A new Google tool aims to bring ‘in-depth analysis’ to the college search

In 2018, the search giant launched a college search feature that gives students information about four-year universities, including acceptance rates, costs and graduation rates. This year, Google expanded the feature to include two-year colleges, associate programs and certificate programs, reflecting the changing ways Americans are pursuing degrees. Today, roughly 35% of all college students, about 6 million people, are enrolled in two-year institutions like community colleges, rather than trad


In 2018, the search giant launched a college search feature that gives students information about four-year universities, including acceptance rates, costs and graduation rates. This year, Google expanded the feature to include two-year colleges, associate programs and certificate programs, reflecting the changing ways Americans are pursuing degrees. Today, roughly 35% of all college students, about 6 million people, are enrolled in two-year institutions like community colleges, rather than trad
A new Google tool aims to bring ‘in-depth analysis’ to the college search Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, rates, search, indepth, colleges, programs, students, institutions, tool, bring, aims, fouryear, analysis, twoyear, workers, college, education


A new Google tool aims to bring 'in-depth analysis' to the college search

Students today use Google to do their homework, connect with peers and teachers and apply to college. Now, more college-bound students may turn to the search engine for decision-making help. In 2018, the search giant launched a college search feature that gives students information about four-year universities, including acceptance rates, costs and graduation rates. This year, Google expanded the feature to include two-year colleges, associate programs and certificate programs, reflecting the changing ways Americans are pursuing degrees. Today, roughly 35% of all college students, about 6 million people, are enrolled in two-year institutions like community colleges, rather than traditional four-year colleges. While workers with associate’s degrees are typically out-earned by workers with higher educational attainment, earning a two-year degree in a high-demand field can be a low-cost way for workers to continue their education and increase their potential earnings. As a result, the number of students earning an associate’s degree each year has risen from 579,000 in 2001 to nearly 1 million in 2018, an increase of about 74%.

Attendance at these kinds of programs has increased also because they are typically “open-access,” meaning they accept most, or all, qualified students. Proponents of these kinds of open-access programs emphasize that they provide a low-cost education to students who might not have the opportunity to attend more exclusive four-year schools and that they enroll high percentages of students of color and low-income students. But graduation rates are significantly lower at two-year programs than they are at four-year programs. According to the Department of Education, 31.6% of students at two-year institutions graduate within four years, compared to over 40% at four-year institutions.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, google, rates, search, indepth, colleges, programs, students, institutions, tool, bring, aims, fouryear, analysis, twoyear, workers, college, education


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How to stay committed to your goals: Tell someone more successful than you, says new study

In 2010, entrepreneur Derek Sivers’ TED Talk went viral because of his surprising goal-making advice: Keep your goals to yourself. When the study participants shared their target goal with the so-called doctoral-level student, they were more likely to reach their goal. On the flip side, those who relayed their goals to the individual who they believed was a community college student did not perform better. Similarly, the group who didn’t tell their goal to anyone also didn’t see any improvement.


In 2010, entrepreneur Derek Sivers’ TED Talk went viral because of his surprising goal-making advice: Keep your goals to yourself. When the study participants shared their target goal with the so-called doctoral-level student, they were more likely to reach their goal. On the flip side, those who relayed their goals to the individual who they believed was a community college student did not perform better. Similarly, the group who didn’t tell their goal to anyone also didn’t see any improvement.
How to stay committed to your goals: Tell someone more successful than you, says new study Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, times, college, goals, committed, goal, share, stay, successful, tell, study, didnt, work


How to stay committed to your goals: Tell someone more successful than you, says new study

In 2010, entrepreneur Derek Sivers’ TED Talk went viral because of his surprising goal-making advice: Keep your goals to yourself. Citing psychology research, Sivers posited that when you share your goals with others, it makes you feel “less motivated to do the actual hard work necessary” to achieve them, he said.

But new research out of The Ohio State University could turn this frequently quoted wisdom on its head, finding that people tend to be more committed to their goals after they share them with someone who they see as “higher status,” or whose opinions they respect.

“If you don’t care about the opinion of whom you tell, it doesn’t affect your desire to persist — which is really what goal commitment is all about,” Howard Klein, lead author and professor of management and human resources at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business, said in a press release. “You want to be dedicated and unwilling to give up on your goal, which is more likely when you share that goal with someone you look up to.”

For one part of the study, which is published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, 171 undergrad college students were given a basic computer task that involved moving a slider across a screen as many times as they could over a period of time. From there, they set a goal number of times they would complete the task on the next round. Researchers then sent a “lab assistant” to review their work, who either revealed they were a doctoral-level student, or said they were a student employee at a community college.

When the study participants shared their target goal with the so-called doctoral-level student, they were more likely to reach their goal. On the flip side, those who relayed their goals to the individual who they believed was a community college student did not perform better. Similarly, the group who didn’t tell their goal to anyone also didn’t see any improvement.

In another experiment, 292 college students set ambitious goals for their grades at the beginning of the semester and shared them. Again, those who divulged their goals with someone of higher status tended to be more committed to their grades by the end of the semester.

Researchers say that sharing your goal with a higher-up does more than keep you accountable, it also makes you more motivated, simply because you care what this person thinks of you. For example, telling a mentor or manager about your hopes to get promoted could light a fire under you more than, say, a peer or friend.

Of course, this advice depends on the goal and the person. While “evaluation apprehension,” the term researchers use to describe anxiety caused by being supervised, could make you more driven, it could also have a negative effect on your ability or willingness to crush a goal.

“We didn’t find it in this study, but it is possible that you may create so much anxiety in trying to impress someone that it could interfere with your performance,” Klein said in the release.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-05  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, times, college, goals, committed, goal, share, stay, successful, tell, study, didnt, work


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Here’s how much college cost the year you were born

One hundred years later, nearly 20 million students are enrolled in college. The College Board estimates that during the 1998 – 1999 school year, average published costs at public institutions (including tuition, room and board) were $12,000 and the average net cost for public university students after grants and scholarships was about $8,850. But calculating the cost of college over time is challenging, because few Americans attended college during the first half of the 20th century and there i


One hundred years later, nearly 20 million students are enrolled in college. The College Board estimates that during the 1998 – 1999 school year, average published costs at public institutions (including tuition, room and board) were $12,000 and the average net cost for public university students after grants and scholarships was about $8,850. But calculating the cost of college over time is challenging, because few Americans attended college during the first half of the 20th century and there i
Here’s how much college cost the year you were born Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, born, board, increased, school, college, public, room, heres, average, cost, tuition, students


Here's how much college cost the year you were born

In 1919, an estimated 598,000 students were enrolled in American colleges. One hundred years later, nearly 20 million students are enrolled in college.

And while college attendance has increased dramatically over time, so have costs. The College Board estimates that during the 1998 – 1999 school year, average published costs at public institutions (including tuition, room and board) were $12,000 and the average net cost for public university students after grants and scholarships was about $8,850. During the 2018 – 2019 school year, those figures increased to $21,370 and $14,880, respectively.

But calculating the cost of college over time is challenging, because few Americans attended college during the first half of the 20th century and there is limited information on the cost of college before the 1960s. In the early 1900’s, college was mostly reserved for wealthy white men. It wasn’t until Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, better known as the GI Bill of Rights, that college access increased to include large swaths of veterans. The Higher Education Act of 1965 increased accessibility for women and minorities.

According to Discover, the average cost of college for full-time undergraduate students has increased 143% since 1963. The financial services company estimates that during the 1963-1964 school year, the average student paid the equivalent of $9,818, in 2017 dollars, for tuition, fees, room and board. During the 2016-2017 school year, students paid approximately $23,091 to cover the same costs.

Using data collected as part of the Higher Education General Information Survey and the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, The College Board took a look at tuition, fees, room and board at private and public colleges between the 1971 – 1972 and 2018 – 2019 school years.

Here’s how much college cost the year you were born in 2018 dollars, according to The College Board:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, born, board, increased, school, college, public, room, heres, average, cost, tuition, students


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College graduates who choose this major could earn over $100,000

Joho | Cultura RM | Getty ImagesLooking for a college major that will help squash your student loan debt? Recent graduates in that field are earning the highest median annual salary — $72,600, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Longer term, electrical engineers earn a median salary of $99,070, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Recent graduates with bachelor’s degrees in this field have median annual earnings of $65,400, according to the National Cente


Joho | Cultura RM | Getty ImagesLooking for a college major that will help squash your student loan debt? Recent graduates in that field are earning the highest median annual salary — $72,600, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Longer term, electrical engineers earn a median salary of $99,070, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Recent graduates with bachelor’s degrees in this field have median annual earnings of $65,400, according to the National Cente
College graduates who choose this major could earn over $100,000 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: darla mercado
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College graduates who choose this major could earn over $100,000

Joho | Cultura RM | Getty Images

Looking for a college major that will help squash your student loan debt? Consider electrical engineering. Recent graduates in that field are earning the highest median annual salary — $72,600, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Longer term, electrical engineers earn a median salary of $99,070, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. “If you were to get a doctorate, you’d get higher pay but you’re incurring more debt,” said Kyle Kensing, online content editor at CareerCast. The job hunting website analyzed employment data from the BLS.

“For electrical engineers, making around $73,000 right out of the gate is really impressive,” Kensing said. Expect to fight hard to get your foot in the door, though. The unemployment rate is only 3% for new electrical engineering graduates, which suggests that competition for open posts is tough, CareerCast found. “You’ll end up miserable if you don’t like it, and the prospects aren’t great if you don’t have an aptitude for it,” said Kensing. “I would recommend considering a double major or a minor in something you’re passionate about, but get a degree in something a little more stable.” Here are the other majors that offer attractive employment prospects upon graduation.

Computer and information systems

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Whether your plan is to become a software developer or you hope to build a career in cybersecurity, you can’t go wrong with a major in computer and information systems. Recent graduates with bachelor’s degrees in this field have median annual earnings of $65,400, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

You’ll end up miserable if you don’t like it, and the prospects aren’t great if you don’t have an aptitude for it. Kyle Kensing online content editor, CareerCast

Hiring prospects are looking strong for careers in this field. For instance, information security analysts earn a median salary of $98,350, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. These jobs are expected to grow by 32% from 2018 to 2028. Median salaries exceed the $100,000 mark for software engineers and application software developers, the bureau found.

Finance and accounting

Cristian Baitg Schreiweis/aluxum | Getty Images

Accounting majors who just received their degree are starting at a median salary of $57,700, while finance majors are making $63,700, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Both disciplines pay off if you stick with them. More from Personal Finance:

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4 ways for college students to manage health care costs Financial advisors have a median pay of $88,890 per year, while accountants and auditors have a median salary of $70,500, the BLS found.

Marketing

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-04  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, statistics, according, dont, median, salary, major, college, 100000, software, choose, pay, prospects, kensing, electrical, graduates, earn


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Four ways for college students to manage their health-care costs

The default option for many college students — especially if they’re under age 26 — might be to remain on Mom and Dad’s insurance, yet that may come with additional costs. For starters, will a parent’s plan adequately cover a college student if he or she attends school out of state and has only out-of-network providers available? Before making changes to your medical coverage, assess your available options based on the monthly premium, benefits, co-payments, deductibles and provider networks, sa


The default option for many college students — especially if they’re under age 26 — might be to remain on Mom and Dad’s insurance, yet that may come with additional costs. For starters, will a parent’s plan adequately cover a college student if he or she attends school out of state and has only out-of-network providers available? Before making changes to your medical coverage, assess your available options based on the monthly premium, benefits, co-payments, deductibles and provider networks, sa
Four ways for college students to manage their health-care costs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: elizabeth myong, darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, manage, insurance, state, parents, plan, college, kaiser, ways, providers, tax, costs, student, healthcare, family, students


Four ways for college students to manage their health-care costs

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Students and their families are grappling with the cost of higher education, but here’s one expense that might be a surprise: health care. The default option for many college students — especially if they’re under age 26 — might be to remain on Mom and Dad’s insurance, yet that may come with additional costs. For starters, will a parent’s plan adequately cover a college student if he or she attends school out of state and has only out-of-network providers available?

“If it’s all out of network, it might be worth looking at other alternatives,” said Scott Frank, a certified financial planner and founder of Stone Steps Financial in Encinitas, California. Before making changes to your medical coverage, assess your available options based on the monthly premium, benefits, co-payments, deductibles and provider networks, said Karen Pollitz, senior fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation. Here’s how to choose among the various options.

1. Staying on a parent’s plan

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Many students opt to stay on a parent’s plan, at least until the age of 26, when they can no longer be covered by their parents. Not only do students generally have doctors they are used to visiting, it also means there will be no change in the household cash flow, said Frank of Stone Steps Financial. In workplace insurance plans, where employers subsidize a large portion of premiums, the average family of four paid a total of $7,726 in 2018 to cover premiums and cost-sharing, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

If it’s all out of network, it might be worth looking at other alternatives. Scott Frank CFP and founder of Stone Steps Financial

It is important to consider whether a student will have access to in-network providers where they are attending college. Being in state and close to home, versus out of state, may have a huge impact on out-of-pocket costs. That’s because if you see a doctor or go to a hospital that’s out of network, your plan may either pay a smaller portion of the bill or may decide not to cover the service at all.

2. Choosing a student health plan

Health plans provided by colleges or universities may be an option for students who don’t have access to in-network providers on their parent’s plan. Students should consider their health-care needs and get to know the in-network providers available around campus, said Carolyn McClanahan, a physician and founder of Life Planning Partners in Jacksonville, Florida. More from Personal Finance:

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How to recession proof your life This is especially important for students with chronic conditions or who require regular doctor visits, she said. “What you have to think about with each option is what kind of medical service you need,” said McClanahan. “Am I healthy or are there issues I have to be seen for regularly?”

3. Finding marketplace plans

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Purchasing a plan through the federal or state insurance marketplace might make sense for students who are no longer dependents on their parents’ tax returns. Those who apply for insurance on their own may be eligible for premium tax credits based on their own income. These credits can help defray the cost of the plan they select. Visit the Kaiser Foundation’s Marketplace Subsidy Calculator to find estimates of premiums and subsidies. Students who are claimed as dependents on their parent’s tax returns are likely to be ineligible for subsidies due to higher household income, said Pollitz of the Kaiser Family Foundation.

4. Qualifying for Medicaid

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-03  Authors: elizabeth myong, darla mercado
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5 things every college student should do with their money

Banks and credit unions offer specialized cards for college students who don’t have long credit histories. Prioritize credit card debt repaymentWhile building credit history is important, you also want to avoid falling into debt. For more inspiration on how to build up your emergency fund, check out these helpful tips: 6 things college students should avoid spending money on5 small moves to save big on college costs7 ways to save money in college5. Any college student can — and should — apply. D


Banks and credit unions offer specialized cards for college students who don’t have long credit histories. Prioritize credit card debt repaymentWhile building credit history is important, you also want to avoid falling into debt. For more inspiration on how to build up your emergency fund, check out these helpful tips: 6 things college students should avoid spending money on5 small moves to save big on college costs7 ways to save money in college5. Any college student can — and should — apply. D
5 things every college student should do with their money Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, card, student, payments, youre, students, debt, things, college, credit, financial


5 things every college student should do with their money

Leaving home for college is the first time that many young adults find themselves on their own — responsible for attending classes, cooking meals and managing money largely by themselves. It’s inevitable to make a few financial mistakes, even if you’re prepared. But with a little effort, you can minimize them, no matter how green you are on the subject when you head off to campus. Here are five tips for getting your finances in order while you’re in school.

1. Start making student loan payments

Technically, undergraduates often don’t need to make payments on their loans until six months after graduating or dropping below half-time status. But by making payments throughout your college years, if you’re able, you can potentially save thousands of dollars in interest, depending on the size of the loans and the interest rate. “It’ll cost less in the future once you enter repayment if you get that principal down,” Elaine Griffin Rubin, senior contributor and communications specialist at Edvisors, told CNBC. “And it will lower your monthly payments.” If you start making payments before the grace period, there are no minimum payments and no penalty for prepaying, which can help you not only lessen your debt load, but get in the habit of making payments while acclimating to a budget.

2. Build your credit history

One of the most important parts of your credit history is how long you have had access to credit. That means the sooner you get started, responsibly, the better your score will be, experts say. Banks and credit unions offer specialized cards for college students who don’t have long credit histories. Another option, if your parents or guardians are up for it, is to become an authorized user on someone else’s card. “If you’re using cards responsibly, it can be possible to build up great credit in two to four years,” John Ganotis, founder of CreditCardInsider.com, previously told CNBC Make It. “The only way to really maximize scores is time.” A higher score can help secure better credit card offers, as well as home and auto loan rates, saving you even more money in interest payments. Here are some great first-time credit card options for students.

3. Prioritize credit card debt repayment

While building credit history is important, you also want to avoid falling into debt. Over 35% of U.S. college students say they have more than $1,000 in credit card debt, according to a report published earlier this summer by EVERFI and AIG.

Twenty/20

That might not seem like a pressing issue compared to the record amount of loan debt students are taking on, but credit cards typically have higher interest rates than other types of debt. The average credit card APR is 17.71%, according to CreditCards.com, while federal student loan rates are currently less than half that. If you start accruing credit card debt in school, paying that off, in full, should be your top financial priority. That said, college students do seem to practice smart financial habits when it comes to credit cards: More than 70% say they pay their bills on time, according to Sallie Mae’s 2019 Majoring in Money report, with 60% saying that they pay off their cards in full every month.

4. Start building an emergency fund

When you leave school, you’ll want options. Moving across the country to pursue a job, going on an extended trip or taking time to find a role you’re passionate about all require capital, and a fully-funded emergency fund will help make the time after graduation easier. But with college being more expensive than ever before, it can seem like an uphill battle to save for a rainy day. Start by keeping your other expenses as low as possible. “The best way to keep your costs down while in school is one, have multiple roommates; two, drive a paid off car; and three, learn how to cook cheaply while checking out the amazing lists out there on sites like Pinterest,” Travis Hornsby, founder of Student Loan Planner, tells CNBC Make It. One of the most important factors to your bottom line? Limiting the cost of attendance as much as possible, which includes taking advantage of financial aid. For more inspiration on how to build up your emergency fund, check out these helpful tips: 6 things college students should avoid spending money on

5 small moves to save big on college costs

7 ways to save money in college

5. Fill out FAFSA for 2020

It might be 2019, but the deadline for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid for the 2020-2021 school year opens October 1, and students should apply as early as possible. FAFSA allows students to apply for financial aid from the federal government, no strings attached, for college or grad school. It must be filed each year in order for you to continue to receive federal financial support. Any college student can — and should — apply. As college finance experts put it, it’s free money. And that will help keep your loan balance down. “Regardless of your personal financial situation, you should be filing the FAFSA form every year to open doors to potential grants or loans that otherwise you would not have access to,” Amin Dabit, head of Advisory Services at Personal Capital, tells CNBC Make It. “Filing as early as possible can be an advantage as well. There is a defined pool of money that is allocated every year. If you apply late or after the deadline, you might miss out on money.” You will need your Social Security number, your income tax information (or your parents’) for 2018, investment and bank records and an FSA ID. If you’re struggling to fill out the form, Dabit suggests seeking help from your university’s financial aid office or from a financial advisor. Apply on the Department of Ed’s federal student aid website. Don’t miss: Over a third of college students already have credit card debt Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, card, student, payments, youre, students, debt, things, college, credit, financial


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At campaign stop, Biden hints at his plan to address student debt and rising tuition

Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden reacts during a campaign Community Event at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire, U.S., August 24, 2019. Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris, have released bold plans to address concerns about escalating student debt and college tuition. Sanders’ plan would erase all $1.6 trillion of outstanding student debt and make two- and four-year public colleges tuition- and debt-free. Harris has said she


Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden reacts during a campaign Community Event at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire, U.S., August 24, 2019. Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris, have released bold plans to address concerns about escalating student debt and college tuition. Sanders’ plan would erase all $1.6 trillion of outstanding student debt and make two- and four-year public colleges tuition- and debt-free. Harris has said she
At campaign stop, Biden hints at his plan to address student debt and rising tuition Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-27  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, state, address, college, hampshire, hints, student, rising, campaign, biden, wouldnt, keene, service, public, debt, stop, plan, tuition


At campaign stop, Biden hints at his plan to address student debt and rising tuition

Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden reacts during a campaign Community Event at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire, U.S., August 24, 2019.

After an event at Keene State College in New Hampshire over the weekend, a student walked up to Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and asked him to promise her that he wouldn’t forget college students should he make it to the White House.

“No, I don’t forget college students,” Biden said. “I put three kids through college and graduate school.

“I ended up with a debt of over $280,000,” he added. “I get it; I’ve forgotten more about it than you’ll ever know.”

Biden went on to sketch out his higher education plan.

He stopped short of his previous position that all four years of public college should be free, saying instead that he supported two years of free community college, “cutting in half the cost of four years of college at a state university.”

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“We’re going to cut back on what’s owed by people who go to private college,” Biden said, adding that he would reduce the monthly student loan payments for people enrolled in income-driven repayment plans, in which bills are capped at a percentage of a borrower’s income.

Currently, under those plans, people pay 10% to 20% of their discretionary income. Biden suggested he would require them to pay just 5%.

And if a student loan borrower earns less than $30,000, Biden said, they wouldn’t be required to pay anything and interest wouldn’t accumulate on their debt.

A campaign spokesperson said Biden will soon release a plan for “making higher education affordable and accessible to all Americans.”

Higher education expert Mark Kantrowitz said Biden’s plan doesn’t make any big waves.

“He does not propose to forgive student loans, even in a targeted manner,” Kantrowitz said. “They won’t attract much attention from millennials.”

Many of the major contenders for the Democratic nomination, including Sens. Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris, have released bold plans to address concerns about escalating student debt and college tuition.

Sanders’ plan would erase all $1.6 trillion of outstanding student debt and make two- and four-year public colleges tuition- and debt-free. Warren has proposed eliminating the cost of tuition and fees at every public two-year and four-year college, and canceling $640 billion of student debt. Harris has said she would make community college free and four-year public college debt-free.

In New Hampshire, Biden said there should be “college forgiveness for public service, if you’re engaged,” an apparent reference to the already existing public service loan forgiveness program.

Signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2007, the public service program allows not-for-profit and government employees to have their federal student loans canceled after 10 years of payments. However, the program has been plagued by problems, and more than 99% of applicants are rejected.

“You’re going to do fine,” Biden told the student at the New Hampshire rally. “Your parents are making a great sacrifice having you here at a private university.”

“This is public,” the woman corrected him. “It’s Keene State College.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-27  Authors: annie nova
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The most ‘valuable’ college majors

Your college major has a huge impact on the size of your paycheck later on. Pharmacy majors earn a median salary of $100,000, while music majors make $36,000. Botany majors typically earn $50,000. A new ranking by personal finance website Bankrate.com orders majors by the median income and unemployment rates they lead to. “People have to look at a ranking like this and balance their passion with the financial considerations,” Garcia said.


Your college major has a huge impact on the size of your paycheck later on. Pharmacy majors earn a median salary of $100,000, while music majors make $36,000. Botany majors typically earn $50,000. A new ranking by personal finance website Bankrate.com orders majors by the median income and unemployment rates they lead to. “People have to look at a ranking like this and balance their passion with the financial considerations,” Garcia said.
The most ‘valuable’ college majors Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-26  Authors: annie nova
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The most 'valuable' college majors

Engineers assemble intelligent robots at Chuangze Intelligent Robot Co., Ltd. on April 29, 2019 in Rizhao, Shandong Province of China.

Your college major has a huge impact on the size of your paycheck later on. Pharmacy majors earn a median salary of $100,000, while music majors make $36,000.

Flower fan? Botany majors typically earn $50,000.

A new ranking by personal finance website Bankrate.com orders majors by the median income and unemployment rates they lead to. With the cost of attending college exploding over the last few decades, it’s important to understand how much your degree can earn you in the future.

“Picking a major is a huge decision and it has financial impacts for the rest of your life,” said Adrian Garcia, a data analyst at Bankrate.com.

The salary information shouldn’t dissuade you from pursuing your interests. However, it can help you decide how much you should take out in loans, or what kind of school you should attend. And if you’re undecided, it can provide some direction.

“People have to look at a ranking like this and balance their passion with the financial considerations,” Garcia said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-26  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, valuable, majors, salary, ranking, intelligent, huge, major, earn, garcia, college, financial, median


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Colleges are slashing their tuition. Don’t expect to feel relief

To understand why, faculty there compared the college’s price tag with other schools in the area. “What we found is that our tuition was $10,000 out of line with similar colleges,” Gibralter said. As a result, tuition at the college in Aurora, New York, will be cut by 25% for the 2019-2020 academic year. Tuition at St. John’s College, with campuses in New Mexico and Maryland, will be down by a third this coming year. That’s because when colleges lower their tuition, they tend to also scale back


To understand why, faculty there compared the college’s price tag with other schools in the area. “What we found is that our tuition was $10,000 out of line with similar colleges,” Gibralter said. As a result, tuition at the college in Aurora, New York, will be cut by 25% for the 2019-2020 academic year. Tuition at St. John’s College, with campuses in New Mexico and Maryland, will be down by a third this coming year. That’s because when colleges lower their tuition, they tend to also scale back
Colleges are slashing their tuition. Don’t expect to feel relief Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slashing, college, dont, schools, colleges, enrollment, expect, price, gibralter, relief, university, families, tuition, reduced, feel


Colleges are slashing their tuition. Don't expect to feel relief

When Jonathan Gibralter became president of Wells College in 2015, enrollment at the school was at a nadir. To understand why, faculty there compared the college’s price tag with other schools in the area.

“What we found is that our tuition was $10,000 out of line with similar colleges,” Gibralter said. “Some students weren’t even looking at us.”

As a result, tuition at the college in Aurora, New York, will be cut by 25% for the 2019-2020 academic year. Families have noticed. “The number of applications this year has gone up,” Gibralter said.

The cost of attending college has exploded over the last few decades. More than 40% of private colleges reported a decline in freshmen enrollment between 2015 and 2018, with the majority of the schools citing “price sensitivity” among families as the culprit, a recent study by the National Association of College and University Business Officers found.

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Recognizing their price has turned many families away, more and more schools are resetting their tuition. Between 2012 and 2018, an average of 10 schools a year reduced their tuition, compared with an average of one college a year from 1987 to 2011, according to an analysis by Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of SavingforCollege.com.

Tuition at St. John’s College, with campuses in New Mexico and Maryland, will be down by a third this coming year. Tuition will be reduced by 57% at the University of the Cumberlands in Williamsburg, Kentucky.

Unfortunately, families don’t usually feel much relief from these reductions.

That’s because when colleges lower their tuition, they tend to also scale back their financial aid packages. The net cost to a family doesn’t change much, if at all.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, slashing, college, dont, schools, colleges, enrollment, expect, price, gibralter, relief, university, families, tuition, reduced, feel


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The 10 highest-paying college majors of 2019, according to PayScale

The site also identified the highest-paying college majors, and polled workers about whether or not they felt their work makes the world a better place. Here are the 10 highest-paying college majors, according to PayScale:Graduate students in MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics create simulators of a winged aircraft or ground vehicles. Aeronautics & astronauticsMedian salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $73,100Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,6


The site also identified the highest-paying college majors, and polled workers about whether or not they felt their work makes the world a better place. Here are the 10 highest-paying college majors, according to PayScale:Graduate students in MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics create simulators of a winged aircraft or ground vehicles. Aeronautics & astronauticsMedian salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $73,100Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,6
The 10 highest-paying college majors of 2019, according to PayScale Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, majors, college, say, experience, makes, highestpaying, work, place, 05, payscale, 2019, better, world, alumni, according


The 10 highest-paying college majors of 2019, according to PayScale

College students arriving on campuses across the U.S. this fall may think that choosing a school was the biggest decision they’d have to make for a while. But now, they’ll need to choose a major. “Research shows that in many ways it doesn’t really matter where you go to college,” Jon Marcus, higher education editor at The Hechinger Report, tells CNBC Make It. “What major you pick has a greater influence on your future postgraduate earnings and career success.” As part of its annual College Salary Report, released today, PayScale analyzed data from graduates of more than 2,500 schools in order to spotlight how much graduates typically make early and mid-way through their careers. The site also identified the highest-paying college majors, and polled workers about whether or not they felt their work makes the world a better place. Here are the 10 highest-paying college majors, according to PayScale:

Graduate students in MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics create simulators of a winged aircraft or ground vehicles. Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor | Getty Images

10. Aeronautics & astronautics

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $73,100

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $131,600

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 59%

9. Pharmacy

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $79,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $132,500

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 77%

8. Business analysis

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,200

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $133,200

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 50%

7. Electrical power engineering

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $72,400

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $134,700

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 63%

6. Actuarial mathematics

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $63,300

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $135,100

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 46%

5. Political economy

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $57,600

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $136,200

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 38%

4. Operations research

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $77,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $137,100

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 48%

3. Applied economics and management

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $58,900

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $140,000

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 69%

2. Electrical engineering & computer science

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $88,000

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $142,200

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 44%

1. Petroleum engineering

Median salary for alumni with 0-5 years of experience: $94,500

Median salary for alumni with 10+ years of experience: $176,900

Percent who say their work makes the world a better place: 72%

sezer66 | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, majors, college, say, experience, makes, highestpaying, work, place, 05, payscale, 2019, better, world, alumni, according


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