New report from members of The Washington Post’s union shows women and people of color are paid less

A new comprehensive study released by The Washington Post Newspaper Guild, a union started by company employees in 1934, shows that women and people of color are paid significantly less than their white male counterparts on staff. All of this information is based on pay data for Guild-covered employees that the union requested in July 2019. Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist Steven Rich led efforts on the study, alongside a team of other Post Guild members. Office of the Washington Post on M


A new comprehensive study released by The Washington Post Newspaper Guild, a union started by company employees in 1934, shows that women and people of color are paid significantly less than their white male counterparts on staff.
All of this information is based on pay data for Guild-covered employees that the union requested in July 2019.
Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist Steven Rich led efforts on the study, alongside a team of other Post Guild members.
Office of the Washington Post on M
New report from members of The Washington Post’s union shows women and people of color are paid less Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, members, post, paid, employees, company, women, posts, guild, report, union, shows, color, men, study, data, pay


New report from members of The Washington Post's union shows women and people of color are paid less

A new comprehensive study released by The Washington Post Newspaper Guild, a union started by company employees in 1934, shows that women and people of color are paid significantly less than their white male counterparts on staff. The study, which looks at pay disparities in both the newsroom and in the commercial division, says that “women as a group are paid less than men” and that “women of color in the newsroom receive $30,000 [per year] less than white men.” All of this information is based on pay data for Guild-covered employees that the union requested in July 2019. Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist Steven Rich led efforts on the study, alongside a team of other Post Guild members. He tells CNBC Make It via email that he hopes the data will move the company closer to achieving pay equity.

Office of the Washington Post on May 03, 2012, in Washington, United States. The Washington Post is an American daily newspaper. Thomas Imo | Photothek | Getty Images

“The Post has been on a hiring spree in recent years, and one thing we’ve heard from many members of the Guild was that they’d like to better understand pay across the organization,” he says. “The Post has never conducted and released to the public a comprehensive pay study, so The Guild felt it was time to do so again since it had been three years since the last such study.” In addition to highlighting a pay gap among women and people of color, the study also found that the pay disparity between men and women is most prevalent in journalists under the age of 40. Based on the data, the median salary for men and women over 40 in the newsroom is $127,765 per year and $126,000 per year, respectively. That’s a 1.5% gap. But, when looking at journalists under 40, that gap widens to 14% with men earning $95,890 per year, compared to women earning $84,030 per year. For young employees of color, the study found that on average they make 7% less than white journalists, with median salaries of $84,780 and $90,780, respectively. In a series of testimonies given by employees, one 35-year-old award-winning journalist says she started her career as an intern at the company in the mid-2000s. Recently, she says, she found out that all of the men on her team are paid more than she is, despite her having more experience than most of them. One of the men, she says, even makes $30,000 more than she does. The journalist continues by saying that the only time she received a significant raise at the company was when a competitor presented her with another job offer several years ago. “It’s always disgusted me that the only way we can get what we deserve is by getting an offer somewhere else,” she says. “How is that a way to show that you value someone?”

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos attends the Amazon Prime Video’s Golden Globe Awards After Party in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Jan. 6, 2019. Emma McIntyre | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, members, post, paid, employees, company, women, posts, guild, report, union, shows, color, men, study, data, pay


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Inside Ferrari’s New York design lab where the super rich can customize $500,000 cars

The ‘Tailor Made Center’ for Ferrari is a design lab where clients can customize their rides. Ferrari launched the tailor made program in 2011, with a single design center at its factory in Maranello, Italy. Ferrari only makes about 200 to 300 tailor made cars a year, out of a total production of 9,200 cars last year. You don’t just pick your own paint color — you can create a new one, name it after yourself and have it forever immortalized on Ferrari’s gleaming wall of paint color samples. A ‘T


The ‘Tailor Made Center’ for Ferrari is a design lab where clients can customize their rides. Ferrari launched the tailor made program in 2011, with a single design center at its factory in Maranello, Italy. Ferrari only makes about 200 to 300 tailor made cars a year, out of a total production of 9,200 cars last year. You don’t just pick your own paint color — you can create a new one, name it after yourself and have it forever immortalized on Ferrari’s gleaming wall of paint color samples. A ‘T
Inside Ferrari’s New York design lab where the super rich can customize $500,000 cars Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: robert frank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rich, paint, color, 500000, inside, center, cars, clients, program, super, york, ferraris, lab, ferrari, source, customize, tailor, design


Inside Ferrari's New York design lab where the super rich can customize $500,000 cars

Any average millionaire or billionaire can buy a Ferrari. But only a select group gets the privilege of buying a fully customized one — an honor that is becoming big business for the Italian carmaker. Ferrari this month opened its third “tailor made center” in the world, a 6,600-square-foot showroom on Manhattan’s Park Avenue that allows buyers to fully customize their rides, choosing everything from fabrics and leathers to woods, paint colors and wheels. While Ferrari has long allowed customers to choose basic features of their cars, the tailor made program takes personalization to a whole new level, adding between 20% to 100% to a car’s price.

The ‘Tailor Made Center’ for Ferrari is a design lab where clients can customize their rides. Source: CNBC

The higher sticker prices generate fatter profit margins that’s helped Ferrari offset a slowdown in sales in the second quarter. The company said “strong positive contribution from its personalization programs” contributed to 10% growth in adjusted operating profit in the quarter. And the tailor made program is expected to continue boosting the bottom line in its third-quarter earnings, scheduled for release next month. “It’s a nice business opportunity,” said Enrico Galliera, Ferrari’s chief marketing and commercial officer. “But most of all, it’s a way to engage clients and keep them happy and coming back again.” Ferrari launched the tailor made program in 2011, with a single design center at its factory in Maranello, Italy. It was meant to harken back to Ferraris in the 1950s, when each one was designed specifically for each customer.

CNBC’s Robert Frank designs his own Ferrari through the ‘Tailor Made Center’ computer software. Source: CNBC

Demand was so high at the original tailor made center — especially among clients from Asia — the company opened a second one in Shanghai in 2014. Now, with a third center in New York, Ferrari has made it even easier for customers to spend six-figures on a personalized sports car. The Park Avenue showroom looks more like a luxury fashion boutique than a car-design shop. Swatches of buttery leather, spools of brightly-colored threads and samples of suede and denim fill the cabinets. The walls are covered in a rainbow of paint samples, from Bianco Polo white and Griggio Notte grey to the classic Ferrari “Rosso Corsa” red. Being able to buy a tailor made Ferrari makes you a member of a highly elite club. Ferrari only makes about 200 to 300 tailor made cars a year, out of a total production of 9,200 cars last year. Buyers have to apply for the chance to buy one and having a tailor made Ferrari instantly gives the owner status among collectors — and often a higher resale value.

Interior view of the custom-upholstered Ferrari. Source: CNBC

Ferrari is coy about what qualifications a customer needs to become a tailor made customer. But it probably helps to have purchased several other Ferraris and show devotion to the Prancing Horse. “There is no specific entry-gate,” Galliera said. “Certainly you have to be a client for some time. You have to purchase and collect your car and keep it as a piece of art.” The process of creating a tailor made Ferrari is an exercise in both ego-stroking and engineering. You don’t just pick your own paint color — you can create a new one, name it after yourself and have it forever immortalized on Ferrari’s gleaming wall of paint color samples. One popular color is “Grigio Ingrid,” a warm grey that was created by Italian director Roberto Rossellini to match the eyes of his wife, the famed actress Ingrid Bergman.

A ‘Tailor Made’ Ferrari with a blue exterior paint color and bespoke racing stripes on the hood. Source: CNBC

Clients chosen for the tailor made Center are given a personal designer to walk them through the process, which can take a half-day or more. There are so many choices that Ferrari helps clients start out with one of three design themes. There is “Scuderia,” where the aesthetics are inspired by Ferrari’s racing history. There is “Classica,” modeled on Ferrari’s classic touring cars of the 1950s and 1960s. And there is “Edita,” inspired by today’s more trendy fashions, fabrics and pop culture. Clients often come in with pictures of their yacht and ask Ferrari to match the paint color and woods. Or they will model a car after their private-jet or favorite vacation home. They can choose the threads for the seat stitching, the dashboard fabric and even the color of the shift-paddles on the steering wheel. Clients can also get their signature or name on a special tailor made dedication plate between the front seats. Ferrari acknowledges there are some requests it has to turn down.

Clients choose between hundreds of colors on display in the ‘Tailor Made Center’ for Ferrari. Source: CNBC

“Sometimes we have to say no,” Galliera said. “Let’s say if the color is pink with cartoons on the bonnet of the car, that’s something we don’t want to do. We have our design team check every single request and decide whether it’s feasible, fitting with our positioning. Every day we have people coming with crazy requests.” For Ferrari, it’s worth it. The tailor made process can add hundreds of thousands to the price of a Ferrari, which already deliver fat margins with sticker prices ranging between $215,00 to over $600,000. While the company won’t say exactly how much it earns from the program, personalization has become a critical source of profits for super-car companies, as today’s super rich seek cars that are truly special or unique. Aside from a big bank account, the most important requirement to become a tailor made customer is patience. Ferrari said that once the vehicle is approved and “accepted for production” it takes another nine to 12 months for delivery.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: robert frank
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rich, paint, color, 500000, inside, center, cars, clients, program, super, york, ferraris, lab, ferrari, source, customize, tailor, design


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One of the biggest reasons women aren’t getting ahead at work, according to a new survey

And the numbers are much smaller for women are color, with 68 Latinas and 58 Black women promoted at that level. “You can look at every level of a company and you’ll see a huge disparity for women of color,” says Yee. The ‘broken rung’ problemMany of these struggles create what McKinsey and Lean In call “the broken rung” — or the fact that women miss that first step up to manager. The report says that based on five years of pipeline data from hundreds of companies, this “broken rung” is the bigg


And the numbers are much smaller for women are color, with 68 Latinas and 58 Black women promoted at that level. “You can look at every level of a company and you’ll see a huge disparity for women of color,” says Yee. The ‘broken rung’ problemMany of these struggles create what McKinsey and Lean In call “the broken rung” — or the fact that women miss that first step up to manager. The report says that based on five years of pipeline data from hundreds of companies, this “broken rung” is the bigg
One of the biggest reasons women aren’t getting ahead at work, according to a new survey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: julia boorstin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arent, color, getting, companies, woman, biggest, yee, work, ahead, survey, mckinsey, women, broken, reasons, according, men, rung, think


One of the biggest reasons women aren't getting ahead at work, according to a new survey

In the past five years, workplaces have had many conversations about harassment and equality, with the rise of the Me Too and Time’s Up movements. But as a result, has anything really changed for women? That’s what the fifth annual “Women in the Workplace” study from consulting firm McKinsey and Company and the organization Lean In looks to understand. For the survey, the organizations analyzed more than 68,500 employees to make conclusions about the state of women in corporate America. The study collected information from 329 different organizations, employing 13 million people, between May and August 2019. This is what the study’s authors found.

Progress to close the leadership gap

Women are making progress in the C-suite, where the percentage of women has increased from 17% to 21% over the last five years. That increase may seem small, but it does show that many companies have added women to the C-suite: Today, 44% of companies have three or more women in their C-suite, up from 29% in 2015. “The average top team has one, two or three women now,” says Lareina Yee, a senior partner at McKinsey, who is the company’s chief diversity and inclusion officer. “Even though that is not a full step to gender equality, we think it’s really important because when you have women at the most important decision-making table weighing in, that matters for companies.” Yee says this small increase in representation at the top can also have ripple effects. “When you think about the women in the organization, someone who’s a first manager or a V.P., she can look up at the top and see role models, and women doing it. She’ll have more confidence that she can as well.”

Another sign that progress could continue to close the gap: Women are still asking for promotions and negotiating salaries at the same rate as men, which has been the case for the past five years. And not only are more companies offering paternity leave, as opposed to just maternity leave for women, but more men are also taking that time off. In 2019, the report found, men were roughly as likely as women to take leave when they became a new parent “That is a step in the right direction because you actually want all of your employees to be able to take time for families,” Yee says.

Persistent problems with the gender gap

Despite those signs of progress, there is more to do to make sure all women are well-represented in the corporate world, the report found. Women of color are underrepresented at every level of business. And while one in five C-suite executives is a woman, only one in 25 is a woman of color. “As a woman of color in business, it’s more personal,” says Yee. “There’s a huge disparity that starts very early … Women get stuck before they can even get through that very first promotion.” McKinsey and Lean In evaluated first promotions, and found that for every 100 men getting their first promotion, just 72 women are promoted. And the numbers are much smaller for women are color, with 68 Latinas and 58 Black women promoted at that level. “You can look at every level of a company and you’ll see a huge disparity for women of color,” says Yee.

The ‘broken rung’ problem

Many of these struggles create what McKinsey and Lean In call “the broken rung” — or the fact that women miss that first step up to manager. The report says that based on five years of pipeline data from hundreds of companies, this “broken rung” is the biggest systemic barrier to gender parity. An even bigger problem: The survey finds that few companies are aware of this broken rung, with human-resources leaders pointing to less access to sponsorship or a lack of women throughout the pipeline instead. And many aren’t aware of a problem at all: 62% of men and 54% of women say they think women are well represented at the manager level, when one in three managers in their company is a woman. If this “broken rung” is fixed, and women are promoted and hired to first-level manager at the same rates as men, the McKinsey and LeanIn survey says, 1 million women will be added to management in corporate America over the next five years.

Backlash for women

There is also the issue of backlash to the Me Too and Time’s Up movements, which have resulted in the ousting of a number of high-profile men following revelations of misconduct. “I don’t think you need research to say that there’s some backlash,” says Yee. But the movements have sparked needed conversations about sexual harassment, women of color at work and microaggressions in the workplace, she says. “If that’s a hard discussion, let’s have that discussion. We have to have a more transparent and open workplace where we can talk about that. And I think it would be surprising if there weren’t men who are finding that an uncomfortable discussion.”

Solutions


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: julia boorstin
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, arent, color, getting, companies, woman, biggest, yee, work, ahead, survey, mckinsey, women, broken, reasons, according, men, rung, think


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This $3.2 million diamond is having ‘surgery’ to be more pink—if it survives, it could double in value

Side-view of the 5-carat pink diamond the Wests will re-polish in ‘diamond surgery.’ Workstation where a master diamond cutter will re-polish the 5-carat pink diamond worth millions. A tiny spark flashes during the cutting process of this 5-carat pink diamond valued at $3.2 Million. West diamonds inspects the 5-carat pink diamond after its ‘diamond surgery’ is complete. Front-view of the newly re-cut 5-carat pink diamond now graded as a fancy intense pink diamond valued around $7 Million.


Side-view of the 5-carat pink diamond the Wests will re-polish in ‘diamond surgery.’ Workstation where a master diamond cutter will re-polish the 5-carat pink diamond worth millions. A tiny spark flashes during the cutting process of this 5-carat pink diamond valued at $3.2 Million. West diamonds inspects the 5-carat pink diamond after its ‘diamond surgery’ is complete. Front-view of the newly re-cut 5-carat pink diamond now graded as a fancy intense pink diamond valued around $7 Million.
This $3.2 million diamond is having ‘surgery’ to be more pink—if it survives, it could double in value Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: erica wright ray parisi, erica wright, ray parisi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diamonds, pinkif, diamond, scott, 5carat, survives, million, double, pink, rock, having, wheel, stone, west, surgery, color, value


This $3.2 million diamond is having 'surgery' to be more pink—if it survives, it could double in value

I’d never heard of a diamond going into “surgery,” so when I was invited to watch a massive 5-carat pink diamond worth $3.2 million go under the knife (aka, diamond cutting wheel), I was more than a little curious. “One wrong move and the stone could just shatter, then millions of dollars right down the drain,” Scott West tells me as he looks at a bright pink diamond in the palm of his hand.

Scott West of L.J. West Diamonds holds a rare, 5-carat pink diamond in his hand. CNBC

The thought of shattering such a perfect gem makes me cringe, but Scott West knows what he’s doing. He and his dad, Larry West, are the father-son duo who run L.J. West Diamonds, a wholesale diamond house in New York City that’s been around for 41 years. The Wests are known as “diamantaires” in the industry, experts whose primary business is sourcing and cutting rare colored diamonds.

Larry and Scott West of L.J. West Diamonds inspecting their latest acquisition through a jeweler’s loupe. CNBC

First a little back story on their pink rock… “We purchased it at auction for $3.2 million, but we see the potential to add millions to its value,” says Scott.

Front-view of the massive, 5-carat fancy pink diamond Scott and Larry West will attempt to re-cut to increase its value. CNBC

When Scott and his dad shelled out all that cash, they were drawn to the rock because they knew they could unlock more value in the stone by cutting it. In fact, they specialize in cutting and shaving colored diamonds in ways that improve cut, clarity, and color. In essence, a new shape can help a stone better reflect light, which can enhance or magnify a diamond’s natural hue. In this case, they believe they can reshape this exotic pink rock to make it even more pink. They do it because a more intense pink color will make it even more valuable. Scott says it’s pretty simple, “The more color the stone has, the more valuable it is.” How much more valuable? Scott tells me, “If we are successful, we can double the stone’s value overnight.” So with this rock we’re talking going from $3.2 million to some where north of $6 million.

The 5-carat pink diamond must be visually inspected by a microscope to check for any imperfections. CNBC

Operation pink

The Wests say they confirmed through computer modeling that some tweaks to the stone’s shape would make it better reflect light and pump up its pink hue — and that price-tag. During the operation, they plan to remove a few micro millimeters from key points around the rock and shave the angle of a few facets. The diamond’s 5-carat weight is big part of the reason it’s worth so much money, so they want to get this done by removing as little weight from the stone as possible.

One wrong move and the stone could just shatter, then millions of dollars right down the drain. Scott West L.J. West Diamonds partner and V.P.

And since diamonds are one of the hardest materials in the world, instead of a scalpel, the tool in this surgery is a steel polishing wheel coated with diamond dust that spins anywhere from 350 to 600 RPMs. When you touch a diamond to the spinning wheel, in a split second it can shave micro millimeters from a facet. In the diamond business this delicate surgery is called “re-polishing.” The risk is, if you apply too much pressure to the diamond or hold it at the wrong angle on the wheel, it could destroy the stone.

Side-view of the 5-carat pink diamond the Wests will re-polish in ‘diamond surgery.’ CNBC

“We had a 20-carat yellow diamond that ‘busted on the wheel’ we call it… it went from $600,000 to $100,000 – just like that, it’s the unlucky lotto,” says Scott.

Inside the diamond OR

This delicate procedure is rarely seen outside the industry and this is the first time L.J. West Diamonds is allowing cameras inside the “operating room.” “When you re-polish these stones, it can be very nerve-wracking…but you have to go for it,” Scott says. We take an elevator three floors up from the L.J. West offices to an area called the gem-polishing room. It’s a high-security area that requires us to be swiped in with a digital key and enter through two sets of security doors, where finally someone unlocks it and lets us through.

Workstation where a master diamond cutter will re-polish the 5-carat pink diamond worth millions. CNBC

We enter a small, magenta-painted room with five diamond cutting stations. The air is thick, filled with microscopic particles of diamond dust and it smells kind of smoky. The guys sitting at these stations are called master diamond cutters. In order to reach this master level of diamond cutting, some of these craftsmen must practice for over 10 years with white diamonds before they acquire skills and patience needed to handle even rarer colored diamonds. Scott takes the pink diamond he’s carrying over to a man dressed in a navy blue button-down shirt that reminds me of something a wood shop worker would wear. His hands are covered in dust. Scott tells me he’s one of the best diamond “surgeons” in America, but there are ground rules: I can’t use his name in my reporting and our cameras can never be pointed at his face. (People who work in the diamond industry generally like to be discrete about their access to multi-million dollar diamonds so they don’t become targets.)

The 5-carat pink diamond is set into a clamp the master diamond cutter will run along the polishing wheel. CNBC

The mysterious diamond master asks if we’re ready, and I nudge my camera guy to make sure he’s rolling. This guy’s about to increase the value of this diamond by millions of dollars — or destroy it.

This polishing wheel made of steel and coated with diamond dust is used to shave down micro millimeters of the pink diamond stone. CNBC

I hold my breath as he brings the stone closer to the spinning wheel and Scott’s holding his breath too.

A tiny spark flashes during the cutting process of this 5-carat pink diamond valued at $3.2 Million. CNBC

When the rock hits the wheel and the first spin chews into the stone, the sound is jarring. It’s a lot like the terrible buzz you hear when having a cavity drilled by the dentist, only this is 10 times louder. Scott’s got $3.2 million on the line, so his eyes are glued to the wheel. After about 30 minutes of spinning, checking facets and weighing the diamond on a scale, the diamond master says he’s done for the day. Scott tells me it’s too dangerous to do too much cutting in a single sitting, instead they pause because they don’t want to over cut the stone and must let the “excited” stone relax: The speed of the wheel and grinding the stone against it causes the diamond to heat up and intensify the color. This color increase is often temporary, so Larry and Scott need to give this pink diamond time to cool down and rest while they re-evaluate the techniques they’ll use to finish up the job.

The master diamond cutter holds the stone as he inspects the color post cutting. CNBC

In fact, the re-polishing process for this rock unfolds over more than 10 sessions and two weeks. In total, this diamond spends about six hours in the “operating room.”

Larry West of L.J. West diamonds inspects the 5-carat pink diamond after its ‘diamond surgery’ is complete. CNBC

Seeing pink

I visit the Wests on the final day of surgery and when I see the stone, I honestly can’t tell any difference. The Wests explain it takes an expert eye to see it. Larry West whips out his jeweler’s loupe, a small magnifying glass experts use in the business, to closely examine the newly shaped stone and announces, “Well, Scott I think you did the trick.”

Side-by-side comparison of the 5-carat pink diamond that underwent ‘diamond surgery,’ the average person may not be able to discern the difference in color. CNBC

But before the Wests can pop the champagne, they need to ship the rock to the Gemological Institute of America (GIA), the institute that officially classifies gems by color and clarity on the industry’s standardized diamond grading scale. Experts at the GIA will assess the rock to determine if the operation has really made the rock any more pink.

The GIA lab report shows the upgrade in color for this 5-carat fancy intense pink diamond. CNBC

Two-weeks later, the GIA ships the rock back with the verdict, and Scott is thrilled, “We got the upgrade — from fancy pink to fancy intense pink.” That means the surgery was a success and the diamond’s color is now a more “intense” pink than it was before. Amping up the pink moves the rock into an even smaller group of rare pink diamonds — and that boosts its value by a lot. “Because it did so well, the stone is now worth over $7 million… it was a total home run,” explains Scott. Experts say this pink diamond has definitely increased in value by the millions, but it remains to be seen if L.J. West will find a buyer to pay $7 million for the diamond. The increase in value is a big boost, but the Wests decline to share how it compares to what they have made off past stones.

Front-view of the newly re-cut 5-carat pink diamond now graded as a fancy intense pink diamond valued around $7 Million. CNBC

The Wests have since set the seven-figure diamond into a platinum ring flanked by two white diamonds. They plan to take it on a tour to several V.I.P. events this fall where they believe they’ll find a client who will “fall in love with it” and write them a big check to take it home.

The 5-carat fancy intense pink diamond set in a plaitnum ring with white side stones. CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-08  Authors: erica wright ray parisi, erica wright, ray parisi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diamonds, pinkif, diamond, scott, 5carat, survives, million, double, pink, rock, having, wheel, stone, west, surgery, color, value


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Many minorities avoid seeking credit due to generations of discrimination. Why that keeps them back

Long’s credit score remains far lower than the average FICO score of 695. Ricki Lowitz, chief executive officer at Working Credit, a Chicago-based nonprofit that helps clients in seven states navigate the credit system, believes that the way to assist disenfranchised consumers is to first help them overcome “their deep seated fear of credit.” When her clients learn how the credit system works, many are angry that they did not have the information earlier, she says. The median credit score for pa


Long’s credit score remains far lower than the average FICO score of 695. Ricki Lowitz, chief executive officer at Working Credit, a Chicago-based nonprofit that helps clients in seven states navigate the credit system, believes that the way to assist disenfranchised consumers is to first help them overcome “their deep seated fear of credit.” When her clients learn how the credit system works, many are angry that they did not have the information earlier, she says. The median credit score for pa
Many minorities avoid seeking credit due to generations of discrimination. Why that keeps them back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-01  Authors: lori teresa yearwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seeking, generations, minorities, score, long, color, white, discrimination, rates, keeps, working, fenelon, avoid, mother, system, credit


Many minorities avoid seeking credit due to generations of discrimination. Why that keeps them back

Image Source | DigitalVision | Getty Images

For many minorities in America, it’s an all too familiar scene. An applicant who is a person of color and and applies for credit is either denied or gets much worse terms than a white borrower. In fact, an investigation by the National Fair Housing Alliance, a Washington D.C.-based nonprofit, found that 60% of the time, applicants who were people of color — and way more financially qualified than their white counterparts —nevertheless were offered higher-priced car loans, costing them an extra $2,662 each over the course of the loan. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) joined forces in May to introduce the Loan Shark Prevention Act to “combat the predatory lending practices of America’s big banks and protect consumers already burdened with exorbitant credit-card interest rates.” The legislation would cap interest rates at 15%, likely benefiting many consumers of color. More from Personal Finance:

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Millennials aren’t thinking about this risk to their finances

3 retirement essentials to keep more cash in your pocket Whether these actions can repair the financial damage that minorities have long endured in America remains to be seen. Decades of discrimination by the federal government and America’s financial institutions has induced an almost trauma-like response, causing many people of color, particularly African-Americans, to adopt self-protective behavior not unlike a post-traumatic stress reaction. The paradox: This defensive behavior, where the cause of injury is avoided, often distances people of color from the very credit-granting institutions they need to thrive. The ramifications of that can prove devastating, as good credit impacts everything from mortgage rates to hiring decisions by employers.

Scarred at an early age

Consider the plight of Sherry Long, 68, who witnessed racism firsthand when she was just 10, an experience that continues to impact her financial well-being. On a hot summer day in 1959, Long and her mother walked the 2.5 miles from their log cabin to the Rawlins, Wyoming, municipal building twice in one day, the second time to ask why the city had turned off their water. On their first visit, they had paid their water bill in cash. “I just gave you $300,” Long’s mother, an African-American, told the city worker, a white woman. “You didn’t give me any money,” Long said the clerk replied.

Sherry Long avoided seeking credit due to racial childhood trauma. Lori Teresa Yearwood

Long’s mother, a nurse’s aide and house cleaner who lived paycheck to paycheck, pleaded with her employers for emergency loans and then worked overtime to pay off the debts. On that day, Long made a vow to herself: She would avoid the white, mainstream institutions that reminded her of the one that stole from her mother. A soft-spoken woman, Long chokes back tears as she recounts how she hoped that by this time in her life, after earning her bachelor’s degree in psychology and working for nearly 30 years in the non-profit sector, she would own a house and have good credit. Instead, after paying annual interest rates of up to 700% on emergency payday loans to cover her rent and basic living costs, she fell behind and got evicted from her two-bedroom apartment in an upscale Salt Lake City neighborhood. After couch-surfing with friends for more than a year, she now rents a one-bedroom apartment above a busy restaurant, across the street from a massage parlor in a high-crime area. Long’s credit score remains far lower than the average FICO score of 695.

She says she never considered seeking help from a white-owned institution. “They just didn’t seem like they were meant for people like us,” Long said.

Defensive crouch

Jacqueline Scott, an associate professor of philosophy who specializes in race theory at Chicago’s Loyola University, understands that traumatized people go into a “kind of defensive crouch.” In fact, this PTSD-like response is so prevalent that Scott has coined a term to help her students understand it: “meta oppression.” “It’s the depression that comes from having already dealt with oppression for an extended period of time,” Scott explained. Ricki Lowitz, chief executive officer at Working Credit, a Chicago-based nonprofit that helps clients in seven states navigate the credit system, believes that the way to assist disenfranchised consumers is to first help them overcome “their deep seated fear of credit.” Nearly 80% of Working Credit’s clients are people of color.

We meet people who have been beaten down by the system. Ricki Lowitz chief executive officer at Working Credit

There is longstanding debate over whether the algorithms that drive the credit scoring system are racially biased. Joanne Gaskin, vice president of scores and analytics at credit-scoring company FICO, says the firm doesn’t use age, address, employment, income, gender or race in generating their scores. “The fact that race is not factored into the credit score is perhaps the greatest opportunity we have to help people of color level the playing field,” Lowitz said. When her clients learn how the credit system works, many are angry that they did not have the information earlier, she says. “We meet people who have been beaten down by the system,” Lowitz said. “In some cases, we are contradicting their parents and grandparents who have told them to stay away.” The median credit score for participants in Working Credit’s 18-month program increased by 45 points for Hispanic participants and by 44 points for African Americans.

Cleaning up his credit history

Stanley Fenelon, of Boston, is one graduate of the program. In 2016, the 26-year-old African-American had spent about a year sleeping in his car while working at a paid internship.

Stanley Fenelon is a business analyst at Harvard University. Rose Lincoln | Harvard University

After overcoming that struggle and finding a job, Fenelon faced another challenge: cleaning up his credit history. His low scores disqualified him from affordable car loans and safe apartment rentals that he needed to stabilize his life. “As with just about any African-American or minority I know, my parents didn’t know about credit,” he said. “I was taught to take great caution with it, everyone had so much fear.” Instead of seeking credit, Fenelon’s family repeatedly urged him to be “independent.”

Then you turn around and beat them at their own game Stanley Fenelon

As a result, Fenelon eventually found himself with little in savings or access to credit, contributing to his plunge into homelessness. Even when he managed to land a job as a business analyst at Harvard University, Fenelon said he was passed over numerous times for apartment rentals by landlords looking for “more qualified applicants.” Confounded, he enrolled in a Working Credit workshop, where he learned to negotiate with creditors, strategically pay off his debts and assuage his fear of banks.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-01  Authors: lori teresa yearwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, seeking, generations, minorities, score, long, color, white, discrimination, rates, keeps, working, fenelon, avoid, mother, system, credit


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This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni


She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni
This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

Warren cited data that indicates that more than 70% of black mothers and more than 40% of Latina mothers are the sole breadwinners in their families, compared to less than a quarter of white mothers. She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination.

In a Medium post, the Massachusetts senator writes that if elected, on day one of her presidency she would implement a set of executive actions that would “boost wages for women of color and open up new pathways to the leadership positions they deserve.”

On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks on during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “And it’s getting worse,” writes Warren. “The gap in weekly earnings between white and black women is higher today than it was 40 years ago. ”

To fix this problem, Warren says that as president she would deny federal contracts to companies with a poor track record of diversity and equal pay, implement a minimum wage salary of $15 an hour (since black and brown women disproportionately occupy low-wage jobs), ban companies from asking applicants about their salary and criminal histories, and ban companies from using forced arbitration and non-compete clauses that “make it harder for employees to fight wage theft, discrimination and harassment.”

Additionally, Warren points out that women of color also face a steeper climb to higher-level management positions. “Even though black women and Latinas are often the leaders and decision-makers in their own homes and communities, they hold only one spot on the Fortune 500 CEO list and less than 5% of Fortune 500 Board positions, ” she writes.

Currently, Mary Winston, who was appointed interim CEO of Bed, Bath & Beyond in May, is the only black woman leading a Fortune 500 company.

Warren writes that she would provide companies with resources to attract applicants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities and other minority-serving institutions. She says she would also create paid fellowship programs for federal jobs for minority and low-income candidates and she would require every federal agency to make diversity a core part of its strategic plan. This includes, she says, creating a government-wide mentorship program focused on black and brown employees.

“It’s time to build an America that recognizes the role that women of color play in their families and in the economy,” writes Warren, “that fairly values their work, and that delivers equal opportunity for everyone.”

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Don’t miss: Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elizabeth, mothers, gap, plans, companies, women, pay, black, writes, positions, warren, white, color, close


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Amazon’s latest Kindle Oasis lets you adjust the screen color for easier reading at night

Amazon introduced a new version of its high-end Kindle Oasis e-reader on Wednesday, offering a feature that will make it more comfortable to read at night. The last version was widely considered to be the best e-reader on the market. When active, it adds a bit of an orange hue instead of using just a bright white backlight. Amazon said this isn’t a blue light filter, but is simply an additional option for people who find an orange tint more comfortable. Amazon suggested that such a filter isn’t


Amazon introduced a new version of its high-end Kindle Oasis e-reader on Wednesday, offering a feature that will make it more comfortable to read at night. The last version was widely considered to be the best e-reader on the market. When active, it adds a bit of an orange hue instead of using just a bright white backlight. Amazon said this isn’t a blue light filter, but is simply an additional option for people who find an orange tint more comfortable. Amazon suggested that such a filter isn’t
Amazon’s latest Kindle Oasis lets you adjust the screen color for easier reading at night Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, read, orange, ereader, latest, screen, version, eyes, isnt, filter, lets, kindle, amazons, oasis, color, light, comfortable, reading, night, easier


Amazon's latest Kindle Oasis lets you adjust the screen color for easier reading at night

Amazon introduced a new version of its high-end Kindle Oasis e-reader on Wednesday, offering a feature that will make it more comfortable to read at night.

The last version was widely considered to be the best e-reader on the market.

The updated version has controls that allow users to change the color temperature of the display from cool to warm, which means it won’t be as jarring in a dark room and is easier on the eyes. When active, it adds a bit of an orange hue instead of using just a bright white backlight.

Amazon said this isn’t a blue light filter, but is simply an additional option for people who find an orange tint more comfortable. Amazon suggested that such a filter isn’t necessary because the Kindle is not backlit and spreads light across the page rather than shooting it directly into your eyes, so “you can read comfortably for hours without eyestrain.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, read, orange, ereader, latest, screen, version, eyes, isnt, filter, lets, kindle, amazons, oasis, color, light, comfortable, reading, night, easier


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This company will pay someone $10,000 to travel across America and Canada

If you’re a #nofilter kind of person who wants to travel the world and have someone else pick up the tab, the gig of “color explorer” may be for you. Behr Paint is holding a contest where the winner will get to travel the world to find inspiration for creating new paint colors and their quirky names. The Behr Color Explorer will receive all-expense paid flights, lodging and prepaid adventures valued at approximately $20,000, according to the company, plus a $10,000 stipend. “We have a few inspir


If you’re a #nofilter kind of person who wants to travel the world and have someone else pick up the tab, the gig of “color explorer” may be for you. Behr Paint is holding a contest where the winner will get to travel the world to find inspiration for creating new paint colors and their quirky names. The Behr Color Explorer will receive all-expense paid flights, lodging and prepaid adventures valued at approximately $20,000, according to the company, plus a $10,000 stipend. “We have a few inspir
This company will pay someone $10,000 to travel across America and Canada Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: jimmy im
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 10000, explorer, paint, colorful, behr, world, america, travel, youbehr, canada, working, youre, color, company, pay


This company will pay someone $10,000 to travel across America and Canada

If you’re a #nofilter kind of person who wants to travel the world and have someone else pick up the tab, the gig of “color explorer” may be for you.

Behr Paint is holding a contest where the winner will get to travel the world to find inspiration for creating new paint colors and their quirky names. The Behr Color Explorer will receive all-expense paid flights, lodging and prepaid adventures valued at approximately $20,000, according to the company, plus a $10,000 stipend.

“We have a few inspiring, colorful destinations in mind, like the glacial blues of Lake Louise in Banff, Canada, and the colorful exteriors of Charleston, South Carolina’s Rainbow Row, but we’ll be working with the selected Color Explorer to finalize their itinerary,” a spokesperson for Behr tells CNBC Make It.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: jimmy im
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 10000, explorer, paint, colorful, behr, world, america, travel, youbehr, canada, working, youre, color, company, pay


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Virginia attorney general Mark Herring, third in line for governor, wore blackface in college

Northam, a Democrat, still faces widespread calls for his resignation after a conservative news site last week published his yearbook page photo. Justin Fairfax, also a Democrat, was accused earlier this week of sexually assaulting a woman at the Democratic National Convention in 2004. If Northam, Fairfax and Herring all resign, the state’s speaker of the House of Delegates, Kirk Cox, would become governor. “This conduct is in no way reflective of the man I have become in the nearly 40 years sin


Northam, a Democrat, still faces widespread calls for his resignation after a conservative news site last week published his yearbook page photo. Justin Fairfax, also a Democrat, was accused earlier this week of sexually assaulting a woman at the Democratic National Convention in 2004. If Northam, Fairfax and Herring all resign, the state’s speaker of the House of Delegates, Kirk Cox, would become governor. “This conduct is in no way reflective of the man I have become in the nearly 40 years sin
Virginia attorney general Mark Herring, third in line for governor, wore blackface in college Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: dan mangan, kevin breuninger, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images, scott dudelson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, college, northam, blackface, color, herring, virginia, yearbook, mark, pain, line, felt, efforts, democrat, attorney, governor, week, way, general, wore


Virginia attorney general Mark Herring, third in line for governor, wore blackface in college

Northam, a Democrat, still faces widespread calls for his resignation after a conservative news site last week published his yearbook page photo.

And Northam’s would-be successor, Lieutenant Gov. Justin Fairfax, also a Democrat, was accused earlier this week of sexually assaulting a woman at the Democratic National Convention in 2004. He denies her accusation.

If Northam, Fairfax and Herring all resign, the state’s speaker of the House of Delegates, Kirk Cox, would become governor. Cox is a Republican.

The Republican majority in the House of Delegates was decided by a name being drawn from a bowl to break a tie in a race for one seat in that legislative body.

A Democrat has been in Virginia’s governor mansion since 2014.

Sen. Mark Warner, D-Virginia, said he was “shocked and disappointed” by Herrings’ disclosure.

Warner said the week has been an “awful” one for Virginia.

He refused to comment further when asked if Herring should resign, given the fact that Warner earlier called for Northam to leave office for possibly wearing blackface in his yearbook page photo.

In his full statement Wednesday, Herring said:

“The very bright light that is shining on Virginia right now is sparking a painful but, I think we all hope, important conversation. The stakes are high, and our spirits are low.

“I am sure we all have done things at one time or another in our lives that show poor judgment, and worse yet, have caused some level of pain to others. I have a glaring example from my past that I have thought about with deep regret in the many years since, and certainly each time I took a step forward in public service, realizing that my goals and this memory could someday collide and cause pain for people I care about, those who stood with me in the many years since, or those who I hoped to serve while in office.

“In 1980, when I was a 19-year-old undergraduate in college, some friends suggested we attend a party dressed like rappers we listened to at the time, like Kurtis Blow, and perform a song. It sounds ridiculous even now writing it. But because of our ignorance and glib attitudes – and because we did not have an appreciation for the experiences and perspectives of others – we dressed up and put on wigs and brown makeup.

“This was a onetime occurrence and I accept full responsibility for my conduct.

That conduct clearly shows that, as a young man, I had a callous and inexcusable lack of awareness and insensitivity to the pain my behavior could inflict on others. It was really a minimization of both people of color, and a minimization of a horrific history I knew well even then.

“Although the shame of that moment has haunted me for decades, and though my disclosure of it now pains me immensely, what I am feeling in no way compares to the betrayal, the shock, and the deep pain that Virginians of color may be feeling. Where they have deserved to feel heard, respected, understood, and honestly represented, I fear my actions have contributed to them being forced to revisit and feel a historical pain that has never been allowed to become history.

“This conduct is in no way reflective of the man I have become in the nearly 40 years since.

“As a senator and as attorney general, I have felt an obligation to not just acknowledge but work affirmatively to address the racial inequities and systemic racism that we know exist in our criminal justice system, in our election processes, and in other institutions of power. I have long supported efforts to empower communities of color by fighting for access to healthcare, making it easier and simpler to vote, and twice defended the historic re-enfranchisement of former felons before the Supreme Court of Virginia. I have launched efforts to make our criminal justice system more just, fair, and equal by addressing implicit bias in law enforcement, establishing Virginia’s first-ever program to improve re-entry programs in local jails, and pushing efforts to reform the use of cash bail. And I have tried to combat the rise in hate crimes and white supremacist violence that is plaguing our Commonwealth and our country.

“That I have contributed to the pain Virginians have felt this week is the greatest shame I have ever felt. Forgiveness in instances like these is a complicated process, one that necessarily cannot and should not be decided by anyone but those directly affected by the transgressor, should forgiveness be possible or appropriate at all. In the days ahead, honest conversations and discussions will make it clear whether I can or should continue to serve as attorney general, but no matter where we go from here, I will say that from the bottom of my heart, I am deeply, deeply sorry for the pain that I cause with this revelation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: dan mangan, kevin breuninger, bill clark, cq-roll call group, getty images, scott dudelson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, college, northam, blackface, color, herring, virginia, yearbook, mark, pain, line, felt, efforts, democrat, attorney, governor, week, way, general, wore


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Women like Stacey Abrams and Serena Williams are proof that bravery trumps perfectionism

Since giving a TED Talk on the socially ingrained bravery gap between girls and boys, I’ve been on a nationwide crusade against the perils of perfectionism. And wherever I go, I hear the same thing from women of color: perfectionism isn’t a choice for us, it’s a requirement. Look no further than the appalling treatment of Serena Williams at the U.S. Open this year for proof of what can happen when women of color advocate for themselves. Our employers, media, and peers must stop holding women and


Since giving a TED Talk on the socially ingrained bravery gap between girls and boys, I’ve been on a nationwide crusade against the perils of perfectionism. And wherever I go, I hear the same thing from women of color: perfectionism isn’t a choice for us, it’s a requirement. Look no further than the appalling treatment of Serena Williams at the U.S. Open this year for proof of what can happen when women of color advocate for themselves. Our employers, media, and peers must stop holding women and
Women like Stacey Abrams and Serena Williams are proof that bravery trumps perfectionism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: reshma saujani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, proof, trumps, bravery, fail, williams, girls, women, going, family, perfectionism, abrams, perfect, color, serena, stacey, live


Women like Stacey Abrams and Serena Williams are proof that bravery trumps perfectionism

Recently, Stacey Abrams said to an audience in California: “I’m not going to change my hair, my skin color, my gender to win this election. And there’s no amount of Jenny Craig that’s going to solve anything in six weeks.”

It was her way of saying, sorry folks, but I am not going to alter one single iota of who I am to fit your mold. I may not be your “perfect” candidate — but I am “frustratingly” myself.

Her words stopped me dead in my tracks. But why?

Since giving a TED Talk on the socially ingrained bravery gap between girls and boys, I’ve been on a nationwide crusade against the perils of perfectionism. And wherever I go, I hear the same thing from women of color: perfectionism isn’t a choice for us, it’s a requirement. And bravery, quite frankly, is a privilege.

As women of color, there are two messages we receive from the time we are little girls that are so thoroughly drilled into us they are basically a part of our very being. Lesson 1: it’s not enough to be good, you have to be better than everyone else just to be equal. And lesson 2: if you fail, you are bringing your family and your community down with you.

It takes bravery to admit to and own our so-called flaws, to ask for raises or promotions, to quit our jobs and go off on our own — essentially to follow the “Lean In” playbook. But, to quote Michelle Obama, well, “that s— doesn’t always work.”

Because although we live in a culture that fetishizes failure — the failed Silicon Valley startup, the career pivot gone wrong, the congressional aspirations cut short — we simply don’t celebrate that kind of failure for women, and definitely not women of color. More often than not, we’re actually penalized for our bravery, for taking chances.

Look no further than the appalling treatment of Serena Williams at the U.S. Open this year for proof of what can happen when women of color advocate for themselves. It’s not just using our voices that gets us into trouble. When black women in leadership make mistakes — an inevitable consequence of taking risks — research shows that they are more likely to be criticized or punished for organizational failures than male, or even white female counterparts.

Cue the perfectionist drive. Stay on track, do and act as you’re told — by your family, community, society. Aim to please. Worse, conform.

As a brown girl and the daughter of Indian immigrants who came to this country as refugees from Uganda, this phenomenon has played out for most of my life.

In my family, there were three options when it came to careers: doctor, lawyer, engineer. Being the “perfect” immigrant daughter meant conforming in spaces like Harvard and Yale, trying desperately not to be found out for not belonging. Somewhere along the way, being “perfect” turned into being inauthentic, into ignoring my lifelong dream of running for office because I was afraid of losing and letting people down. Before I knew it, I’d lost my bravery muscle.

That’s why I was so stunned to hear my friend Stacey Abrams say what she did. In one fell swoop, Abrams turned these powerful myths about perfectionism upside down. Rather than sink under the weight of others’ disappointments, recoiling in shame and pain over a narrow loss, she bravely re-committed herself to her dream to serve as Governor. And, rather than change who she is, she vowed to continue leading with her so-called imperfections, with her whole self.

And she’s not the only one. Gabrielle Union recently laid bare her experience of using a surrogate, a brave thing to say out loud because — according to the toxic narrative of perfection — being a “successful” woman necessitates effortlessly navigating the journey from girlfriend to wife to mother. Rep. Ayanna Pressley negotiated with Speaker Nancy Pelosi for a seat on the Gun Violence Prevention Task Force — risking criticism that she should “wait her turn.”

Because the bravery gap between is socially ingrained — it will take society at large to change. Our employers, media, and peers must stop holding women and girls of color to a higher bar. Because, ultimately, we shouldn’t have to achieve fame or perfection or wealth before we are allowed to — or prepared to — be brave.

And although there is no overstating the work to be done on the part of our institutions to ensure that women of color have the space to fail safely and live authentically —we also don’t have time to wait. There’s a bravery revolution on the horizon. And I’m thrilled to see these women leading it, opening up the space for women everywhere to fear less, fail more, and live bolder.

Reshma Saujani is the author of “Brave, Not Perfect,” and is the founder and CEO of Girls Who Code.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: reshma saujani
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, proof, trumps, bravery, fail, williams, girls, women, going, family, perfectionism, abrams, perfect, color, serena, stacey, live


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