US Treasury yields fall after report shows little inflation

U.S. government debt yields fell on Wednesday after a government report showed that prices consumers pay across the U.S. economy inched higher in May. ET, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was lower at around 2.119%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was little changed at 2.618%. The Labor Department’s consumer price index rose a seasonally adjusted 0.1% in May as consumers paid little more for goods ranging from milk and eggs to electri


U.S. government debt yields fell on Wednesday after a government report showed that prices consumers pay across the U.S. economy inched higher in May. ET, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was lower at around 2.119%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was little changed at 2.618%. The Labor Department’s consumer price index rose a seasonally adjusted 0.1% in May as consumers paid little more for goods ranging from milk and eggs to electri
US Treasury yields fall after report shows little inflation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: thomas franck silvia amaro, thomas franck, silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, fall, inflation, yield, consumers, volatile, fell, report, price, socalled, treasury, rose, little, shows


US Treasury yields fall after report shows little inflation

U.S. government debt yields fell on Wednesday after a government report showed that prices consumers pay across the U.S. economy inched higher in May.

At around 12:19 p.m. ET, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was lower at around 2.119%, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was little changed at 2.618%.

The Labor Department’s consumer price index rose a seasonally adjusted 0.1% in May as consumers paid little more for goods ranging from milk and eggs to electricity and rent. Excluding volatile energy and food components, costs rose a similar 0.1%.

Prices rose 1.8% from the previous year, while the so-called core gauge rose 2%; both prints fell just short of what economists polled by Dow Jones had expected.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: thomas franck silvia amaro, thomas franck, silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, fall, inflation, yield, consumers, volatile, fell, report, price, socalled, treasury, rose, little, shows


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Instagram will now let advertisers put more ‘influencer’ ads in your feed

Facebook’s Instagram is rolling out a change that will let advertisers promote posts from “influencers,” or users who work with brands to promote services or products. When the branded ads appear in the Instagram feed or in stories, other users will see a “paid partnership with” tag on the post. The company says branded content ads in-feed will be available for all advertisers in “coming weeks” and for stories in the “coming months.” David Shadpour, CEO and founder of branded content platform So


Facebook’s Instagram is rolling out a change that will let advertisers promote posts from “influencers,” or users who work with brands to promote services or products. When the branded ads appear in the Instagram feed or in stories, other users will see a “paid partnership with” tag on the post. The company says branded content ads in-feed will be available for all advertisers in “coming weeks” and for stories in the “coming months.” David Shadpour, CEO and founder of branded content platform So
Instagram will now let advertisers put more ‘influencer’ ads in your feed Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, influencers, reach, feed, platform, brands, consumers, advertisers, ads, post, content, influencer, let, instagram, posts, branded


Instagram will now let advertisers put more 'influencer' ads in your feed

Facebook’s Instagram is rolling out a change that will let advertisers promote posts from “influencers,” or users who work with brands to promote services or products. This will widen the reach of those “branded” posts beyond just an influencer’s own following. And for consumers, that means you’ll likely soon be seeing sponsored posts for influencers you don’t follow.

Instagram announced the change in a blog post Tuesday. This comes after the platform discussed the upcoming update earlier this year at an event with businesses and influencers and said it has been testing the ads since last year, Ad Age reported in March.

The change comes as brands try to grapple with reaching consumers in a natural way that isn’t annoying for them.

When the branded ads appear in the Instagram feed or in stories, other users will see a “paid partnership with” tag on the post. The company says branded content ads in-feed will be available for all advertisers in “coming weeks” and for stories in the “coming months.”

A quote from Old Navy vice president of brand communications Liat Weingarten in the blog post indicated that the organic reach from “trusted sources who have credibility” has become “increasingly limited.”

“Promoting content directly from an influencer’s handle inherently gives the post more authenticity than coming from a brand handle, and we’re seeing significantly higher engagement rates using this strategy,” Weingarten wrote.

But even if a post has wider reach, brands still have to grapple with trust in a space where consumers are wary of the miracle benefits of the health supplements and weight-loss teas that are pervasive on the platform. A study released in May by media agency UM said 4% of respondents think that three-quarters or more of the information they get from influencers is true.

David Shadpour, CEO and founder of branded content platform Social Native, said in an email he expects the branded content ads to be effective at first because they’re a new type of content in the feed.

“However, over time, their impact will decrease because over-saturation will train users to tune them out, just like they’ve learned to do with brand ads. In the future we could even see a tipping point, where ads overtake organic content on the feed, causing the value of the platform to diminish for consumers,” he said.

He added that this will give brands more control over their influencer marketing strategy and give more metrics to gauge the return-on-investment of working with those influencers.

“Influencer marketing has already gained massive traction, and now brands can scale the reach and engagement of influencer posts to reach new target audiences. The downside though, is that posts are reaching people who didn’t actively opt-in by following that influencer as a result of having similar interests,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, influencers, reach, feed, platform, brands, consumers, advertisers, ads, post, content, influencer, let, instagram, posts, branded


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Is China really paying for Trump’s tariffs? It isn’t so straightforward

Trump has on many occasions said the U.S. is collecting billions of dollars in tariffs from China. But Trump could be right in that, eventually, it may be the Chinese that pay for the consequences of those tariffs, economists said. That would happen if exporters in China slash the prices they charge their American customers — and therefore earn lower profits — to remain competitive. Despite some studies pointing to American consumers eventually paying the cost of tariffs, the U.S. inflation rate


Trump has on many occasions said the U.S. is collecting billions of dollars in tariffs from China. But Trump could be right in that, eventually, it may be the Chinese that pay for the consequences of those tariffs, economists said. That would happen if exporters in China slash the prices they charge their American customers — and therefore earn lower profits — to remain competitive. Despite some studies pointing to American consumers eventually paying the cost of tariffs, the U.S. inflation rate
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, american, china, levies, economists, straightforward, consumers, tariffs, trump, paying, price, isnt, trumps, prices, really


Is China really paying for Trump's tariffs? It isn't so straightforward

U.S. President Donald Trump talks to reporters with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (L) and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (R) in the White House on March 8, 2018. Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

More than a year after U.S. President Donald Trump fired the first tariff salvo that eventually led to a trade war with China, the debate about who actually bears the burden of those elevated levies has not found a definite conclusion. Trump has on many occasions said the U.S. is collecting billions of dollars in tariffs from China. In fact, the president reiterated that view over the weekend in a Twitter post, saying that “China is paying a heavy cost in that they will subsidize goods to keep them coming, devalue their currency.” But Trump’s claim has been disputed by many American businesses that import Chinese goods, which argue that they’re the ones bearing the brunt of those duties. According to economists, both sides could be right.

Footing the bill

When Chinese goods arrive in America, importers — which are generally American but can also be U.S.-registered entities of foreign firms — pay tariffs to customs in order to receive their products. In that sense, American businesses are right that they’re the ones footing the bill. But Trump could be right in that, eventually, it may be the Chinese that pay for the consequences of those tariffs, economists said. That would happen if exporters in China slash the prices they charge their American customers — and therefore earn lower profits — to remain competitive. Effectively, that situation would mean the Chinese companies are paying for the levies going into U.S. government coffers.

More often than not, the “real pain” of tariffs is split between the country that impose those levies and the nation targeted, according to Simon Baptist, global chief economist and managing director in Asia at consultancy The Economist Intelligence Unit. That means that everyone along the supply chain of a product targeted by Trump’s tariffs — from the manufacturer and exporter in China, to importer and consumer in the U.S. — will bear some burden. And economists are increasingly focusing their research on how that burden is shared among those involved in moving goods from China to the U.S. “How the real pain — along with the smaller amount of gain — is spread around depends on how prices and quantities in the market adjust in response,” Baptist wrote in a May note. He explained that, generally, if China is the only supplier for a product, “more (or all) of the tariff is passed on to US consumers, and the pain is felt by the latter.” But in the event that China is merely one of the many countries that sell a product, “prices do not change much and Chinese suppliers lose market share. Then the pain is felt mostly by Chinese producers.” “So, the answer very much varies by product, which is why both sides have been selecting the targets so carefully,” Baptist wrote.

What do we know so far?

An expanding body of research has found that the burden of tariffs has mostly fallen on the U.S. One of the latest papers published on the topic is by economics researchers from the International Monetary Fund, Harvard University, University of Chicago and the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Using price data collected at the U.S. borders and at retailers, the researchers found “nearly complete pass through of tariffs” to America. In other words, little cost is falling on the Chinese manufacturers. The investigation remains in progress into how much, if at all, retail prices are rising, although some preliminary findings suggest that retailers have absorbed “much of the price impact” and earn lower profit margins from products impacted by Trump’s tariffs.

How the real pain — along with the smaller amount of gain — is spread around depends on how prices and quantities in the market adjust in response. Simon Baptist economist, The Economist Intelligence Unit

Other studies, though, suggest that consumer prices have gone up in the U.S. as a result of higher levies. One such paper, focusing on washing machines, was published in April by researchers from the Federal Reserve and the University of Chicago. Washers were among the earliest products targeted by the Trump administration, with tariffs from 20% to 50% imposed on nearly all imported large residential washing machines, regardless of their countries of origin. The impact, according to the study, was a nearly 12% jump in the price of washers — both imported and domestically produced — in the immediate four to eight months after the implementation of the new levies. In addition, the study found that the price of dryers increased by the same magnitude, although they were not subject to elevated tariffs. William Reinsch, senior advisor and Scholl Chair in international business at think tank Center for Strategic and International Studies, cited that particular study in an April commentary on the impact of tariffs. He explained that prices of both items went up “because most consumers buy washers and dryers together, and manufacturers realized they could get away with increasing the price of both and simply pocket the extra money.” On why the price of washers made in the U.S. also went up even though they’re not subject to tariffs, Reinsch said that phenomenon “illustrates the central point of protection — to allow domestic producers to raise prices and make more money so they can recover from the damage done to them by the imports.”

Not all products will react to tariff the same way as washing machines due to different demand and supply dynamics at play. But another study published in March looking at the collective impact of all tariffs imposed by the Trump administration in 2018 found that consumers are bearing the full cost. “We find that the U.S. tariffs were almost completely passed through into U.S. domestic prices, so that the entire incidence of the tariffs fell on domestic consumers and importers up to now, with no impact so far on the prices received by foreign exporters. We also find that U.S. producers responded to reduced import competition by raising their prices,” wrote researchers from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Columbia University and Princeton University That change in prices has led to an estimated reduction in U.S. real income of $1.4 billion per month by the end of last year, the researchers said. Despite some studies pointing to American consumers eventually paying the cost of tariffs, the U.S. inflation rate has been relatively stable, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Price Index. Mary Daly, president and chief executive of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, said part of the reason inflation has not ticked up is “firms are still not passing along” the increase in costs to consumers. Instead, they appear to mostly be bearing the brunt of the levies themselves. Still, that analysis has not been universally confirmed. In fact, some research indicates that Chinese exporters may be the ones paying the toll. European economists Benedikt Zoller-Rydzek and Gabriel Felbermayr argued in a November 2018 paper that “Chinese firms pay approximately 75% of the tariff burden.” In particularly, their analysis found that a 25 percentage point increase in tariffs results in an average 4.5% rise in the price that U.S. consumers pay for Chinese products, but it slashes the price that producers in China charge by 20.5%.

Who really loses — the US or China?

How all parties along the supply chain are affected forms just one part of the overall economic cost of tariffs. Economists also take into account how the changes in prices and sales volume affect the behavior of consumers and companies in the long run. That’s ultimately more important for economic growth. Generally, economists predicted that the Chinese economy — instead of the U.S. — will experience a larger hit from Trump’s tariffs. That’s partly because the American economy is on better footing, and over the longer term, China may have more to lose because of its larger reliance on exports. Research firm Oxford Economics said in a May report that, if the U.S. and China impose elevated tariffs on all goods they trade, the American economy in 2020 is estimated to grow by 0.5 percentage points less than a no-tariff scenario. Meanwhile, China’s economic setback is expected to be 1.3 percentage points, the report said.

Yangshan Deepwater Container Port in Shanghai, China. Qilai Shen | Corbis Historical | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, american, china, levies, economists, straightforward, consumers, tariffs, trump, paying, price, isnt, trumps, prices, really


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If China and the US split the tech world, that could come at a cost to consumers

That is, the development of technology would become more expensive, Mahendra Negi, chief financial officer at Trend Micro, told CNBC’s “Street Signs ” on Tuesday. His company develops cybersecurity software that can protect corporate data from hackers. “Secondly, the local regulations might drive development in different parts, so you will have this problem of compatibility,” he said. For example, users may end up with multiple smartphones — one that works in China, and another that works outsid


That is, the development of technology would become more expensive, Mahendra Negi, chief financial officer at Trend Micro, told CNBC’s “Street Signs ” on Tuesday. His company develops cybersecurity software that can protect corporate data from hackers. “Secondly, the local regulations might drive development in different parts, so you will have this problem of compatibility,” he said. For example, users may end up with multiple smartphones — one that works in China, and another that works outsid
If China and the US split the tech world, that could come at a cost to consumers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, cost, different, works, according, ongoing, come, consumers, world, china, development, company, split, global


If China and the US split the tech world, that could come at a cost to consumers

If the ongoing tensions between Beijing and Washington force companies to develop two different sets of technologies — one for China and its aligned countries, and the other for the rest of the world — then it would be bad news for everyone, according to a senior executive at a multinational tech firm.

That is, the development of technology would become more expensive, Mahendra Negi, chief financial officer at Trend Micro, told CNBC’s “Street Signs ” on Tuesday. His company develops cybersecurity software that can protect corporate data from hackers.

“Secondly, the local regulations might drive development in different parts, so you will have this problem of compatibility,” he said. For example, users may end up with multiple smartphones — one that works in China, and another that works outside the country.

Technology competition has become a major factor in the ongoing U.S.-China rivalry and trade dispute, with implications for global IT supply chains based in Asia and the United States, according to analysts. Many have warned that the current disagreement could hasten a “splinternet” — a future where the global digital network is fragmented, or at least bifurcated.

Recently, the U.S. put Chinese tech heavyweight Huawei, a leader in the next generation of high-speed mobile internet, on a black list that makes it harder for the company to do business with American firms.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: saheli roy choudhury
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tech, cost, different, works, according, ongoing, come, consumers, world, china, development, company, split, global


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Mondelez isn’t feeling the heat from global consumer worries, CEO says

Mondelez International has been able to boost sales despite an “unease” among worldwide consumers, CEO Dirk Van de Put told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Tuesday. “If I look at food [companies], they’re doing pretty good,” Van de Put he said in a “Mad Money” interview. “Consumers are more on-the-go, they eat more out of [the] home — millennials particularly don’t really want to sit down and have a big meal. Mondelez has also relied on its research team to leverage the fact that food consumption differs in e


Mondelez International has been able to boost sales despite an “unease” among worldwide consumers, CEO Dirk Van de Put told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Tuesday. “If I look at food [companies], they’re doing pretty good,” Van de Put he said in a “Mad Money” interview. “Consumers are more on-the-go, they eat more out of [the] home — millennials particularly don’t really want to sit down and have a big meal. Mondelez has also relied on its research team to leverage the fact that food consumption differs in e
Mondelez isn’t feeling the heat from global consumer worries, CEO says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, feeling, snacking, mondelez, dont, isnt, food, consumers, worries, growing, van, stock, global, heat, consumer, ceo, market, really


Mondelez isn't feeling the heat from global consumer worries, CEO says

Mondelez International has been able to boost sales despite an “unease” among worldwide consumers, CEO Dirk Van de Put told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Tuesday.

“If I look at food [companies], they’re doing pretty good,” Van de Put he said in a “Mad Money” interview. “I would say as it relates to their overall life circumstances and how the middle class feels … the lower class — they don’t feel well at the moment.”

Geopolitical issues, such as Great Britain’s impending breakup with the European Union, is causing uncertainty and weighing on overall consumer confidence, Van de Put said.

But the packaged food company has found success by adapting to changing consumer tastes, especially those of millennials, said Van de Put, who has led the company since the end of 2017. That demographic of shoppers has demanded more and more snack products, he added.

“They’re snacking, well, because it’s a lifestyle change,” he said. “Consumers are more on-the-go, they eat more out of [the] home — millennials particularly don’t really want to sit down and have a big meal. They want to sort of fuel themselves, and they eat 7 times a day, so snacking is really growing as a habit and also the market is growing as a consequence of that.”

The Illinois-based parent of Nabisco, Oreo, Philadelphia Cream Cheese and other recognizable brands recorded nearly 4% organic sales growth and more than 8% growth in emerging markets in its April quarterly earnings report. The stock has rallied nearly 30% this year.

Mondelez has also relied on its research team to leverage the fact that food consumption differs in each market. Take China, where the snack manufacturer successfully rolled out an Oreo campaign and entered the wafers segment that connected with the local customer.

“I don’t think consumers … want to eat the same thing all over the world, and we’re trying to adapt to that,” Van de Put said. “We try to get local insight and talk to [consumers], listen to them, observe their snacking behaviors and they will tell you if they like it or they don’t like it and from there we develop our product.”

Van de Put hinted at more growth on the horizon in the domestic market with the company’s premium cookie Tate’s, which it began selling after acquiring Tate’s Bake Shop in May 2018 for $500 million. The fast-growing brand also makes other baked goods.

“It’s on fire. It’s really growing very fast. It still isn’t in every store in the U.S., so it’s huge potential,” he said. “And in the store it’s in, it doesn’t have enough space. It needs more space because it’s out of stock all the time.”

Shares of Mondelez fell 2.23% during the session Tuesday. The stock is $2 off its all-time high, set in mid-May.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, growth, feeling, snacking, mondelez, dont, isnt, food, consumers, worries, growing, van, stock, global, heat, consumer, ceo, market, really


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A growing number of Chinese consumers are switching from Apple’s iPhone, paper says

Customers look at products in an Apple store in Beijing on December 11, 2018. Huawei is winning over more and more Apple fans in China as the escalated trade tensions have stoked “nationalist sentiment,” according to the South China Morning Post. China’s consumers are increasingly favoring their domestic brands after the U.S. stepped up its action against Huawei, the paper said. The article cited a few anecdotes where people switched to Huawei smartphones from their beloved iPhones to show their


Customers look at products in an Apple store in Beijing on December 11, 2018. Huawei is winning over more and more Apple fans in China as the escalated trade tensions have stoked “nationalist sentiment,” according to the South China Morning Post. China’s consumers are increasingly favoring their domestic brands after the U.S. stepped up its action against Huawei, the paper said. The article cited a few anecdotes where people switched to Huawei smartphones from their beloved iPhones to show their
A growing number of Chinese consumers are switching from Apple’s iPhone, paper says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, trade, tensions, chinese, store, brands, paper, consumers, number, switched, iphone, switching, winning, apples, growing, huawei, apple, china


A growing number of Chinese consumers are switching from Apple's iPhone, paper says

Customers look at products in an Apple store in Beijing on December 11, 2018.

Huawei is winning over more and more Apple fans in China as the escalated trade tensions have stoked “nationalist sentiment,” according to the South China Morning Post.

China’s consumers are increasingly favoring their domestic brands after the U.S. stepped up its action against Huawei, the paper said. The article cited a few anecdotes where people switched to Huawei smartphones from their beloved iPhones to show their support for the country and Chinese brands.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, support, trade, tensions, chinese, store, brands, paper, consumers, number, switched, iphone, switching, winning, apples, growing, huawei, apple, china


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China has plenty of ways to get back at US for treatment of Huawei

Omar Marques | LightRocket | Getty ImagesChina has plenty of ways it can retaliate against the U.S. treatment of Huawei, and U.S. companies could feel the brunt of it. Huawei was put on the Commerce Department’s Entity List which would require companies to apply for a license to sell technology to Huawei, thus limiting its access to U.S. technology. The U.S. may see the action against Huawei as a lever in its China trade negotiations, which have hit a rough spot and now could take several more m


Omar Marques | LightRocket | Getty ImagesChina has plenty of ways it can retaliate against the U.S. treatment of Huawei, and U.S. companies could feel the brunt of it. Huawei was put on the Commerce Department’s Entity List which would require companies to apply for a license to sell technology to Huawei, thus limiting its access to U.S. technology. The U.S. may see the action against Huawei as a lever in its China trade negotiations, which have hit a rough spot and now could take several more m
China has plenty of ways to get back at US for treatment of Huawei Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plenty, chance, trade, meng, consumers, treatment, deal, ways, products, huawei, technology, companies, china


China has plenty of ways to get back at US for treatment of Huawei

5G logo is seen on an android mobile phone with Huawei logo on the background. Omar Marques | LightRocket | Getty Images

China has plenty of ways it can retaliate against the U.S. treatment of Huawei, and U.S. companies could feel the brunt of it. Both the White House and Commerce Department Wednesday took actions against the Chinese telecom company, which would essentially ban it from selling technology in the U.S. market and also stop it from buying the Qualcomm chips it needs for its production. Huawei was put on the Commerce Department’s Entity List which would require companies to apply for a license to sell technology to Huawei, thus limiting its access to U.S. technology. The U.S. may see the action against Huawei as a lever in its China trade negotiations, which have hit a rough spot and now could take several more months. China’s possible reactions range from encouraging boycotts of U.S. products, favoring other companies over American companies, and conducting nuisance regulatory enforcements and inspections.

China could also use the same tactics it might use if trade talks become more difficult or fall apart, such as limiting purchases of U.S. Treasurys or selling them or weakening its currency. The biggest holder of U.S. Treasurys, China recently reduced its holdings to the lowest level in two years. Eurasia Group analysts said there’s only now a 15% chance of a deal by the time President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping meet at the G-20 meeting at the end of June. They see a 45% chance that negotiations will be extended, and 40% chance there will be no deal or truce. Citigroup economists still expect a trade deal within the next couple of months, regardless of where Huawei stands. “This is consistent with our view that the tensions between the U.S. and China go beyond trade. What we thought before this event was these issues regarding the technology sector were mostly taken on a different path, so they’re not that tied to having a trade deal,” said Cesar Rojas, global economist at Citigroup. Analysts speculated that one of China’s first responses to the Huawei actions was to formally charge two Canadians Thursday with espionage. The two were arrested in December, and the charges against them were viewed as payback for Canada’s help in the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, who is fighting extradition to the U.S.

‘Mobilizing patriotic consumers’

In January, the U.S. charged Huawei and Meng with wire fraud, obstructing justice, conspiring to launder money and violating the International Emergency Economic Powers Act by doing business with sanctioned Iran. Meng is the daughter of Hauwei’s founder and faces extradition to the U.S. Washington has also discouraged the adoption of Huawei technology in other countries, for fear its equipment is not secure and could be used for cyber-espionage. “There has been some signaling about maybe mobilizing patriotic consumers, so you could maybe see a boycott of U.S. products. That’s been pretty limited so far. That’s been the main response,” said Adam Segal, director of digital and cybersecurity at the Council on Foreign Relations. He said Apple would be the most likely target because its products are sold directly to consumers, but China may not want to rev up consumers too much. “There is a worry that if you mobilize too much nationalist sentiment, that you can’t control it,” he said. Segal said China could use anti-competition inspections on China-based operations of U.S. companies, as it did with Microsoft several years ago. “They could search your factory. At 5 o’clock in the morning, inspectors show up and demand to see your books,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plenty, chance, trade, meng, consumers, treatment, deal, ways, products, huawei, technology, companies, china


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Consumer watchdog agency sues two large credit-repair firms, alleging unlawful fees and deceptive practices

The nation’s consumer watchdog agency is suing the owners of two large credit-repair companies, accusing them of taking unlawful fees from consumers and engaging in deceptive and abusive sales tactics. The lawsuit also alleges that deceptive methods were used to get customers to sign up for credit-repair services at both firms. Signage is displayed inside the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) headquarters in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, March 4, 2019. The suit says the unnamed fi


The nation’s consumer watchdog agency is suing the owners of two large credit-repair companies, accusing them of taking unlawful fees from consumers and engaging in deceptive and abusive sales tactics. The lawsuit also alleges that deceptive methods were used to get customers to sign up for credit-repair services at both firms. Signage is displayed inside the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) headquarters in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, March 4, 2019. The suit says the unnamed fi
Consumer watchdog agency sues two large credit-repair firms, alleging unlawful fees and deceptive practices Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: sarah obrien, douglas holtz-eakin, president of the american action forum, alicia h munnell, director of the center for retirement research at
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, creditrepair, sues, services, firms, large, lexington, bureau, watchdog, unlawful, fees, law, practices, complaint, consumer, deceptive, consumers


Consumer watchdog agency sues two large credit-repair firms, alleging unlawful fees and deceptive practices

The nation’s consumer watchdog agency is suing the owners of two large credit-repair companies, accusing them of taking unlawful fees from consumers and engaging in deceptive and abusive sales tactics. In a complaint filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in Utah, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau accused CreditRepair.com and Lexington Law, their owners and various affiliated entities, of violating telemarking laws by collecting fees from consumers before they were legally permitted to do so. The lawsuit also alleges that deceptive methods were used to get customers to sign up for credit-repair services at both firms. In its complaint, the bureau said it is seeking to stop the upfront fees, end deceptive representations used through marketing the services and obtain relief for harmed consumers.

Signage is displayed inside the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) headquarters in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, March 4, 2019. Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Under federal law, companies can charge fees for credit-repair services only once the promised results have been achieved and proven with a credit report six months later. The lawsuit says that at the time of enrollment with Lexington Law or CreditRepair.com, consumers are charged a fee for a copy of their credit report and told that the fee — which has ranged from $9.99 to $14.99 since July 2011 — is required to begin the credit-repair process. Ongoing monthly fees range from $79.95 to $129.95. The complaint also says that Lexington Law and CreditRepair.com relied on a shared network of marketing affiliates that used deceptive tactics to get consumers to enroll.

For example, the CFPB said, from at least 2012 through 2017, a partner identified as “HSP1” offered consumers low-interest mortgages, access to rent-to-own housing or other products and services, none of which it actually could do. The suit says the unnamed firm was simply an affiliated call center with the purpose of transferring potential clients to Lexington Law. More than 100,000 consumers signed up for Lexington Law’s credit-repair services through that unnamed firm’s efforts, the complaint says. The lawsuit claims the defendants either knew about the misrepresentations or had “reckless indifference” to them or an awareness of the high probability of their existence. More from Personal Finance:

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Tread carefully when lending money to family and friends “Despite this knowledge, the … defendants continued to sign up consumers through the affiliate or participated in the affiliate’s deceptive conduct,” the complaint states. The two firms plan to fight the accusations. “We find ourselves a bit perplexed,” said Eric Kamerath, a spokesman for the companies. “In a system that already is weighted heavily against the consumer in favor of opportunistic and opaque processes, why would the [bureau] choose to prevent consumers from getting professional help?”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: sarah obrien, douglas holtz-eakin, president of the american action forum, alicia h munnell, director of the center for retirement research at
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, creditrepair, sues, services, firms, large, lexington, bureau, watchdog, unlawful, fees, law, practices, complaint, consumer, deceptive, consumers


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Are you afraid of running out of money in retirement? This score can help assess your risk

The tool is also intended to be flexible, so you can adjust certain data to see how that affects your outcome. That goes particularly for individuals who already have a high RISE score through other income sources. More from Personal Finance:Adult children are eating into parents’ retirement savings: StudyAre Americans overly confident about retirement? The tool is aimed at individuals ages 45 and up with investable assets of $75,000 to $2 million. The professional version will take more nuances


The tool is also intended to be flexible, so you can adjust certain data to see how that affects your outcome. That goes particularly for individuals who already have a high RISE score through other income sources. More from Personal Finance:Adult children are eating into parents’ retirement savings: StudyAre Americans overly confident about retirement? The tool is aimed at individuals ages 45 and up with investable assets of $75,000 to $2 million. The professional version will take more nuances
Are you afraid of running out of money in retirement? This score can help assess your risk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: lorie konish, nils hendrik mueller, cultura, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, tool, income, money, score, statler, financial, social, retirement, consumers, afraid, risk, assess, version, individuals, alliance, running


Are you afraid of running out of money in retirement? This score can help assess your risk

What you will need to budget for once you retire 10:14 AM ET Wed, 27 Feb 2019 | 00:48

The tool is provided by the Alliance for Lifetime Income, a nonprofit organization backed by the financial services industry. It was developed by Milliman, a provider of actuarial products and services.

Consumers can access the tool online. After inputting factors such as the Social Security income you expect, any pension income you may have, how much you have saved and your monthly living and medical expenses, you can see how well you will fare financially in retirement.

“Based on what you put in, this is your score and means you’re going to run out of money if you live past a certain age,” said Jean Statler, executive director at the Alliance for Lifetime Income.

The information you put in is anonymous, meaning it will not be shared with other parties. The tool is also intended to be flexible, so you can adjust certain data to see how that affects your outcome.

The alliance advocates that consumers consider annuities to access guaranteed income. However, the tool itself does not steer consumers to specific investment products.

“Sometimes the answer is not an annuity,” Statler said. That goes particularly for individuals who already have a high RISE score through other income sources.

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Instead, the organization hopes that consumers will take away one key message from the score: “Go talk to your financial advisor,” Statler said.

The tool is aimed at individuals ages 45 and up with investable assets of $75,000 to $2 million.

The consumer-facing version of the RISE score was launched on Wednesday. A separate, financial advisor-facing version is slated to launch in May. The professional version will take more nuances of an individual’s financial picture into account, such as portfolio allocations and different kinds of annuities.

Both versions are free.

WATCH: Retiree health costs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: lorie konish, nils hendrik mueller, cultura, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, help, tool, income, money, score, statler, financial, social, retirement, consumers, afraid, risk, assess, version, individuals, alliance, running


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Coca-Cola is making a big push into coffee

Coca-Cola isn’t new to coffee, but the global beverage giant is planning on making a big push into the industry this year. The company is releasing Coca-Cola Coffee in more than 25 markets around the world by the end of 2019. The drink, which blends Coke with coffee, has slightly less caffeine than a normal cup of coffee but more than a can of the soda. Coca-Cola Coffee contains less sugar than a Coke of the same size. Ready-to-drink coffee is the fastest growing segment in the coffee category,


Coca-Cola isn’t new to coffee, but the global beverage giant is planning on making a big push into the industry this year. The company is releasing Coca-Cola Coffee in more than 25 markets around the world by the end of 2019. The drink, which blends Coke with coffee, has slightly less caffeine than a normal cup of coffee but more than a can of the soda. Coca-Cola Coffee contains less sugar than a Coke of the same size. Ready-to-drink coffee is the fastest growing segment in the coffee category,
Coca-Cola is making a big push into coffee Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: amelia lucas, yui mok, pa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coffee, revenue, consumers, making, billion, growth, big, quincey, push, company, growing, coke, cocacola


Coca-Cola is making a big push into coffee

Coca-Cola isn’t new to coffee, but the global beverage giant is planning on making a big push into the industry this year.

The company is releasing Coca-Cola Coffee in more than 25 markets around the world by the end of 2019.

“Coke Coffee was designed to reach consumers during specific occasions and channels like the mid-afternoon energy slump at work,” CEO James Quincey told analysts Tuesday.

The drink, which blends Coke with coffee, has slightly less caffeine than a normal cup of coffee but more than a can of the soda.

The move comes as consumers have shifted from drinking soda to choosing less sugary options, like bottled water and Coca-Cola Zero Sugar. Coca-Cola Coffee contains less sugar than a Coke of the same size.

The drink also allows the company to capitalize on a trend that is working: coffee. Ready-to-drink coffee is the fastest growing segment in the coffee category, growing 31% in 2016 and 2017, according to Mintel. Chilled coffee drinks such as cold brew are also growing in popularity with consumers. From 2013 to 2017, cold coffee grew at least 10% annually in the U.S., Mintel research found. The trend is less appreciated by European consumers, who tend to experiment less.

So far, Coke’s coffee business has largely been focused in Japan, where canned coffee has been popular in vending machines for decades. The Atlanta-based company’s Georgia Coffee brand has surpassed $1 billion in sales and expanded to other Asian countries.

Coke first tried to introduce coffee to its namesake brand back in 2006. The company discontinued the short-lived Coca-Cola Blak two years later.

In 2017, Coke took another whack at it, introducing Coca-Cola Plus Coffee in Australia. The following year, the company brought it to Asia for more tests after retooling the formula to heighten the coffee aroma.

“The early results are very promising, delivering incremental growth for the Coca-Cola brand with very little cannibalization,” Quincey told analysts in July.

The company also plans to start selling ready-to-drink Costa coffee products in European markets during the second quarter. Coke purchased the British coffee chain for $5.1 billion including debt and closed the deal in January.

“We’re in early days of working out exactly how we’re going to bring to life the synergy plans for greater revenue growth and profit growth,” Quincey said on CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street.”

Coke’s stock rose 2% in morning trading Tuesday after the company reported earnings and revenue that beat Wall Street’s estimates. The beverage giant earned 48 cents per share from continuing operations, beating the 46 cents per share expected by analysts surveyed by Refinitiv. Revenue rose 5% to $8.02 billion, topping expectations of $7.88 billion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: amelia lucas, yui mok, pa images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coffee, revenue, consumers, making, billion, growth, big, quincey, push, company, growing, coke, cocacola


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