The price of apples is soaring in China, and Beijing is showing concern

The price of apples in China has surged nearly 30%, and consumers are cutting their purchases of the fruit, according to data from grocery delivery platform Dada-JD Daojia. Government figures released Wednesday showed China’s consumer price index rose in May to 2.7%, its highest in more than a year, boosted by an 18.2% climb in pork prices and a 26.7% increase in fruit prices. African swine fever has hit millions of pigs, while bad weather has hit the fruit crop. The cost of half a kilogram of a


The price of apples in China has surged nearly 30%, and consumers are cutting their purchases of the fruit, according to data from grocery delivery platform Dada-JD Daojia. Government figures released Wednesday showed China’s consumer price index rose in May to 2.7%, its highest in more than a year, boosted by an 18.2% climb in pork prices and a 26.7% increase in fruit prices. African swine fever has hit millions of pigs, while bad weather has hit the fruit crop. The cost of half a kilogram of a
The price of apples is soaring in China, and Beijing is showing concern Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fruit, concern, increase, yuan, soaring, beijing, prices, nearly, dadajd, hit, pound, showing, apples, china, price, consumer


The price of apples is soaring in China, and Beijing is showing concern

The price of apples in China has surged nearly 30%, and consumers are cutting their purchases of the fruit, according to data from grocery delivery platform Dada-JD Daojia.

That’s just one example in several jumps in food prices in the country. The rapid increase is worth watching for any impact on consumer sentiment and spending, especially since Beijing is putting great emphasis on consumption as a way to keep the economy steadily growing.

Government figures released Wednesday showed China’s consumer price index rose in May to 2.7%, its highest in more than a year, boosted by an 18.2% climb in pork prices and a 26.7% increase in fruit prices.

African swine fever has hit millions of pigs, while bad weather has hit the fruit crop.

The cost of half a kilogram of apples jumped to 15.19 yuan at the beginning of June from 11.81 yuan at the end of April, Dada-JD Daojia said. That’s an increase from about $1.55 a pound to nearly $2 per pound.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: evelyn cheng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fruit, concern, increase, yuan, soaring, beijing, prices, nearly, dadajd, hit, pound, showing, apples, china, price, consumer


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Military families say this is their top concern

Members of the military face hurdles every day — and financial challenges are among some of the biggest. In fact, service members and their spouses ranked financial stress as their greatest concern, even over deployment, according to Blue Star Families’ annual military family lifestyle survey. Members of the Arizona National Guard listen to instructions on April 9, 2018, at the Papago Park Military Reservation in Phoenix. Rather than have some of those challenges subside as the economy improved,


Members of the military face hurdles every day — and financial challenges are among some of the biggest. In fact, service members and their spouses ranked financial stress as their greatest concern, even over deployment, according to Blue Star Families’ annual military family lifestyle survey. Members of the Arizona National Guard listen to instructions on April 9, 2018, at the Papago Park Military Reservation in Phoenix. Rather than have some of those challenges subside as the economy improved,
Military families say this is their top concern Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: sharon epperson katie young jessica dickler, sharon epperson, katie young, jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nfcc, service, national, spouses, challenges, financial, say, according, pay, members, military, families, concern


Military families say this is their top concern

Members of the military face hurdles every day — and financial challenges are among some of the biggest. Eric Wanner, a sergeant in the U.S. Army, and his wife, Jana, have moved four times in the last 12 years — most recently to Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Because of frequent deployments and moving expenses, as well as cost-of-living adjustments and erratic pay, the couple struggles when it comes to managing their household finances.They are raising a family on a single military income. For example, “when we came back from overseas we had to rent a car for two months while we waited for our other car to get shipped,” said Jana Wanner. “That was a massive expense.” In fact, service members and their spouses ranked financial stress as their greatest concern, even over deployment, according to Blue Star Families’ annual military family lifestyle survey.

Members of the Arizona National Guard listen to instructions on April 9, 2018, at the Papago Park Military Reservation in Phoenix. – Arizona deployed its first 225 National Guard members to the Mexican border on Monday after President Donald Trump ordered thousands of troops to the frontier region to combat drug trafficking and illegal immigration. Caitlin O’Hara | AFP | Getty Images

Nearly 9 in 10 active service members and 84% of spouses or partners have worries about personal finances, according to a separate report by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, which also did the same survey of military personnel five years ago. Rather than have some of those challenges subside as the economy improved, more military families are worried about meeting basic household needs and debt payments today than in 2014, the NFCC found. In fact, service members are now twice as likely not to be able to pay all their bills on time than they were just a few years ago. Roughly 3 in 10 spouses or partners of service members said they do not pay their bills on time and about 1 in 10 said they currently have debts in collection, according to the survey. Still, because of issues such as increased childcare costs during periods of deployment and the likelihood of relocation, it can be hard for spouses to find full-time employment to supplement their military incomes and build retirement savings. As a result, about half of service members and their spouses of service members say they rely on the gig economy to stay afloat, the NFCC found. More from Invest in You:

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This tactic can help ease financial stress for couples

If you failed that online financial quiz, don’t sweat your score In general, people are struggling to make ends meet, said Rebecca Steele, president and CEO of the NFCC. That’s “amplified in military households.” “Men and women in uniform face many challenges and daily sacrifices while serving our country,” she added. “Financial concerns shouldn’t be one of them.” To that end, Josh Andrews, a certified financial planner and advice director at financial services firm USAA in San Antonio, offers the following tips to active duty military and their spouses or partners:

Start early

Beginning with your first paycheck, opt to take the full Servicemembers’ Group Life Insurance coverage amount and increase automatic contributions to the military’s Thrift Savings Plan to at least 10%. With what is left, learn to live well within your means — spend less than you earn and put what you can into an emergency fund.

Pay down debt

If you do have debt, develop an attack strategy. Figure out which loans are costing you the most, and make it a priority to pay those off first. Payday loans, also called cash advances, are the worst offenders, with interest rates that can easily run into the triple digits.

Plan for the inevitable

Consider where you will be living with every Permanent Change of Station, or PCS, and then adjust your budget accordingly. From groceries to gasoline, the cost of living can vary substantially by location.

Take a long-term view


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: sharon epperson katie young jessica dickler, sharon epperson, katie young, jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nfcc, service, national, spouses, challenges, financial, say, according, pay, members, military, families, concern


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America’s Huawei fight is of no concern to the UAE, Dubai A.I. executive says

DUBAI — The U.S.’s concerted campaign against Chinese tech companies, particularly telecommunications giant Huawei, isn’t stopping allies like the United Arab Emirates from making use of their technology. This was evident during the country’s inaugural AI Everything summit held this week in Dubai, which hosted delegates from companies around the world including the American heavyweights Google, IBM, Microsoft as well as Chinese rivals Alibaba, SenseTime and Huawei. As the small Gulf nation striv


DUBAI — The U.S.’s concerted campaign against Chinese tech companies, particularly telecommunications giant Huawei, isn’t stopping allies like the United Arab Emirates from making use of their technology. This was evident during the country’s inaugural AI Everything summit held this week in Dubai, which hosted delegates from companies around the world including the American heavyweights Google, IBM, Microsoft as well as Chinese rivals Alibaba, SenseTime and Huawei. As the small Gulf nation striv
America’s Huawei fight is of no concern to the UAE, Dubai A.I. executive says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, companies, chinese, welcomed, executive, dubai, world, work, ai, americas, fight, week, uae, huawei, wide, concern


America's Huawei fight is of no concern to the UAE, Dubai A.I. executive says

DUBAI — The U.S.’s concerted campaign against Chinese tech companies, particularly telecommunications giant Huawei, isn’t stopping allies like the United Arab Emirates from making use of their technology.

This was evident during the country’s inaugural AI Everything summit held this week in Dubai, which hosted delegates from companies around the world including the American heavyweights Google, IBM, Microsoft as well as Chinese rivals Alibaba, SenseTime and Huawei.

As the small Gulf nation strives to diversify its economy and enhance ease of doing business, its government is pushing for the broad implementation of artificial intelligence into everyday life, governance and business operations. To that effect, it’s welcomed the partnership of a wide spectrum of companies and countries, decidedly declining to take sides in what many have described as the global AI race between China and the U.S.

“I don’t believe it’s a concern for our government, especially as we are managing that relationship very carefully,” Aisha bin Bishr, director general of Smart Dubai, the government body leading Dubai’s AI roadmap, told CNBC’s Dan Murphy during the event.

“You cannot stop implementing technologies just because of some negative flags flagged externally — you need to take that risk and calculate it, be ready for anything to happen during that journey, and we work very closely with our chief security officers,” she said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: natasha turak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, companies, chinese, welcomed, executive, dubai, world, work, ai, americas, fight, week, uae, huawei, wide, concern


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Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert22 Hours AgoCNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.


Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert22 Hours AgoCNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.
Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, consumer, concern, security, real, cybersecurity, selling, profit, expert, data, companies, power, national


Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

22 Hours Ago

CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, consumer, concern, security, real, cybersecurity, selling, profit, expert, data, companies, power, national


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Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert3:28 PM ET Tue, 23 April 2019CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.


Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert3:28 PM ET Tue, 23 April 2019CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.
Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, national, concern, data, team, consumer, expert, cybersecurity, power, companies, security, profit, real, selling


Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

3:28 PM ET Tue, 23 April 2019

CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, national, concern, data, team, consumer, expert, cybersecurity, power, companies, security, profit, real, selling


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Here’s a wrap of what Wall Street investors think the Mueller findings mean for the stock market

Wall Street is scrambling to figure out what the conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited investigation means for the stock market. “No one fully contemplated an impeachment: It’s just so hard to do,” said Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities. “But overall the investigation rarely was a big concern for investors. Here are the full comments from market investors, strategists and analysts:Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities”No one full


Wall Street is scrambling to figure out what the conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited investigation means for the stock market. “No one fully contemplated an impeachment: It’s just so hard to do,” said Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities. “But overall the investigation rarely was a big concern for investors. Here are the full comments from market investors, strategists and analysts:Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities”No one full
Here’s a wrap of what Wall Street investors think the Mueller findings mean for the stock market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: thomas franck, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, wrap, going, strategist, mueller, wall, chief, think, stock, concern, investigation, market, big, investors, heres, founder, street, mean


Here's a wrap of what Wall Street investors think the Mueller findings mean for the stock market

Wall Street is scrambling to figure out what the conclusions of special counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited investigation means for the stock market.

While many investment and equity strategists told CNBC that Attorney General William Barr’s letter about Mueller’s report relieves a persistent concern, few had expected a disastrous outcome for President Donald Trump.

“No one fully contemplated an impeachment: It’s just so hard to do,” said Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities. “It’s been like an aching joint. We’ve never seen market reaction to this. It’s always been that one market catalyst that has always been right around the corner.”

“I think the market was going to bounce back anyway and this gives it a little extra oomph,” said Stephen Weiss, founder of Short Hills Capital Partners. “But overall the investigation rarely was a big concern for investors. If there is a big pop on this, you can likely fade it.”

Others, like The Bear Traps Report founder Larry McDonald, were more optimistic and suggested the findings could be a boon to certain sectors.

“It frees him up to focus on infrastructure and housing reform,” McDonald said. “We will rally on this but everything that took us down last week will keep rearing it’s ugly head again.”

Here are the full comments from market investors, strategists and analysts:

Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities

“No one fully contemplated an impeachment: It’s just so hard to do. That’s always been the fallback position. The thinking was there could be disruption, but that it could never unseat the president.” “It’s been like an aching joint. We’ve never seen market reaction to this. It’s always been that one market catalyst that has always been right around the corner.” “We may well have removed a nagging concern, but the current concerns like the China trade war and overseas grief that outweighs that. The disaster du jour on Friday was PMI and the global economy.” “We’re going to pretty much roll into the first-quarter earnings season. And we all knew the economy was slowing, but have we priced that in? Does this earnings reporting season give us a corporate American that guides us down again or have we gotten everything in place?”

Larry McDonald, founder of The Bear Traps Report

“It frees him up to focus on infrastructure and housing reform.” “We will rally on this but everything that took us down last week will keep rearing it’s ugly head again.” “The fact that these tariffs may not be going away is having a negative multiplier effect on the global economy. There’s a massive GDP destruction going on.”

Bruce McCain, chief investment strategist at Key Private Bank

“I think that most people have discounted the findings of the Mueller investigation in comparison to the Chinese trade war and tensions overseas trends.” “I don’t think that it really has had the sort of play in depressing securities or giving them boost. When you resolve uncertainly people like it, but I don’t really see any specific area to watch.”

Stephen Weiss, founder of Short Hills Capital Partners

“I think the market was going to bounce back anyway and this gives it a little extra oomph. But overall the investigation rarely was a big concern for investors. If there is a big pop on this, you can likely fade it.”

Jeff Kilburg, CEO of KKM Financial

“This cloud has now dissipated and this should allow markets to breathe a sigh of relief.” “This could be a real positive for the market if it allows Trump to focus on getting the Chinese trade deal concluded.”

Peter Boockvar, chief investment officer at Bleakley Advisory Group

“While we might have a bounce, the markets I do not believe was focused one iota on the Mueller report. In fact, I’ve never ever myself even once mentioned him and the investigation as a factor impacting markets.”

—With reporting by Fred Imbert and Yun Li


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-24  Authors: thomas franck, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, wrap, going, strategist, mueller, wall, chief, think, stock, concern, investigation, market, big, investors, heres, founder, street, mean


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Roku plunges the most in over a year on concern of competitive threat from Disney, AT&T and others

Roku shares had their worst day in over a year Wednesday after analysts at Macquarie Research said the stock’s 2019 rally isn’t justified given the threat of competition from a host of larger media companies. Roku plunged more than 14 percent to $60.74, the steepest drop since February 2018, and the third-biggest decline since the company went public in 2017. Even after the slump, Roku shares have almost doubled this year. Analysts at Macquarie downgraded the stock Wednesday to neutral, saying i


Roku shares had their worst day in over a year Wednesday after analysts at Macquarie Research said the stock’s 2019 rally isn’t justified given the threat of competition from a host of larger media companies. Roku plunged more than 14 percent to $60.74, the steepest drop since February 2018, and the third-biggest decline since the company went public in 2017. Even after the slump, Roku shares have almost doubled this year. Analysts at Macquarie downgraded the stock Wednesday to neutral, saying i
Roku plunges the most in over a year on concern of competitive threat from Disney, AT&T and others Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: lauren feiner, stephen desaulniers, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, macquarie, plunges, thirdbiggest, worst, roku, analysts, valuation, att, went, shares, threat, concern, competitive, disney


Roku plunges the most in over a year on concern of competitive threat from Disney, AT&T and others

Roku shares had their worst day in over a year Wednesday after analysts at Macquarie Research said the stock’s 2019 rally isn’t justified given the threat of competition from a host of larger media companies.

Roku plunged more than 14 percent to $60.74, the steepest drop since February 2018, and the third-biggest decline since the company went public in 2017.

Even after the slump, Roku shares have almost doubled this year. Analysts at Macquarie downgraded the stock Wednesday to neutral, saying it’s at “a full valuation,” and that the ad-supported video on demand (AVOD) space is becoming intensely competitive.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: lauren feiner, stephen desaulniers, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, macquarie, plunges, thirdbiggest, worst, roku, analysts, valuation, att, went, shares, threat, concern, competitive, disney


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Roku plunges the most in over a year on concern of competitive threat from Disney, AT&T and others

Roku shares had their worst day in over a year Wednesday after analysts at Macquarie Research said the stock’s 2019 rally isn’t justified given the threat of competition from a host of larger media companies. Roku plunged more than 14 percent to $60.74, the steepest drop since February 2018, and the third-biggest decline since the company went public in 2017. Even after the slump, Roku shares have almost doubled this year. Analysts at Macquarie downgraded the stock Wednesday to neutral, saying i


Roku shares had their worst day in over a year Wednesday after analysts at Macquarie Research said the stock’s 2019 rally isn’t justified given the threat of competition from a host of larger media companies. Roku plunged more than 14 percent to $60.74, the steepest drop since February 2018, and the third-biggest decline since the company went public in 2017. Even after the slump, Roku shares have almost doubled this year. Analysts at Macquarie downgraded the stock Wednesday to neutral, saying i
Roku plunges the most in over a year on concern of competitive threat from Disney, AT&T and others Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: lauren feiner, stephen desaulniers, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, macquarie, plunges, thirdbiggest, worst, roku, analysts, valuation, att, went, shares, threat, concern, competitive, disney


Roku plunges the most in over a year on concern of competitive threat from Disney, AT&T and others

Roku shares had their worst day in over a year Wednesday after analysts at Macquarie Research said the stock’s 2019 rally isn’t justified given the threat of competition from a host of larger media companies.

Roku plunged more than 14 percent to $60.74, the steepest drop since February 2018, and the third-biggest decline since the company went public in 2017.

Even after the slump, Roku shares have almost doubled this year. Analysts at Macquarie downgraded the stock Wednesday to neutral, saying it’s at “a full valuation,” and that the ad-supported video on demand (AVOD) space is becoming intensely competitive.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: lauren feiner, stephen desaulniers, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, video, macquarie, plunges, thirdbiggest, worst, roku, analysts, valuation, att, went, shares, threat, concern, competitive, disney


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Mark Zuckerberg raises a key concern around Facebook’s Portal

Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seems to get why consumers might find its Portal creepy. In the first of a series of discussions on technology of society Zuckerberg had as part of his annual personal challenge, Zuckerberg appeared to unwittingly concede the key criticism of Facebook’s new video calling device. Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain, who hosted the discussion, pointed out that Facebook’s Portal is quite literally a camera in people’s living rooms. Laughing, Zuckerberg said, “T


Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seems to get why consumers might find its Portal creepy. In the first of a series of discussions on technology of society Zuckerberg had as part of his annual personal challenge, Zuckerberg appeared to unwittingly concede the key criticism of Facebook’s new video calling device. Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain, who hosted the discussion, pointed out that Facebook’s Portal is quite literally a camera in people’s living rooms. Laughing, Zuckerberg said, “T
Mark Zuckerberg raises a key concern around Facebook’s Portal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: lauren feiner, tony avelar, bloomberg, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, key, living, facebooks, society, raises, portal, facebook, peoples, series, video, privacy, zuckerberg, mark, concern


Mark Zuckerberg raises a key concern around Facebook's Portal

Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seems to get why consumers might find its Portal creepy.

In the first of a series of discussions on technology of society Zuckerberg had as part of his annual personal challenge, Zuckerberg appeared to unwittingly concede the key criticism of Facebook’s new video calling device.

While talking about his desire to build more end-to-end encryption in Facebook’s services, Zuckerberg said, “I basically think that if you want to talk in metaphors, messaging is like people’s living room, and we definitely don’t want a society where there’s a camera in everyone’s living room.”

Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain, who hosted the discussion, pointed out that Facebook’s Portal is quite literally a camera in people’s living rooms.

Laughing, Zuckerberg said, “That is I guess… yeah. Although that would be encrypted.”

When Facebook debuted its Portal in November, the tech community immediately raised privacy concerns about giving Facebook a window into the home after a series of privacy stumbles and had been revealed over the past year.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: Facebook Portal review — great for video calls but lacks compelling features


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: lauren feiner, tony avelar, bloomberg, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, key, living, facebooks, society, raises, portal, facebook, peoples, series, video, privacy, zuckerberg, mark, concern


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Mark Zuckerberg raises a key concern around Facebook’s Portal

Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seems to get why consumers might find its Portal creepy. In the first of a series of discussions on technology of society Zuckerberg had as part of his annual personal challenge, Zuckerberg appeared to unwittingly concede the key criticism of Facebook’s new video calling device. Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain, who hosted the discussion, pointed out that Facebook’s Portal is quite literally a camera in people’s living rooms. Laughing, Zuckerberg said, “T


Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seems to get why consumers might find its Portal creepy. In the first of a series of discussions on technology of society Zuckerberg had as part of his annual personal challenge, Zuckerberg appeared to unwittingly concede the key criticism of Facebook’s new video calling device. Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain, who hosted the discussion, pointed out that Facebook’s Portal is quite literally a camera in people’s living rooms. Laughing, Zuckerberg said, “T
Mark Zuckerberg raises a key concern around Facebook’s Portal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: lauren feiner, tony avelar, bloomberg, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, key, living, facebooks, society, raises, portal, facebook, peoples, series, video, privacy, zuckerberg, mark, concern


Mark Zuckerberg raises a key concern around Facebook's Portal

Even Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg seems to get why consumers might find its Portal creepy.

In the first of a series of discussions on technology of society Zuckerberg had as part of his annual personal challenge, Zuckerberg appeared to unwittingly concede the key criticism of Facebook’s new video calling device.

While talking about his desire to build more end-to-end encryption in Facebook’s services, Zuckerberg said, “I basically think that if you want to talk in metaphors, messaging is like people’s living room, and we definitely don’t want a society where there’s a camera in everyone’s living room.”

Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain, who hosted the discussion, pointed out that Facebook’s Portal is quite literally a camera in people’s living rooms.

Laughing, Zuckerberg said, “That is I guess… yeah. Although that would be encrypted.”

When Facebook debuted its Portal in November, the tech community immediately raised privacy concerns about giving Facebook a window into the home after a series of privacy stumbles and had been revealed over the past year.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: Facebook Portal review — great for video calls but lacks compelling features


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: lauren feiner, tony avelar, bloomberg, getty images, magdalena petrova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, key, living, facebooks, society, raises, portal, facebook, peoples, series, video, privacy, zuckerberg, mark, concern


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