Three words that got Boris Johnson the UK election victory he craved

Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to supporters at the Copper Box Arena on December 11, 2019 in London, United Kingdom. Three simple words that resonated with millions of people and propelled Boris Johnson into 10 Downing Street as a U.K. prime minister with a fresh term and a comfortable majority. Whiteley said by phone that Labour’s Brexit position had offered a “terrible narrative in the context of a weary electorate.” Christopher Furlong | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesCorbyn a


Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to supporters at the Copper Box Arena on December 11, 2019 in London, United Kingdom.
Three simple words that resonated with millions of people and propelled Boris Johnson into 10 Downing Street as a U.K. prime minister with a fresh term and a comfortable majority.
Whiteley said by phone that Labour’s Brexit position had offered a “terrible narrative in the context of a weary electorate.”
Christopher Furlong | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesCorbyn a
Three words that got Boris Johnson the UK election victory he craved Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, party, getty, craved, seats, labour, brexit, referendum, boris, labours, words, election, victory, corbyn, johnson


Three words that got Boris Johnson the UK election victory he craved

Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to supporters at the Copper Box Arena on December 11, 2019 in London, United Kingdom. Leon Neal | Getty Images News | Getty Images

“Get Brexit Done.” Three simple words that resonated with millions of people and propelled Boris Johnson into 10 Downing Street as a U.K. prime minister with a fresh term and a comfortable majority. The brutal simple message was endlessly repeated by the Conservative Party to a frustrated public — tired of the endless arguing over the result of the 2016 EU referendum. The Conservatives have 365 MPs (Members of Parliament) and an 80-seat majority over all the other parties combined when the new U.K. Parliament resumes. Labour, meanwhile, will occupy just 203 seats in the 650-strong Parliament, its worst return since 1935.

A Brexit election

The Conservative Party’s ruthless message was aligned to a strategy that sought votes from the millions of leave voters in the 2016 referendum. That meant reaching beyond the Tory heartland of southern England and looking to smash the Labour strongholds of Wales and England’s midlands and north. If the Tories were clear and simplistic, then Labour’s message got lost in the fog. The opposition party had some initial success by refusing to commit to whether it supported Brexit or not, but ultimately voters tired of the indecision. Corbyn eventually said Labour would negotiate a new deal and hold a second referendum, but then refused to declare who he would campaign for. Voters interpreted that as a weak and confusing stance and on Thursday, Labour’s so-called “red wall” — a stronghold of seats across the country it has typically controlled — crumbled. U.K. politics professor at the University of Essex, Paul Whiteley, told CNBC Friday that while Johnson isn’t popular by historical standards, he was still a lot more admired than Corbyn. Whiteley said by phone that Labour’s Brexit position had offered a “terrible narrative in the context of a weary electorate.”

Cost of Corbyn

The party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, was emblematic of Labour’s apparent muddle. Many viewed him as too left wing — a Marxist who would ruin the U.K. economy with plans to nationalize key industries. Others felt his political history showed improper sympathies with anti-Israeli groups as well as pro-IRA supporters in Ireland. That led to concerns over weakness on national security.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn attends the launch of the party’s election manifesto at Birmingham City University on November 21, 2019 in Birmingham, England. Christopher Furlong | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Corbyn attempted to shift the U.K. election campaign away from the constitutional question of Brexit onto domestic matters such as the National Health Service and education. But its manifesto, which included proposals to provide free internet and up spending on health care and education, was decried as too expensive by opponents. Again, Labour and Corbyn had failed to convince. Labour has now not won an election since 2005, and only one of its leaders, Tony Blair, has won an election in more than 40 years. Corbyn has announced he will now step down and the battle for control of Labour’s leadership and party direction will begin again.

A right-wing country?

Prior to the election, a right-of-center think tank claimed that for the Conservatives to win a majority they would need to target “Workington Man.” This fictional stereotype voted for Brexit, was older, white and northern. It was decried as a rude stereotype but ultimately a total of 27 Labour-held seats in constituencies in the north of England fell to the Tories — including the real town of Workington. According to data published by the polling company YouGov in August, 28% of Britons describe themselves as left-wing while 25% consider themselves right-wing. A further 19% place themselves in the center and the remaining 29% don’t know. Whiteley said any idea that the U.K had become more right-wing was simplistic and that the electorate, especially in poorer areas, believed two things. First, that Johnson will deliver on improving the lives of people with better social support and employment prospects, and second, that he will deliver Brexit.

A disunited kingdom

The voting trends in England and Wales do not translate to the two other constituents of the United Kingdom — Scotland and Northern Ireland. In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) now hold 48 of the 59 available seats north of the border. The SNP campaigned hard against Brexit after the 2016 referendum revealed only a third of Scots wanted to leave the European Union.

Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon delivers a speech during a media conference at the Scotland House in Brussels as she is on a one day visit to meet with EU officials, on June 29, 2016. Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt | AFP | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-13  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, party, getty, craved, seats, labour, brexit, referendum, boris, labours, words, election, victory, corbyn, johnson


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Don’t count out Jeremy Corbyn in the UK’s general election

Regarding the UK election on Dec. 12, the oddsmakers and the pollsters say that Boris Johnson is “on course for a comfortable majority.” YouGov also found that 54 per cent thought Mr Johnson came across as more prime ministerial, compared with 29 per cent for Mr Corbyn. Fifty-nine per cent said, however, that the Labour leader was more in touch with ordinary voters, compared with 25 per cent for Mr Johnson. Now that Cummings is running the Johnson campaign, he has chosen a strikingly similar mes


Regarding the UK election on Dec. 12, the oddsmakers and the pollsters say that Boris Johnson is “on course for a comfortable majority.”
YouGov also found that 54 per cent thought Mr Johnson came across as more prime ministerial, compared with 29 per cent for Mr Corbyn.
Fifty-nine per cent said, however, that the Labour leader was more in touch with ordinary voters, compared with 25 per cent for Mr Johnson.
Now that Cummings is running the Johnson campaign, he has chosen a strikingly similar mes
Don’t count out Jeremy Corbyn in the UK’s general election Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: john ellis, editor of online publication news items
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cent, election, jeremy, corbyn, message, yougov, johnson, general, count, labour, dont, campaign, uks, way


Don't count out Jeremy Corbyn in the UK's general election

Regarding the UK election on Dec. 12, the oddsmakers and the pollsters say that Boris Johnson is “on course for a comfortable majority.” The question is: Is that true?

It certainly appears to be true. The Times of London recently commissioned a massive survey of the British electorate, went through it constituency-by-constituency, weighted the results accordingly and came away with the following:

The Conservatives would win 359 seats, Labour 211, the SNP 43 and the Liberal Democrats 13 if the election were held today, according to a seat-by-seat analysis based on polling by YouGov for The Times.

Eurointelligence, a smart and useful newsletter about all things Europe, offered this assessment of the YouGov poll results:

We think the poll is more or less a good description of the status quo – not so much because of its technology, but its sheer size. YouGov interviewed some 100,000 people over a period of seven days, a number big enough to make YouGov’s multi-level regression and post-stratification (MRP) technology possible in the first place. The main polling result is that the Tories are leading Labour by some 11 points, very much in line with the poll trackers. YouGov says that, if the gap falls to below 7 percentage points, a hung parliament becomes more likely.

So that should be that.

But it doesn’t feel that way. And evidence to the contrary keeps popping up.

Here’s one disagreeable data point, courtesy of (again) Eurointelligence:

A last-minute spike in voter registration shows a 38% increase over 2017. Of those new registrations, two thirds are from the under-35. As young people are more likely to vote Labour, this would help the Labour Party. The UK newspapers attribute the spike ahead of last night’s deadline to a message from the Stormzy, a popular British rapper.

Here’s another: After the first nationally televised debate, The Times of London reported:

A snap YouGov poll after the ITV debate handed victory to Mr Johnson by the narrowest of margins, with 51 per cent saying that he was the better performer against 49 per cent for Mr Corbyn. YouGov also found that 54 per cent thought Mr Johnson came across as more prime ministerial, compared with 29 per cent for Mr Corbyn. Fifty-nine per cent said, however, that the Labour leader was more in touch with ordinary voters, compared with 25 per cent for Mr Johnson.

51-49? Huh? Post-debate polls are useful because they provide fresh insight into voter preference. Debates, in this age of polarization, are all-but-entirely perceived through the lens of partisanship. If you’re for Johnson, he has to go far, far astray to make you say he “lost” the debate. The same holds true for Corbyn. He could call for the reformation of the Soviet Union and he wouldn’t suffer any immediate, consequential voter attrition. He might (he almost certainly would) suffer the next day and the day after that, after the press had waterboarded him on the front pages and television newscasts. But even then, his candidacy would not collapse.

51%-49% got everyone’s attention. A statistical tie! And then there was this disquieting business about being “more in touch with ordinary voters.” Fifty-nine percent said Corbyn was “more in touch.” Twenty-five percent said Johnson was. Few things in politics are more disquieting than a 34-point deficit on an important metric of electoral success.

Johnson’s strategist, Dominic Cummings, secured his reputation for political mastery by guiding the Brexit referendum “Leave” campaign to victory. He did so by executing the most effective digital campaign in the history of modern British politics and by keeping the electorate focused on a simple message: “Take Back Control.” Indeed, he built the entire campaign around that idea and never once deviated from it. It was his version of James Carville’s relentless and effective four word mantra for the 1992 U.S. presidential election: “It’s the economy, stupid.”

Throughout the “Leave” campaign, Cummings viewed politicians like Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson as distractions and did everything he could to marginalize their importance to the electorate. He wanted voters entirely focused on (from his point of view) their empowerment. He wanted nothing to do with the self-aggrandizement of men like Farage and Johnson, whom he viewed with barely concealed disdain.

He was mostly successful. It worked. Leave won.

Now that Cummings is running the Johnson campaign, he has chosen a strikingly similar message: “Get Brexit Done.” Not: Elect Tories. Not: Keep Johnson. Not: Stay The Course. Get Brexit Done. He chose that message because research shows it is the surest path to victory.

And yet, even with that simple, straightforward, popular-enough proposition, Johnson’s Tories have not been able to put the election away. An upset remains possible and not improbable.

The UK’s heavily-populated anti-Corbyn press corps, sensing disaster, has taken to constantly “assessing” Johnson’s (important) strengths and (unimportant) weaknesses while portraying Corbyn as a cross between Joseph Stalin’s rightful heir and Jack the Ripper. The devil you know is a devil, they say. The devil you don’t is a monster.

Even with the onslaught of all this negative Corbyn press, however, Johnson keeps muddying the message and getting in the way; a disastrous visit to flood victims in the north, a dreadful interview with the BBC, the annoying and unhappy girlfriend, the list goes on (and on). Johnson has run a terrible campaign. It’s not lost on anyone that he can’t escape the grasp of an opponent who sports a (roughly) 60% unfavorable rating.

Toward the end of last week and over the weekend, the Johnson campaign and its allies talked to a number of key U.S. power brokers beseeching them to keep President Trump from “meddling” in the UK election campaign. Trump’s unfavorable rating in the UK is every bit as robust as Corbyn’s, if not more so. An endorsement from the U.S. president polls badly, across the board. As a result, every effort was made to convince Trump to keep his distance and forgo any tweets on the subject.

So far, Trump has “behaved” and “stayed focused,” in the condescending words of his self-important aides. How long he will be able to do so is an open question. But his mere presence has given salience to Corbyn’s unstated message, which is, basically, “Send Them a Message,” the slogan of the insurgent 1968 and 1972 presidential campaigns of late four-term Alabama Gov. George Wallace, a fellow master of grievance politics.

That’s a powerful message for a wide swath of the electorate. If you think Johnson is a charlatan and a cad, a posh populist, an Eton elitist through and through, then voting Labour (and thus supporting Corbyn) would seem meaningful in the same way that voting to “take back control” seemed satisfying and significant in 2016.

Corbyn isn’t anyone’s idea of posh. He’s the antithesis of the focus-grouped candidate. Which is part of what makes him formidable. He’s made more formidable by an illogical but enabling sequence: Since he’s going to lose anyway, like Trump in 2016, there’s no harm in voting Labour. Your voice will be heard, loud and clear. And let’s face it; nothing says “drain the swamp” quite like voting for Jeremy Corbyn.

That’s the mindset Labour is counting on. If enough people think that way, the odds of a hung Parliament increase accordingly. And that’s why we are where we are now — somewhere between an uneasy Tory win and a hung Parliament.

In the privacy of his office, Dominic Cummings must pine for the days when he managed the Leave campaign: unencumbered, under-estimated, under the radar. He’s none of those things now. He strives to keep it simple. Johnson seems almost compelled to make it sloppy. There’s no way to marginalize his importance to the electorate.

To quote Wallace one more time, in these kinds of political campaigns, at the end, when everyone is riveted to the news and partisans are hungry for more, “you gotta get it down there where the dogs can eat it.” Corbyn knows a thing or two about dog food. Don’t count him out. Don’t be surprised if a hung Parliament is the election’s result.

John Ellis is the Editor of News Items and a former columnist for The Boston Globe. You can reach him at jellis41@protonmail.com. You can sign up for the News Items newsletter here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: john ellis, editor of online publication news items
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cent, election, jeremy, corbyn, message, yougov, johnson, general, count, labour, dont, campaign, uks, way


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Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn big issues in UK election, former trade minister says


Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn big issues in UK election, former trade minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
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Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn big issues in UK election, former trade minister says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
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UK’s Johnson in talks to give US access to health service in trade talks, Labour’s Corbyn says

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn shake hands during the ITV Leaders Debate on November 19, 2019 in Salford, England. Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn on Wednesday produced what he said were documents showing that Prime Minister Boris Johnson has discussed offering the United States access to the British health service in trade talks. Johnson has denied ever raising the sale of Britain’s National Health Service in such talks. Corbyn, who has argued t


Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn shake hands during the ITV Leaders Debate on November 19, 2019 in Salford, England.
Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn on Wednesday produced what he said were documents showing that Prime Minister Boris Johnson has discussed offering the United States access to the British health service in trade talks.
Johnson has denied ever raising the sale of Britain’s National Health Service in such talks.
Corbyn, who has argued t
UK’s Johnson in talks to give US access to health service in trade talks, Labour’s Corbyn says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27
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UK's Johnson in talks to give US access to health service in trade talks, Labour's Corbyn says

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn shake hands during the ITV Leaders Debate on November 19, 2019 in Salford, England.

Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn on Wednesday produced what he said were documents showing that Prime Minister Boris Johnson has discussed offering the United States access to the British health service in trade talks.

Johnson has denied ever raising the sale of Britain’s National Health Service in such talks.

Corbyn, who has argued that Johnson’s Conservatives will allow the United States to increase drug prices as part of a post-Brexit trade deal, said he had 451 pages of unredacted documents on talks between the two countries.

“Perhaps he (Johnson) would like to explain why these documents confirm the U.S. is demanding the NHS is on the table in the trade talks,” he told a news conference.

“These uncensored documents leave Boris Johnson’s denials in absolute tatters.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-27
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trade, johnson, documents, service, labours, health, corbyn, states, access, united, boris, minister, talks, prime, uks


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UK’s Labour vows action on ‘tax and wage cheat’ multinationals

Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses delegates on the final day of the Labour Party conference on September 26, 2017 in Brighton, England. Labour said its “Fair Tax Programme” would ensure the City of London financial district, big businesses and those who dodged tax paid their share. They use loopholes to claim they dont owe tax and cynically push their workers to the limit,” Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn will say outside the Amazon depot in northern England. “The next Labour government will cha


Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses delegates on the final day of the Labour Party conference on September 26, 2017 in Brighton, England.
Labour said its “Fair Tax Programme” would ensure the City of London financial district, big businesses and those who dodged tax paid their share.
They use loopholes to claim they dont owe tax and cynically push their workers to the limit,” Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn will say outside the Amazon depot in northern England.
“The next Labour government will cha
UK’s Labour vows action on ‘tax and wage cheat’ multinationals Cached Page below :
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UK's Labour vows action on 'tax and wage cheat' multinationals

Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses delegates on the final day of the Labour Party conference on September 26, 2017 in Brighton, England.

Britain’s opposition Labour Party will hold a rally outside an Amazon depot on Saturday as it highlights its promise to target multinational firms it accuses of dodging taxes and cheating workers should it win next month’s election.

In its manifesto launched on Thursday, Labour unveiled a plan to spend almost 83 billion pounds on a program of widespread nationalization and free public services with the revenue coming from taxes on high earners and corporations.

Labour said its “Fair Tax Programme” would ensure the City of London financial district, big businesses and those who dodged tax paid their share.

“Huge multinational companies often act as if the rules we all live by dont apply to them. They use loopholes to claim they dont owe tax and cynically push their workers to the limit,” Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn will say outside the Amazon depot in northern England.

“The next Labour government will challenge head-on the tax and wage cheat culture of so many multinational companies, who use their power and our weak laws to rip off both the taxpayer and their workers,” Corbyn will say in extracts released by his office.

Labour is lagging Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party by about 10 points or more in the polls but it hopes that targeting “vested interests” will win over voters ahead of the Dec. 12 election.

The party has earmarked tech firms such as Amazon, Alphabet’s Google, and Facebook for additional taxes, saying it would bring in measures to stop multinationals avoiding tax through profit-shifting schemes. It said this would bring in 6.3 billion pounds in 2023-4.

Other planned measures include establishing an inquiry into the finance sector, introducing a 20% Offshore Company Property Levy, and scrapping non-domiciled status which allows some people resident in Britain to limit the tax they pay.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wage, party, cheat, workers, action, win, amazon, say, uks, multinationals, corbyn, labour, vows, taxes, tax, multinational


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Britain’s ruling Conservative party launches spoof opposition ‘manifesto’ site

The U.K.’s Conservative Party on Thursday created a spoof website purporting to be the Labour Party’s manifesto and attacking its pledges. The official Conservative Party Twitter account tweeted out links to the spoof site multiple times on Thursday afternoon. The site identifies itself as “a website by the Conservative Party” beneath the headline “Labour’s 2019 Manifesto.” Twitter itself weighed in on Wednesday to condemn the action, warning of punitive measures if CCHQ, the Conservative press


The U.K.’s Conservative Party on Thursday created a spoof website purporting to be the Labour Party’s manifesto and attacking its pledges.
The official Conservative Party Twitter account tweeted out links to the spoof site multiple times on Thursday afternoon.
The site identifies itself as “a website by the Conservative Party” beneath the headline “Labour’s 2019 Manifesto.”
Twitter itself weighed in on Wednesday to condemn the action, warning of punitive measures if CCHQ, the Conservative press
Britain’s ruling Conservative party launches spoof opposition ‘manifesto’ site Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spoof, launches, manifesto, labour, britains, site, ruling, corbyn, conservative, twitter, opposition, prime, party, website


Britain's ruling Conservative party launches spoof opposition 'manifesto' site

The U.K.’s Conservative Party on Thursday created a spoof website purporting to be the Labour Party’s manifesto and attacking its pledges.

Shortly before the main opposition party launched its manifesto, a website using the URL “labourmanifesto.co.uk” was registered by the Conservatives, and contains a picture of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn looking confused while mocking the party’s policies on Brexit and tax.

The official Conservative Party Twitter account tweeted out links to the spoof site multiple times on Thursday afternoon.

The Conservatives had reportedly paid for a Google advert meaning internet browsers were directed toward the website when users searched for “Labour” shortly after the manifesto launch.

The site identifies itself as “a website by the Conservative Party” beneath the headline “Labour’s 2019 Manifesto.” It then contains a series of news excerpts criticizing the opposition’s flagship policies.

The spoof website states: “All you need to know about Labour’s manifesto is that Jeremy Corbyn as Prime Minister means higher taxes for you and your family, the chaos of two more referendums and more indecision and delay on Brexit.”

This stunt comes just days after the Conservative Party faced a backlash for rebranding its press office Twitter account to masquerade as a fact checking service and tweet out Conservative talking points during a televised debate between Corbyn and Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

The move had been branded “dystopian” by the BBC and faced widespread criticism for its apparent attempt to mislead voters ahead of the December 12 general election.

Twitter itself weighed in on Wednesday to condemn the action, warning of punitive measures if CCHQ, the Conservative press wing, repeated such behavior.

CNBC has contacted the Labour Party for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-21  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, spoof, launches, manifesto, labour, britains, site, ruling, corbyn, conservative, twitter, opposition, prime, party, website


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British public stuck with two ‘dreadful’ candidates for prime minister, economist says

In this handout image supplied by ITV, Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn shake hands during the ITV Leaders Debate at Media Centre on November 19, 2019 in Salford, England. The British electorate faces a “terrible choice” at the ballot box next month, according to the chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics. Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed to end ongoing “national misery” by delivering Brexit by the end of January. In contrast, Jeremy Corbyn, leader


In this handout image supplied by ITV, Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn shake hands during the ITV Leaders Debate at Media Centre on November 19, 2019 in Salford, England.
The British electorate faces a “terrible choice” at the ballot box next month, according to the chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed to end ongoing “national misery” by delivering Brexit by the end of January.
In contrast, Jeremy Corbyn, leader
British public stuck with two ‘dreadful’ candidates for prime minister, economist says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, stuck, union, public, prime, corbyn, dreadful, johnson, leave, party, leader, deal, brexit, end, minister, candidates, british


British public stuck with two 'dreadful' candidates for prime minister, economist says

In this handout image supplied by ITV, Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Leader of the Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn shake hands during the ITV Leaders Debate at Media Centre on November 19, 2019 in Salford, England.

The British electorate faces a “terrible choice” at the ballot box next month, according to the chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics.

His comments come shortly after the leaders of Britain’s two biggest political parties clashed in their first televised debate of the election campaign on Tuesday evening.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed to end ongoing “national misery” by delivering Brexit by the end of January.

The Conservative Party leader, who had previously promised to deliver Brexit “do or die, come what may” by the end of October, sought to reinforce a pledge that his party would be able to resolve the Brexit crisis quickly, saying his government had a divorce deal that is “oven-ready.”

In contrast, Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the opposition Labour party, said he would “get Brexit sorted by giving you, the people, the final say.”

Labour wants to negotiate a new deal with the European Union, with a customs union and a closer relationship with the single market. Corbyn has said this deal would be put to a public vote, with citizens choosing either to leave on Labour’s terms or to remain.

Corbyn, who was asked nine times by Johnson to say whether his party would then campaign to stay in the bloc or leave, said he would respect the decision of the people.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-20  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economist, stuck, union, public, prime, corbyn, dreadful, johnson, leave, party, leader, deal, brexit, end, minister, candidates, british


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Trump criticism will probably please Jeremy Corbyn, Tony Blair says

Trump criticism will probably please Jeremy Corbyn, Tony Blair saysFormer U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair discusses Britain’s Brexit impasse, the country’s upcoming general election, and U.S.-U.K. relations.


Trump criticism will probably please Jeremy Corbyn, Tony Blair saysFormer U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair discusses Britain’s Brexit impasse, the country’s upcoming general election, and U.S.-U.K. relations.
Trump criticism will probably please Jeremy Corbyn, Tony Blair says Cached Page below :
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Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, tony, prime, probably, upcoming, blair, relations, usuk, corbyn, criticism, saysformer, jeremy


Trump criticism will probably please Jeremy Corbyn, Tony Blair says

Trump criticism will probably please Jeremy Corbyn, Tony Blair says

Former U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair discusses Britain’s Brexit impasse, the country’s upcoming general election, and U.S.-U.K. relations.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05
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Jeremy Corbyn not a suitable candidate to lead a caretaker government: Dominic Grieve

Jeremy Corbyn not a suitable candidate to lead a caretaker government: Dominic Grieve4 Hours AgoBritish lawmaker Dominic Grieve discusses the potential for a caretaker government if Prime Minister Boris Johnson is forced out or resigns.


Jeremy Corbyn not a suitable candidate to lead a caretaker government: Dominic Grieve4 Hours AgoBritish lawmaker Dominic Grieve discusses the potential for a caretaker government if Prime Minister Boris Johnson is forced out or resigns.
Jeremy Corbyn not a suitable candidate to lead a caretaker government: Dominic Grieve Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30
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Jeremy Corbyn not a suitable candidate to lead a caretaker government: Dominic Grieve

Jeremy Corbyn not a suitable candidate to lead a caretaker government: Dominic Grieve

4 Hours Ago

British lawmaker Dominic Grieve discusses the potential for a caretaker government if Prime Minister Boris Johnson is forced out or resigns.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-30
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UK opposition leader Corbyn writes to Queen over parliament suspension

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more


Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White HouseThere’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates… Politicsread more
UK opposition leader Corbyn writes to Queen over parliament suspension Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, warren, tariffs, uk, corbyn, trumps, leader, queen, opposition, ticket, theyre, sanders, voters, white, support, suspension, parliament, say


UK opposition leader Corbyn writes to Queen over parliament suspension

Bashing China could be the Democrats’ ticket to the White House

There’s a good chance the same voters who say they don’t like “Trump’s tariffs” will support them if they’re promoted by Warren, Sanders or Biden. But none of the candidates…

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-28
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, writes, warren, tariffs, uk, corbyn, trumps, leader, queen, opposition, ticket, theyre, sanders, voters, white, support, suspension, parliament, say


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