Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


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Trump administration courts investors in broad effort to combat rising health care costs

The Trump administration is battling rising health costs by going after the incentives that help drive higher prices. It is also the driving force behind a new initiative to engage health care investors about how reimbursement policies are fueling funds for new treatment options in the pipeline. Last week, the deputy secretary sat down with CNBC to discuss the investor initiative at the Cleveland Clinic Innovation Summit. His objective is to gain better insights from venture capitalists, private


The Trump administration is battling rising health costs by going after the incentives that help drive higher prices. It is also the driving force behind a new initiative to engage health care investors about how reimbursement policies are fueling funds for new treatment options in the pipeline. Last week, the deputy secretary sat down with CNBC to discuss the investor initiative at the Cleveland Clinic Innovation Summit. His objective is to gain better insights from venture capitalists, private
Trump administration courts investors in broad effort to combat rising health care costs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-27  Authors: bertha coombs, jonathan ernst, -alex azar, hhs secretary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, health, trump, deputy, week, costs, innovation, care, rising, summit, reimbursement, hargan, secretary, effort, courts, combat, broad


Trump administration courts investors in broad effort to combat rising health care costs

The Trump administration is battling rising health costs by going after the incentives that help drive higher prices.

That’s the idea at the heart of the new payment model for high-priced drugs laid out by the administration last week. It is also the driving force behind a new initiative to engage health care investors about how reimbursement policies are fueling funds for new treatment options in the pipeline.

“We have certain initiatives that we do where we depend on innovation,” Eric Hargan, deputy secretary for Health and Human Services, told CNBC in a recent interview.

“Whether it’s in digital health, new drugs, health [technology], new payments models, managing patient population, all those things are crucial to continuing to improve people’s lives. Much of that is driven by the investors,” he added.

Last week, the deputy secretary sat down with CNBC to discuss the investor initiative at the Cleveland Clinic Innovation Summit. His objective is to gain better insights from venture capitalists, private equity and strategic health care investors, through a year-long project dubbed the Deputy Secretary’s Innovation and Investment Summit.

“Is there some way in which what we’re doing, whether it’s on regulatory side or the reimbursement side, is signaling to them invest here [or] put your money over there. We don’t have a lot of insight into that,” Hargan said.

With increasing reimbursement pressures coming from both government and the private sector payers, health care investors are likely anxious to make sure their voices are heard. Hargan is currently deciding on the members for the summit group, and plans to convene the first meeting in December.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-27  Authors: bertha coombs, jonathan ernst, -alex azar, hhs secretary
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, investors, health, trump, deputy, week, costs, innovation, care, rising, summit, reimbursement, hargan, secretary, effort, courts, combat, broad


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Pricing power could help Apple combat the cost of tariffs, analyst says

Apple’s brand power can help the technology giant cope with some of the pain of the trade war, D.A. “To the extent that the tariffs increase the price of their products to consumers … I would argue they could offset that to the extent they’ve got brand power and consumers generally are willing to pay more for their products,” Forte said on CNBC’s “Closing Bell.” As first reported by Bloomberg, Apple said the Apple Watch and AirPods headphones, as well as the Mac mini desktop computer, Apple Pe


Apple’s brand power can help the technology giant cope with some of the pain of the trade war, D.A. “To the extent that the tariffs increase the price of their products to consumers … I would argue they could offset that to the extent they’ve got brand power and consumers generally are willing to pay more for their products,” Forte said on CNBC’s “Closing Bell.” As first reported by Bloomberg, Apple said the Apple Watch and AirPods headphones, as well as the Mac mini desktop computer, Apple Pe
Pricing power could help Apple combat the cost of tariffs, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-07  Authors: chloe aiello
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, tariffs, help, trade, combat, consumers, watch, analyst, letter, forte, power, cost, lot, products, pricing


Pricing power could help Apple combat the cost of tariffs, analyst says

Apple’s brand power can help the technology giant cope with some of the pain of the trade war, D.A. Davidson senior research analyst Tom Forte told CNBC on Friday.

“To the extent that the tariffs increase the price of their products to consumers … I would argue they could offset that to the extent they’ve got brand power and consumers generally are willing to pay more for their products,” Forte said on CNBC’s “Closing Bell.”

In a letter to the U.S. Trade Representative, Apple said PresidentDonald Trump’s proposed tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese goods cover a wide range of its products, pulling the country’s largest tech company squarely into the crosshairs of ongoing trade tensions. As first reported by Bloomberg, Apple said the Apple Watch and AirPods headphones, as well as the Mac mini desktop computer, Apple Pencil stylus, various chargers, adapters and manufacturing equipment would likely be affected. The letter did not offer an estimate of how much the tariffs would increase its costs.

Forte said it’s possible Apple will experience “mid-single-digit to high-single-digit increases in their products” but since the iPhone hasn’t been projected to be impacted yet, it may not be too serious.

“I think the one that’s been talked about the most, historically, has been the Apple Watch, which, admittedly, is not one of their most important products. It’d be a lot more damaging if it was hitting the smartphones,” Forte said.

The other snag posed by the potential tariffs is lost sales in China, Forte said. That problem may not have quite as simple a solution.

“They generate a lot of revenue by selling their products to consumers in China,” Forte said.

Apple shares closed down nearly 1 percent Friday, after gaining as much as 1 percent earlier in the session.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-07  Authors: chloe aiello
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, tariffs, help, trade, combat, consumers, watch, analyst, letter, forte, power, cost, lot, products, pricing


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Hotels are arming workers with panic buttons to combat harassment

After countless complaints of hotel workers enduring sexual harassment, the industry is finally responding by introducing increased measures to better protect its employees, including a portable panic button. The portable safety device helps employees alert security personnel if they feel they are in danger or a compromising position. The panic button will be rolled out nationwide by Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt, Wyndham Hotels & Resorts, among other hotel operators. Unite Here says more than 50 perc


After countless complaints of hotel workers enduring sexual harassment, the industry is finally responding by introducing increased measures to better protect its employees, including a portable panic button. The portable safety device helps employees alert security personnel if they feel they are in danger or a compromising position. The panic button will be rolled out nationwide by Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt, Wyndham Hotels & Resorts, among other hotel operators. Unite Here says more than 50 perc
Hotels are arming workers with panic buttons to combat harassment Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-06  Authors: seema mody, source, marriott international
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buttons, hotel, harassment, employees, panic, arming, industry, device, button, combat, workers, sexual, safety, hotels


Hotels are arming workers with panic buttons to combat harassment

After countless complaints of hotel workers enduring sexual harassment, the industry is finally responding by introducing increased measures to better protect its employees, including a portable panic button.

Thursday’s announcement is the largest step taken by hotel operators to address harassment and improve safety, and is being made in conjunction with the American Hotel and Lodging Association.

The portable safety device helps employees alert security personnel if they feel they are in danger or a compromising position. Harassment of hotel workers — specifically housekeepers — has been a longstanding issue the industry has had a difficult time addressing. The #MeToo and #TimesUp campaigns reignited the conversation around harassment inside hotel rooms and has forced industry leaders to find a more comprehensive solution.

The panic button will be rolled out nationwide by Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt, Wyndham Hotels & Resorts, among other hotel operators.

A number of cities including Chicago and Seattle have already deployed the panic button and have gone so far as to require hotels to provide their staff with the device due to ongoing complaints of harassment, ranging from guest nudity, groping, touching and forced contact.

“We are testing and deploying associate alert devices to enable hotel associates to press a button to summon help if they encounter a threatening situation,” Arne Sorenson, president and CEO of Marriott International in a press release.

“In addition to implementing anti-harassment and anti-trafficking training across all 5,400+ of our properties, we have already deployed employee safety devices in New York, Washington D.C., Seattle and Chicago properties,” said Chris Nassetta, president and CEO of Hilton.

Unite Here, a labor union, which represents the rights of hospitality employees across the nation, has played a notable role in pushing hotels to adopt the panic button to better protect its workers.

“The panic buttons, or safety buttons, are useful in that they are a real-time lifeline for women who work alone. It can be used in the case of a sexual assault or harassment, and in other dangerous situations, like if a worker finds a guest who has highly dangerous or illegal materials in their hotel room,” said Rachel Gumpert, national press secretary for Unite Here.

Unite Here says more than 50 percent of hotel housekeepers in Seattle have endured some type of sexual harassment.

U.S. hotels are aiming to implement the panic button at all properties by 2020. Given the different size and layouts of each hotel, the American Hotel and Lodging Association has organized a special task force to help hotels figure out the best technology and device to deploy.

Some devices will emit a loud noise, while others will have GPS capabilities.

“One of the things we’ve been wrestling with the last couple of years is how do you find a technology solution to be able to call somebody when it’s urgent, whether you’re in a 50 story stacked high-rise hotel or a spread-out resort, so that the technology is simple, [and] can be accurate,” Sorenson told CNBC.

In addition to the device, the major hotel operators are providing employees with ongoing training and education on reporting sexual harassment and ensuring anti-sexual harassment policies are in place in multiple languages. AHLA is also teaming up with Tina Tchen of Times Up Legal Defense Fund to improve workplace diversity.

“I applaud the hotel industry for taking the initiative and continuing to put employee safety first, recognizing that all people should feel safe while doing their jobs,” said Tchen.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-06  Authors: seema mody, source, marriott international
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, buttons, hotel, harassment, employees, panic, arming, industry, device, button, combat, workers, sexual, safety, hotels


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Hospitals band together to make drugs to combat shortages and high prices

The initial focus will be a group of 14 generic drugs that are administered to patients in the hospital. “This will improve the situation for patients by bringing much needed competition to the generic drug market.” Though the generic drug system is designed to create low-cost versions of branded medicines, lack of competition and other factors have led to continued shortages of certain products, or skyrocketing prices. Or a number of drugs acquired by Valeant Pharmaceuticals, which then boosted


The initial focus will be a group of 14 generic drugs that are administered to patients in the hospital. “This will improve the situation for patients by bringing much needed competition to the generic drug market.” Though the generic drug system is designed to create low-cost versions of branded medicines, lack of competition and other factors have led to continued shortages of certain products, or skyrocketing prices. Or a number of drugs acquired by Valeant Pharmaceuticals, which then boosted
Hospitals band together to make drugs to combat shortages and high prices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-05  Authors: meg tirrell, getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, combat, high, drug, rx, shortages, valeant, drugs, hospitals, healthcare, band, hospital, prices, company, generic, health


Hospitals band together to make drugs to combat shortages and high prices

Intermountain Healthcare made a splash in January when it said it and other major hospital systems, fed up with drug shortages and skyrocketing prices, planned to manufacture their own generic medicines.

Now it has a plan for how it’s going to do it. The Salt Lake City-based hospital system is teaming with the Mayo Clinic, HCA Healthcare and four others to form a nonprofit company called Civica Rx. The seven organizations, the company said in a statement Thursday, represent about 500 U.S. hospitals.

The initial focus will be a group of 14 generic drugs that are administered to patients in the hospital. The consortium wouldn’t name which they are, but said its first goal is to stabilize supply of essential generic medicines, and that it expects to have its first products on the market as early as next year. Civica Rx will be an Food and Drug Administration-approved manufacturer and will either directly make the drugs itself, or will contract the work out, the company said.

Civica also named a chief executive: Martin Van Trieste, former chief quality officer for biotech giant Amgen.

“We are creating a public asset with a mission to ensure that essential generic medications are accessible and affordable,” Van Trieste said in the statement. “This will improve the situation for patients by bringing much needed competition to the generic drug market.”

Though the generic drug system is designed to create low-cost versions of branded medicines, lack of competition and other factors have led to continued shortages of certain products, or skyrocketing prices.

Such was the case for Daraprim, the decades-old anti-parasitic drug acquired by Martin Shkreli, who raised the price by 5,000 percent overnight. Or a number of drugs acquired by Valeant Pharmaceuticals, which then boosted prices. The Cleveland Clinic said two heart drugs alone, acquired by Valeant, cost it more than $5 million a year. (Valeant is now know as Bausch Health.)

Without competition, hospitals were left without other options. Now they plan to create their own.

The four other organizations that will govern the nonprofit company are Catholic Health Initiatives, Providence St. Joseph Health, SSM Health and Trinity Health. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the company said, “will also work in consultation with Civica Rx to address its particular needs.”

The Laura and John Arnold Foundation, which has focused on combating high drug prices and other health costs, along with the Peterson Center on Healthcare and the Gary and Mary West Foundation, also focused on affordable health care, will also govern the new company.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-05  Authors: meg tirrell, getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, combat, high, drug, rx, shortages, valeant, drugs, hospitals, healthcare, band, hospital, prices, company, generic, health


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Fitbit teams with U Michigan researchers to combat doctor depression

After medical school, which itself is super stressful, graduates spend about two years practicing under supervision at a hospital. University of Michigan researchers have been studying the problem for more than a decade, enrolling over 2,000 medical interns from schools around the country every year, then studying how they fare over time. The problem seems to start in medical school, where a survey found that roughly 10 percent of students had thought about killing themselves within the previous


After medical school, which itself is super stressful, graduates spend about two years practicing under supervision at a hospital. University of Michigan researchers have been studying the problem for more than a decade, enrolling over 2,000 medical interns from schools around the country every year, then studying how they fare over time. The problem seems to start in medical school, where a survey found that roughly 10 percent of students had thought about killing themselves within the previous
Fitbit teams with U Michigan researchers to combat doctor depression Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-23  Authors: christina farr, robert daly, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fitbit, michigan, risk, suicide, medical, school, sleep, interns, teams, study, start, researchers, doctor, depression, studying, combat


Fitbit teams with U Michigan researchers to combat doctor depression

What would happen if you took a group of healthy, young people and subjected them to months of sleep deprivation, piles of work, extreme pressure to succeed and hazing from superiors and peers? Oh, and during that time, a single mistake could mean the difference between saving a life or inadvertently killing someone.

That’s basically what happens for thousands of Americans each during their medical internship.

After medical school, which itself is super stressful, graduates spend about two years practicing under supervision at a hospital. Reports have shown that many of them face depression, anxiety and other mental health issues.

University of Michigan researchers have been studying the problem for more than a decade, enrolling over 2,000 medical interns from schools around the country every year, then studying how they fare over time.

“During the first year of training, rates of depression [go] up, risk of suicide goes up, anxiety goes up and part of what we’re studying is why that is and who’s at risk and what environmental elements put them at risk,” Dr. Srijan Sen, professor of depression and neurosciences, said in an interview with CNBC.

The problem seems to start in medical school, where a survey found that roughly 10 percent of students had thought about killing themselves within the previous year. This population also suffers from suicide at rates 15 to 30 percent higher than the general population. It continues, and for some gets a lot worse, during the internship.

“We find that many of the interns start out fine, and about half get depressed by the end of the year,” said Sen.

Now the study is getting a technology boost. The interns are getting a Fitbit.

Fitbit got involved with the study through its own research efforts, which involve looking at consumer-generated data for signals of depression. The company thinks its data could be useful in analyzing things like sleep interruptions and varying activity levels, which might contribute to mental health problems. If an intern is running on particularly low levels of sleep and exercise, a Fitbit could pick it up.

“We see indications that sleep can get pretty erratic, especially for medical interns who are shift workers,” said Jonathan Charlesworth, a research scientist at Fitbit and a trained neuroscientist. “We’re seeing that correlate to depressive symptoms.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-23  Authors: christina farr, robert daly, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fitbit, michigan, risk, suicide, medical, school, sleep, interns, teams, study, start, researchers, doctor, depression, studying, combat


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Genetically modified mosquitoes target health threats like Zika virus

What if there was a way to control these devastating diseases without the environmental problems of widespread insecticide use? In fact, it’s not even a new idea; scientists were talking about modifying insect populations to control diseases as early as the 1940s. Progress is also being made to use GM mosquitoes to combat malaria, the most devastating mosquito-borne disease, although field releases for malaria control have not yet taken place. These new technologies make GM mosquitoes for diseas


What if there was a way to control these devastating diseases without the environmental problems of widespread insecticide use? In fact, it’s not even a new idea; scientists were talking about modifying insect populations to control diseases as early as the 1940s. Progress is also being made to use GM mosquitoes to combat malaria, the most devastating mosquito-borne disease, although field releases for malaria control have not yet taken place. These new technologies make GM mosquitoes for diseas
Genetically modified mosquitoes target health threats like Zika virus Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-21  Authors: jason rasgon, daniel becerril
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, genetically, diseases, control, disease, zika, mosquito, pathogens, gm, combat, threats, modified, target, virus, viruses, mosquitoes, health


Genetically modified mosquitoes target health threats like Zika virus

Mosquitoes are some of the most deadly creatures on the planet. They carry viruses, bacteria and parasites, which they transmit through bites, infecting some 700 million people and killing more than 1 million each year.

With international travel, migration and climate change, these infections are no longer confined to tropical and subtropical developing countries. Pathogens such as West Nile virus and Zika virus have caused significant outbreaks in the United States and its territories that are likely to continue, with new invasive pathogens being discovered all the time. Currently, control of these diseases is mostly limited to broad-spectrum insecticide sprays, which can harm both humans and non-target animals and insects. What if there was a way to control these devastating diseases without the environmental problems of widespread insecticide use?

Genetically modifying mosquitoes to prevent disease may sound like science fiction, but the technology has advanced in recent years to the point where this is no longer a scenario relegated to late-night movies. In fact, it’s not even a new idea; scientists were talking about modifying insect populations to control diseases as early as the 1940s. Today, genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes, developed during the past several decades of research in university laboratories, are being used to combat mosquito-borne pathogens – including viruses such as dengue and Zika – in many locations around the globe, including the United States. Progress is also being made to use GM mosquitoes to combat malaria, the most devastating mosquito-borne disease, although field releases for malaria control have not yet taken place.

More from The Conversation:

Why mosquitoes bite some people more than others

Modifying mosquitoes to stop transmission of dengue fever

Infecting mosquitoes with bacteria so they can’t infect us with viruses like Zika and dengue

I have been working on GM mosquitoes, both as a lab tool and to combat disease, for over 20 years. During that time, I have personally witnessed the technology go from theoretical, to seeing it used in the field. I’ve seen older techniques that were inefficient, random and slow pave the way for new methods like CRISPR, which enables efficient, rapid and precise editing of mosquito genomes, and ReMOT Control which eliminates the requirement for injecting materials into mosquito embryos. These new technologies make GM mosquitoes for disease control not a question of “if,” but rather a question of “where” and “when.”

Don’t worry, these genetic changes only affect the mosquitoes – they are not transmitted to people when the mosquito bites them.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-21  Authors: jason rasgon, daniel becerril
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, genetically, diseases, control, disease, zika, mosquito, pathogens, gm, combat, threats, modified, target, virus, viruses, mosquitoes, health


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This 11-year-old launched a business with her sister to combat racism—and it’s taking off

The students in Rogers’ class in Los Angeles were primarily white, recall the sisters. So Erika Pollard, the girls’ mom, moved Rogers to a more diverse school for the 2013 – 2014 school year. At the school Rogers attended from second through fifth grade, kids still made fun of her, but this time the kids bullying her were black. Their business, Flexin’ In My Complexion, launched shortly thereafter in April 2017. Erika gave the sisters about a $100 to get their project off the ground, Pollard say


The students in Rogers’ class in Los Angeles were primarily white, recall the sisters. So Erika Pollard, the girls’ mom, moved Rogers to a more diverse school for the 2013 – 2014 school year. At the school Rogers attended from second through fifth grade, kids still made fun of her, but this time the kids bullying her were black. Their business, Flexin’ In My Complexion, launched shortly thereafter in April 2017. Erika gave the sisters about a $100 to get their project off the ground, Pollard say
This 11-year-old launched a business with her sister to combat racism—and it’s taking off Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-11  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sister, pollard, sisters, picture, kids, students, rogers, combat, school, launched, gave, 11yearold, taking, used, business, racismand, girls


This 11-year-old launched a business with her sister to combat racism—and it's taking off

The students in Rogers’ class in Los Angeles were primarily white, recall the sisters. There were four other African-Americans, but Rogers’ skin was darker than everyone else’s. Rogers, now 11, remembers being asked to draw a picture of herself; the teacher gave her a black crayon while the other African-American students were given brown ones.

So Erika Pollard, the girls’ mom, moved Rogers to a more diverse school for the 2013 – 2014 school year.

At the school Rogers attended from second through fifth grade, kids still made fun of her, but this time the kids bullying her were black. Rogers came to learn that this called colorism.

So in the spring of 2017, Taylor Pollard tweeted a photo of Rogers with the hashtag, “#FlexinInHerComplexion,” an expression the sisters’ grandmother, Bettie Pollard, who grew up in Louisiana, used frequently to encourage the girls to feel beautiful.

“When that picture was published, I went viral,” Rogers tells CNBC Make It. (The original tweet was accidentally deleted, but Pollard had a screenshot, which she has since retweeted.)

In response to the post, the sisters received a flurry of messages supporting Rogers and decided they wanted to channel that energy. Together, they came up with the idea of putting the message on a t-shirt. Their business, Flexin’ In My Complexion, launched shortly thereafter in April 2017.

Erika gave the sisters about a $100 to get their project off the ground, Pollard says. They used some of the money to build a website.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-11  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sister, pollard, sisters, picture, kids, students, rogers, combat, school, launched, gave, 11yearold, taking, used, business, racismand, girls


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Apple introduces suite of features to combat tech addiction

Apple debuted a series of tools to combat technology addiction and “fear of missing out” on Monday at its Worldwide Developer Conference in San Jose, California. Top software executive Craig Federighi said Apple has “thought deeply” about technology addiction and introduced several new features in conjunction with its new operating system, iOS 12. Apple has also introduced a timer feature so users can set specific time limits during which they will not receive notifications. Google introduced si


Apple debuted a series of tools to combat technology addiction and “fear of missing out” on Monday at its Worldwide Developer Conference in San Jose, California. Top software executive Craig Federighi said Apple has “thought deeply” about technology addiction and introduced several new features in conjunction with its new operating system, iOS 12. Apple has also introduced a timer feature so users can set specific time limits during which they will not receive notifications. Google introduced si
Apple introduces suite of features to combat tech addiction Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-04  Authors: chloe aiello
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, features, introduces, introduced, technology, shareholders, addiction, combat, apple, users, feature, suite, tech, apples, notifications, federighi


Apple introduces suite of features to combat tech addiction

Apple debuted a series of tools to combat technology addiction and “fear of missing out” on Monday at its Worldwide Developer Conference in San Jose, California.

Top software executive Craig Federighi said Apple has “thought deeply” about technology addiction and introduced several new features in conjunction with its new operating system, iOS 12.

“Some apps demand more of our attention than we might even realize. They beg us to use our phone when we really should be occupying ourselves with something else,” Federighi said. “For some of us, it has become such a habit, we might not even recognize just how distracted we have become.”

These features have been expected for months, after shareholders Jana Partners in January wrote a letter to Apple imploring the company to add more parental controls to iPhones and to study the technology’s impact on mental health.

“This is an innovative and thoughtful response to the challenge we put forth, and we commend Apple once again for its leadership and commitment to acting responsibly. While we will review the details and Apple’s follow-through will be important, this looks like a clear win for parents and families, as well as shareholders given that this should strengthen Apple’s ecosystem for years to come,” Jana Partners said in response to Apple’s Monday announcement.

Here are some of the changes, which Federighi said help “limit distraction, focus and understand how you are spending your time.”

“Do Not Disturb during bedtime” lets users quiet notifications in the night, an expansion on the existing “Do Not Disturb” feature. Apple has also introduced a timer feature so users can set specific time limits during which they will not receive notifications.

IPhone users will also get grouped notifications, which means users can dismiss notifications en masse.

Apple will also distribute a once-weekly update to educate iPhone or iPad users on how much and how often they are using their devices. The feature will allow users to set limits on app use, and parents can request activity reports from their children’s devices.

“We think this is something that could help families achieve the right balance for them,” Federighi said.

Google introduced similar features when it unveiled the new version of Android, currently named Android P, earlier this month.

WWDC is an opportunity for Apple to introduce its latest products and features that developers can include in apps for the iPhone and other devices. Apple typically teases iOS updates at the conference and rolls out major changes later in the year.

— CNBC’s Scott Wapner contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-04  Authors: chloe aiello
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, features, introduces, introduced, technology, shareholders, addiction, combat, apple, users, feature, suite, tech, apples, notifications, federighi


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Israel says first country to use U.S.-made F-35 in combat

Israel says it’s the first country to use the US-made F-35 fighter jet in combat 42 Mins Ago | 00:52Israel is the first country to have used the U.S.-made F-35 stealth fighter in combat, the Israeli air force chief said on Tuesday in remarks carried by the military’s official Twitter account. Norkin also displayed a photograph of an Israeli F-35 overflying Beirut, local media said. Israel was the first country outside the United States to acquire the F-35. According to Israeli media, at least ni


Israel says it’s the first country to use the US-made F-35 fighter jet in combat 42 Mins Ago | 00:52Israel is the first country to have used the U.S.-made F-35 stealth fighter in combat, the Israeli air force chief said on Tuesday in remarks carried by the military’s official Twitter account. Norkin also displayed a photograph of an Israeli F-35 overflying Beirut, local media said. Israel was the first country outside the United States to acquire the F-35. According to Israeli media, at least ni
Israel says first country to use U.S.-made F-35 in combat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, usmade, air, israel, israeli, country, forces, fighter, combat, f35


Israel says first country to use U.S.-made F-35 in combat

Israel says it’s the first country to use the US-made F-35 fighter jet in combat 42 Mins Ago | 00:52

Israel is the first country to have used the U.S.-made F-35 stealth fighter in combat, the Israeli air force chief said on Tuesday in remarks carried by the military’s official Twitter account.

Local media further quoted Major-General Amikam Norkin as saying in a speech to the chiefs of 20 foreign air forces convening in Israel: “We are flying the F-35 all over the Middle East and have already attacked twice on two different fronts”.

Norkin also displayed a photograph of an Israeli F-35 overflying Beirut, local media said.

Manufactured by Lockheed Martin Corp, the F-35 is also known as the Joint Strike Fighter and, in Israel, by its Hebrew name “Adir” (Mighty).

Israel was the first country outside the United States to acquire the F-35. In December 2016, it received the first two planes out of an order of 50. According to Israeli media, at least nine have been delivered so far.

Israel says it has carried out scores of strikes in Syria against suspected Iranian emplacements or arms transfers to Hezbollah guerrillas in neighboring Lebanon.

Its air forces is also widely believed to have operated over against Islamist militants in the Egyptian Sinai and Hamas arms smugglers in Sudan.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, media, usmade, air, israel, israeli, country, forces, fighter, combat, f35


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