YouTube shuts down racist comments on stream of Congress’ hearing on white nationalism

one commenter wrote on Fox Business channel’s YouTube stream of the hearing. By Tuesday afternoon, the comment feature on the Fox Business live stream was also disabled. Google confirmed to CNBC that the feature was disabled “[d]ue to the presence of hateful comments.” The incident is a microcosm of the problem YouTube and other social media platforms have faced when it comes to removing hate speech. The House Judiciary Committee called Tuesday’s hearing to discuss tech’s role in the spread of w


one commenter wrote on Fox Business channel’s YouTube stream of the hearing. By Tuesday afternoon, the comment feature on the Fox Business live stream was also disabled. Google confirmed to CNBC that the feature was disabled “[d]ue to the presence of hateful comments.” The incident is a microcosm of the problem YouTube and other social media platforms have faced when it comes to removing hate speech. The House Judiciary Committee called Tuesday’s hearing to discuss tech’s role in the spread of w
YouTube shuts down racist comments on stream of Congress’ hearing on white nationalism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: lauren feiner, zach gibson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congress, racist, youtube, shuts, speech, comments, nationalism, google, white, users, stream, walden, hearing, removing


YouTube shuts down racist comments on stream of Congress' hearing on white nationalism

“Look at Google deciding for us what we can’t see!” one commenter wrote on Fox Business channel’s YouTube stream of the hearing. By Tuesday afternoon, the comment feature on the Fox Business live stream was also disabled.

Google confirmed to CNBC that the feature was disabled “[d]ue to the presence of hateful comments.”

“Hate speech has no place on YouTube. We’ve invested heavily in teams and technology dedicated to removing hateful comments and videos and we take action on them when flagged by our users,” the company said in a statement.

The incident is a microcosm of the problem YouTube and other social media platforms have faced when it comes to removing hate speech. The House Judiciary Committee called Tuesday’s hearing to discuss tech’s role in the spread of white nationalism and possible solutions, but the comments on its own stream underscore the complexity of that issue.

As YouTube apparently worked to disable the chat function on the House’s official livestream, Alexandria Walden, a Google counsel for free expression and human rights, told the committee that users are bound to the company’s community guidelines.

“I want to state clearly that every Google product that hosts user content prohibits incitement of violence and hate speech against individuals or groups based on specified attributes,” Walden said in her opening statement. “We view both as grave social ills, so our policies go beyond what the U.S. requires.”

Walden explained YouTube’s system for flagging and removing content it deems harmful, which involves both human and machine intervention. But as recently as last month, these systems were tested following the shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, that left 50 dead. Copies of a video of one of the shootings proliferated across the platform, with YouTube unable to keep up with the pace of uploads.

YouTube’s decision to shut down comments on the House’s stream did not prevent users from finding other ways to share their views on the topic, whether by commenting on other streams or sharing their own. One channel called Red Ice TV, which is run by people who the Anti-Defamation League describe as white supremacists, hosted its own stream of the hearing overlaid with its own commentary.

Google did not immediately respond to questions about why comments on other streams of the hearing were still active, but they appeared to be disabled by Tuesday afternoon.

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Watch: NZ Prime Minister: Police taking precautionary approach


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: lauren feiner, zach gibson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congress, racist, youtube, shuts, speech, comments, nationalism, google, white, users, stream, walden, hearing, removing


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YouTube shuts down racist comments on stream of Congress’ hearing on white nationalism

one commenter wrote on Fox Business channel’s YouTube stream of the hearing. By Tuesday afternoon, the comment feature on the Fox Business live stream was also disabled. Google confirmed to CNBC that the feature was disabled “[d]ue to the presence of hateful comments.” The incident is a microcosm of the problem YouTube and other social media platforms have faced when it comes to removing hate speech. The House Judiciary Committee called Tuesday’s hearing to discuss tech’s role in the spread of w


one commenter wrote on Fox Business channel’s YouTube stream of the hearing. By Tuesday afternoon, the comment feature on the Fox Business live stream was also disabled. Google confirmed to CNBC that the feature was disabled “[d]ue to the presence of hateful comments.” The incident is a microcosm of the problem YouTube and other social media platforms have faced when it comes to removing hate speech. The House Judiciary Committee called Tuesday’s hearing to discuss tech’s role in the spread of w
YouTube shuts down racist comments on stream of Congress’ hearing on white nationalism Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: lauren feiner, zach gibson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congress, nationalism, users, walden, comments, racist, shuts, google, removing, youtube, hearing, stream, speech, white


YouTube shuts down racist comments on stream of Congress' hearing on white nationalism

“Look at Google deciding for us what we can’t see!” one commenter wrote on Fox Business channel’s YouTube stream of the hearing. By Tuesday afternoon, the comment feature on the Fox Business live stream was also disabled.

Google confirmed to CNBC that the feature was disabled “[d]ue to the presence of hateful comments.”

“Hate speech has no place on YouTube. We’ve invested heavily in teams and technology dedicated to removing hateful comments and videos and we take action on them when flagged by our users,” the company said in a statement.

The incident is a microcosm of the problem YouTube and other social media platforms have faced when it comes to removing hate speech. The House Judiciary Committee called Tuesday’s hearing to discuss tech’s role in the spread of white nationalism and possible solutions, but the comments on its own stream underscore the complexity of that issue.

As YouTube apparently worked to disable the chat function on the House’s official livestream, Alexandria Walden, a Google counsel for free expression and human rights, told the committee that users are bound to the company’s community guidelines.

“I want to state clearly that every Google product that hosts user content prohibits incitement of violence and hate speech against individuals or groups based on specified attributes,” Walden said in her opening statement. “We view both as grave social ills, so our policies go beyond what the U.S. requires.”

Walden explained YouTube’s system for flagging and removing content it deems harmful, which involves both human and machine intervention. But as recently as last month, these systems were tested following the shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, that left 50 dead. Copies of a video of one of the shootings proliferated across the platform, with YouTube unable to keep up with the pace of uploads.

YouTube’s decision to shut down comments on the House’s stream did not prevent users from finding other ways to share their views on the topic, whether by commenting on other streams or sharing their own. One channel called Red Ice TV, which is run by people who the Anti-Defamation League describe as white supremacists, hosted its own stream of the hearing overlaid with its own commentary.

Google did not immediately respond to questions about why comments on other streams of the hearing were still active, but they appeared to be disabled by Tuesday afternoon.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: NZ Prime Minister: Police taking precautionary approach


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: lauren feiner, zach gibson, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congress, nationalism, users, walden, comments, racist, shuts, google, removing, youtube, hearing, stream, speech, white


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Banks in Europe are unexpectedly rallying after Draghi’s comments. Here’s why

Banks will typically make money when interest rate curves are steep by lending out at higher rates and paying deposits with lower rates. The ECB has set a negative rate to encourage banks to lend out to the real economy, drive growth and stimulate inflation. Draghi’s comments today led many to believe that the ECB are considering options to help mitigate some of the negative side effects low interest rates have had on the banking system. One measure could be by pursuing a method used by other ce


Banks will typically make money when interest rate curves are steep by lending out at higher rates and paying deposits with lower rates. The ECB has set a negative rate to encourage banks to lend out to the real economy, drive growth and stimulate inflation. Draghi’s comments today led many to believe that the ECB are considering options to help mitigate some of the negative side effects low interest rates have had on the banking system. One measure could be by pursuing a method used by other ce
Banks in Europe are unexpectedly rallying after Draghi’s comments. Here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: joumanna bercetche, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unexpectedly, draghis, banks, interest, bank, ecb, banking, effects, deposits, comments, negative, rates, heres, rallying, rate, europe


Banks in Europe are unexpectedly rallying after Draghi's comments. Here's why

European banking stocks bounced more than 3.5 percent Wednesday after European Central Bank President Mario Draghi hinted that the central bank is looking at the “side effects” of negative rates on the banking sector.

At the annual ECB Watchers conference in Frankfurt, Draghi reiterated that growth risks in Europe remain and that substantial accommodation was still needed in order to get inflation back to the bank’s target.

Draghi’s prepared statement also included a line about banks’ squeezed net interest margins adding “if necessary we need to reflect on possible measures that can preserve the favorable implication of negative rates for the economy while mitigating the side effects, if any”, adding that “low bank profitability is not an inevitable consequence of negative rates.”

Net interest margin is the difference between the interest income generated by banks and the amount of interest paid out to their lenders

European banking stocks are down almost 20 percent in value over the past year, a function of lower profitability, competition and a benign interest rate environment.

Banks will typically make money when interest rate curves are steep by lending out at higher rates and paying deposits with lower rates. But the ECB deposit rate is currently set at negative 40 basis points, forcing cash rich banks to pay for placing deposits and current account reserves with the central bank.

The ECB has set a negative rate to encourage banks to lend out to the real economy, drive growth and stimulate inflation.

Draghi’s comments today led many to believe that the ECB are considering options to help mitigate some of the negative side effects low interest rates have had on the banking system.

If the ECB did go ahead and introduce the new system, it would likely benefit French and German banks, which account for about 65%of deposits and 55% of Current Accounts. Deutsche Bank traded up almost 3% higher in the session while the large French Banks Societe Generale and BNP Paribas were also up a similar amount.

One measure could be by pursuing a method used by other central banks with negative rates such as the Swiss National Bank and Bank of Japan, which tiers deposits. This effectively reduces the amount of excess liquidity earning a negative return at the deposit rate by allowing part of bank’s excess reserves to sit at the zero percent MRO (Main Refinancing Operations rate) instead.

According to Goldman Sachs analyst, Sven Jari Sthen, about 94 percent of deposits that are held at the ECB earn a negative rate.

“If 50 percent of excess liquidity were to be subject to a zero rate instead of -0.40 percent, the gain for the banking system would be just below four billion euros a year,” he said in a note earlier this month.

Jari Sthen added that Euro area bank profits before tax were around 120 billion euros in 2017.

While tiering might provide short term relief for the banks, one banking analyst told CNBC on condition of anonymity that what’s really needed is a rate hike.

“That would have much bigger and longer lasting benefits as tiering doesn’t fix the systemic issue of low profitability”.

But Chief Economist of Unicredit Erik Nielsen told CNBC by email that tiering “could be a neat way of mitigating negative effects” because the narrative of raising rates would be “virtually impossible to pull off.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-27  Authors: joumanna bercetche, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unexpectedly, draghis, banks, interest, bank, ecb, banking, effects, deposits, comments, negative, rates, heres, rallying, rate, europe


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US Treasury yields move higher after Powell comments

Last week, data showed the world’s largest economy added just 20,000 jobs in February versus an expected gain of 180,000 — marking the weakest month of jobs creation since September 2017. The data come amid growing concern about the global economy. Data out of China last week showed its exports slumped 20.7 percent from a year earlier, far below analyst expectations and wiping out a surprise jump in January. On Monday, investors will keep an eye on more data out Monday, with retail sales out at


Last week, data showed the world’s largest economy added just 20,000 jobs in February versus an expected gain of 180,000 — marking the weakest month of jobs creation since September 2017. The data come amid growing concern about the global economy. Data out of China last week showed its exports slumped 20.7 percent from a year earlier, far below analyst expectations and wiping out a surprise jump in January. On Monday, investors will keep an eye on more data out Monday, with retail sales out at
US Treasury yields move higher after Powell comments Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, showed, jobs, week, economy, powell, treasury, billion, comments, notes, worlds, data, worth, world, higher


US Treasury yields move higher after Powell comments

Last week, data showed the world’s largest economy added just 20,000 jobs in February versus an expected gain of 180,000 — marking the weakest month of jobs creation since September 2017.

The data come amid growing concern about the global economy. Data out of China last week showed its exports slumped 20.7 percent from a year earlier, far below analyst expectations and wiping out a surprise jump in January.

On Sunday, Fed Chair Powell told “60 Minutes” that he thinks the U.S. economy is still strong, though he acknowledged that weakness around the world could start to hit the U.S.

“I would say there’s no reason why this economy cannot continue to expand,” he said.

On Monday, investors will keep an eye on more data out Monday, with retail sales out at 8:30 a.m. ET and business inventories at 10:00 a.m. ET.

Also on Monday, the Treasury is set to auction $48 billion worth of 13-week notes, $39 billion worth of 26-week notes and $38 billion worth of three-year notes.

—CNBC’s Spriha Srivastava contributed to this article.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, showed, jobs, week, economy, powell, treasury, billion, comments, notes, worlds, data, worth, world, higher


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Priscilla Chan: ‘Paying higher taxes is not a bad thing’

Priscilla Chan, who co-founded the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative with her husband, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, is supporting higher taxes for the wealthy. “For people who can afford it, paying higher taxes is not a bad thing,” Chan said Friday at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas. Chan’s comments came during an interview with CNN journalist Poppy Harlow, who asked Chan if she was in support of higher taxes for the wealthy. Harlow followed by asking Chan if she supported Rep. Alex


Priscilla Chan, who co-founded the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative with her husband, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, is supporting higher taxes for the wealthy. “For people who can afford it, paying higher taxes is not a bad thing,” Chan said Friday at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas. Chan’s comments came during an interview with CNN journalist Poppy Harlow, who asked Chan if she was in support of higher taxes for the wealthy. Harlow followed by asking Chan if she supported Rep. Alex
Priscilla Chan: ‘Paying higher taxes is not a bad thing’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: salvador rodriguez, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, taxes, bad, wealthyfor, thing, higher, chan, zuckerberg, priscilla, proposal, wealthy, paying, harlow, comments


Priscilla Chan: 'Paying higher taxes is not a bad thing'

Priscilla Chan, who co-founded the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative with her husband, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, is supporting higher taxes for the wealthy.

“For people who can afford it, paying higher taxes is not a bad thing,” Chan said Friday at the South by Southwest conference in Austin, Texas. “We should be doing that.”

Chan’s comments came during an interview with CNN journalist Poppy Harlow, who asked Chan if she was in support of higher taxes for the wealthy. Harlow followed by asking Chan if she supported Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s proposal for a 70 percent wealth tax.

“I don’t know enough about her proposal, but I do think we should be thoughtful about how we can get more resources for these important systems,” Chan responded.

During the session, Chan spoke about her organization’s philanthropic initiatives in science, education and prison reform. Her comments come on the same day as 2020 presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren unveiled a new plan to break up large tech companies like Facebook and Amazon.

WATCH: Here’s how to see which apps have access to your Facebook data — and cut them off


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-08  Authors: salvador rodriguez, patrick t fallon, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, taxes, bad, wealthyfor, thing, higher, chan, zuckerberg, priscilla, proposal, wealthy, paying, harlow, comments


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Huawei CFO defense will center on President Trump’s trade comments

A defense lawyer for Meng Wanzhou, CFO of China tech giant Huawei, told an Ottawa judge on Wednesday that it will take time to develop arguments against extradition in part because of possible political issues and “comments by the U.S. Meng was arrested in Vancouver on Dec. 1, while she was on a 12-hour layover between Hong Kong and Mexico. The defense said it needed time to prepare for the “highly unusual” case, specifically politics and motivation stemming from Trump’s comments. “The Departmen


A defense lawyer for Meng Wanzhou, CFO of China tech giant Huawei, told an Ottawa judge on Wednesday that it will take time to develop arguments against extradition in part because of possible political issues and “comments by the U.S. Meng was arrested in Vancouver on Dec. 1, while she was on a 12-hour layover between Hong Kong and Mexico. The defense said it needed time to prepare for the “highly unusual” case, specifically politics and motivation stemming from Trump’s comments. “The Departmen
Huawei CFO defense will center on President Trump’s trade comments Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: kate fazzini, ben nelms, bloomberg, getty images, alexander bibik
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, case, president, justice, meng, trumps, department, huawei, cfo, center, extradition, comments, told, indicated, political, trade, defense


Huawei CFO defense will center on President Trump's trade comments

A defense lawyer for Meng Wanzhou, CFO of China tech giant Huawei, told an Ottawa judge on Wednesday that it will take time to develop arguments against extradition in part because of possible political issues and “comments by the U.S. president.”

Meng was arrested in Vancouver on Dec. 1, while she was on a 12-hour layover between Hong Kong and Mexico. She is the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei

On Jan. 28, the U.S. Justice Department accused Meng and Huawei of bank fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy in what the Department of Justice alleges was a years-long scheme to deceive international banks over the nature of payments made through a Hong Kong technology supplier.

Chinese officials have indicated they believe the U.S. has political motives in its moves against Huawei, which also include ongoing accusations of spying and a trade secrets theft case now unfolding in Washington.

On Dec. 11, President Donald Trump indicated he would consider intervening in the case if it would be helpful to a trade deal, a departure from the usually bold line between U.S. political negotiations and Justice Department cases.

The case was adjourned on Wednesday, and a new hearing was scheduled for May 8. The defense said it needed time to prepare for the “highly unusual” case, specifically politics and motivation stemming from Trump’s comments.

“The Department of Justice is empowered to enforce federal law fairly, untainted by political or geopolitical considerations,” Richard Matheny, a global trade partner at law firm Goodwin, told CNBC. “The suggestion that the Department could — or should — be used to achieve an objective unrelated to the fair administration of justice erodes public confidence, both domestically and on a global stage. This is understandable and explains why, historically, U.S. presidents have carefully refrained from comments of the sort we see increasingly from the current administration.”

The extradition process will likely be lengthy, and Meng’s attorneys have indicated they intend to fiercely fight the request. A banker from Thailand, Rakesh Saxena, successfully fought extradition from Canada on embezzlement charges for 13 years, losing his battle in 2009, in one of the country’s longest extradition cases.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: kate fazzini, ben nelms, bloomberg, getty images, alexander bibik
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, case, president, justice, meng, trumps, department, huawei, cfo, center, extradition, comments, told, indicated, political, trade, defense


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Huawei CFO defense will center on President Trump’s trade comments

A defense lawyer for Meng Wanzhou, CFO of China tech giant Huawei, told an Ottawa judge on Wednesday that it will take time to develop arguments against extradition in part because of possible political issues and “comments by the U.S. Meng was arrested in Vancouver on Dec. 1, while she was on a 12-hour layover between Hong Kong and Mexico. The defense said it needed time to prepare for the “highly unusual” case, specifically politics and motivation stemming from Trump’s comments. “The Departmen


A defense lawyer for Meng Wanzhou, CFO of China tech giant Huawei, told an Ottawa judge on Wednesday that it will take time to develop arguments against extradition in part because of possible political issues and “comments by the U.S. Meng was arrested in Vancouver on Dec. 1, while she was on a 12-hour layover between Hong Kong and Mexico. The defense said it needed time to prepare for the “highly unusual” case, specifically politics and motivation stemming from Trump’s comments. “The Departmen
Huawei CFO defense will center on President Trump’s trade comments Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: kate fazzini, ben nelms, bloomberg, getty images, alexander bibik
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, case, president, justice, meng, trumps, department, huawei, cfo, center, extradition, comments, told, indicated, political, trade, defense


Huawei CFO defense will center on President Trump's trade comments

A defense lawyer for Meng Wanzhou, CFO of China tech giant Huawei, told an Ottawa judge on Wednesday that it will take time to develop arguments against extradition in part because of possible political issues and “comments by the U.S. president.”

Meng was arrested in Vancouver on Dec. 1, while she was on a 12-hour layover between Hong Kong and Mexico. She is the daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei

On Jan. 28, the U.S. Justice Department accused Meng and Huawei of bank fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy in what the Department of Justice alleges was a years-long scheme to deceive international banks over the nature of payments made through a Hong Kong technology supplier.

Chinese officials have indicated they believe the U.S. has political motives in its moves against Huawei, which also include ongoing accusations of spying and a trade secrets theft case now unfolding in Washington.

On Dec. 11, President Donald Trump indicated he would consider intervening in the case if it would be helpful to a trade deal, a departure from the usually bold line between U.S. political negotiations and Justice Department cases.

The case was adjourned on Wednesday, and a new hearing was scheduled for May 8. The defense said it needed time to prepare for the “highly unusual” case, specifically politics and motivation stemming from Trump’s comments.

“The Department of Justice is empowered to enforce federal law fairly, untainted by political or geopolitical considerations,” Richard Matheny, a global trade partner at law firm Goodwin, told CNBC. “The suggestion that the Department could — or should — be used to achieve an objective unrelated to the fair administration of justice erodes public confidence, both domestically and on a global stage. This is understandable and explains why, historically, U.S. presidents have carefully refrained from comments of the sort we see increasingly from the current administration.”

The extradition process will likely be lengthy, and Meng’s attorneys have indicated they intend to fiercely fight the request. A banker from Thailand, Rakesh Saxena, successfully fought extradition from Canada on embezzlement charges for 13 years, losing his battle in 2009, in one of the country’s longest extradition cases.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: kate fazzini, ben nelms, bloomberg, getty images, alexander bibik
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, case, president, justice, meng, trumps, department, huawei, cfo, center, extradition, comments, told, indicated, political, trade, defense


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British royal family to block trolls on social media

The British royal family has said it can delete, block or report social media users who make comments on its channels that do not meet new guidelines published Monday. Neither must they be irrelevant, unintelligible, contain advertising or beach the terms of the social media platform. The palace uses software to track comments as well as monitoring social media accounts manually. The guidelines apply to the social media channels run by the Royal Family, Clarence House (home to Charles, prince of


The British royal family has said it can delete, block or report social media users who make comments on its channels that do not meet new guidelines published Monday. Neither must they be irrelevant, unintelligible, contain advertising or beach the terms of the social media platform. The palace uses software to track comments as well as monitoring social media accounts manually. The guidelines apply to the social media channels run by the Royal Family, Clarence House (home to Charles, prince of
British royal family to block trolls on social media Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, duchess, guidelines, family, comments, users, sussex, social, channels, block, palace, british, media, royal, trolls


British royal family to block trolls on social media

The British royal family has said it can delete, block or report social media users who make comments on its channels that do not meet new guidelines published Monday.

The guidelines said that comments must not “contain spam, be defamatory of any person, deceive others, be obscene, offensive, threatening, abusive, hateful, inflammatory or promote sexually explicit material or violence,” or “promote discrimination based on race, sex, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.” Neither must they be irrelevant, unintelligible, contain advertising or beach the terms of the social media platform.

The new rules are published in the midst of reports of sexist and racist comments and threats targeted at Kate, the duchess of Cambridge and Meghan, duchess of Sussex. In January, Kensington Palace sought advice from Instagram on how to deal with online trolls, the Guardian reported. The palace uses software to track comments as well as monitoring social media accounts manually.

The guidelines apply to the social media channels run by the Royal Family, Clarence House (home to Charles, prince of Wales and Camilla, duchess of Cornwall) and Kensington Palace, social media handle for the duke and duchess of Cambridge, duke and duchess of Sussex and their Royal Foundation. Their combined Twitter and Instagram followers total more than 18 million.

The new guidelines state: “The aim of our social media channels is to create an environment where our community can engage safely in debate and is free to make comments, questions and suggestions.”

“We ask that anyone engaging with our social media channels shows courtesy, kindness and respect for all other members of our social media communities.”

Posts and comments that do not meet these standards may be hidden or deleted, and users who do not follow the guidelines may be blocked or reported to the authorities.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, duchess, guidelines, family, comments, users, sussex, social, channels, block, palace, british, media, royal, trolls


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British royal family to block trolls on social media

The British royal family has said it can delete, block or report social media users who make comments on its channels that do not meet new guidelines published Monday. Neither must they be irrelevant, unintelligible, contain advertising or beach the terms of the social media platform. The palace uses software to track comments as well as monitoring social media accounts manually. The guidelines apply to the social media channels run by the Royal Family, Clarence House (home to Charles, prince of


The British royal family has said it can delete, block or report social media users who make comments on its channels that do not meet new guidelines published Monday. Neither must they be irrelevant, unintelligible, contain advertising or beach the terms of the social media platform. The palace uses software to track comments as well as monitoring social media accounts manually. The guidelines apply to the social media channels run by the Royal Family, Clarence House (home to Charles, prince of
British royal family to block trolls on social media Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, duchess, guidelines, family, comments, users, sussex, social, channels, block, palace, british, media, royal, trolls


British royal family to block trolls on social media

The British royal family has said it can delete, block or report social media users who make comments on its channels that do not meet new guidelines published Monday.

The guidelines said that comments must not “contain spam, be defamatory of any person, deceive others, be obscene, offensive, threatening, abusive, hateful, inflammatory or promote sexually explicit material or violence,” or “promote discrimination based on race, sex, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.” Neither must they be irrelevant, unintelligible, contain advertising or beach the terms of the social media platform.

The new rules are published in the midst of reports of sexist and racist comments and threats targeted at Kate, the duchess of Cambridge and Meghan, duchess of Sussex. In January, Kensington Palace sought advice from Instagram on how to deal with online trolls, the Guardian reported. The palace uses software to track comments as well as monitoring social media accounts manually.

The guidelines apply to the social media channels run by the Royal Family, Clarence House (home to Charles, prince of Wales and Camilla, duchess of Cornwall) and Kensington Palace, social media handle for the duke and duchess of Cambridge, duke and duchess of Sussex and their Royal Foundation. Their combined Twitter and Instagram followers total more than 18 million.

The new guidelines state: “The aim of our social media channels is to create an environment where our community can engage safely in debate and is free to make comments, questions and suggestions.”

“We ask that anyone engaging with our social media channels shows courtesy, kindness and respect for all other members of our social media communities.”

Posts and comments that do not meet these standards may be hidden or deleted, and users who do not follow the guidelines may be blocked or reported to the authorities.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, duchess, guidelines, family, comments, users, sussex, social, channels, block, palace, british, media, royal, trolls


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YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks at Lesbians Who Tech conference

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki will speak at the Lesbians Who Tech conference in San Francisco on Friday around 1:45 p.m. ET, one day after her company decided to disable comments on most videos featuring minors in an effort to curb predatory behavior. The Google-owned company faced backlash from advertisers who halted spending on the platform within the past couple weeks following reports that pedophiles used coded comments to alert each other to instances of suggestive images featuring children in


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki will speak at the Lesbians Who Tech conference in San Francisco on Friday around 1:45 p.m. ET, one day after her company decided to disable comments on most videos featuring minors in an effort to curb predatory behavior. The Google-owned company faced backlash from advertisers who halted spending on the platform within the past couple weeks following reports that pedophiles used coded comments to alert each other to instances of suggestive images featuring children in
YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks at Lesbians Who Tech conference Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesbians, featuring, conference, youtube, speaks, susan, videos, weeks, used, ceo, comments, company, tech, wojcicki


YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki speaks at Lesbians Who Tech conference

YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki will speak at the Lesbians Who Tech conference in San Francisco on Friday around 1:45 p.m. ET, one day after her company decided to disable comments on most videos featuring minors in an effort to curb predatory behavior.

The Google-owned company faced backlash from advertisers who halted spending on the platform within the past couple weeks following reports that pedophiles used coded comments to alert each other to instances of suggestive images featuring children in seemingly innocent videos. AT&T, Hasbro, Disney, Mattel and Nestle were among the companies that pulled their ads from the platform.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lesbians, featuring, conference, youtube, speaks, susan, videos, weeks, used, ceo, comments, company, tech, wojcicki


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