Mnuchin: Phone call on trade with China set for Thursday, ‘complicated issues’ remain

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Thursday that he and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer will talk with Chinese counterparts later in the day but “complicated issues” remain in the trade war. “We’re working under the direction of President Trump and President Xi from the meeting in Osaka and we’ll see where we get.” China and the U.S. agreed last month at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, to restart trade talks and avoid the implementation of additional tariffs. The Wall St


Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Thursday that he and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer will talk with Chinese counterparts later in the day but “complicated issues” remain in the trade war. “We’re working under the direction of President Trump and President Xi from the meeting in Osaka and we’ll see where we get.” China and the U.S. agreed last month at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, to restart trade talks and avoid the implementation of additional tariffs. The Wall St
Mnuchin: Phone call on trade with China set for Thursday, ‘complicated issues’ remain Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, issues, president, remain, phone, trump, china, talks, osaka, mnuchin, trade, conversation, complicated, set, went


Mnuchin: Phone call on trade with China set for Thursday, 'complicated issues' remain

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Thursday that he and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer will talk with Chinese counterparts later in the day but “complicated issues” remain in the trade war.

“This will be the second conversation we’ve had. There has been conversation at the staff level,” Mnuchin said in a “Squawk Box ” interview. “We’re working under the direction of President Trump and President Xi from the meeting in Osaka and we’ll see where we get.”

Mnuchin added that if the call went well, he would expect in-person meetings to take place.

China and the U.S. agreed last month at the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, to restart trade talks and avoid the implementation of additional tariffs. The world’s largest economies have been engaged in a trade war for more than a year, keeping a cloud of uncertainty over financial markets and the global economic outlook.

The Wall Street Journal reported that U.S.-China trade talks have been at a standstill as the Trump administration weighs China’s demands to ease restrictions on telecom giant Huawei.

Mnuchin said Huawei was not a sticking point on the negotiations, but “there are just a lot of complicated issues.”

“We were very far along [in] the deal. We were disappointed that we went backwards on certain issues,” he said. “But if we can get a good deal, this is a great opportunity for U.S. companies and for U.S. workers.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, issues, president, remain, phone, trump, china, talks, osaka, mnuchin, trade, conversation, complicated, set, went


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Stop asking, ‘Can I pick your brain?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful


Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. Identify the type of advice you’re seekingImmediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtful
Stop asking, ‘Can I pick your brain?’ Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guidance, researchers, brain, problem, youre, type, question, stop, outcomes, advice, pick, harvard, margolis, say, successful, asking, conversation, ask


Stop asking, 'Can I pick your brain?' Harvard researchers say this is how successful people ask for advice

“Can I pick your brain?” Five words that make up the most thoughtless, irritating and generic way to ask for advice — and any person who is a rock star in their industry has heard it more than a dozen times. The phrase, while well-intentioned, is overused, vague and way too open-ended. When conversations start this way, there’s no telling where it’ll go or how long it’ll take. Don’t get me wrong: I’m all for giving — and receiving — advice. Offering advice is a sign of good leadership, and asking for advice is a sign of intelligence. If the exchange goes well, both parties benefit. “The whole interaction is a subtle and intricate art. It requires emotional intelligence, self-awareness, restraint, diplomacy and patience,” Harvard Business School professors Joshua D. Margolis and David A. Garvin wrote in a 2015 Harvard Business Review article. But the process can derail in many ways. It can quickly lead to “frustration, decision gridlock, subpar solutions, frayed relationships and thwarted personal development,” according to Margolis and Garvin. To avoid those consequences, here’s some guidance on how to ask for advice without annoying the other person:

Start with a positive tone

The way you initiate the conversation is everything. Instead of starting with, “Can I pick your brain,” shift the language to a more positive tone. When in doubt, I recommend: “I’d love your advice.” No-frills, friendly and simple.

Identify the type of advice you’re seeking

Immediately after your opening line, address the topic of your problem in the form a question. In order to craft a question with great precision, ask yourself: What type of advice am I seeking? What does my problem involve? What are my desired outcomes? Below are the four general types of advice, according to Garvin and Margolis’ research: Type of advice: Discrete

What it involves: Exploring options for a single decision

Desired outcomes: Recommendations in favor of or against specific options

Example question: “Where should we build the new factory — in China, Brazil or Eastern Europe?” Type of advice: Counsel

What it involves: Providing guidance on how to approach a complex or unfamiliar situation

Desired outcomes: A framework or process for navigating the situation

Example question: “How should I handle my domineering supervisor?” Type of advice: Coaching

What it involves: Enhancing skills, self-awareness and self-management

Desired outcomes: Task proficiency; personal and professional development

Example question: “How can I work more collaboratively with my peers?” Type of advice: Mentoring

What it involves: Providing opportunities, guidance and protection to aid career success

Desire outcomes: A relationship dedicated to building and sustaining professional and personal effectiveness and to career advancement

Example question: “How can I get more exposure for my project?” Just the other day, someone approached me for guidance, and her execution was perfect: “I’d love your advice. My company is asking me to relocate. There are several factors to consider and I’m not sure if I should do it. Do you have 45 minutes to chat?” Forty-five minutes is a lot, I know, but I appreciated the fact that she acknowledged it would be a longer conversation. I happily blocked off some time on my calendar and we ended up talking for an hour.

Come prepared with specific details

As you move further into the conversation, it’s important to clearly define the problem. Otherwise, you’re doing what I like to call a “bait-and-switch.” (This is another reason why you should never ask to pick someone’s brain; it makes the other person assume that the exchange will only take a few minutes. But more often than not, it ends up being a deep dive.) According to Margolis and Garvin, when you don’t come prepared with specific details about your problem, you’re more likely to end up “telling a lengthy, blow-by-blow story” that might cause the advice giver to tune out, lose focus or misidentify the core problem that needs solving. Simply put, don’t come into the conversation empty-handed. Put realistic guardrails on the conversation and include any essential background information that your advisor might not be familiar with. Providing specific details also keeps the conversation pleasant and interesting.

Ask the right person

Several field studies have discovered that advice seekers are more likely to ask for guidance from people they feel comfortable with, like a close friend or family member. “Though friendship, accessibility and non-threatening personalities all impart high levels of comfort and trust, they might have no relation to the quality or thoughtfulness of the advice,” Margolis and Garvin wrote. This is especially true if you’re seeking career-related advice. Think creatively about the expertise you need. Who will bring in the most valuable insight? Who has the most knowledge that’s relevant to your problem? For example, if you’re asking a seasoned CEO for advice involving your personal life, don’t expect to have lunch with Yoda. Your advisor is offering up valuable time to listen and provide professional feedback, not to hear you vent for an hour.

Don’t ask everyone

Things can backfire quickly if you run around asking a bunch of people for advice. Clearly, you won’t be able to follow everyone’s advice. “Research shows that those whose advice you don’t take may have a worse view of you afterward. They may even see you as less competent or avoid you, ” according to Hayley Blunden, a PhD student at Harvard Business School and co-author of the 2018 study, “The Interpersonal Costs of Ignoring Advice.” For example, a marketing executive who is widely respected is pleased when you ask her what to do about a particular situation, but is then less pleased when she finds out you didn’t do it. Remember, you’re not running a Gallup poll (but if you really are, then just say so).

Don’t assume you already know the answers

Garvin and Margolis pointed out that people often have a hard time “assessing their own competence and place too much faith in their intuition.” As a result, they end up asking for advice simply to gain validation or praise. Those who have a tendency to do this often believe they’ve already solved the problem, but just want confirmation or recognition from their bosses or peers. “It’s a dangerous game to play because they risk alienating their advisers when it becomes evident — and it will — that they’re requesting guidance just for show or to avoid additional work,” the professors noted.

Be grateful


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: gary burnison
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guidance, researchers, brain, problem, youre, type, question, stop, outcomes, advice, pick, harvard, margolis, say, successful, asking, conversation, ask


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What to do when you find out your co-worker makes more money than you do

Here are the five most common mistakes to avoid when bringing up the conversation with your boss — and what to do instead:1. If the answer is yes, let your boss know you’d like to set aside some time to discuss your compensation. Details about how you found out that your co-worker makes more or their exact salaries are irrelevant. This strategy lets your boss know that you’re aware of the pay gap. A few examples: If your boss says you’re not ready for a raise, ask: “What do I need to do to get a


Here are the five most common mistakes to avoid when bringing up the conversation with your boss — and what to do instead:1. If the answer is yes, let your boss know you’d like to set aside some time to discuss your compensation. Details about how you found out that your co-worker makes more or their exact salaries are irrelevant. This strategy lets your boss know that you’re aware of the pay gap. A few examples: If your boss says you’re not ready for a raise, ask: “What do I need to do to get a
What to do when you find out your co-worker makes more money than you do Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: vivian garcia-tunon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coworker, instead, conversation, ask, youre, money, dont, know, think, boss, work, raise, makes


What to do when you find out your co-worker makes more money than you do

I’ve always been in favor of co-workers sharing salaries with each other. It can be uncomfortable, sure, but transparency is a key element to closing the gender wage gap, where women typically get the burden. According to a new study from the ADP Research Institute, women earn $25 an hour on average, which is 79% of the $32 an hour their male counterparts make. The study analyzed payroll data from 13 million employees at 30,000 firms across eight sectors in the U.S. Finding out that a co-worker who does the same work and has similar qualifications is getting paid more than you can be an infuriating experience. Here are the five most common mistakes to avoid when bringing up the conversation with your boss — and what to do instead:

1. Don’t act out of immediate anger

I know what you’re thinking: Duh. But it happens more often than you think. While your frustration is understandable, this tit-for-tat approach makes you look unprofessional. It also distracts you from thinking about important points to bring up when making your case. What to do instead: Take a moment to process the news and calm your emotions. Ask yourself: Do I deserve a raise? If the answer is yes, let your boss know you’d like to set aside some time to discuss your compensation. It’s important to be specific about the topic of the meeting so they can get prepared and not be caught off guard.

2. Don’t mention specific names or salaries

Remember, this conversation is about you, and not your co-workers. Details about how you found out that your co-worker makes more or their exact salaries are irrelevant. Your goal is to keep the conversation focused on your performance and the value you add to the company. What to do instead: Start the meeting with something like, “It has come to my attention that some of my colleagues are earning more for the same work I’ve been doing.” This strategy lets your boss know that you’re aware of the pay gap. Then, move the conversation in a positive direction by mentioning how hard you’ve been working, how much you’ve enjoyed the experience and that you’d like to know what you can do to get a significant raise.

3. Don’t come unprepared with market data

Many employees fail to go the extra mile and do some market research. They often think that explaining how they’ve been putting in the extra work is enough to qualify for a raise. It isn’t. What to do instead: Show that you have a strong understanding about the salary range for positions that are equivalent to yours. Come prepared with information about where you rank — at the top, bottom or somewhere in the middle — so you can discuss potential growth areas. If you find that you’re a high performer who falls in the lower pay bracket, for example, explain your understanding to your boss. The most valuable employees know their worth.

4. Don’t take ‘no’ for an answer

Your boss might conclude that a raise is not in the works anytime soon. Whatever the reason, don’t shrug it off and accept the reality. What to do instead: The conversation doesn’t end at “no.” Be persistent in asking what exactly needs to happen in order for you to get a raise. A few examples: If your boss says you’re not ready for a raise, ask: “What do I need to do to get a raise?”

If your boss says there isn’t enough in the budget for a raise, ask: “When do you think would be a reasonable time to revisit this conversation?” Make sure you’re both in agreement in terms of objectives you need to do reach and a time frame in which you can follow up. Document everything you discussed and check in with your boss frequently to ensure that you’re on track. It also doesn’t hurt to ask if there are other benefits or perks in lieu of a raise. You may be able to negotiate more vacation time, option to work remotely or a title promotion.

5. Don’t stay at the company out of fear


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: vivian garcia-tunon
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coworker, instead, conversation, ask, youre, money, dont, know, think, boss, work, raise, makes


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Kara Swisher: Facebook changed the conversation on regulation

Kara Swisher: Facebook changed the conversation on regulation11:28 AM ET Mon, 3 June 2019Recode co-founder Kara Swisher joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the antitrust probe the Department of Justice has opened against Google.


Kara Swisher: Facebook changed the conversation on regulation11:28 AM ET Mon, 3 June 2019Recode co-founder Kara Swisher joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the antitrust probe the Department of Justice has opened against Google.
Kara Swisher: Facebook changed the conversation on regulation Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, swisher, changed, justice, squawk, opened, google, regulation1128, conversation, regulation, joins, facebook, probe, kara


Kara Swisher: Facebook changed the conversation on regulation

Kara Swisher: Facebook changed the conversation on regulation

11:28 AM ET Mon, 3 June 2019

Recode co-founder Kara Swisher joins “Squawk Alley” to discuss the antitrust probe the Department of Justice has opened against Google.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, swisher, changed, justice, squawk, opened, google, regulation1128, conversation, regulation, joins, facebook, probe, kara


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Ex-Navy SEAL: How to tell when it’s ‘your duty’ to break the chain of command

When you skip the chain of command, “you’re breaking the trust and damaging the relationship you’ve been building,” Willink explains. Going over your immediate superior’s head can cause irreparable damage and it should be your very last resort,” he said. In an episode of the “Jocko Podcast,” former U.S. Navy SEAL commander Jocko Willink was asked by a listener about when and how to break the chain of command when a superior is part of a problem. “It’s going to be a very hard conversation, so be


When you skip the chain of command, “you’re breaking the trust and damaging the relationship you’ve been building,” Willink explains. Going over your immediate superior’s head can cause irreparable damage and it should be your very last resort,” he said. In an episode of the “Jocko Podcast,” former U.S. Navy SEAL commander Jocko Willink was asked by a listener about when and how to break the chain of command when a superior is part of a problem. “It’s going to be a very hard conversation, so be
Ex-Navy SEAL: How to tell when it’s ‘your duty’ to break the chain of command Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-27  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, willink, seal, say, work, boss, break, command, going, superiors, chain, exnavy, dont, tell, way, youre, duty, conversation


Ex-Navy SEAL: How to tell when it's 'your duty' to break the chain of command

When you skip the chain of command, “you’re breaking the trust and damaging the relationship you’ve been building,” Willink explains. “Sometimes, it’s unsalvageable and you’ll never be able to recover.”

Situations like this “can be very, very problematic. Going over your immediate superior’s head can cause irreparable damage and it should be your very last resort,” he said.

Willink, who hosts the podcast, hesitated only briefly before doling out some sage wisdom on the topic.

In an episode of the “Jocko Podcast,” former U.S. Navy SEAL commander Jocko Willink was asked by a listener about when and how to break the chain of command when a superior is part of a problem.

When we find ourselves in disagreement with our superiors, we’re often forced to choose between two difficult decisions : Safeguard our careers by keeping our mouths shut or risk ostracism by going over their heads.

In an ideal world, we’d never have to question or decide against any of our superiors’ decisions. But that’s not always the case.

On the other hand, if your boss is doing something illegal, immoral or unethical, only then is it “your duty” to take action, he says.

If that’s the case, Willink suggests speaking to them directly sooner rather than later. If integrity is indeed your goal — and it should be — don’t be afraid to speak and act with confidence.

“It’s going to be a very hard conversation, so be careful with how you approach it,” Willink warns. “You want to raise the situation in a non-threatening way.” He emphasizes using the word “we,” as opposed to “I.”

He offers an example of how to initiate the conversation: “You could say, ‘I was thinking about what we were doing […]’ — and then lay out the plan, the costs and the benefits. Then suggest, ‘Would you mind if we bring this up to the [superior’s] boss to see what he thinks?’ ”

The nature of the conversation will depend on your boss’ personality. If you have a defensive and insecure boss, for example, Willink suggests massaging their egos to let them know you respect them.

It’s critical that you don’t make yourself out to be someone who feels above them, Willink said a previous interview with CNBC Make It about how to communicate with a defensive boss. You’ll build a better relationship with them by proving that “you’re actually there to make them look good.”

If that doesn’t work, then it’s time to go over your boss’ head and speak to their direct superior.

“You could say something like, ‘I’m on so and so’s team. We’re working on a tough mission, but I was thinking of another way to do it,'” he says. “You want to try to get them to say, ‘that sounds like a good idea.'”

The most important thing is to make it clear that you’re only acting on principle. Of course, it helps if you’ve already established your principles from the very start.

“When you work for someone, or someone works for you, you need to lay it right out of the gate, like, ‘Hey, this is where I stand,'” says Willink, adding that it’s the only way to ensure your actions don’t take anyone by surprise.

Tom Popomaronis is a commerce expert and proud Baltimore native. Currently, he is the Senior Director of Product Innovation at the Hawkins Group. His work has been featured in Forbes, Fast Company and The Washington Post. In 2014, he was named a “40 Under 40” by the Baltimore Business Journal.

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Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-27  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, willink, seal, say, work, boss, break, command, going, superiors, chain, exnavy, dont, tell, way, youre, duty, conversation


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Negotiate your rent in 4 easy steps and potentially save thousands of dollars a year

The average rent for one-bedroom apartments across the country is around $950 a month, and in the country’s biggest cities it can be significantly higher than that. “The single biggest expense for most people is their rent and yet they never take the time to realize you can negotiate this,” Sethi tells CNBC Make It. The national rent index fell slightly month-over-month for the second month in a row, ApartmentList found in its March report. And “if you can negotiate, you can often save hundreds


The average rent for one-bedroom apartments across the country is around $950 a month, and in the country’s biggest cities it can be significantly higher than that. “The single biggest expense for most people is their rent and yet they never take the time to realize you can negotiate this,” Sethi tells CNBC Make It. The national rent index fell slightly month-over-month for the second month in a row, ApartmentList found in its March report. And “if you can negotiate, you can often save hundreds
Negotiate your rent in 4 easy steps and potentially save thousands of dollars a year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steps, conversation, easy, negotiate, expense, save, thousands, month, rent, dollars, bargain, sethi, biggest, potentially, apartments


Negotiate your rent in 4 easy steps and potentially save thousands of dollars a year

If you’re renting, housing is likely your biggest monthly expense. The average rent for one-bedroom apartments across the country is around $950 a month, and in the country’s biggest cities it can be significantly higher than that.

But what if you could bargain with your landlord to get a better deal? Turns out you may well be able to, according to personal finance expert Ramit Sethi.

“The single biggest expense for most people is their rent and yet they never take the time to realize you can negotiate this,” Sethi tells CNBC Make It.

And now may be the best time to have that conversation. The national rent index fell slightly month-over-month for the second month in a row, ApartmentList found in its March report.

Sethi, the best-selling author of “I Will Teach You to be Rich,” says that, when there’s a glut of apartments, you have more opportunity as a renter to bargain. And “if you can negotiate, you can often save hundreds of dollars a month which adds up to thousands of dollars a year,” Sethi says.

Here’s how to approach this type of conversation in five easy steps.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, steps, conversation, easy, negotiate, expense, save, thousands, month, rent, dollars, bargain, sethi, biggest, potentially, apartments


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7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou


She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work. Expect the best, but prepare for the worstWhile you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted. “Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. Say it ou
7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here’s how to tackle them Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


7 in 10 Americans are avoiding difficult conversations at work — here's how to tackle them

Nevertheless, approaching difficult conversations is not only an important workplace skill, it could also be what enables your next step forward, said Sarah Sheehan, Bravely’s chief customer officer, who co-founded the company with Hervey as a platform for confidential professional advice.

She outlined three tips to prepare yourself for a difficult conversation at work.

1. Consider viewpoints beyond your own

“It’s easy to think about yourself and only yourself when you’re dealing with something challenging at work, but take the time to think through how someone might see it from the other side, and whether certain circumstances could be creating the situation at hand,” said Sheehan.

Your manager is a person, too, noted Sheehan, so sometimes the best thing you can do is to put yourself in their shoes and try to think things through from a new perspective.

2. Expect the best, but prepare for the worst

While you will be hoping for the best possible resolution to your conversation, it’s helpful to prepare yourself for a potential negative outcome. That way, you will be better able to keep your emotions in check and avoid escalating the situation, Sheehan noted.

“Try to think through the worst-case scenarios and prepare for how you might respond in that situation. That way, you might be less likely to react with emotion,” she said.

3. Say it out loud

Finally, try rehearsing the conversation, either to yourself or someone else, to hone your message and perfect your delivery, said Sheehan.

“It will no doubt feel awkward at first,” she said, adding that “forcing yourself to say the words will help you hone how you deliver it, control the tone (which is super important!), and ensure you stick the landing.”

Don’t miss: Think your boss hates you? You could be onto something

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: karen gilchrist, -tohervey, ceo of bravely
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tackle, difficult, try, heres, say, americans, situation, important, avoiding, conversation, best, think, work, conversations, prepare, sheehan, way


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America’s favorite Valentine’s Day candy is missing — here are some other options

This Valentine’s Day, consumers shouldn’t panic that the original conversation hearts candy isn’t on shelves. Other candy brands are stepping up to fill the void. Americans are expected to spend $1.8 billion on candy this Valentine’s Day, according to the National Retail Federation. Some of that money will no doubt be spent on other versions of conversation hearts, in addition to chocolates. Brach’s, which has sold conversation hearts since the 1960s, said in a statement that it has been the mar


This Valentine’s Day, consumers shouldn’t panic that the original conversation hearts candy isn’t on shelves. Other candy brands are stepping up to fill the void. Americans are expected to spend $1.8 billion on candy this Valentine’s Day, according to the National Retail Federation. Some of that money will no doubt be spent on other versions of conversation hearts, in addition to chocolates. Brach’s, which has sold conversation hearts since the 1960s, said in a statement that it has been the mar
America’s favorite Valentine’s Day candy is missing — here are some other options Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: amelia lucas, diana haronis, moment mobile, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americas, missing, sold, favorite, options, hearts, candy, conversation, sweethearts, day, brachs, spangler, valentines, brands, sour


America's favorite Valentine's Day candy is missing — here are some other options

This Valentine’s Day, consumers shouldn’t panic that the original conversation hearts candy isn’t on shelves. Other candy brands are stepping up to fill the void.

Sweethearts conversation hearts are unavailable for the first since since 1866 as the brand’s new owner, Spangler Candy, acquired it too late to produce the candy in time for the holiday. Spangler, best known for its Dum Dum lollipops, said in January that conversation hearts will return next year.

Americans are expected to spend $1.8 billion on candy this Valentine’s Day, according to the National Retail Federation. Some of that money will no doubt be spent on other versions of conversation hearts, in addition to chocolates.

Brach’s released three new lines of flavors for its conversation hearts this year. Brach’s, which has sold conversation hearts since the 1960s, said in a statement that it has been the market leader in conversation hearts for years. Candystore.com reported that Sweethearts’ version was the popular candy for the holiday last year.

“Brach’s size, texture, colors, sayings, flavors and quality provide the perfect sweet solution for those conversation heart lovers who are lamenting over reports that this Valentine’s favorite is not available this year,” Hans Becher, general manager of Brach’s and seasonal confections at parent company Ferrara Candy, said in a statement.

Spangler did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

For something a little more sour and less chalky, both Nestle’s SweeTarts and Mondelez’s Sour Patch Kids have their own take on conversation hearts. Besides the difference in flavor, the candies’ sayings aren’t as visible as those on Brach’s or Sweethearts’ versions.

New England Confectionery Co., also known as Necco, went out of business in July and sold Sweethearts and its other candy brands at auction. Round Hill Investments, which brought Hostess brands back from the brink, acquired Necco’s brands but sold Sweethearts and the Necco wafer brand several months later.

But fans of Sweethearts might be glad that the candy isn’t available this year. Bloomberg reported in October that exterminator visits to the factory had grown sporadic — and rat sightings became much more common.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-14  Authors: amelia lucas, diana haronis, moment mobile, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americas, missing, sold, favorite, options, hearts, candy, conversation, sweethearts, day, brachs, spangler, valentines, brands, sour


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Facebook’s Sean Parker says Amazon is not guaranteeing you any privacy

Sean Parker, founding president of Facebook, worries more about Amazon violating your privacy than Facebook. “If you’re having a conversation in front of an Alexa-enabled device, Amazon is not guaranteeing you any privacy,” Parker said in a discussion on stage with CNBC’s Hadley Gamble at the Milken Institute MENA Summit. A spokesperson for Amazon was not immediately available to comment when contacted by CNBC. Amazon came under fire last year when an Echo device reportedly secretly recorded a f


Sean Parker, founding president of Facebook, worries more about Amazon violating your privacy than Facebook. “If you’re having a conversation in front of an Alexa-enabled device, Amazon is not guaranteeing you any privacy,” Parker said in a discussion on stage with CNBC’s Hadley Gamble at the Milken Institute MENA Summit. A spokesperson for Amazon was not immediately available to comment when contacted by CNBC. Amazon came under fire last year when an Echo device reportedly secretly recorded a f
Facebook’s Sean Parker says Amazon is not guaranteeing you any privacy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parker, sean, alexa, youre, facebooks, conversation, worries, thats, voice, device, guaranteeing, privacy, amazon


Facebook's Sean Parker says Amazon is not guaranteeing you any privacy

Sean Parker, founding president of Facebook, worries more about Amazon violating your privacy than Facebook.

Parker said on Wednesday there is “no limit” to how Amazon is storing and listening to private conversations, adding that these recordings “could potentially be used against you in a court of law or for other purposes.”

“If you’re having a conversation in front of an Alexa-enabled device, Amazon is not guaranteeing you any privacy,” Parker said in a discussion on stage with CNBC’s Hadley Gamble at the Milken Institute MENA Summit.

A spokesperson for Amazon was not immediately available to comment when contacted by CNBC.

Amazon came under fire last year when an Echo device reportedly secretly recorded a family’s conversation and sent it to a random person. Amazon blamed the incident on Alexa misinterpreting a set of commands.

Speaking to CNBC last month, Amazon’s VP of Voice Pete Thompson said that his company was taking security and data privacy extremely seriously.

“Even when we put Alexa into our partner products that’s something that we mandate of how they can do, how they can use this stuff. Obviously it is early days on how voice works and some of the biggest challenges is when you speak to it hands free, and you are talking to it from a distance. We try very hard to tune it, to make sure we’ve only heard ‘Alexa’ and then that’s when it wakes up .. we have to keep improving that,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-13  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, parker, sean, alexa, youre, facebooks, conversation, worries, thats, voice, device, guaranteeing, privacy, amazon


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Is Facebook really that bad? A conversation with Roger McNamee and Antonio Garcia Martinez

Is Facebook unwittingly connecting the world to too much misinformation, political manipulation, or worse? He’s an early investor in Facebook and an early adviser to Mark Zuckerberg. McNamee says Facebook is bad for America. Also joining the conversation is Antonio García Martínez, former Facebook employee, and author of “Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley.” He does not think Facebook is bad for America.


Is Facebook unwittingly connecting the world to too much misinformation, political manipulation, or worse? He’s an early investor in Facebook and an early adviser to Mark Zuckerberg. McNamee says Facebook is bad for America. Also joining the conversation is Antonio García Martínez, former Facebook employee, and author of “Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley.” He does not think Facebook is bad for America.
Is Facebook really that bad? A conversation with Roger McNamee and Antonio Garcia Martinez Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: jonathan kim, jon fortt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, garcia, connecting, mark, conversation, bad, facebook, antonio, does, mcnamee, really, martinez, world, silicon, valley, roger, zuckerberg, early


Is Facebook really that bad? A conversation with Roger McNamee and Antonio Garcia Martinez

Facebook is worth almost a half trillion dollars. It has more than 2 billion users who log in at least once a month. It has a famous CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, hailed in Silicon Valley as a Bill Gates for the Internet age – the suburban Harvard kid who dropped out of college to start a company and change the world.

Facebook also has problems. Its once non-controversial mission of connecting the world has taken a dark turn. Connecting the world to what, exactly? After the Cambridge Analytica scandal, and controversies over how Facebook gave partners access to user data, there’s a question hanging out there.

Is Facebook unwittingly connecting the world to too much misinformation, political manipulation, or worse? Or does the good that happens on Facebook outweigh the bad?

Joining Jon Fortt this week to discuss is Roger McNamee. He’s an early investor in Facebook and an early adviser to Mark Zuckerberg. He is also the author of a new book: “Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe.” McNamee says Facebook is bad for America.

Also joining the conversation is Antonio García Martínez, former Facebook employee, and author of “Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley.” He does not think Facebook is bad for America.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: jonathan kim, jon fortt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, garcia, connecting, mark, conversation, bad, facebook, antonio, does, mcnamee, really, martinez, world, silicon, valley, roger, zuckerberg, early


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