This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni


She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni
This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

Warren cited data that indicates that more than 70% of black mothers and more than 40% of Latina mothers are the sole breadwinners in their families, compared to less than a quarter of white mothers. She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination.

In a Medium post, the Massachusetts senator writes that if elected, on day one of her presidency she would implement a set of executive actions that would “boost wages for women of color and open up new pathways to the leadership positions they deserve.”

On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks on during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “And it’s getting worse,” writes Warren. “The gap in weekly earnings between white and black women is higher today than it was 40 years ago. ”

To fix this problem, Warren says that as president she would deny federal contracts to companies with a poor track record of diversity and equal pay, implement a minimum wage salary of $15 an hour (since black and brown women disproportionately occupy low-wage jobs), ban companies from asking applicants about their salary and criminal histories, and ban companies from using forced arbitration and non-compete clauses that “make it harder for employees to fight wage theft, discrimination and harassment.”

Additionally, Warren points out that women of color also face a steeper climb to higher-level management positions. “Even though black women and Latinas are often the leaders and decision-makers in their own homes and communities, they hold only one spot on the Fortune 500 CEO list and less than 5% of Fortune 500 Board positions, ” she writes.

Currently, Mary Winston, who was appointed interim CEO of Bed, Bath & Beyond in May, is the only black woman leading a Fortune 500 company.

Warren writes that she would provide companies with resources to attract applicants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities and other minority-serving institutions. She says she would also create paid fellowship programs for federal jobs for minority and low-income candidates and she would require every federal agency to make diversity a core part of its strategic plan. This includes, she says, creating a government-wide mentorship program focused on black and brown employees.

“It’s time to build an America that recognizes the role that women of color play in their families and in the economy,” writes Warren, “that fairly values their work, and that delivers equal opportunity for everyone.”

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Don’t miss: Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


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Amazon’s latest Kindle Oasis lets you adjust the screen color for easier reading at night

Amazon introduced a new version of its high-end Kindle Oasis e-reader on Wednesday, offering a feature that will make it more comfortable to read at night. The last version was widely considered to be the best e-reader on the market. When active, it adds a bit of an orange hue instead of using just a bright white backlight. Amazon said this isn’t a blue light filter, but is simply an additional option for people who find an orange tint more comfortable. Amazon suggested that such a filter isn’t


Amazon introduced a new version of its high-end Kindle Oasis e-reader on Wednesday, offering a feature that will make it more comfortable to read at night. The last version was widely considered to be the best e-reader on the market. When active, it adds a bit of an orange hue instead of using just a bright white backlight. Amazon said this isn’t a blue light filter, but is simply an additional option for people who find an orange tint more comfortable. Amazon suggested that such a filter isn’t
Amazon’s latest Kindle Oasis lets you adjust the screen color for easier reading at night Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, read, orange, ereader, latest, screen, version, eyes, isnt, filter, lets, kindle, amazons, oasis, color, light, comfortable, reading, night, easier


Amazon's latest Kindle Oasis lets you adjust the screen color for easier reading at night

Amazon introduced a new version of its high-end Kindle Oasis e-reader on Wednesday, offering a feature that will make it more comfortable to read at night.

The last version was widely considered to be the best e-reader on the market.

The updated version has controls that allow users to change the color temperature of the display from cool to warm, which means it won’t be as jarring in a dark room and is easier on the eyes. When active, it adds a bit of an orange hue instead of using just a bright white backlight.

Amazon said this isn’t a blue light filter, but is simply an additional option for people who find an orange tint more comfortable. Amazon suggested that such a filter isn’t necessary because the Kindle is not backlit and spreads light across the page rather than shooting it directly into your eyes, so “you can read comfortably for hours without eyestrain.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, read, orange, ereader, latest, screen, version, eyes, isnt, filter, lets, kindle, amazons, oasis, color, light, comfortable, reading, night, easier


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This company will pay someone $10,000 to travel across America and Canada

If you’re a #nofilter kind of person who wants to travel the world and have someone else pick up the tab, the gig of “color explorer” may be for you. Behr Paint is holding a contest where the winner will get to travel the world to find inspiration for creating new paint colors and their quirky names. The Behr Color Explorer will receive all-expense paid flights, lodging and prepaid adventures valued at approximately $20,000, according to the company, plus a $10,000 stipend. “We have a few inspir


If you’re a #nofilter kind of person who wants to travel the world and have someone else pick up the tab, the gig of “color explorer” may be for you. Behr Paint is holding a contest where the winner will get to travel the world to find inspiration for creating new paint colors and their quirky names. The Behr Color Explorer will receive all-expense paid flights, lodging and prepaid adventures valued at approximately $20,000, according to the company, plus a $10,000 stipend. “We have a few inspir
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: jimmy im
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 10000, explorer, paint, colorful, behr, world, america, travel, youbehr, canada, working, youre, color, company, pay


This company will pay someone $10,000 to travel across America and Canada

If you’re a #nofilter kind of person who wants to travel the world and have someone else pick up the tab, the gig of “color explorer” may be for you.

Behr Paint is holding a contest where the winner will get to travel the world to find inspiration for creating new paint colors and their quirky names. The Behr Color Explorer will receive all-expense paid flights, lodging and prepaid adventures valued at approximately $20,000, according to the company, plus a $10,000 stipend.

“We have a few inspiring, colorful destinations in mind, like the glacial blues of Lake Louise in Banff, Canada, and the colorful exteriors of Charleston, South Carolina’s Rainbow Row, but we’ll be working with the selected Color Explorer to finalize their itinerary,” a spokesperson for Behr tells CNBC Make It.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: jimmy im
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 10000, explorer, paint, colorful, behr, world, america, travel, youbehr, canada, working, youre, color, company, pay


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Virginia attorney general Mark Herring, third in line for governor, wore blackface in college

Northam, a Democrat, still faces widespread calls for his resignation after a conservative news site last week published his yearbook page photo. Justin Fairfax, also a Democrat, was accused earlier this week of sexually assaulting a woman at the Democratic National Convention in 2004. If Northam, Fairfax and Herring all resign, the state’s speaker of the House of Delegates, Kirk Cox, would become governor. “This conduct is in no way reflective of the man I have become in the nearly 40 years sin


Northam, a Democrat, still faces widespread calls for his resignation after a conservative news site last week published his yearbook page photo. Justin Fairfax, also a Democrat, was accused earlier this week of sexually assaulting a woman at the Democratic National Convention in 2004. If Northam, Fairfax and Herring all resign, the state’s speaker of the House of Delegates, Kirk Cox, would become governor. “This conduct is in no way reflective of the man I have become in the nearly 40 years sin
Virginia attorney general Mark Herring, third in line for governor, wore blackface in college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: dan mangan, kevin breuninger, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images, scott dudelson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, college, northam, blackface, color, herring, virginia, yearbook, mark, pain, line, felt, efforts, democrat, attorney, governor, week, way, general, wore


Virginia attorney general Mark Herring, third in line for governor, wore blackface in college

Northam, a Democrat, still faces widespread calls for his resignation after a conservative news site last week published his yearbook page photo.

And Northam’s would-be successor, Lieutenant Gov. Justin Fairfax, also a Democrat, was accused earlier this week of sexually assaulting a woman at the Democratic National Convention in 2004. He denies her accusation.

If Northam, Fairfax and Herring all resign, the state’s speaker of the House of Delegates, Kirk Cox, would become governor. Cox is a Republican.

The Republican majority in the House of Delegates was decided by a name being drawn from a bowl to break a tie in a race for one seat in that legislative body.

A Democrat has been in Virginia’s governor mansion since 2014.

Sen. Mark Warner, D-Virginia, said he was “shocked and disappointed” by Herrings’ disclosure.

Warner said the week has been an “awful” one for Virginia.

He refused to comment further when asked if Herring should resign, given the fact that Warner earlier called for Northam to leave office for possibly wearing blackface in his yearbook page photo.

In his full statement Wednesday, Herring said:

“The very bright light that is shining on Virginia right now is sparking a painful but, I think we all hope, important conversation. The stakes are high, and our spirits are low.

“I am sure we all have done things at one time or another in our lives that show poor judgment, and worse yet, have caused some level of pain to others. I have a glaring example from my past that I have thought about with deep regret in the many years since, and certainly each time I took a step forward in public service, realizing that my goals and this memory could someday collide and cause pain for people I care about, those who stood with me in the many years since, or those who I hoped to serve while in office.

“In 1980, when I was a 19-year-old undergraduate in college, some friends suggested we attend a party dressed like rappers we listened to at the time, like Kurtis Blow, and perform a song. It sounds ridiculous even now writing it. But because of our ignorance and glib attitudes – and because we did not have an appreciation for the experiences and perspectives of others – we dressed up and put on wigs and brown makeup.

“This was a onetime occurrence and I accept full responsibility for my conduct.

That conduct clearly shows that, as a young man, I had a callous and inexcusable lack of awareness and insensitivity to the pain my behavior could inflict on others. It was really a minimization of both people of color, and a minimization of a horrific history I knew well even then.

“Although the shame of that moment has haunted me for decades, and though my disclosure of it now pains me immensely, what I am feeling in no way compares to the betrayal, the shock, and the deep pain that Virginians of color may be feeling. Where they have deserved to feel heard, respected, understood, and honestly represented, I fear my actions have contributed to them being forced to revisit and feel a historical pain that has never been allowed to become history.

“This conduct is in no way reflective of the man I have become in the nearly 40 years since.

“As a senator and as attorney general, I have felt an obligation to not just acknowledge but work affirmatively to address the racial inequities and systemic racism that we know exist in our criminal justice system, in our election processes, and in other institutions of power. I have long supported efforts to empower communities of color by fighting for access to healthcare, making it easier and simpler to vote, and twice defended the historic re-enfranchisement of former felons before the Supreme Court of Virginia. I have launched efforts to make our criminal justice system more just, fair, and equal by addressing implicit bias in law enforcement, establishing Virginia’s first-ever program to improve re-entry programs in local jails, and pushing efforts to reform the use of cash bail. And I have tried to combat the rise in hate crimes and white supremacist violence that is plaguing our Commonwealth and our country.

“That I have contributed to the pain Virginians have felt this week is the greatest shame I have ever felt. Forgiveness in instances like these is a complicated process, one that necessarily cannot and should not be decided by anyone but those directly affected by the transgressor, should forgiveness be possible or appropriate at all. In the days ahead, honest conversations and discussions will make it clear whether I can or should continue to serve as attorney general, but no matter where we go from here, I will say that from the bottom of my heart, I am deeply, deeply sorry for the pain that I cause with this revelation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: dan mangan, kevin breuninger, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images, scott dudelson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, college, northam, blackface, color, herring, virginia, yearbook, mark, pain, line, felt, efforts, democrat, attorney, governor, week, way, general, wore


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Women like Stacey Abrams and Serena Williams are proof that bravery trumps perfectionism

Since giving a TED Talk on the socially ingrained bravery gap between girls and boys, I’ve been on a nationwide crusade against the perils of perfectionism. And wherever I go, I hear the same thing from women of color: perfectionism isn’t a choice for us, it’s a requirement. Look no further than the appalling treatment of Serena Williams at the U.S. Open this year for proof of what can happen when women of color advocate for themselves. Our employers, media, and peers must stop holding women and


Since giving a TED Talk on the socially ingrained bravery gap between girls and boys, I’ve been on a nationwide crusade against the perils of perfectionism. And wherever I go, I hear the same thing from women of color: perfectionism isn’t a choice for us, it’s a requirement. Look no further than the appalling treatment of Serena Williams at the U.S. Open this year for proof of what can happen when women of color advocate for themselves. Our employers, media, and peers must stop holding women and
Women like Stacey Abrams and Serena Williams are proof that bravery trumps perfectionism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: reshma saujani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, proof, trumps, bravery, fail, williams, girls, women, going, family, perfectionism, abrams, perfect, color, serena, stacey, live


Women like Stacey Abrams and Serena Williams are proof that bravery trumps perfectionism

Recently, Stacey Abrams said to an audience in California: “I’m not going to change my hair, my skin color, my gender to win this election. And there’s no amount of Jenny Craig that’s going to solve anything in six weeks.”

It was her way of saying, sorry folks, but I am not going to alter one single iota of who I am to fit your mold. I may not be your “perfect” candidate — but I am “frustratingly” myself.

Her words stopped me dead in my tracks. But why?

Since giving a TED Talk on the socially ingrained bravery gap between girls and boys, I’ve been on a nationwide crusade against the perils of perfectionism. And wherever I go, I hear the same thing from women of color: perfectionism isn’t a choice for us, it’s a requirement. And bravery, quite frankly, is a privilege.

As women of color, there are two messages we receive from the time we are little girls that are so thoroughly drilled into us they are basically a part of our very being. Lesson 1: it’s not enough to be good, you have to be better than everyone else just to be equal. And lesson 2: if you fail, you are bringing your family and your community down with you.

It takes bravery to admit to and own our so-called flaws, to ask for raises or promotions, to quit our jobs and go off on our own — essentially to follow the “Lean In” playbook. But, to quote Michelle Obama, well, “that s— doesn’t always work.”

Because although we live in a culture that fetishizes failure — the failed Silicon Valley startup, the career pivot gone wrong, the congressional aspirations cut short — we simply don’t celebrate that kind of failure for women, and definitely not women of color. More often than not, we’re actually penalized for our bravery, for taking chances.

Look no further than the appalling treatment of Serena Williams at the U.S. Open this year for proof of what can happen when women of color advocate for themselves. It’s not just using our voices that gets us into trouble. When black women in leadership make mistakes — an inevitable consequence of taking risks — research shows that they are more likely to be criticized or punished for organizational failures than male, or even white female counterparts.

Cue the perfectionist drive. Stay on track, do and act as you’re told — by your family, community, society. Aim to please. Worse, conform.

As a brown girl and the daughter of Indian immigrants who came to this country as refugees from Uganda, this phenomenon has played out for most of my life.

In my family, there were three options when it came to careers: doctor, lawyer, engineer. Being the “perfect” immigrant daughter meant conforming in spaces like Harvard and Yale, trying desperately not to be found out for not belonging. Somewhere along the way, being “perfect” turned into being inauthentic, into ignoring my lifelong dream of running for office because I was afraid of losing and letting people down. Before I knew it, I’d lost my bravery muscle.

That’s why I was so stunned to hear my friend Stacey Abrams say what she did. In one fell swoop, Abrams turned these powerful myths about perfectionism upside down. Rather than sink under the weight of others’ disappointments, recoiling in shame and pain over a narrow loss, she bravely re-committed herself to her dream to serve as Governor. And, rather than change who she is, she vowed to continue leading with her so-called imperfections, with her whole self.

And she’s not the only one. Gabrielle Union recently laid bare her experience of using a surrogate, a brave thing to say out loud because — according to the toxic narrative of perfection — being a “successful” woman necessitates effortlessly navigating the journey from girlfriend to wife to mother. Rep. Ayanna Pressley negotiated with Speaker Nancy Pelosi for a seat on the Gun Violence Prevention Task Force — risking criticism that she should “wait her turn.”

Because the bravery gap between is socially ingrained — it will take society at large to change. Our employers, media, and peers must stop holding women and girls of color to a higher bar. Because, ultimately, we shouldn’t have to achieve fame or perfection or wealth before we are allowed to — or prepared to — be brave.

And although there is no overstating the work to be done on the part of our institutions to ensure that women of color have the space to fail safely and live authentically —we also don’t have time to wait. There’s a bravery revolution on the horizon. And I’m thrilled to see these women leading it, opening up the space for women everywhere to fear less, fail more, and live bolder.

Reshma Saujani is the author of “Brave, Not Perfect,” and is the founder and CEO of Girls Who Code.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: reshma saujani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, proof, trumps, bravery, fail, williams, girls, women, going, family, perfectionism, abrams, perfect, color, serena, stacey, live


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Women earn 63% more with an MBA—but still not as much as white men

For many people, earning an MBA is the key to a bigger paycheck and loftier position in the workplace. But if you’re a woman or a person of color, an advanced degree still doesn’t mean equal pay for equal work. That’s according to a recent study released by the Forté Foundation, a non-profit focused on helping women advance in business. But when comparing these salaries within the group, women and people of color still received lower pay than their white male counterparts, despite having equival


For many people, earning an MBA is the key to a bigger paycheck and loftier position in the workplace. But if you’re a woman or a person of color, an advanced degree still doesn’t mean equal pay for equal work. That’s according to a recent study released by the Forté Foundation, a non-profit focused on helping women advance in business. But when comparing these salaries within the group, women and people of color still received lower pay than their white male counterparts, despite having equival
Women earn 63% more with an MBA—but still not as much as white men Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: courtney connley, photo courtesy of getty, thomas barwick getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fort, white, women, mbabut, men, pay, earn, equal, earning, youre, business, study, foundation, color, 63


Women earn 63% more with an MBA—but still not as much as white men

For many people, earning an MBA is the key to a bigger paycheck and loftier position in the workplace.

But if you’re a woman or a person of color, an advanced degree still doesn’t mean equal pay for equal work.

That’s according to a recent study released by the Forté Foundation, a non-profit focused on helping women advance in business. The study, led by Michelle Wieser, Interim Dean School of Business at St. Catherine University, found that overall men and women of all races tend to see a 63 percent salary bump after earning an MBA.

But when comparing these salaries within the group, women and people of color still received lower pay than their white male counterparts, despite having equivalent credentials.

Elissa Sangster, CEO of the Forté Foundation, tells CNBC Make It that she believes the problem could be a mix of outright discrimination as well as unconscious bias in terms of how raises are awarded. She says more companies need to have serious conversations around how these decisions are being made and why “certain groups aren’t getting promoted as fast or why they don’t have as many people reporting to them.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-04  Authors: courtney connley, photo courtesy of getty, thomas barwick getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fort, white, women, mbabut, men, pay, earn, equal, earning, youre, business, study, foundation, color, 63


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2018 new home sales end weaker

2018 new home sales end weaker13 Hours AgoCNBC’s Diana Olick provides some color to the new home sales numbers in 2018.


2018 new home sales end weaker13 Hours AgoCNBC’s Diana Olick provides some color to the new home sales numbers in 2018.
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31
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2018 new home sales end weaker

2018 new home sales end weaker

13 Hours Ago

CNBC’s Diana Olick provides some color to the new home sales numbers in 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31
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Department of Labor accuses Oracle of discrimination

The U.S. Labor Department accused Oracle of wage discrimination practices that cost female and minority employees $400 million, according to a new federal filing Tuesday. The suit was stayed later that year to allow the Department of Labor and Oracle to mediate the dispute. The Department of Labor is now renewing its claims that Oracle discriminates in its compensation and hiring practices and even alleges the company destroyed evidence. The Department of Labor alleges that Oracle used two metho


The U.S. Labor Department accused Oracle of wage discrimination practices that cost female and minority employees $400 million, according to a new federal filing Tuesday. The suit was stayed later that year to allow the Department of Labor and Oracle to mediate the dispute. The Department of Labor is now renewing its claims that Oracle discriminates in its compensation and hiring practices and even alleges the company destroyed evidence. The Department of Labor alleges that Oracle used two metho
Department of Labor accuses Oracle of discrimination Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: lauren feiner, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oracle, women, labor, pay, discrimination, practices, color, federal, department, accuses, involved, company


Department of Labor accuses Oracle of discrimination

The U.S. Labor Department accused Oracle of wage discrimination practices that cost female and minority employees $400 million, according to a new federal filing Tuesday.

The new complaint builds upon a 2017 lawsuit the DoL’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance filed in 2017 alleging Oracle systematically paid white male workers more than their peers who were women or people of color. The suit was stayed later that year to allow the Department of Labor and Oracle to mediate the dispute. The Department of Labor is now renewing its claims that Oracle discriminates in its compensation and hiring practices and even alleges the company destroyed evidence.

Oracle declined CNBC’s request for comment.

The Department of Labor alleges that Oracle used two methods to discriminate against women and people of color at the company. The first involved allegedly setting initial pay based on prior salary and the second allegedly involved “channeling” these groups into career tracks that would have lower pay.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: lauren feiner, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
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Geisha Williams’ departure from PG&E means there are now no Latina Fortune 500 CEOs

Investigators linked 17 wildfires to the California utility company’s equipment in the year Williams became CEO, according to Fortune. Williams’ exit highlights a persistent problem in corporate America, where very few women, and even fewer women of color, hold leadership positions. When Williams first assumed the CEO role in 2017, there were 32 female CEOs at the companies on the Fortune 500 list, the highest number in history. That number has since decreased, with just 5 percent of Fortune 500


Investigators linked 17 wildfires to the California utility company’s equipment in the year Williams became CEO, according to Fortune. Williams’ exit highlights a persistent problem in corporate America, where very few women, and even fewer women of color, hold leadership positions. When Williams first assumed the CEO role in 2017, there were 32 female CEOs at the companies on the Fortune 500 list, the highest number in history. That number has since decreased, with just 5 percent of Fortune 500
Geisha Williams’ departure from PG&E means there are now no Latina Fortune 500 CEOs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: courtney connley, f carter smith, bloomberg, getty images, paul morigi, getty images entertainment
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceos, women, means, 500, dollar, williams, pge, earning, geisha, cents, leadership, number, departure, ceo, fortune, color, latina


Geisha Williams' departure from PG&E means there are now no Latina Fortune 500 CEOs

John Simon, who has served as PG&E’s executive vice president and general counsel since 2017, will serve as interim CEO. In a statement addressing the leadership changes, Richard C. Kelly, Chair of the Board of PG&E Corporation, thanked Williams for her “service and tireless commitment” to the company and recognized that “tremendous challenges” lie ahead for the organization.

Investigators linked 17 wildfires to the California utility company’s equipment in the year Williams became CEO, according to Fortune. Just hours after her departure, the company announced that it will file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection due to the financial impact of the wildfires.

Williams’ exit highlights a persistent problem in corporate America, where very few women, and even fewer women of color, hold leadership positions. When Williams first assumed the CEO role in 2017, there were 32 female CEOs at the companies on the Fortune 500 list, the highest number in history. That number has since decreased, with just 5 percent of Fortune 500 CEO seats now being held by women.

In a CNBC Make It interview for Equal Pay Day last year, Lisa Crooms-Robinson, Professor of Law & Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Howard University, said that the lack of women in leadership roles, especially women of color, certainly affects the gender and racial pay gaps that exist today.

Women earn, on average, 80 cents for every dollar earned by a white man. Among women of color that number is even lower, with black women earning 63 cents for every dollar, Native American women earning 57 cents for every dollar and Latina women earning 54 cents for every dollar.

“For most organizations, [closing these gaps] would require a shift that goes beyond diversity committees and affinity groups,” said Crooms-Robinson. “Committed organizational leadership at the very highest level is essential to make such a significant culture shift.”

In an interview to accompany Time’s list of women who are changing the world, Williams spoke about what it meant to be the first Latina in her position and the impact that she hoped it would have on young women in the future.

“You always hear people talking about what it means to be the first,” she said. “But I think it’s important that we focus on making sure there are others. While I may be the first, I certainly don’t want to be the last.”

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Don’t miss: 5 black women talk starting salaries, being underpaid and how they asked for more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: courtney connley, f carter smith, bloomberg, getty images, paul morigi, getty images entertainment
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceos, women, means, 500, dollar, williams, pge, earning, geisha, cents, leadership, number, departure, ceo, fortune, color, latina


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Black and white TV is not completely out of style in the UK

Although black and white television is ancient history for most tech-savvy consumers, more than 7,000 households in the UK still use the monochromatic TV set. The UK’s licensing body, TV Licensing, revealed that curious fact last week, underscoring that despite the overwhelming migration to streaming and high-definition TV units, a small subset of consumers in Britain still watch TV the old fashioned way. Jason Hill, a spokesperson for TV Licensing, couldn’t provide an exact reason for why some


Although black and white television is ancient history for most tech-savvy consumers, more than 7,000 households in the UK still use the monochromatic TV set. The UK’s licensing body, TV Licensing, revealed that curious fact last week, underscoring that despite the overwhelming migration to streaming and high-definition TV units, a small subset of consumers in Britain still watch TV the old fashioned way. Jason Hill, a spokesperson for TV Licensing, couldn’t provide an exact reason for why some
Black and white TV is not completely out of style in the UK Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: falyn page, lambert, archive photos, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, licensing, white, completely, uk, style, licence, black, watch, monochromatic, households, tv, tvs, color


Black and white TV is not completely out of style in the UK

Although black and white television is ancient history for most tech-savvy consumers, more than 7,000 households in the UK still use the monochromatic TV set.

The UK’s licensing body, TV Licensing, revealed that curious fact last week, underscoring that despite the overwhelming migration to streaming and high-definition TV units, a small subset of consumers in Britain still watch TV the old fashioned way.

A licence is required by law to watch or record live TV programs on any channel using any type of device, including a TV, laptop, tablet and cellular device. According to TV Licensing’s index, the most black and white licenses can be found in London at 1,768; followed by the West Midlands with 431 licenses, and Greater Manchester with 390.

Jason Hill, a spokesperson for TV Licensing, couldn’t provide an exact reason for why some TV watchers still preferred black and white. However, he told CNBC that “over half of the UK’s TVs now connect to the internet, so it’s interesting that more than 7,000 households still choose to watch their favorite shows on a black and white telly.”

Since its beginnings in 1967, many people have switched over to color transmissions. Yet as of the year 2000, there were still 212,000 households that watched shows using their black and white transmissions, according to TV Licensing data. Over the years this number has since declined drastically, but there are still people in the world who enjoy their monochromatic television.

One advantage of having a black and white licence over a color licence is that it’s significantly cheaper. A black and white license holder is paying £50.50 a year (nearly $65), when compared to a color licence holder who is paying three times that price at £150.50 (or over $192) a year.

Meanwhile, its clear that at least some watchers simply enjoy the colorless experience. Jeffrey Borinsky, a London-based television and radio technology historian, raved about his monochromatic televison to TV Licensing.

“There are hundreds of collectors like myself who have many black and white TVs. Who wants all this new-fangled [high-definition TVs], satellite dishes or a screen that’s bigger than your room, when you can have glorious black and white TV!”

Although many stores no longer sale black and white tv sets, many are still offered on sites such as eBay, and at vintage shops around the world.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-15  Authors: falyn page, lambert, archive photos, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, licensing, white, completely, uk, style, licence, black, watch, monochromatic, households, tv, tvs, color


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