Pelosi taps Schiff, Nadler and 5 others as Trump impeachment managers

WASHINGTON — House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff and Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler will be part of a team of seven impeachment managers at President Donald Trump’s upcoming Senate trial, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced on Wednesday morning. Trump’s impeachment trial in the Senate is expected to begin Tuesday, according to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The job of the impeachment managers in a Senate trial is to lay out the House approved arguments for rem


WASHINGTON — House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff and Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler will be part of a team of seven impeachment managers at President Donald Trump’s upcoming Senate trial, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced on Wednesday morning.
Trump’s impeachment trial in the Senate is expected to begin Tuesday, according to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.
The job of the impeachment managers in a Senate trial is to lay out the House approved arguments for rem
Pelosi taps Schiff, Nadler and 5 others as Trump impeachment managers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: christina wilkie
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, managers, pelosi, committee, trump, articles, house, taps, senate, trial, schiff, nadler, impeachment, witnesses, president


Pelosi taps Schiff, Nadler and 5 others as Trump impeachment managers

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) announces impeachment managers for the articles of impeachment against US President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill January 15, 2020, in Washington, DC, next to Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler(L)D-NY and Adam Schiff(D-CA), the House Democrat who led the Trump investigation.

“He’s been impeached forever. They can never erase that,” Pelosi said.

At a press conference on Capitol Hill, Pelosi said that Trump’s impeachment in the House last month “will last forever,” and that more incriminating evidence against the president has come out in the proceeding weeks.

The two men, Democrats from California and New York, respectively, will be joined by Democratic Caucus Chair Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, also of New York, Rep. Zoe Lofgren, Calif., Florida congresswoman Val Demings, freshman Rep. Jason Crow of Colorado, and Texas Rep. Sylvia Garcia, also a freshman.

WASHINGTON — House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff and Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler will be part of a team of seven impeachment managers at President Donald Trump’s upcoming Senate trial, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced on Wednesday morning.

Demings and Crow were surprise additions to the managers team, but both have relevant experience to bring to a Senate trial, as well as representing voter blocs within the Democratic electorate that are crucial to maintaining control of the House.

Demings is a former chief of police for the city of Orlando, the first woman of color to ever hold the position.

Crow is a former U.S. Army Ranger and recipient of the Bronze Star, who served three tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan. In 2018, Crow defeated incumbent Republican Rep. Mike Coffman, becoming the first Democrat ever to win that seat in suburban Denver.

Five of the seven managers are members of the House Judiciary Committee, and two, Schiff and Demings, are members of the Intelligence Committee.

“There is an overwhelming case, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the president betrayed the country by withholding federal funds appropriated by congress, breaking the law in doing so, in order to extort a foreign government into intervening in our election to embarrass a political opponent,” Nadler said at the press conference.

Wednesday’s announcement came just hours before the House is scheduled to vote on a resolution formally transmitting the two impeachment articles against Trump from the House to the Senate. Trump’s impeachment trial in the Senate is expected to begin Tuesday, according to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

The job of the impeachment managers in a Senate trial is to lay out the House approved arguments for removing the president from office. The president’s lawyers will argue the opposing point, and the Senate will ultimately vote on whether to remove Trump from office.

In that sense, the task of the impeachment managers resembles that of a prosecutor in a civil trial, although the rules and procedures for an impeachment trial are completely different.

Schiff and Nadler were both widely expected to be among the managers Pelosi named, given their deep knowledge and prior involvement in the House impeachment inquiry this fall. Schiff and the Intelligence Committee led the inquiry, which included public testimony from more than a dozen witnesses.

Nadler, meanwhile, chairs the committee which drafted and approved the two articles of impeachment against the president that were passed by the House in December.

The House resolution to be voted on Wednesday will have three functions: To transmit the articles of impeachment to the Senate, designate the House members who will serve as managers of the impeachment trial, and fund the trial itself.

On a practical level, the resolution’s adoption by the House will also trigger a series of carefully choreographed procedural steps between the House and Senate, culminating in a walk across the Capitol by the House impeachment managers, who will be carrying the actual articles of impeachment in their hands.

The managers will then physically deliver the articles to Secretary of the Senate Julie Adams, a career public servant and former McConnell staffer who has held the Senate’s top administrative position since 2015.

The actual delivery of the articles is scheduled to begin at 5 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon, when Pelosi signs the resolution.

The handover will mark the end of a nearly month-long delay in transmitting the documents, which Pelosi orchestrated in an attempt to force concessions out of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

Chief among them has been the ability to call witnesses, which Democrats have long demanded as part of any trial they would consider to be a “fair” one.

As of early Wednesday, the issue of witnesses at Trump’s Senate trial remained very much unresolved, following reports that McConnell met with a small group of GOP senators on Tuesday who pitched him on the idea that calling witnesses could work to the president’s advantage, as long as there are no restrictions on exactly who can be summoned.

Some Republicans have considered calling Hunter Biden, as well as the whistleblower whose complaint about Trump’s July 25 call with Ukraine’s president helped spark the impeachment inquiry, as witnesses in the Senate trial.

Democrats argued at the presser Wednesday morning that the witnesses called to appear in the Senate trial ought to be relevant to the charges against Trump.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: christina wilkie
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Here are the House impeachment managers — and what they will do in Trump’s Senate trial

Pelosi selected seven House Democrats to serve as impeachment managers, essentially acting as prosecutors during Trump’s Senate trial. Seven managers were also appointed during the 1868 impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, for instance, while there were 13 Republican managers from the House Judiciary Committee Republicans in Bill Clinton’s 1998 Senate trial. Here’s what to know about the House managers in Trump’s impeachment trial:Adam SchiffPelosi tapped the chairman of the House Intelligence C


Pelosi selected seven House Democrats to serve as impeachment managers, essentially acting as prosecutors during Trump’s Senate trial.
Seven managers were also appointed during the 1868 impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, for instance, while there were 13 Republican managers from the House Judiciary Committee Republicans in Bill Clinton’s 1998 Senate trial.
Here’s what to know about the House managers in Trump’s impeachment trial:Adam SchiffPelosi tapped the chairman of the House Intelligence C
Here are the House impeachment managers — and what they will do in Trump’s Senate trial Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
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Here are the House impeachment managers — and what they will do in Trump's Senate trial

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) announces impeachment managers for the articles of impeachment against US President Donald Trump on Capitol Hill January 15, 2020, in Washington, DC. Brendan Smialowski | AFP | Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday unveiled the team of Democrats who will make the case for President Donald Trump’s conviction and removal from office. Pelosi selected seven House Democrats to serve as impeachment managers, essentially acting as prosecutors during Trump’s Senate trial. They will lay out the evidence that House investigators have collected and make their arguments for voting Trump out of office, while Trump’s lawyers defend him. The 100 senators, in turn, will act as jurors as they consider how they will vote on the two articles of impeachment that the House passed on Dec. 18. It is highly unlikely that two-thirds of the GOP-majority Senate will vote to convict and remove a Republican president. No Senate Republicans have said they will vote to convict. Trump is just the third U.S. president ever to be impeached.

Some of the rules for impeachment are mandated in the Constitution, while others are based on precedent. Seven managers were also appointed during the 1868 impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, for instance, while there were 13 Republican managers from the House Judiciary Committee Republicans in Bill Clinton’s 1998 Senate trial. No matter the outcome of the trial, “he’s been impeached forever,” Pelosi said before announcing the managers at a press conference Wednesday. “They can never erase that.” House Democrats voted to impeach Trump on articles of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, both related to his efforts to have Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy announce probes involving former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter, as well as a debunked conspiracy theory about the 2016 election. White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said in a statement that “the naming of these managers does not change a single thing.” Trump “has done nothing wrong,” Grisham said. “He looks forward to having the due process rights in the Senate that Speaker Pelosi and House Democrats denied to him, and expects to be fully exonerated.” Here’s what to know about the House managers in Trump’s impeachment trial:

Adam Schiff

Pelosi tapped the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee to be the lead prosecutor in Trump’s Senate trial. Schiff was already seen as a leading figure in the impeachment inquiry. His attacks on Trump and his approach to running the House impeachment proceedings have made him a target of scathing criticism from Republicans and the president himself. “I am humbled by the responsibility of serving as the lead House Manager in the Senate impeachment trial,” the California congressman said in a statement. “It is a solemn responsibility and one that I will undertake with the seriousness that the task requires.” Schiff and other Democrats have demanded that the Senate trial allow witnesses to come forward. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer asked McConnell to approve four witnesses, including former national security advisor John Bolton and White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, in advance of the trial. McConnell refused, saying he wants the trial to mirror Clinton’s, in which senators waited until the proceedings had already started to debate whether to call witnesses. “Americans overwhelmingly want a fair trial in the Senate, fair to the President and fair to the people. Senators must demand to see and hear the full evidence, including the documents and witnesses the President has blocked,” Schiff said in his statement. “Only then can they faithfully discharge their own Constitutional duties to be fair and impartial jurors.”

Jerrold Nadler

The congressman from New York is chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. He has said that Trump “richly deserves impeachment” since the end of former special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. Nadler oversaw an impeachment hearing in his committee in early December, when a panel of experts debated whether Trump’s Ukraine dealings met the bar for charges. Three of those witnesses said Trump committed impeachable offenses, while one disagreed. “There is an overwhelming case, beyond any reasonable doubt, that the president betrayed the country by withholding federal funds appropriated by Congress, breaking the law in doing so, in order to extort a foreign government into intervening in our election to embarrass a political opponent,” Nadler said at Wednesday’s press conference.

Zoe Lofgren

Lofgren, a 13-term congresswoman from California, chairs the House Administration Committee — which, as Pelosi points out, has jurisdiction over legislation relating to federal elections. Lofgren served on the Judiciary Committee in 1998, when Clinton was impeached in the House for lying about an affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky. When she herself was an intern, Lofgren reportedly helped the same committee draft impeachment charges against Richard Nixon. Lofgren is seen as a more even-keeled and judicious member of the team than some of her more vocal colleagues. Unlike many other Democrats. Lofgren had been skeptical about moving forward with impeachment proceedings against Trump following the release of the Mueller report.

Hakeem Jeffries

Jeffries, the No. 5 Democrat in the House, chairs his party’s caucus in the chamber, which crafts and controls party policy. Jeffries has represented his New York district in Congress since 2013. He previously worked as a litigator. “The evidence is overwhelming that Donald Trump corruptly abused his power” by pressuring Ukraine to announce the Biden probe, Jeffries said Wednesday. “In America, no one is above the law.”

Val Demings

The Florida representative, one of the most junior members of Congress on the management team, had served as the first female chief of the Orlando Police Department before running for political office. She made headlines during Mueller’s testimony before Congress last year, when she asked if Trump’s written responses to the special counsel’s questions “showed that he wasn’t always being truthful.” Mueller replied: “I would say generally.” Demings serves on the House Judiciary and Intelligence panels. “I understand that the politics of impeachment are difficult for many Senators. But I have not written off the Senate. Each Senator still has the power to do the right thing,” Demings tweeted Wednesday.

Jason Crow

While some members were widely expected to be recruited to the team of House managers, Crow seems to have flown in under the radar. Crow, an Army veteran, was elected to the House in 2018, defeating Republican incumbent Rep. Mike Coffman and flipping the suburban Denver district for the Democrats for the first time since it was drawn in the early 1980s. Crow, a lawyer, serves on the House Armed Services Committee. Unlike some other freshman Democrats who won Republican-leaning districts in 2018, Crow has not been afraid to declare his support for Trump’s impeachment. He co-authored an op-ed in September with other freshman Democrats, saying if the allegations about Trump’s Ukraine dealings are true, then “we believe these actions represent an impeachable offense.”

Sylvia Garcia


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: kevin breuninger
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New Sen. Kelly Loeffler will help oversee agency that regulates her husband’s company

Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga., arrives for a re-enactment of her swearing-in, Monday Jan. 6, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Senate Agriculture Committee, which Loeffler joined following her Senate confirmation, oversees that agency. Loeffler, R-Ga., and Sprecher married in 2004, before the company went public in 2005. But the Republican senator told The Wall Street Journal that she “will recuse myself if needed on a case by case basis.” Loeffler was sworn in as a senator on Monday, succee


Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga., arrives for a re-enactment of her swearing-in, Monday Jan. 6, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
The Senate Agriculture Committee, which Loeffler joined following her Senate confirmation, oversees that agency.
Loeffler, R-Ga., and Sprecher married in 2004, before the company went public in 2005.
But the Republican senator told The Wall Street Journal that she “will recuse myself if needed on a case by case basis.”
Loeffler was sworn in as a senator on Monday, succee
New Sen. Kelly Loeffler will help oversee agency that regulates her husband’s company Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: yelena dzhanova
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New Sen. Kelly Loeffler will help oversee agency that regulates her husband's company

Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga., arrives for a re-enactment of her swearing-in, Monday Jan. 6, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

After becoming a U.S. senator this week, Kelly Loeffler won assignment to a committee that oversees the agency in charge of regulating her husband’s business, setting the grounds for a potential conflict of interest.

Loeffler’s husband, Jeffrey Sprecher, is CEO of Intercontinental Exchange, which is regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission and owns the New York Stock Exchange. The Senate Agriculture Committee, which Loeffler joined following her Senate confirmation, oversees that agency.

ICE’s annual report says it’s “subject to extensive regulation by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.”

Loeffler, R-Ga., and Sprecher married in 2004, before the company went public in 2005. She had worked at ICE, leading the company’s investor relations and communications programs for 15 years before slipping into Bakkt, a crypto trading platform created by ICE, as CEO in 2018.

Loeffler’s office did not respond to a request for comment from CNBC asking about a potential conflict of interest. But the Republican senator told The Wall Street Journal that she “will recuse myself if needed on a case by case basis.”

“I have worked hard to comply with both the letter and the spirit of the Senate’s ethics rules and will continue to do so every day,” she said. “I will recuse myself if needed on a case by case basis.”

The committee did not respond to a request for comment from CNBC. But Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan., called Loeffler “a welcome addition to the Committee,” according to the Journal.

Loeffler was sworn in as a senator on Monday, succeeding Sen. Johnny Isakson, who retired on Dec 31. She was appointed by Republican Gov. Brian Kemp in December in defiance of President Donald Trump, who had pressed Kemp to appoint Rep. Doug Collins to the seat.

Collins, the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee, was a full-throated defender of the president during the House impeachment process led by Democrats. His appointment to the Senate could have aided Trump when proceedings move to that chamber.

Loeffler will serve in the role until a special election is held in November 2020 when she will have to win the vote. Collins has not ruled out the possibility of running for the seat at that time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-09  Authors: yelena dzhanova
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Boeing sends more 737 Max docs to house committee

Boeing sends more 737 Max docs to house committeeBoeing supplied more documents on its 737 Max to the House Transportation Committee yesterday. CNBC’s Bill Griffeth reports on “Closing Bell.”


Boeing sends more 737 Max docs to house committeeBoeing supplied more documents on its 737 Max to the House Transportation Committee yesterday.
CNBC’s Bill Griffeth reports on “Closing Bell.”
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Boeing sends more 737 Max docs to house committee

Boeing sends more 737 Max docs to house committee

Boeing supplied more documents on its 737 Max to the House Transportation Committee yesterday. CNBC’s Bill Griffeth reports on “Closing Bell.”


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House Judiciary Committee says it could draft ‘new articles of impeachment’ against Trump

They argue that McGahn’s testimony is “central” to parts of the House committee’s investigation into Trump, which is not yet complete even though the Democratic-led chamber passed two articles of impeachment against him last week . Lawyers for the House Judiciary Committee said Monday that the panel could draft and recommend “new articles of impeachment” against President Donald Trump if additional evidence is revealed by former White House counsel Don McGahn. Click here or scroll down to read t


They argue that McGahn’s testimony is “central” to parts of the House committee’s investigation into Trump, which is not yet complete even though the Democratic-led chamber passed two articles of impeachment against him last week .
Lawyers for the House Judiciary Committee said Monday that the panel could draft and recommend “new articles of impeachment” against President Donald Trump if additional evidence is revealed by former White House counsel Don McGahn.
Click here or scroll down to read t
House Judiciary Committee says it could draft ‘new articles of impeachment’ against Trump Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-23  Authors: kevin breuninger
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House Judiciary Committee says it could draft 'new articles of impeachment' against Trump

Democrats have been fighting in court for months to enforce a subpoena for McGahn to testify as part of the impeachment proceedings in Congress. They argue that McGahn’s testimony is “central” to parts of the House committee’s investigation into Trump, which is not yet complete even though the Democratic-led chamber passed two articles of impeachment against him last week .

Lawyers for the House Judiciary Committee said Monday that the panel could draft and recommend “new articles of impeachment” against President Donald Trump if additional evidence is revealed by former White House counsel Don McGahn.

And McGahn’s testimony is “also relevant to the Committee’s ongoing investigations into Presidential misconduct and consideration of whether to recommend additional articles of impeachment,” lawyers for the Judiciary Committee wrote in a submission to the Washington, D.C., Court of Appeals.

Click here or scroll down to read the House Judiciary Committee’s court filing

“If McGahn’s testimony produces new evidence supporting the conclusion that President Trump committed impeachable offenses that are not covered by the Articles approved by the House, the Committee will proceed accordingly—including, if necessary, by considering whether to recommend new articles of impeachment,” the lawyers wrote.

Trump was impeached on two articles — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — related to his efforts to have Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy announce investigations involving former Vice President Joe Biden and his son, and a debunked conspiracy that Ukraine, not Russia, interfered in the 2016 presidential election.

Trump allegedly withheld hundreds of millions of dollars in congressionally approved military aid to Ukraine while he was pushing for the probes into his political rivals. His administration refused to comply with congressional Democrats’ impeachment inquiry and has pressured numerous government witnesses not to cooperate.

The Judiciary Committee’s court filing Monday followed an entry from attorneys for the Justice Department, who argued that the House’s vote to impeach Trump undermines the push from Democrats to have McGahn’s subpoena enforced quickly.

The DOJ lawyers wrote that there is no longer “any justification for otherwise expediting the Court’s decision in this case,” outside of an already scheduled Jan. 3 hearing, where both sides will argue their cases.

But the Judiciary Committee’s attorneys countered that Trump’s impeachment in the House has “reinforced,” rather than undercut, the need for an “expeditious resolution of this appeal.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-23  Authors: kevin breuninger
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GOP Sen. Grassley says Mitch McConnell sabotaged support for his drug pricing bill

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) talks with reporters as he heads for a meeting at the Capitol October 02, 2018 in Washington, DC. Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley said Wednesday that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is responsible for his colleagues’ apparent lack of enthusiasm about his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices. When asked by reporters during a briefing why more Senate Republicans haven’t supported the legislation, the Senate Finance Committee chairman


Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) talks with reporters as he heads for a meeting at the Capitol October 02, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley said Wednesday that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is responsible for his colleagues’ apparent lack of enthusiasm about his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices.
When asked by reporters during a briefing why more Senate Republicans haven’t supported the legislation, the Senate Finance Committee chairman
GOP Sen. Grassley says Mitch McConnell sabotaged support for his drug pricing bill Cached Page below :
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GOP Sen. Grassley says Mitch McConnell sabotaged support for his drug pricing bill

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) talks with reporters as he heads for a meeting at the Capitol October 02, 2018 in Washington, DC.

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley said Wednesday that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is responsible for his colleagues’ apparent lack of enthusiasm about his bipartisan bill to lower drug prices.

When asked by reporters during a briefing why more Senate Republicans haven’t supported the legislation, the Senate Finance Committee chairman said because McConnell “asked them not to.”

“The president wants it!” Grassley said, according to a recording of the briefing.

Grassley and McConnell have reportedly been at odds over the bipartisan measure, which has support from President Donald Trump and many Senate Democrats.

When asked for comment, a spokesperson for McConnell directed CNBC to a report where McConnell is quoted saying the Senate’s path forward on drug costs is still “under discussion” and he is “looking to do something on drug pricing.”

Grassley and ranking Democrat Ron Wyden, of Oregon, advanced the broad drug pricing bill through committee in July. Looking to gain more Republican support, the lawmakers unveiled a revamped version of the bill earlier this month. The bill would make changes to Medicare by adding an out-of-pocket maximum for beneficiaries and capping drug price increases at the rate of inflation, among other measures.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-18  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr, in berkeleylovelace
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House committee approves USMCA trade deal, setting up vote on Thursday

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal (L), Democrat of Massachusetts, speaks about the US – Mexico – Canada Agreement, known as the USMCA, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, December 10, 2019. A House committee cleared a new North American trade deal on Tuesday, setting up approval in the full chamber this week. The House Ways and Means Committee favorably reported the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, a replacement for NAFTA negotiated b


Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal (L), Democrat of Massachusetts, speaks about the US – Mexico – Canada Agreement, known as the USMCA, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, December 10, 2019.
A House committee cleared a new North American trade deal on Tuesday, setting up approval in the full chamber this week.
The House Ways and Means Committee favorably reported the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, a replacement for NAFTA negotiated b
House committee approves USMCA trade deal, setting up vote on Thursday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-17  Authors: jacob pramuk
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House committee approves USMCA trade deal, setting up vote on Thursday

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal (L), Democrat of Massachusetts, speaks about the US – Mexico – Canada Agreement, known as the USMCA, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, December 10, 2019.

A House committee cleared a new North American trade deal on Tuesday, setting up approval in the full chamber this week.

The House Ways and Means Committee favorably reported the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, a replacement for NAFTA negotiated by the Trump administration and tweaked by House Democrats. The panel sent the three-nation pact to the full House in a bipartisan voice vote.

Earlier Tuesday, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said the House plans to consider the trade deal on Thursday. The chamber is expected to approve it with bipartisan support.

President Donald Trump considers replacing NAFTA, the 1994 trade deal he has criticized as a job killer, one of his top priorities ahead of his 2020 reelection bid. The Democratic-held House is set to sign off on the deal only a day after it impeaches Trump.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-17  Authors: jacob pramuk
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House Judiciary Committee publishes full impeachment report

Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) waits to speak during a media briefing after a House vote approving rules for an impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 31, 2019. “President Trump has realized the Framers’ worst nightmare. The committee, led by Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., devotes part one to detailing the process by which the House Intelligence Committee investigated the case against Trump. The House Judiciary Committe


Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) waits to speak during a media briefing after a House vote approving rules for an impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 31, 2019.
“President Trump has realized the Framers’ worst nightmare.
The committee, led by Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., devotes part one to detailing the process by which the House Intelligence Committee investigated the case against Trump.
The House Judiciary Committe
House Judiciary Committee publishes full impeachment report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-16  Authors: richie duchon, alex johnson
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House Judiciary Committee publishes full impeachment report

Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) waits to speak during a media briefing after a House vote approving rules for an impeachment inquiry into U.S. President Trump on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 31, 2019.

“President Trump has realized the Framers’ worst nightmare. He has abused his power in soliciting and pressuring a vulnerable foreign nation to corrupt the next United States Presidential election by sabotaging a political opponent and endorsing a debunked conspiracy theory promoted by our adversary, Russia,” the committee wrote.

Part three delves into the details of Democrats’ case that Trump abused the power of his office to pressure a foreign government, Ukraine’s, to investigate his domestic political rival and interfere in the 2020 presidential election.

The committee, led by Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., devotes part one to detailing the process by which the House Intelligence Committee investigated the case against Trump. Part two is dedicated to examining the standards of impeachment laid out in the Constitution.

The report, a 658-page document, is an explanation in four parts of the committee’s process and justification for recommending two articles of impeachment against Trump, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The House Judiciary Committee released its full report on the impeachment of President Donald Trump after midnight Sunday, ahead of consideration by the full House as early as Wednesday.

Part four makes a case that the president obstructed Congress’ ability to hold the executive branch accountable by flouting House investigators’ requests for documents and testimony.

“Other Presidents have recognized their obligation to provide information to Congress under these circumstances,” the report states. “President Trump’s stonewall, by contrast, was categorical, indiscriminate, and without precedent in American history.”

The committee concludes that Trump “has fallen into a pattern of behavior: this is not the first time he has solicited foreign interference in an election, been exposed, and attempted to obstruct the resulting investigation. He will almost certainly continue on this course.”

“For all the reasons given above, President Trump will continue to threaten the Nation’s security, democracy, and constitutional system if he is allowed to remain in office. That threat is not hypothetical,” the report states.

More from NBC News:

Democrats blast GOP senators for signaling how they’ll vote in impeachment trial

Nadler: Anti-impeachment Democrat switching parties because he would lose primary

Schiff: I ‘hope to hell’ I’d impeach Obama if he did the same as Trump

In a response to the Democratic findings, Doug Collins of Georgia, the ranking Republican on the committee, said the articles failed to establish any impeachable offense, arguing that “an accusation of abuse of power must be based on a higher and more concrete standard than conduct that ‘ignored and injured the interests of the Nation.'”

“The people, through elections, decide what constitutes the ‘interests of the nation,'” Collins wrote.

“It is no surprise the allegations shifted from quid pro quo, bribery, and extortion to settle on an undefined ‘abuse of power,'” according to Collins.

The minority also argued that obstruction of Congress isn’t an impeachable offense per se because “the Founders intended to create interbranch conflict.”

“The fact that conflict exists here does not mean the President has committed either a high crime or a high misdemeanor,” Collins wrote, arguing that Congress should pursue the matter in the courts.

Read the full report.

On Sunday, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., proposed terms for a likely impeachment trial in the Senate, including calling former national security adviser John Bolton and acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney as witnesses.

The terms laid out in a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., was evidence that Democrats are seeking an evidentiary trial, not intending to rely on the House investigation.McConnell responded that that he would meet with Schumer “soon” to discuss plans for a possible trial.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-16  Authors: richie duchon, alex johnson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, senate, committee, report, impeachment, congress, power, trial, trump, judiciary, house, publishes, president


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In a surprise move infuriating Republicans, Judiciary Committee delays impeachment vote until Friday

Collins and other Republicans alleged Democrats abruptly changed the schedule only to get more media attention during the day on Friday for the impeachment vote. But Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., said the impeachment vote was so important it should take place during daylight hours. If the articles pass the committee on Friday, the full House is expected to hold a floor vote on the impeachment articles, mostly likely on Wednesday, before lawmakers leave for their holiday break. The delay in the Judici


Collins and other Republicans alleged Democrats abruptly changed the schedule only to get more media attention during the day on Friday for the impeachment vote.
But Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., said the impeachment vote was so important it should take place during daylight hours.
If the articles pass the committee on Friday, the full House is expected to hold a floor vote on the impeachment articles, mostly likely on Wednesday, before lawmakers leave for their holiday break.
The delay in the Judici
In a surprise move infuriating Republicans, Judiciary Committee delays impeachment vote until Friday Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: rebecca shabad, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, democrats, president, nadler, infuriating, committee, house, vote, rep, articles, republicans, judiciary, delays, surprise, impeachment, trump


In a surprise move infuriating Republicans, Judiciary Committee delays impeachment vote until Friday

Collins and other Republicans alleged Democrats abruptly changed the schedule only to get more media attention during the day on Friday for the impeachment vote. “They want the prime time hit,” Collins said.

“That was the most bush league play I have ever seen in my life,” said Rep. Doug Collins, D-Ga., who accused Nadler of turning the committee into a “kangaroo court.”

Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said shortly after 11 p.m. that the committee would instead vote on the impeachment of President Donald Trump on Friday at 10:00 a.m.

WASHINGTON — After a grueling 14-hour meeting, Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee suddenly announced that the panel would not vote as planned late Thursday night on two articles of impeachment, angering Republicans.

Before banging his gavel to recess the meeting that began at 9:00 a.m., Nadler said, “It is now very late at night. I want members on both sides of the aisle to think about what has happened over the last two days and to search their consciences before they cast their final votes.”

Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, was overheard saying Nadler’s move was “Stalin-esque,” adding, “Let’s have a dictator.”

“I think we all thought it was going finish up tonight,” Rep. Andy Biggs, R-Ariz., said on Fox News. “We actually thought there was a deal.”

But Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., said the impeachment vote was so important it should take place during daylight hours.

“We want to do it in broad daylight,” Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Maryland, said on CNN.

If the articles pass the committee on Friday, the full House is expected to hold a floor vote on the impeachment articles, mostly likely on Wednesday, before lawmakers leave for their holiday break. If approved, a trial about whether to convict Trump and remove him from office will be held in the Senate in January.

Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told Sean Hannity on Fox News on Thursday night that there was “no chance” Trump would be convicted in the Senate, which would require a two thirds vote.

“The case is so darn weak coming from the House. We know how it’s going to end,” McConnell said. “There’s no chance the president’s going to be removed from office. My hope is that there won’t be a single Republican who votes for either of these articles of impeachment, and, Sean, it wouldn’t surprise me if we got one or two Democrats.”

The delay in the Judiciary Committee vote came after a day-long debate Thursday over the impeachment articles that Democrats introduced earlier this week. Republicans offered a number of amendments to gut the measures, but they were defeated each time by the Democratic majority on the committee.

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, was the first GOP lawmaker to offer an amendment, which intended to eliminate the first article of impeachment against Trump, on abuse of power. After three hours of debate, it failed in a party-line vote. Another amendment from Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., sought to strike language on former Vice President Joe Biden and replace it with Hunter Biden and Burisma, a Ukrainian gas company.

Democrats offered a single amendment at the beginning of the markup in which Nadler proposed to spell out the president’s middle name, John, in the articles instead of using just the initial.

Throughout the day, Republicans reiterated their complaints that Democrats had not conducted a fair impeachment process. Democrats argued that they had given the president himself opportunities to make his own case and they used the debate time Thursday to explain again why they have decided to pursue impeachment against Trump.

“There are no crimes here? That is the defense my colleagues across the aisle are putting forward?” Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., said. “The president committed the highest crime against the Constitution by abusing his office,” charging that he had invited foreign election interference while jeopardizing U.S. national security.

Earlier in the day, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said, “The facts are clear — irrefutable, in fact.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: rebecca shabad, jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, democrats, president, nadler, infuriating, committee, house, vote, rep, articles, republicans, judiciary, delays, surprise, impeachment, trump


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