Google to invest $1 billion in San Francisco Bay Area housing amid regional expansion

Google will invest $1 billion toward efforts to develop at least 15,000 new homes in the San Francisco Bay Area. “Across the region, one issue stands out as particularly urgent and complex: housing,” CEO Sundar Pichai wrote in a blog post. “As Google grows throughout the Bay Area — whether it’s in our home town of Mountain View, in San Francisco, or in our future developments in San Jose and Sunnyvale — we’ve invested in developing housing that meets the needs of these communities. More than 45,


Google will invest $1 billion toward efforts to develop at least 15,000 new homes in the San Francisco Bay Area. “Across the region, one issue stands out as particularly urgent and complex: housing,” CEO Sundar Pichai wrote in a blog post. “As Google grows throughout the Bay Area — whether it’s in our home town of Mountain View, in San Francisco, or in our future developments in San Jose and Sunnyvale — we’ve invested in developing housing that meets the needs of these communities. More than 45,
Google to invest $1 billion in San Francisco Bay Area housing amid regional expansion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, communities, billion, bay, million, tech, francisco, invest, san, area, local, regional, expansion, google


Google to invest $1 billion in San Francisco Bay Area housing amid regional expansion

Google will invest $1 billion toward efforts to develop at least 15,000 new homes in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“Across the region, one issue stands out as particularly urgent and complex: housing,” CEO Sundar Pichai wrote in a blog post. “As Google grows throughout the Bay Area — whether it’s in our home town of Mountain View, in San Francisco, or in our future developments in San Jose and Sunnyvale — we’ve invested in developing housing that meets the needs of these communities. But there’s more to do.”

The announcement comes as tech companies, especially Google and its parent company Alphabet, face increased pressure from local communities claiming their expansion encroaches on the Bay Area’s already-tight housing market and displaces long-time residents. The move could also be an attempt to preempt protests planned for the Alphabet shareholders meeting Wednesday, as some activists are concerned about Google’s effects on housing prices and local communities.

More than 45,000 Google employees live in the San Francisco Bay Area, according to Pichai.

The $1 billion will be broken up into a few different funding types.

Google will, over the next 10 years, rezone $750 million worth of its property, most of which is currently zoned for commercial and office space. That means Google could knock down existing offices to enable housing.

Nonprofits focused on homelessness and displacement will get $50 million, and $250 million will go toward an investment fund for developers specifically to build affordable housing.

WATCH NOW: How tech IPO could impact San Francisco real estate


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, housing, communities, billion, bay, million, tech, francisco, invest, san, area, local, regional, expansion, google


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Botswana lifts 5-year ban on hunting elephants, pitting traders against preservationists

“Most of the countries surrounding Botswana allow [hunting] and many elephants have moved into Botswana because of the poaching in neighboring countries.” Safari Club International, a U.S.-based hunting group praised the government’s stance, claiming that lifting the ban would be good for wildlife. The Botswana government claims there has been an increase in human-elephant conflict — a consequence of the growing elephant population — and elephant-related damage to livestock. In Botswana elephant


“Most of the countries surrounding Botswana allow [hunting] and many elephants have moved into Botswana because of the poaching in neighboring countries.” Safari Club International, a U.S.-based hunting group praised the government’s stance, claiming that lifting the ban would be good for wildlife. The Botswana government claims there has been an increase in human-elephant conflict — a consequence of the growing elephant population — and elephant-related damage to livestock. In Botswana elephant
Botswana lifts 5-year ban on hunting elephants, pitting traders against preservationists Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: nadine el-bawab
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, botswana, 5year, elephant, hunting, ban, elephants, wildlife, jones, international, pitting, ivory, lifts, population, traders, preservationists, communities


Botswana lifts 5-year ban on hunting elephants, pitting traders against preservationists

BOTSWANA – 2014/06/13: Female African elephant (Loxodonta africana) with baby in the Chitabe area of the Okavango Delta in the northern part of Botswana. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Botswana’s government lifted a 5-year ban on elephant hunting on Thursday, spurring criticism from wildlife conservation groups who see the move as a step backward in protecting the population.

The reversal has tipped off international controversy over wildlife protection, economic stimulus and ivory trading.

Botswana has the highest elephant population of any African country, with an estimated population between 120,000 and 130,000, according to Mark Jones, a veterinarian and the head of policy at the Born Free Foundation, a global wildlife conservation charity.

Jones said trophy hunting is unlikely to have any real impact on the population’s numbers — but is likely to harm the animals themselves.

“Elephants are highly intelligent creatures and will move away from areas where they are in danger,” Jones said. “Most of the countries surrounding Botswana allow [hunting] and many elephants have moved into Botswana because of the poaching in neighboring countries.”

Safari Club International, a U.S.-based hunting group praised the government’s stance, claiming that lifting the ban would be good for wildlife.

“We thank the President of Botswana and all others involved in Botswana for their forward thinking and having the courage to bypass doing what is easy in order to do what is right for the benefit of the wildlife of Botswana and the people of Botswana,” said SCI President Paul Babaz in a statement. “They need to be able to manage their own wildlife so that there will be more wildlife in wild places in harmony with the people for generations to come.”

The Botswana government claims there has been an increase in human-elephant conflict — a consequence of the growing elephant population — and elephant-related damage to livestock.

In Botswana elephants are not confined to fenced reserves. That allows them to migrate freely over large distances throughout the country, and even cross over into neighboring countries.

“We are concerned that hunting causes extreme stress to elephants, which are intelligent, thinking, communicating animals. The elephants begin to associate humans with violence and they retaliate — hence the large number of human fatalities,” Paula Kahumbu, CEO of nonprofit Wildlife Direct, said in a statement.

Still, experts maintain hunting is not a credible method of population control or an effective means to combat higher rates of violence and damage.

There are more humane and legitimate ways to litigate the size of the population and prevent them from crossing into crop-fields. The use of chili or the introduction of beehives have proved to be effective in doing so, Jones said.

Officials also say the ban has caused local communities to suffer as a result of the loss of income from trophy hunters.

“Most of the money generated by hunting is captured by the state and by the hunting companies. Communities make very little gain – studies have shown that less than 2% of the funds generated by hunting reach communities,” Kahumbu said.

Moreover, Botswana is one of four African states proposing the decriminalization of commercial trade of ivory, which is outlawed under international law. “Poaching for ivory is the biggest single threat to elephants,” Jones said.

The U.S., U.K. and China have all outlawed ivory trade.

There were reports of a number of elephants being poached just last year, according to Jones, but allowing the sale of ivory to resume in some countries would stimulate hunting of the animals and put them in grave danger.

WATCH: How China could use its massive US debt holdings as a trade war weapon


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: nadine el-bawab
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, botswana, 5year, elephant, hunting, ban, elephants, wildlife, jones, international, pitting, ivory, lifts, population, traders, preservationists, communities


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Facebook is rolling out the biggest change to its app in the past five years

Facebook will roll out the biggest change to its app in the past five years on Tuesday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced at the company’s F8 Developer Conference. The new version of the app marks an early step toward Zuckerberg’s new privacy and messaging focused vision for the platform. “FB5” marks the fifth “major version” of the app, Zuckerberg said, which will emphasize groups and community to a greater extent than the previous designs. “It has a much bigger focus on communities and making comm


Facebook will roll out the biggest change to its app in the past five years on Tuesday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced at the company’s F8 Developer Conference. The new version of the app marks an early step toward Zuckerberg’s new privacy and messaging focused vision for the platform. “FB5” marks the fifth “major version” of the app, Zuckerberg said, which will emphasize groups and community to a greater extent than the previous designs. “It has a much bigger focus on communities and making comm
Facebook is rolling out the biggest change to its app in the past five years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, app, marks, roll, change, version, biggest, rolling, facebook, groups, communities, focus, past, zuckerberg


Facebook is rolling out the biggest change to its app in the past five years

Facebook will roll out the biggest change to its app in the past five years on Tuesday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced at the company’s F8 Developer Conference.

The new version of the app marks an early step toward Zuckerberg’s new privacy and messaging focused vision for the platform. “FB5” marks the fifth “major version” of the app, Zuckerberg said, which will emphasize groups and community to a greater extent than the previous designs.

“It has a much bigger focus on communities and making communities as central as friends,” Zuckerberg said, highlighting the app’s simpler design. “The app isn’t even blue anymore,” he said, chuckling, adding that Facebook’s icon will be modernized as well.

As the app shifts to focus on groups, Zuckerberg said the company will take measures to ensure that it is not recommending users to join groups made for the purpose of spreading misinformation, a problem for which Facebook has been criticized intensely over the past year. At the beginning of the conference, Zuckerberg acknowledged, “I get that a lot of people aren’t sure that we’re serious about this,” referencing his new privacy-focused strategy in light of its recent scandals.

The new version will roll out in the U.S. on Tuesday and will continue to roll out around the world in the coming weeks. Facebook is also working on a new version of its desktop website, which Zuckerberg said is coming later this year.

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Watch: Investors are excited about innovation at Facebook, says analyst


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, app, marks, roll, change, version, biggest, rolling, facebook, groups, communities, focus, past, zuckerberg


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Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke proposes $5 trillion plan to combat climate change

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke on Monday revealed a $5 trillion plan to address climate change that would be funded largely by changes to the tax code. “The greatest threat we face — which will test our country, our democracy, every single one of us — is climate change,” O’Rourke said in a statement. O’Rourke is the latest Democrat to introduce an overarching framework for combating climate change. O’Rourke said the first bill he would send to Congress as president would include


Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke on Monday revealed a $5 trillion plan to address climate change that would be funded largely by changes to the tax code. “The greatest threat we face — which will test our country, our democracy, every single one of us — is climate change,” O’Rourke said in a statement. O’Rourke is the latest Democrat to introduce an overarching framework for combating climate change. O’Rourke said the first bill he would send to Congress as president would include
Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O’Rourke proposes $5 trillion plan to combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: tom dichristopher, natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, combat, tax, presidential, proposes, orourke, spending, emissions, bill, change, communities, trillion, hopeful, democratic, climate, investment


Democratic presidential hopeful Beto O'Rourke proposes $5 trillion plan to combat climate change

Democratic 2020 presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke speaks during a campaign stop at The Beancounter Coffeehouse & Drinkery in Burlington, Iowa, U.S. March 14, 2019.

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke on Monday revealed a $5 trillion plan to address climate change that would be funded largely by changes to the tax code.

The former U.S. congressman from Texas is pitching a 10-year plan that seeks to spur investment in clean technology and energy efficiency, achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and shore up communities vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

“The greatest threat we face — which will test our country, our democracy, every single one of us — is climate change,” O’Rourke said in a statement. “We have one last chance to unleash the ingenuity and political will of hundreds of millions of Americans to meet this moment before it’s too late.”

O’Rourke is the latest Democrat to introduce an overarching framework for combating climate change. The world’s top climate scientists say the nations of the world must take “unprecedented” and immediate action to prevent catastrophic impact from global warming in the coming years.

Parts of O’Rourke’s proposal dovetail with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal, but O’Rourke’s proposal is fundamentally different because it seeks to leverage an initial government investment in order to spark private spending. Under Ocasio-Cortez’s plan, the U.S. government would entirely fund a radical transformation of the nation’s energy, transportation and building sectors over the course of a decade.

O’Rourke said the first bill he would send to Congress as president would include a $1.5 trillion investment in infrastructure, innovation and communities. The bill would make structural changes to the tax code that “ensure corporations and the wealthiest among us pay their fair share” and end billions of dollars in tax breaks to fossil fuel companies.

The bill would include $600 billion, split evenly between tax credits and direct investments in infrastructure. O’Rourke said that will mobilize at least $4 trillion in additional capital spending.

The campaign believes that will break down to about $1 trillion in spending to accelerate the development of new energy efficiency and alternative power technologies that slash emissions. It says another $3 trillion in spending would be underpinned by institutions like the Rural Utility Service and a new finance authority.

O’Rourke’s bill would also allocate $250 billion to encourage private investment in research and development and climate science. An additional $650 billion investment aims to spur $1.2 trillion in grants for housing, transportation, public health, job training and other benefits for Americans “on the front-lines of a changing climate and those disrupted by the forces of an economy in transition.”

The candidate also says he would sign a number of executive orders on his first day in office, including to reenter the Paris climate agreement. President Donald Trump, who questions climate science and downplays its impacts, withdrew the U.S. from the global framework for reducing emissions.

As president, O’Rourke said, he would develop a legally enforceable standard to make sure that by 2050 the U.S. achieves net zero emissions, meaning the nation offsets any greenhouse gas emissions with measures to offset an equal amount.

O’Rourke also said he would take several measures to help communities deal with and recover from fires, floods, droughts and hurricanes linked to climate change. Those include increasing spending on mitigation projects before climate disasters strike and amending the law to make sure communities hit by these weather events are built back stronger.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: tom dichristopher, natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plan, combat, tax, presidential, proposes, orourke, spending, emissions, bill, change, communities, trillion, hopeful, democratic, climate, investment


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Poor mental health shortens life expectancy almost as much as diabetes and smoking

Poor mental health shortens life expectancy almost as much as diabetes, smoking or not working out, according to U.S. News & World Report and the Aetna Foundation. The findings are part of the organizations’ Healthiest Communities rankings, which evaluates nearly 3,000 communities across 81 health-related metrics, such as nutrition, housing and education. Poor self-reported mental health had about as strong a link, surprising Aetna Foundation President Garth Graham. “I at first wanted us to doub


Poor mental health shortens life expectancy almost as much as diabetes, smoking or not working out, according to U.S. News & World Report and the Aetna Foundation. The findings are part of the organizations’ Healthiest Communities rankings, which evaluates nearly 3,000 communities across 81 health-related metrics, such as nutrition, housing and education. Poor self-reported mental health had about as strong a link, surprising Aetna Foundation President Garth Graham. “I at first wanted us to doub
Poor mental health shortens life expectancy almost as much as diabetes and smoking Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: angelica lavito, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, county, life, community, aetna, communities, graham, expectancy, shortens, strong, smoking, mental, health, diabetes, colorado, healthiest, poor


Poor mental health shortens life expectancy almost as much as diabetes and smoking

Poor mental health shortens life expectancy almost as much as diabetes, smoking or not working out, according to U.S. News & World Report and the Aetna Foundation.

The findings are part of the organizations’ Healthiest Communities rankings, which evaluates nearly 3,000 communities across 81 health-related metrics, such as nutrition, housing and education. Of all the metrics they evaluated, diabetes and smoking had the strongest correlation to reduced life expectancy.

Poor self-reported mental health had about as strong a link, surprising Aetna Foundation President Garth Graham.

“I at first wanted us to double check,” said Graham, who is also Aetna’s vice president for community health.

Mental health did not have as strong of an effect last year, he said. However, the change is consistent with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data that showed increasing fatal opioid overdoses and suicides weighed on U.S. life expectancy.

Douglas County, Colorado, was named the healthiest community in America. Seven communities in Colorado made the top 20. Nearly all adults said they exercise in these counties. Plus, Colorado posted the highest average score for environment.

Communities in the top 25 percent typically posted strong housing quality, low environmental hazards and health outcomes scores. At the bottom 25 percent, education, food and nutrition and economy tended to drag down overall performance.

“We often think about health as the four hours we spend in a doctor’s office a year, but health is about so much more than that,” Graham said.

Here are the top 10 healthiest communities in America:

1. Douglas County, Colorado

2. Los Alamos County, New Mexico

3. Falls Church city, Virginia

4. Loudoun County, Virginia

5. Broomfield County, Colorado

6. Teton County, Wyoming

7. Hamilton County, Indiana

8. Carver County, Minnesota

9. Delaware County, Ohio

10. Howard County, Maryland

CVS Health acquired Aetna, a health insurer, in November. When the transaction closed, the combined company announced it would spend $100 million, or $20 million annually, on community health efforts. The company will use the data from the new report to target these efforts, Graham said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-25  Authors: angelica lavito, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, county, life, community, aetna, communities, graham, expectancy, shortens, strong, smoking, mental, health, diabetes, colorado, healthiest, poor


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Artificial intelligence algorithms in the criminal justice system

We’re subject to biases and stereotypes, and when these come into play in the criminal justice system, the most disadvantaged communities end up suffering. It’s easy to imagine that there’s a better way, that one day we’ll find a tool that can make neutral, dispassionate decisions about policing and punishment. Around the country, police departments and courtrooms are turning to artificial intelligence algorithms to help them decide everything from where to deploy police officers to whether to r


We’re subject to biases and stereotypes, and when these come into play in the criminal justice system, the most disadvantaged communities end up suffering. It’s easy to imagine that there’s a better way, that one day we’ll find a tool that can make neutral, dispassionate decisions about policing and punishment. Around the country, police departments and courtrooms are turning to artificial intelligence algorithms to help them decide everything from where to deploy police officers to whether to r
Artificial intelligence algorithms in the criminal justice system Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-16  Authors: katie brigham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, criminal, way, intelligence, artificial, day, tool, ways, ultimately, turning, using, system, decisions, justice, communities, algorithms


Artificial intelligence algorithms in the criminal justice system

We all know humans are imperfect. We’re subject to biases and stereotypes, and when these come into play in the criminal justice system, the most disadvantaged communities end up suffering. It’s easy to imagine that there’s a better way, that one day we’ll find a tool that can make neutral, dispassionate decisions about policing and punishment.

Some think that day has already arrived.

Around the country, police departments and courtrooms are turning to artificial intelligence algorithms to help them decide everything from where to deploy police officers to whether to release defendants on bail.

Supporters believe that the technology will lead to increased objectivity, ultimately creating safer communities. Others however, say that the data fed into these algorithms is encoded with human bias, meaning the tech will simply reinforce historical disparities.

Learn more about the ways in which communities, policemen and judges across the U.S. are using these algorithms to make decisions about public safety and people’s lives.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-16  Authors: katie brigham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, criminal, way, intelligence, artificial, day, tool, ways, ultimately, turning, using, system, decisions, justice, communities, algorithms


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New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t


” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t
New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


New York's image is 'a bit tarnished' after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

Wylde said the government had to put something on the table to lure Amazon.

“New York is the highest-taxed place in the country, and when we are competing with every other state and city, in places like Nashville and Dallas — runners-up to our application — it’s pretty hard to compare our tax burden and cost burden there,” she said on “Closing Bell.” ” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.”

Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We shouldn’t be subsidizing companies to provide jobs.”

He called Amazon’s decision a “huge victory” for New Yorkers.

“We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. You actually have to make sure that people are included in the conversation and not displace working-class communities that have been here forever.”

Wylde said while the expected tax revenue is a “big loss” for the city, she is optimistic that New York can move forward.

“We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our tech economy growing. It is our fastest-growing industry, and we need it,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


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New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t


” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. “We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our t
New York’s image is ‘a bit tarnished’ after Amazon exit, says business group CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


New York's image is 'a bit tarnished' after Amazon exit, says business group CEO

Wylde said the government had to put something on the table to lure Amazon.

“New York is the highest-taxed place in the country, and when we are competing with every other state and city, in places like Nashville and Dallas — runners-up to our application — it’s pretty hard to compare our tax burden and cost burden there,” she said on “Closing Bell.” ” Employers here pay 20, 30 percent premium for employees in New York because of the cost of living, and then there’s the taxes.”

Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, applauded Amazon’s exit. “We shouldn’t be subsidizing companies to provide jobs.”

He called Amazon’s decision a “huge victory” for New Yorkers.

“We’ll now be able to reset what the climate should be for businesses in New York,” he told “Closing Bell.” “If you want to come to New York, you actually have to deal with regular people. You actually have to make sure that people are included in the conversation and not displace working-class communities that have been here forever.”

Wylde said while the expected tax revenue is a “big loss” for the city, she is optimistic that New York can move forward.

“We are going to figure out how to work together to make up for it and to keep our tech economy growing. It is our fastest-growing industry, and we need it,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-15  Authors: michelle fox, drew angerer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, closing, bit, bell, communities, group, image, ceo, actually, tax, tarnished, city, cost, york, burden, yorks, exit, amazon, business, amazons


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4 of the 5 most affordable retirement spots are in this state

When 55places.com, an online resource for active adult communities in the U.S., identified the most affordable places to retire in 2019, one sun-drenched state — Florida — stood out by landing four of the top five spots. 1 perch, which went to the most populous city in a much chillier Midwestern state: Sioux Falls, South Dakota. To craft its list, 55places considered the cost of living, median home prices, state tax laws, local health-care options, the availability of 55-plus communities and pub


When 55places.com, an online resource for active adult communities in the U.S., identified the most affordable places to retire in 2019, one sun-drenched state — Florida — stood out by landing four of the top five spots. 1 perch, which went to the most populous city in a much chillier Midwestern state: Sioux Falls, South Dakota. To craft its list, 55places considered the cost of living, median home prices, state tax laws, local health-care options, the availability of 55-plus communities and pub
4 of the 5 most affordable retirement spots are in this state Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski, alexander nicholson, digitalvision, getty images, andras szada, eyeem, henryk sadura, tetra images, denis jr tangney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sundrenched, living, state, retirement, 55placescom, communities, zillowcom, spots, options, transit, went, affordable, tax


4 of the 5 most affordable retirement spots are in this state

When 55places.com, an online resource for active adult communities in the U.S., identified the most affordable places to retire in 2019, one sun-drenched state — Florida — stood out by landing four of the top five spots.

But not the No. 1 perch, which went to the most populous city in a much chillier Midwestern state: Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

To craft its list, 55places considered the cost of living, median home prices, state tax laws, local health-care options, the availability of 55-plus communities and public transit options. According to the site, “the cities named not only offer reasonable housing costs, but also provide exciting amenities and healthy living options.”

Sources: 55places.com, Zillow.com, Avalara.com


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski, alexander nicholson, digitalvision, getty images, andras szada, eyeem, henryk sadura, tetra images, denis jr tangney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sundrenched, living, state, retirement, 55placescom, communities, zillowcom, spots, options, transit, went, affordable, tax


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CVS pledges $100 million for community health programs

CVS Health will spend $100 million over the next five years to support community health programs following its roughly $70 billion acquisition of health insurer Aetna. The initiative, dubbed “Building Healthier Communities,” seeks to improve access to affordable health care, manage health challenges like chronic conditions and opioids and partner with communities. The bulk of the funding will come from the CVS Health Foundation and Aetna Foundation, with the rest coming from the company, a CVS s


CVS Health will spend $100 million over the next five years to support community health programs following its roughly $70 billion acquisition of health insurer Aetna. The initiative, dubbed “Building Healthier Communities,” seeks to improve access to affordable health care, manage health challenges like chronic conditions and opioids and partner with communities. The bulk of the funding will come from the CVS Health Foundation and Aetna Foundation, with the rest coming from the company, a CVS s
CVS pledges $100 million for community health programs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: angelica lavito, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, pledges, million, community, visits, cvs, ways, support, 100, aetna, programs, health, manage, chronic, communities


CVS pledges $100 million for community health programs

CVS Health will spend $100 million over the next five years to support community health programs following its roughly $70 billion acquisition of health insurer Aetna.

The initiative, dubbed “Building Healthier Communities,” seeks to improve access to affordable health care, manage health challenges like chronic conditions and opioids and partner with communities. The bulk of the funding will come from the CVS Health Foundation and Aetna Foundation, with the rest coming from the company, a CVS spokesman told CNBC.

As part of its commitment, CVS plans to expand its Project Health program that offers free health and wellness screenings and will use these visits to identify social determinants of health, non-medical aspects of patients’ lives such as their housing or education that can affect their health. The company will also invest in ways to manage chronic disease, including diabetes and heart disease, and organizations focused on addiction treatment and the opioid crisis.

The funds will also help support communities that address social determinants of health in a continuation of the Aetna Foundation’s Healthiest Communities, which together with U.S. News & World Report ranked nearly 3,000 communities nationwide.

CVS has positioned its acquisition of Aetna around its commitment to finding ways to lower health-care costs, which have ballooned to 18 percent of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product. The combined company aims to use CVS’ walk-in clinics to steer people away from unnecessary and expensive doctor’s visits and into CVS’ MinuteClinics to help manage chronic conditions or avoid hospital readmission.

“I believe we are experiencing this kind of inflection point with health care – facing an opportunity to fundamentally transform the way the system works, making it better for consumers and building much healthier communities,” CVS CEO Larry Merlo said Monday at the National Press Club in Washington D.C., according to a transcript of prepared remarks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: angelica lavito, daniel acker, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, pledges, million, community, visits, cvs, ways, support, 100, aetna, programs, health, manage, chronic, communities


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