Elizabeth Warren unveils a $1 trillion environmental justice plan for low-income communities

Presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., introduced on Wednesday an environmental justice plan to defend low-income and minority communities against pollution, contamination and extreme weather events that are exacerbated by climate change. “Our crisis of environmental injustice is the result of decades of discrimination and environmental racism compounding in communities that have been overlooked for too long,” Warren wrote in her plan. The senator’s plan calls for improving equit


Presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., introduced on Wednesday an environmental justice plan to defend low-income and minority communities against pollution, contamination and extreme weather events that are exacerbated by climate change. “Our crisis of environmental injustice is the result of decades of discrimination and environmental racism compounding in communities that have been overlooked for too long,” Warren wrote in her plan. The senator’s plan calls for improving equit
Elizabeth Warren unveils a $1 trillion environmental justice plan for low-income communities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lowincome, plan, trillion, environmental, elizabeth, pollution, warren, weather, justice, climate, industrial, white, communities, unveils


Elizabeth Warren unveils a $1 trillion environmental justice plan for low-income communities

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during a Town Hall at Keene State College on September 25, 2019 in Keene, New Hampshire.

Presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., introduced on Wednesday an environmental justice plan to defend low-income and minority communities against pollution, contamination and extreme weather events that are exacerbated by climate change.

The plan calls for spending at least $1 trillion in the next decade on the country’s most vulnerable communities, which are often concentrated in highly polluted areas and exposed to contamination from lead and other toxic chemicals from industrial and agricultural runoff.

“Our crisis of environmental injustice is the result of decades of discrimination and environmental racism compounding in communities that have been overlooked for too long,” Warren wrote in her plan.

“The same communities that have borne the brunt of industrial pollution are now on the front lines of climate change, often getting hit first and worst,” she wrote.

The senator’s plan calls for improving equity mapping of marginalized communities to better identify climate risk damage from increasingly intense storms, droughts and wildfires.

Warren would mandate that all federal agencies consider climate impacts in developing rules, and she would restore the Obama-era water rule, which the Trump administration recently rolled back. The plan also instructs the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Justice to enhance enforcement against industrial polluters.

Environmental justice is defined by the EPA as the fair treatment of all people and communities with respect to protection from environmental and health hazards.

One recent study shows that black families are more likely to live in neighborhoods with higher concentrations of air pollution than white families, despite having equal or higher incomes. Another study finds that while white people largely cause air pollution, blacks and Latinos are more likely to breathe in that polluted air.

A recent example of extreme weather disproportionately impacting low-income communities is Hurricane Dorian, which pummeled the Bahamas for days, destroying entire neighborhoods and killing 61 people. Many of the residents hit by Dorian did not have resilient infrastructure in place and did not have the resources to evacuate before the storm made landfall.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lowincome, plan, trillion, environmental, elizabeth, pollution, warren, weather, justice, climate, industrial, white, communities, unveils


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Major UN climate report says rapid ocean warming is causing ‘heatwaves,’ threatening fishing industry

A new report from the United Nations says surface temperatures for the world’s oceans are rising at an alarming pace, causing marine “heatwaves” and accelerating sea levels that threaten fishing economies. The heat waves occur when the daily sea surface temperature exceeds the local 99th percentile of the temperature between 1982 and 2016. The global ocean temperatures have warmed every year since 1970, and the rate has more than doubled since 1993. Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarc


A new report from the United Nations says surface temperatures for the world’s oceans are rising at an alarming pace, causing marine “heatwaves” and accelerating sea levels that threaten fishing economies. The heat waves occur when the daily sea surface temperature exceeds the local 99th percentile of the temperature between 1982 and 2016. The global ocean temperatures have warmed every year since 1970, and the rate has more than doubled since 1993. Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarc
Major UN climate report says rapid ocean warming is causing ‘heatwaves,’ threatening fishing industry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: jasmine wu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, texas, major, industry, sea, rapid, warming, heatwaves, communities, surface, ocean, fishing, report, tropical, climate, levels, temperature, threatening, temperatures


Major UN climate report says rapid ocean warming is causing 'heatwaves,' threatening fishing industry

People walk the flooded waters Hopper Rd. on September 19, 2019 in Houston, Texas. Gov. Greg Abbott has declared much of Southeast Texas disaster areas after heavy rain and flooding from the remnants of Tropical Depression Imelda dumped more than two feet of water across some areas.

A new report from the United Nations says surface temperatures for the world’s oceans are rising at an alarming pace, causing marine “heatwaves” and accelerating sea levels that threaten fishing economies.

The heat waves occur when the daily sea surface temperature exceeds the local 99th percentile of the temperature between 1982 and 2016.

“Marine heatwaves have doubled in frequency since 1982 and are increasing in intensity,” the special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said Wednesday.

The global ocean temperatures have warmed every year since 1970, and the rate has more than doubled since 1993.

“Future shifts in fish distribution and decreases in their abundance and fisheries catch potential due to climate change are projected to affect income, livelihoods, and food security of marine resource-dependent communities,” the report said.

Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic have also caused sea levels to rise and accelerate. That increases the frequency of extreme sea level events, which causes disasters such as flooding and tropical cyclones.

Some of the biggest victims are coastal communities, fishing economies, and those in polar and high mountains regions. Rising sea levels will render some island nations uninhabitable. The report said that the low-lying coastal zone is currently home to around 680 million people and is projected to reach more than 1 billion by 2050. Around 670 million people live in high mountain regions, which are particularly vulnerable to changes in the ocean, glaciers and ice sheets.

Ocean warming has also caused a drop in fish populations, which compounds the impact of overfishing and has reduced fishery catches. Communities that depend highly on seafood might also face risk to nutritional health and food security.

The report said that in order to protect and restore the ocean and its ecosystems, humans will need to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and be more conscious about how to manage the use of natural resources.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: jasmine wu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, texas, major, industry, sea, rapid, warming, heatwaves, communities, surface, ocean, fishing, report, tropical, climate, levels, temperature, threatening, temperatures


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The CEOs of nearly 200 companies just said shareholder value is no longer their main objective

Shareholder value is no longer the main focus of some of America’s top business leaders. The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers from major U.S. corporations, issued a statement Monday with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.” “We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.” “The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and chairman of


Shareholder value is no longer the main focus of some of America’s top business leaders. The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers from major U.S. corporations, issued a statement Monday with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.” “We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.” “The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and chairman of
The CEOs of nearly 200 companies just said shareholder value is no longer their main objective Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serves, dimon, roundtable, corporations, 200, companies, longer, communities, investing, shareholder, value, business, main, objective, nearly, purpose, statement, ceos


The CEOs of nearly 200 companies just said shareholder value is no longer their main objective

Shareholder value is no longer the main focus of some of America’s top business leaders.

The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers from major U.S. corporations, issued a statement Monday with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.”

The re-imagined idea of a corporation drops the age-old notion that corporations function first and foremost to serve their shareholders and maximize profits. Rather, investing in employees, delivering value to customers, dealing ethically with suppliers and supporting outside communities are now at the forefront of American business goals, according to the statement.

“While each of our individual companies serves its own corporate purpose, we share a fundamental commitment to all of our stakeholders,” said the statement, which signed by 181 CEOs. “We commit to deliver value to all of them, for the future success of our companies, our communities and our country.”

“The American dream is alive, but fraying,” said Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and chairman of Business Roundtable, in a press release.

Along with Dimon, the statement also received signatures from chiefs Jeff Bezos, Tim Cook, Brian Moynihan, Dennis A. Muilenburg, Mary Barra and many more.

“Major employers are investing in their workers and communities because they know it is the only way to be successful over the long term. These modernized principles reflect the business community’s unwavering commitment to continue to push for an economy that serves all Americans,” said Dimon.

Here is the full Business Roundtable statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serves, dimon, roundtable, corporations, 200, companies, longer, communities, investing, shareholder, value, business, main, objective, nearly, purpose, statement, ceos


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2020 candidate Kirsten Gillibrand, Rep. Bass say their infrastructure bill will boost local jobs, rebuild communities

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand speaks on the second night of the second 2020 Democratic U.S. presidential debate in Detroit, Michigan, July 31, 2019. America’s infrastructure is falling apart – but you don’t need a senator and a member of Congress to tell you that. Second, when we start rebuilding a community, we need to make sure those new jobs are actually going to the people living there. It turns out that even our infrastructure policies fall into that category. They blocked workers from new opp


Senator Kirsten Gillibrand speaks on the second night of the second 2020 Democratic U.S. presidential debate in Detroit, Michigan, July 31, 2019. America’s infrastructure is falling apart – but you don’t need a senator and a member of Congress to tell you that. Second, when we start rebuilding a community, we need to make sure those new jobs are actually going to the people living there. It turns out that even our infrastructure policies fall into that category. They blocked workers from new opp
2020 candidate Kirsten Gillibrand, Rep. Bass say their infrastructure bill will boost local jobs, rebuild communities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: senator kirsten gillibrand, d-ny, us rep karen bass, d-ca
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, infrastructure, say, gillibrand, need, communities, senator, candidate, kirsten, sure, highways, supposed, rep, workers, rebuild, local, jobs, second, policies


2020 candidate Kirsten Gillibrand, Rep. Bass say their infrastructure bill will boost local jobs, rebuild communities

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand speaks on the second night of the second 2020 Democratic U.S. presidential debate in Detroit, Michigan, July 31, 2019.

America’s infrastructure is falling apart – but you don’t need a senator and a member of Congress to tell you that.

If you’ve driven around or done some traveling lately, you probably had the exact same thought that we hear from our constituents all the time: our highways, bridges, airports, and public transportation are just not working right.

The same goes for our contaminated water supplies, our patchwork access to high-speed internet, and our crumbling schools.

We have to fix all of it – and here’s how:

First, we need to get building, and finally clean up the state of disrepair that much of our infrastructure is in now.

Second, when we start rebuilding a community, we need to make sure those new jobs are actually going to the people living there.

And third, when that new project goes up, we need to make sure it’s bringing the community together – not tearing it apart.

We’re in an extraordinary moment right now in which Americans are demanding that we correct the injustices of the last century – especially government policies that hurt poor communities and communities of color. It turns out that even our infrastructure policies fall into that category.

Here’s a glaring example: Highways. Highways are supposed to connect people. They’re supposed to make it easier for neighbors to come together, for kids to get to school, for workers to get to their jobs. But that’s not what happened when our country built them.

Instead, highways like I-81 in Syracuse, freeways like the 10 in Los Angeles, and so many more in between divide cities and neighborhoods in half. They closed local businesses. They blocked workers from new opportunities and better jobs, and the comfortable life that follows.

Because of those bad policies, in cities all over the country today, you see the same disturbing pattern: green spaces, grocery stores, and good jobs on one side of the overpass, and none of them on the other.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: senator kirsten gillibrand, d-ny, us rep karen bass, d-ca
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, infrastructure, say, gillibrand, need, communities, senator, candidate, kirsten, sure, highways, supposed, rep, workers, rebuild, local, jobs, second, policies


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Taylor Morrison is the latest big homebuilder to bet on single-family rentals

Scottsdale, Arizona-based Taylor Morrison just announced a partnership with Christopher Todd Communities, also based in the state, to build single-family, rent-only communities. It’s part of a trend of builders stepping in to the single-family rental space, either on their own or partnering with established rental companies. As for Taylor Morrison, the first projects will be in joint ventures, but then it will take over the construction process — acquire land, develop it and eventually build in


Scottsdale, Arizona-based Taylor Morrison just announced a partnership with Christopher Todd Communities, also based in the state, to build single-family, rent-only communities. It’s part of a trend of builders stepping in to the single-family rental space, either on their own or partnering with established rental companies. As for Taylor Morrison, the first projects will be in joint ventures, but then it will take over the construction process — acquire land, develop it and eventually build in
Taylor Morrison is the latest big homebuilder to bet on single-family rentals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: diana olick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rentals, sell, singlefamily, big, homes, christopher, taylor, bet, communities, homebuilder, investors, morrison, palmer, rental, latest


Taylor Morrison is the latest big homebuilder to bet on single-family rentals

It didn’t take long, but the build-for-rent space is starting to get a little crowded.

Scottsdale, Arizona-based Taylor Morrison just announced a partnership with Christopher Todd Communities, also based in the state, to build single-family, rent-only communities. It’s part of a trend of builders stepping in to the single-family rental space, either on their own or partnering with established rental companies.

Lennar and Toll Brothers have recently started building homes for rent. Lennar sells its properties to investors, while Toll plans to hold the properties in partnerships.

As for Taylor Morrison, the first projects will be in joint ventures, but then it will take over the construction process — acquire land, develop it and eventually build in excess of 2000 single-family homes in rent-only communities. Christopher Todd will design the communities, hire property management and lease the homes. It will all be according to the company’s own time-tested “playbook,” which determines supply-demand characteristics, and then gauges the right submarkets, community design and amenities package.

Three developments are planned in the Phoenix area, breaking ground late this year. The expectation is then to expand over the next several years, bringing more rental communities to more markets.

Taylor Morrison’s CEO, Sheryl Palmer, said she expects to sell the homes to investors initially but might consider other options over time.

“We’ll determine the right time in the lease-up process to sell the assets. There is plenty of money out there, so we could look at a REIT or private investors, but our intent will be to divest in a pretty timely fashion,” said Palmer. “As we look at the best way to optimize price and returns, it might be to do something on our own and create our own fund or REIT, but sell them out of the Taylor Morrison land portfolio.”

Demand for single-family rentals is incredibly strong, as home prices soar and social stigmas around renting fall away. Vacancy rates are low and rents are rising. Half of Christopher Todd’s current tenants are millennials and half are baby boomers, according to Palmer.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: diana olick
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rentals, sell, singlefamily, big, homes, christopher, taylor, bet, communities, homebuilder, investors, morrison, palmer, rental, latest


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Extreme ice melt in Greenland threatens coastal communities across the world, scientists warn

The higher frequency of extreme melt events has serious consequences for coastal communities across the world, climatologists warn. Greenland is the biggest contributor to sea level rise, which threatens to destroy property value in coastal regions, displace residents and eventually impact global markets. In June alone, Greenland’s ice sheet lost 80 billion tons of ice, according to the National Snow and Ice Data center. “You can’t undo these melt events,” said Brian Brettschneider, a climatolog


The higher frequency of extreme melt events has serious consequences for coastal communities across the world, climatologists warn. Greenland is the biggest contributor to sea level rise, which threatens to destroy property value in coastal regions, displace residents and eventually impact global markets. In June alone, Greenland’s ice sheet lost 80 billion tons of ice, according to the National Snow and Ice Data center. “You can’t undo these melt events,” said Brian Brettschneider, a climatolog
Extreme ice melt in Greenland threatens coastal communities across the world, scientists warn Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, levels, warn, coastal, sea, ice, scientists, level, tons, world, extreme, events, greenland, communities, rise, sheet, threatens, melt


Extreme ice melt in Greenland threatens coastal communities across the world, scientists warn

An iceberg floats in Disko Bay behind houses during unseasonably warm weather on July 30, 2019 in Ilulissat, Greenland. Climate change is having a profound effect in Greenland, where over the last several decades summers have become longer and the rate that glaciers and the Greenland ice cap are retreating has accelerated.

The historic heatwave that scorched Europe last week has moved to Greenland, where it’s expected on Thursday to melt away 12 billion tons of water from the ice sheet and irreversibly raise sea levels across the world.

The heat is causing one of the largest melt events ever for Greenland, following a record event in 2012 where 97% of the ice sheet experienced melting. This week, over 60% of Greenland’s surface was melting, according to computer model simulations, with temperatures over 25 to 30 degrees Fahrenheit higher than normal.

The higher frequency of extreme melt events has serious consequences for coastal communities across the world, climatologists warn.

Greenland is the biggest contributor to sea level rise, which threatens to destroy property value in coastal regions, displace residents and eventually impact global markets.

“What we’re seeing in Greenland is exceptional. It’s a wake up call,” Penn State climatologist Luke Trusel said. “What we do now is critically important.”

If all of Greenland’s ice melted, global sea levels would rise over 20 feet. This week’s melt alone is estimated to permanently raise global sea levels by 0.1 millimeters.

While that measurement may seem small, this week’s melt is not an isolated event. Climate models estimate a sharp increase in frequent extreme weather events and longer periods of above average temperatures across Greenland. So, several hundred isolated weather events stacked up over the next 30 years, for instance, translates to multiples inches of sea level rise across the globe.

“The fact that we are getting measurable sea level rise out of a single day of melt is shocking,” said meteorologist Eric Holthaus. “There are real and lasting consequences from this single heat wave that will last for thousands of years.”

In June alone, Greenland’s ice sheet lost 80 billion tons of ice, according to the National Snow and Ice Data center. In July, the ice sheet lost 160 billion tons of ice. This week, Greenland will lose over 50 billion tons of ice, according to estimates.

“You can’t undo these melt events,” said Brian Brettschneider, a climatologist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ International Arctic Research Center. “The only way is to freeze it, and that’s just not possible given the trajectory we’re on.”

Global sea levels will rise 2 to 6 feet by 2100 on the current trajectory, according to satellite data. However, given that greenhouse gas emissions are rising and global warming is accelerating at an unprecedented pace, scientists argue that the current projections underestimate sea level rise.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: emma newburger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, levels, warn, coastal, sea, ice, scientists, level, tons, world, extreme, events, greenland, communities, rise, sheet, threatens, melt


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Google to invest $1 billion in San Francisco Bay Area housing amid regional expansion

Google will invest $1 billion toward efforts to develop at least 15,000 new homes in the San Francisco Bay Area. “Across the region, one issue stands out as particularly urgent and complex: housing,” CEO Sundar Pichai wrote in a blog post. “As Google grows throughout the Bay Area — whether it’s in our home town of Mountain View, in San Francisco, or in our future developments in San Jose and Sunnyvale — we’ve invested in developing housing that meets the needs of these communities. More than 45,


Google will invest $1 billion toward efforts to develop at least 15,000 new homes in the San Francisco Bay Area. “Across the region, one issue stands out as particularly urgent and complex: housing,” CEO Sundar Pichai wrote in a blog post. “As Google grows throughout the Bay Area — whether it’s in our home town of Mountain View, in San Francisco, or in our future developments in San Jose and Sunnyvale — we’ve invested in developing housing that meets the needs of these communities. More than 45,
Google to invest $1 billion in San Francisco Bay Area housing amid regional expansion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, communities, billion, bay, million, tech, francisco, invest, san, area, local, regional, expansion, google


Google to invest $1 billion in San Francisco Bay Area housing amid regional expansion

Google will invest $1 billion toward efforts to develop at least 15,000 new homes in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“Across the region, one issue stands out as particularly urgent and complex: housing,” CEO Sundar Pichai wrote in a blog post. “As Google grows throughout the Bay Area — whether it’s in our home town of Mountain View, in San Francisco, or in our future developments in San Jose and Sunnyvale — we’ve invested in developing housing that meets the needs of these communities. But there’s more to do.”

The announcement comes as tech companies, especially Google and its parent company Alphabet, face increased pressure from local communities claiming their expansion encroaches on the Bay Area’s already-tight housing market and displaces long-time residents. The move could also be an attempt to preempt protests planned for the Alphabet shareholders meeting Wednesday, as some activists are concerned about Google’s effects on housing prices and local communities.

More than 45,000 Google employees live in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to Pichai.

The $1 billion will be broken up into a few different funding types.

Google will, over the next 10 years, rezone $750 million worth of its property, most of which is currently zoned for commercial and office space. That means Google could knock down existing offices to enable housing.

Nonprofits focused on homelessness and displacement will get $50 million, and $250 million will go toward an investment fund for developers specifically to build affordable housing.

WATCH NOW: How tech IPO could impact San Francisco real estate


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, communities, billion, bay, million, tech, francisco, invest, san, area, local, regional, expansion, google


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Botswana lifts 5-year ban on hunting elephants, pitting traders against preservationists

“Most of the countries surrounding Botswana allow [hunting] and many elephants have moved into Botswana because of the poaching in neighboring countries.” Safari Club International, a U.S.-based hunting group praised the government’s stance, claiming that lifting the ban would be good for wildlife. The Botswana government claims there has been an increase in human-elephant conflict — a consequence of the growing elephant population — and elephant-related damage to livestock. In Botswana elephant


“Most of the countries surrounding Botswana allow [hunting] and many elephants have moved into Botswana because of the poaching in neighboring countries.” Safari Club International, a U.S.-based hunting group praised the government’s stance, claiming that lifting the ban would be good for wildlife. The Botswana government claims there has been an increase in human-elephant conflict — a consequence of the growing elephant population — and elephant-related damage to livestock. In Botswana elephant
Botswana lifts 5-year ban on hunting elephants, pitting traders against preservationists Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: nadine el-bawab
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, botswana, 5year, elephant, hunting, ban, elephants, wildlife, jones, international, pitting, ivory, lifts, population, traders, preservationists, communities


Botswana lifts 5-year ban on hunting elephants, pitting traders against preservationists

BOTSWANA – 2014/06/13: Female African elephant (Loxodonta africana) with baby in the Chitabe area of the Okavango Delta in the northern part of Botswana. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Botswana’s government lifted a 5-year ban on elephant hunting on Thursday, spurring criticism from wildlife conservation groups who see the move as a step backward in protecting the population.

The reversal has tipped off international controversy over wildlife protection, economic stimulus and ivory trading.

Botswana has the highest elephant population of any African country, with an estimated population between 120,000 and 130,000, according to Mark Jones, a veterinarian and the head of policy at the Born Free Foundation, a global wildlife conservation charity.

Jones said trophy hunting is unlikely to have any real impact on the population’s numbers — but is likely to harm the animals themselves.

“Elephants are highly intelligent creatures and will move away from areas where they are in danger,” Jones said. “Most of the countries surrounding Botswana allow [hunting] and many elephants have moved into Botswana because of the poaching in neighboring countries.”

Safari Club International, a U.S.-based hunting group praised the government’s stance, claiming that lifting the ban would be good for wildlife.

“We thank the President of Botswana and all others involved in Botswana for their forward thinking and having the courage to bypass doing what is easy in order to do what is right for the benefit of the wildlife of Botswana and the people of Botswana,” said SCI President Paul Babaz in a statement. “They need to be able to manage their own wildlife so that there will be more wildlife in wild places in harmony with the people for generations to come.”

The Botswana government claims there has been an increase in human-elephant conflict — a consequence of the growing elephant population — and elephant-related damage to livestock.

In Botswana elephants are not confined to fenced reserves. That allows them to migrate freely over large distances throughout the country, and even cross over into neighboring countries.

“We are concerned that hunting causes extreme stress to elephants, which are intelligent, thinking, communicating animals. The elephants begin to associate humans with violence and they retaliate — hence the large number of human fatalities,” Paula Kahumbu, CEO of nonprofit Wildlife Direct, said in a statement.

Still, experts maintain hunting is not a credible method of population control or an effective means to combat higher rates of violence and damage.

There are more humane and legitimate ways to litigate the size of the population and prevent them from crossing into crop-fields. The use of chili or the introduction of beehives have proved to be effective in doing so, Jones said.

Officials also say the ban has caused local communities to suffer as a result of the loss of income from trophy hunters.

“Most of the money generated by hunting is captured by the state and by the hunting companies. Communities make very little gain – studies have shown that less than 2% of the funds generated by hunting reach communities,” Kahumbu said.

Moreover, Botswana is one of four African states proposing the decriminalization of commercial trade of ivory, which is outlawed under international law. “Poaching for ivory is the biggest single threat to elephants,” Jones said.

The U.S., U.K. and China have all outlawed ivory trade.

There were reports of a number of elephants being poached just last year, according to Jones, but allowing the sale of ivory to resume in some countries would stimulate hunting of the animals and put them in grave danger.

WATCH: How China could use its massive US debt holdings as a trade war weapon


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: nadine el-bawab
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, botswana, 5year, elephant, hunting, ban, elephants, wildlife, jones, international, pitting, ivory, lifts, population, traders, preservationists, communities


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Facebook is rolling out the biggest change to its app in the past five years

Facebook will roll out the biggest change to its app in the past five years on Tuesday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced at the company’s F8 Developer Conference. The new version of the app marks an early step toward Zuckerberg’s new privacy and messaging focused vision for the platform. “FB5” marks the fifth “major version” of the app, Zuckerberg said, which will emphasize groups and community to a greater extent than the previous designs. “It has a much bigger focus on communities and making comm


Facebook will roll out the biggest change to its app in the past five years on Tuesday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced at the company’s F8 Developer Conference. The new version of the app marks an early step toward Zuckerberg’s new privacy and messaging focused vision for the platform. “FB5” marks the fifth “major version” of the app, Zuckerberg said, which will emphasize groups and community to a greater extent than the previous designs. “It has a much bigger focus on communities and making comm
Facebook is rolling out the biggest change to its app in the past five years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, app, marks, roll, change, version, biggest, rolling, facebook, groups, communities, focus, past, zuckerberg


Facebook is rolling out the biggest change to its app in the past five years

Facebook will roll out the biggest change to its app in the past five years on Tuesday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced at the company’s F8 Developer Conference.

The new version of the app marks an early step toward Zuckerberg’s new privacy and messaging focused vision for the platform. “FB5” marks the fifth “major version” of the app, Zuckerberg said, which will emphasize groups and community to a greater extent than the previous designs.

“It has a much bigger focus on communities and making communities as central as friends,” Zuckerberg said, highlighting the app’s simpler design. “The app isn’t even blue anymore,” he said, chuckling, adding that Facebook’s icon will be modernized as well.

As the app shifts to focus on groups, Zuckerberg said the company will take measures to ensure that it is not recommending users to join groups made for the purpose of spreading misinformation, a problem for which Facebook has been criticized intensely over the past year. At the beginning of the conference, Zuckerberg acknowledged, “I get that a lot of people aren’t sure that we’re serious about this,” referencing his new privacy-focused strategy in light of its recent scandals.

The new version will roll out in the U.S. on Tuesday and will continue to roll out around the world in the coming weeks. Facebook is also working on a new version of its desktop website, which Zuckerberg said is coming later this year.

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Watch: Investors are excited about innovation at Facebook, says analyst


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, app, marks, roll, change, version, biggest, rolling, facebook, groups, communities, focus, past, zuckerberg


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Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke proposes $5 trillion plan to combat climate change

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke on Monday revealed a $5 trillion plan to address climate change that would be funded largely by changes to the tax code. “The greatest threat we face — which will test our country, our democracy, every single one of us — is climate change,” O’Rourke said in a statement. O’Rourke is the latest Democrat to introduce an overarching framework for combating climate change. O’Rourke said the first bill he would send to Congress as president would include


Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke on Monday revealed a $5 trillion plan to address climate change that would be funded largely by changes to the tax code. “The greatest threat we face — which will test our country, our democracy, every single one of us — is climate change,” O’Rourke said in a statement. O’Rourke is the latest Democrat to introduce an overarching framework for combating climate change. O’Rourke said the first bill he would send to Congress as president would include
Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke proposes $5 trillion plan to combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: tom dichristopher, natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, combat, tax, presidential, proposes, orourke, spending, emissions, bill, change, communities, trillion, hopeful, democratic, climate, investment


Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O'Rourke proposes $5 trillion plan to combat climate change

Democratic 2020 presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke speaks during a campaign stop at The Beancounter Coffeehouse & Drinkery in Burlington, Iowa, U.S. March 14, 2019.

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke on Monday revealed a $5 trillion plan to address climate change that would be funded largely by changes to the tax code.

The former U.S. congressman from Texas is pitching a 10-year plan that seeks to spur investment in clean technology and energy efficiency, achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and shore up communities vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

“The greatest threat we face — which will test our country, our democracy, every single one of us — is climate change,” O’Rourke said in a statement. “We have one last chance to unleash the ingenuity and political will of hundreds of millions of Americans to meet this moment before it’s too late.”

O’Rourke is the latest Democrat to introduce an overarching framework for combating climate change. The world’s top climate scientists say the nations of the world must take “unprecedented” and immediate action to prevent catastrophic impact from global warming in the coming years.

Parts of O’Rourke’s proposal dovetail with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal, but O’Rourke’s proposal is fundamentally different because it seeks to leverage an initial government investment in order to spark private spending. Under Ocasio-Cortez’s plan, the U.S. government would entirely fund a radical transformation of the nation’s energy, transportation and building sectors over the course of a decade.

O’Rourke said the first bill he would send to Congress as president would include a $1.5 trillion investment in infrastructure, innovation and communities. The bill would make structural changes to the tax code that “ensure corporations and the wealthiest among us pay their fair share” and end billions of dollars in tax breaks to fossil fuel companies.

The bill would include $600 billion, split evenly between tax credits and direct investments in infrastructure. O’Rourke said that will mobilize at least $4 trillion in additional capital spending.

The campaign believes that will break down to about $1 trillion in spending to accelerate the development of new energy efficiency and alternative power technologies that slash emissions. It says another $3 trillion in spending would be underpinned by institutions like the Rural Utility Service and a new finance authority.

O’Rourke’s bill would also allocate $250 billion to encourage private investment in research and development and climate science. An additional $650 billion investment aims to spur $1.2 trillion in grants for housing, transportation, public health, job training and other benefits for Americans “on the front-lines of a changing climate and those disrupted by the forces of an economy in transition.”

The candidate also says he would sign a number of executive orders on his first day in office, including to reenter the Paris climate agreement. President Donald Trump, who questions climate science and downplays its impacts, withdrew the U.S. from the global framework for reducing emissions.

As president, O’Rourke said, he would develop a legally enforceable standard to make sure that by 2050 the U.S. achieves net zero emissions, meaning the nation offsets any greenhouse gas emissions with measures to offset an equal amount.

O’Rourke also said he would take several measures to help communities deal with and recover from fires, floods, droughts and hurricanes linked to climate change. Those include increasing spending on mitigation projects before climate disasters strike and amending the law to make sure communities hit by these weather events are built back stronger.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: tom dichristopher, natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, combat, tax, presidential, proposes, orourke, spending, emissions, bill, change, communities, trillion, hopeful, democratic, climate, investment


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