ups with similar aspirations, like Graphcore. Silicon photonics enables fast data transfer with light inside small places, like servers, similar to how fiber-optic cables can quickly move data over long distances. The approach Luminous is using draws on co-founder Mitchell Nahmias’ earlier neuromorphic photonics work at Princeton University.

A few other start-ups, like Lightmatter and Lightelligence, are looking to silicon photonics to boost AI processing. Alphabet’s GV invested in Lightmatter. The idea is to make the Luminous chip compatible with popular open-source AI software frameworks like TensorFlow and PyTorch.

Gomez said it’s hard to say when the chips will become commercially available.

“We’re using exact same technologies that everyone else is using, and so as a consequence, our timelines are on similar paths to other companies,” he said.

WATCH: How artificial intelligence is disrupting industries across the board


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gomez, kalanick, travis, luminous, cofounder, startup, invest, gates, bill, silicon, chips, chip, startups, photonics, data, using, companies, light, ai


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Why this 27-year-old is happy she worked a corporate job before starting her $1 billion business

But that’s okay, according to major fashion start-up founder Ankiti Bose, who says she’s happy she worked a corporate job before going it alone. In fact, that day job is what got her where she is today, Zilingo’s CEO told CNBC Make It. It gave Dhruv and I the opportunity to travel around the region and really understand what consumers want. Ankiti Bose co-founder and CEO, ZilingoTo be sure, the 27-year-old is still remarkable. Zilingo’s senior management team, including co-founder and CEO Ankiti


But that’s okay, according to major fashion start-up founder Ankiti Bose, who says she’s happy she worked a corporate job before going it alone. In fact, that day job is what got her where she is today, Zilingo’s CEO told CNBC Make It. It gave Dhruv and I the opportunity to travel around the region and really understand what consumers want. Ankiti Bose co-founder and CEO, ZilingoTo be sure, the 27-year-old is still remarkable. Zilingo’s senior management team, including co-founder and CEO Ankiti
Why this 27-year-old is happy she worked a corporate job before starting her $1 billion business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 27yearold, worked, cofounder, really, gave, southeast, business, ceo, india, job, happy, starting, ankiti, corporate, bose, billion, zilingo


Why this 27-year-old is happy she worked a corporate job before starting her $1 billion business

Many of us would love to be the kid who dreamed up a multimillion-dollar business idea in their college dorm room, becoming an overnight success without ever working a “real job.” The reality, though, is that those teen proteges are few and far between. But that’s okay, according to major fashion start-up founder Ankiti Bose, who says she’s happy she worked a corporate job before going it alone. In fact, that day job is what got her where she is today, Zilingo’s CEO told CNBC Make It. It gave her the chance to watch and learn. “The fact that I was working in venture capital and consulting before that definitely played an important role in shaping our opinions in what would work and what would not work, what would build a sustainable business,” Bose said of the early years she spent working an office job.

It gave Dhruv and I the opportunity to travel around the region and really understand what consumers want. Ankiti Bose co-founder and CEO, Zilingo

To be sure, the 27-year-old is still remarkable. Bose quit her job in 2015, just before her 24th birthday, and along with her co-founder Dhruv Kapoor has spent the last four years building a e-commerce platform that’s valued at nearly $1 billion, to help Southeast Asia’s independent retailers sell their products online. As of February this year, Singapore-headquartered Zilingo had 7 million active users globally and a valuation of $970 million. That puts Bose on course to become India’s first woman to co-found a $1 billion start-up.

Ankiti Bose, co-founder and CEO of Zilingo CNBC

But it was her time spent observing Asia’s burgeoning tech scene — first as a management consultant at McKinsey, and later as an investment analyst at Sequoia Capital in Bangalore, India — that first gave her that “aha” moment, said Bose. “I think it gave Dhruv and I the opportunity to travel around the region and really understand what consumers want,” she said of her corporate role and Kapoor’s job as a software engineer. Bose said that as an investment analyst, she followed the emergence of e-commerce powerhouses such as Amazon, Alibaba and Flipkart in major economies like the U.S., China and India. Yet it also highlighted to her the dearth of options for sellers in Southeast Asia — one of the world’s largest fashion manufacturing markets.

Despite everything that was happening in India and China at the time, Southeast Asia was the one market which was growing really fast. Ankiti Bose co-founder and CEO, Zilingo

“Despite everything that was happening in India and China at the time, Southeast Asia was the one market which was growing really fast and had the maximum room for a product like ours,” said Bose, who first spotted the opportunity on a trip to Chatuchak market in Bangkok, Thailand. “Everybody was solving for access to the internet, but what about everything else that goes on before you actually sell the product?” Bose continued, listing common hurdles for retailers, such as procurement, design and financing. “We said hey, what about if we plug all those gaps for merchants.”

Zilingo’s senior management team, including co-founder and CEO Ankiti Bose (center). Zilingo


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 27yearold, worked, cofounder, really, gave, southeast, business, ceo, india, job, happy, starting, ankiti, corporate, bose, billion, zilingo


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Twitter co-founder Williams says his ‘phenomenally lucrative’ bet on Beyond Meat stemmed from his vegan past

Twitter co-founder Ev Williams said his past experience as a vegan was one of the factors that led his venture capital firm to make an investment in Beyond Meat, the maker of plant-based meat substitutes that went public earlier this month. With Beyond Meat, Williams said the firm wanted to invest in disrupting the “trillion-dollar market” for animal products. “It’s not an impact investment, it’s a phenomenally lucrative, profitable investment,” Williams said, adding that the company also addres


Twitter co-founder Ev Williams said his past experience as a vegan was one of the factors that led his venture capital firm to make an investment in Beyond Meat, the maker of plant-based meat substitutes that went public earlier this month. With Beyond Meat, Williams said the firm wanted to invest in disrupting the “trillion-dollar market” for animal products. “It’s not an impact investment, it’s a phenomenally lucrative, profitable investment,” Williams said, adding that the company also addres
Twitter co-founder Williams says his ‘phenomenally lucrative’ bet on Beyond Meat stemmed from his vegan past Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: megan graham
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Twitter co-founder Williams says his 'phenomenally lucrative' bet on Beyond Meat stemmed from his vegan past

Ethan Brown, founder and chief executive officer of Beyond Meat Inc., center, celebrates with his wife Tracy Brown, center left, and guests during the company’s initial public offering (IPO) at the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York, U.S., on Thursday, May 2, 2019.

Twitter co-founder Ev Williams said his past experience as a vegan was one of the factors that led his venture capital firm to make an investment in Beyond Meat, the maker of plant-based meat substitutes that went public earlier this month.

Obvious Ventures, which Williams co-founded in 2014, owns a stake in Beyond Meat that’s now valued at close to $350 million, following the stock’s more than 200% increase since the company’s IPO.

“The response to the Beyond Meat IPO, which has been so gratifying, is that people are paying attention to this plant protein company that most people wouldn’t have predicted would make such a big blip,” Williams said in an onstage interview at the Collision conference in Toronto on Tuesday. “I think it’s a lot of people seeing the potential.”

Williams said his firm focuses on what the partners call “world-positive investing,” and big systemic problems in society. Obvious has also invested in electric bus company Proterra and supplements company Olly, which Unilever recently said it would acquire.

With Beyond Meat, Williams said the firm wanted to invest in disrupting the “trillion-dollar market” for animal products.

“It’s not an impact investment, it’s a phenomenally lucrative, profitable investment,” Williams said, adding that the company also addresses a huge environmental need because of the carbon footprint of the meat industry.

Williams, who now eats fish, said both he and fellow Twitter co-founder Biz Stone were fans of Beyond Meat’s products.

“The goal with it was always to penetrate the meat market — I mean that in the actual grocery store sense,” Williams said.

WATCH: Beyond Meat has path to dominate $40 billion market in 10 years


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-21  Authors: megan graham
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Europe’s ride-sharing unicorns call for reform to help the sector thrive

Martin Villig, co-founder of ride-hailing firm Bolt, which was formerly known as Taxify. PARIS — Ride-sharing giants in Europe have urged reforms for the transport industry, in the hope that it will help them expand further within the continent and face less barriers to innovation. “I think it would help even in our industry if there would be some kind of harmonization of the transport regulations,” Bolt co-founder Martin Villig told CNBC in an interview at the Viva Technology conference in Pari


Martin Villig, co-founder of ride-hailing firm Bolt, which was formerly known as Taxify. PARIS — Ride-sharing giants in Europe have urged reforms for the transport industry, in the hope that it will help them expand further within the continent and face less barriers to innovation. “I think it would help even in our industry if there would be some kind of harmonization of the transport regulations,” Bolt co-founder Martin Villig told CNBC in an interview at the Viva Technology conference in Pari
Europe’s ride-sharing unicorns call for reform to help the sector thrive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unicorns, europes, help, transport, villig, think, reform, thrive, ridehailing, bolt, sector, ridesharing, cofounder, operate, spain


Europe's ride-sharing unicorns call for reform to help the sector thrive

Martin Villig, co-founder of ride-hailing firm Bolt, which was formerly known as Taxify.

PARIS — Ride-sharing giants in Europe have urged reforms for the transport industry, in the hope that it will help them expand further within the continent and face less barriers to innovation.

Co-founders from two of the region’s largest mobility firms, BlaBlaCar and Bolt — formerly Taxify — said the lack of a common framework on carpooling and ride-hailing makes it more difficult to operate across the European Union.

The main issue is that the EU, though a collective bloc of 28 — or soon to be 27 — nations, does not have a unified “definition” of what it means to be a ride-sharing start-up, and therefore this creates a fragmentation among the different member states.

“I think it would help even in our industry if there would be some kind of harmonization of the transport regulations,” Bolt co-founder Martin Villig told CNBC in an interview at the Viva Technology conference in Paris.

The firm has been barred from entering countries like Germany, Italy, Spain and Denmark, Villig said, because those territories do not yet permit transportation start-ups to operate freely. In Spain, for instance, firms like Uber and Spanish company Cabify have faced a local pushback due to discontent in the traditional taxi industry.

“I think that there is a big opportunity to open that market,” Bolt’s co-founder said of untapped markets like Germany and Spain, adding that “giving some general harmonization guidelines from a European level” would help, “and then maybe some smaller details can be handled.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unicorns, europes, help, transport, villig, think, reform, thrive, ridehailing, bolt, sector, ridesharing, cofounder, operate, spain


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