NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp


The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined. NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free. But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a comp
NBC’s 2020 streaming service won’t be very compelling for cord cutters — and that’s by design Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


NBC's 2020 streaming service won't be very compelling for cord cutters — and that's by design

The streaming wars — the race to launch subscription video products — has been driven by an underlying concept: The traditional pay-TV bundle is dying as millions of U.S. households cut the cord each year and shift their video consumption to services like Netflix.

This has been a hard pill to swallow for legacy media companies, which derive billions of dollars from traditional pay TV. Yet, many of those media companies are coming to grips with reality and beginning to disrupt their own business models, headlined by Disney’s $6.99 Disney+ offering for this year.

That’s not the case for Comcast’s NBCUniversal (the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com).

NBC doesn’t want you to cut the cord. Maybe this isn’t too surprising since its owner is the largest U.S. cable company. But it’s unusual because it directly contradicts the disruption narrative. Instead of submissively accepting that the pay-TV world is ending, NBC is taking a stand and fighting back.

The proof is in the details of NBC’s streaming service, coming next spring.

NBC’s ad-supported streaming service will be free to all customers who pay for traditional live television — whether through Comcast or any other provider, including virtual pay-TV bundles like Google’s YouTube TV or AT&T’s DirecTV Now, assuming partnership deals are struck, according to people familiar with the matter.

For those who have cut the cord, it will probably be about $10, said the people, who asked not to be named because the discussions on price are still ongoing.

CNBC has also learned that the free version of service for pay-TV subscribers will include live linear channels, same-season episodes and past-season episodes. Customers will be able to watch NBC programming anywhere, on any device, independent of their cable provider’s footprint. NBC will have nonexclusive access to all of the programming it sells to Hulu for the streaming service, as part of the deal with Disney the two companies announced on Tuesday.

But the $10 version for cord cutters won’t include live linear channels and won’t include same-season shows. You’ll get a bunch of reruns, most of which will also be available on Hulu if you already subscribe to that service. And you’ll get a few originals for the streaming service, the quality of which is to be determined.

So what are you getting for your $10 a month? Not much at first. And that’s the point.

NBC expects its revenue from cord cutters on its streaming service to be “completely immaterial,” according to a person familiar with the matter. The company is actively trying to make its cord-cutting streaming service inferior to its pay-TV version. The service is primarily meant as a nice additional benefit for customers who already pay for cable or satellite TV.

NBC’s decision isn’t totally motivated by supporting Comcast’s cable TV business. Now that Disney has full operational control of Hulu, Disney can bundle Hulu (or Hulu with Live TV) with Disney+ to make a compelling streaming offering that should further accelerate cord cutting. NBC is OK with this. Customers who cancel Comcast’s TV service for, say, YouTube TV will still get NBC’s streaming service for free.

NBC will certainly monitor the take rate of its streaming service among non pay-TV subscribers if cord cutting dramatically accelerates. If necessary, it can move content on and off its service thanks to Tuesday’s deal with Hulu, as well as the impending expiration of streaming-rights deals for popular shows it owns, such as “The Office.” And three years from now, when its content deal with Hulu ends, there’s an easy path for NBC to make its streaming service more compelling by making all its content exclusive to it.

But at launch next year, the NBC streaming service won’t be a compelling addition for cord cutters. And that’s the point.

Disclosure: Comcast owns NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.

WATCH: Comcast will sell its Hulu stake to Disney, giving Disney full control


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wont, cord, disney, thats, live, nbcs, service, hulu, tv, 2020, compelling, nbc, paytv, streaming, design, customers, cutters


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Attention cord cutters: Netflix has more ‘certified fresh’ movies than Amazon, Hulu and HBO combined

More doesn’t always mean better, especially when it comes to streaming services. As more people cut the cord and sign-up for non-traditional cable options, companies like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime have to make their offerings more enticing to consumers. While many customers have subscriptions with multiple services, these streaming platforms still have to remain competitive. Using data from Rotten Tomatoes, ReelGood and JustWatch, the folks at StreamingObserver, an organization that analyze


More doesn’t always mean better, especially when it comes to streaming services. As more people cut the cord and sign-up for non-traditional cable options, companies like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime have to make their offerings more enticing to consumers. While many customers have subscriptions with multiple services, these streaming platforms still have to remain competitive. Using data from Rotten Tomatoes, ReelGood and JustWatch, the folks at StreamingObserver, an organization that analyze
Attention cord cutters: Netflix has more ‘certified fresh’ movies than Amazon, Hulu and HBO combined Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: sarah whitten, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, movies, hulu, fresh, certified, amazon, wide, attention, streaming, films, cord, tomatoes, customers, rotten, hbo, using, cutters, netflix, combined


Attention cord cutters: Netflix has more 'certified fresh' movies than Amazon, Hulu and HBO combined

More doesn’t always mean better, especially when it comes to streaming services.

As more people cut the cord and sign-up for non-traditional cable options, companies like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime have to make their offerings more enticing to consumers.

While many customers have subscriptions with multiple services, these streaming platforms still have to remain competitive. Some customers want a wide selection of content to choose from, others are looking for the newest titles or programs that are exclusive to just one platform.

For others, it’s all about prestige. Using data from Rotten Tomatoes, ReelGood and JustWatch, the folks at StreamingObserver, an organization that analyzes the latest trends in streaming technology, determined that Netflix had the highest concentration of Rotten Tomatoes “certified fresh” films in its library when compared to its competitors.

In fact, the platform had more quality films than Hulu, Amazon and HBO combined.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: sarah whitten, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, movies, hulu, fresh, certified, amazon, wide, attention, streaming, films, cord, tomatoes, customers, rotten, hbo, using, cutters, netflix, combined


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Two surgeons in China developing a method to transplant a human head

An adhesive called polyethylene glycol will be used to connect the volunteer’s head with the spinal cord of the donor’s body. The major barrier is fusing the spinal cord of the head to that of the donor body. “We have shown that with this technique, spinal perfusion is possible,” Ren said (Canavero did not respond to multiple requests for comment). That said, his focus right now is patients with spinal cord injuries and paralysis due to accidents or other causes. So I try to translate this techn


An adhesive called polyethylene glycol will be used to connect the volunteer’s head with the spinal cord of the donor’s body. The major barrier is fusing the spinal cord of the head to that of the donor body. “We have shown that with this technique, spinal perfusion is possible,” Ren said (Canavero did not respond to multiple requests for comment). That said, his focus right now is patients with spinal cord injuries and paralysis due to accidents or other causes. So I try to translate this techn
Two surgeons in China developing a method to transplant a human head Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-15  Authors: roni jacobson, jeff j mitchell, getty images, sergei fadeichev, tass, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, ponywang, anjali sundaram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, developing, dogs, technique, ren, head, patients, human, spinal, blood, china, regained, surgeons, method, cord, transplant, body


Two surgeons in China developing a method to transplant a human head

While it sounds outrageous, keeping a detached human head alive is not the main stumbling block, and may even currently be possible. The unconscious head would be kept at a very cold temperature (50 degrees Fahrenheit) to mitigate against brain damage, and be hooked up to two pumps — one supplying continuous blood flow and the other oxygen.

An adhesive called polyethylene glycol will be used to connect the volunteer’s head with the spinal cord of the donor’s body. The plan is to induce the volunteer into a coma for a month while blood and new nerve networks rebuild in hopes that the body doesn’t reject the head — an inherent type of risk in all transplant procedures. In addition to the spine, the head will also have to be reconnected to airways, the esophagus and blood vessels.

The major barrier is fusing the spinal cord of the head to that of the donor body. If not successful, the body would be paralyzed, a medical problem that still has yet to be solved. This is not the obstacle it once was, however.

In December, Canavero and Ren published a study in which they severed the spinal cords of 12 dogs. They then applied polyethylene glycol to the incision of seven dogs and also delivered electrical stimulation. Over the next two months the dogs in the treatment group regained some motor function, while those in the control group did not. In earlier animal studies, Ren performed the complete head transplantation with spinal fusion technique on mice and rats, as well as a dog, all of whom also regained some motor function, although it was jerky and not completely normal.

“We have shown that with this technique, spinal perfusion is possible,” Ren said (Canavero did not respond to multiple requests for comment). Ren acknowledges that the project is “controversial,” but insists it is necessary to save people with “working brains whose bodies have died,” including those with neuromuscular degenerative diseases, end-stage cancer and multiple organ failure.

That said, his focus right now is patients with spinal cord injuries and paralysis due to accidents or other causes. “These patients don’t currently have good strategies, their mortality is very very high. So I try to translate this technique to benefit these patients,” Ren said. “That is my main strategy in the future.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-15  Authors: roni jacobson, jeff j mitchell, getty images, sergei fadeichev, tass, chris ratcliffe, bloomberg, ponywang, anjali sundaram
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, developing, dogs, technique, ren, head, patients, human, spinal, blood, china, regained, surgeons, method, cord, transplant, body


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ESPN is launching a daily ‘SportsCenter’ series on its app

At ESPN’s inaugural NewFront presentation on Wednesday, the sports channel said a daily edition of its “SportsCenter” program will come soon to the ESPN app. Hosted by Scott Van Pelt and several other “SportsCenter” anchors, the series will feature clips and news, including top plays, highlights and what fans should expect in the coming day. New episodes will be prominently featured on the home screen when users first open ESPN’s app. Disney launched ESPN+ in April, the company’s first ever dire


At ESPN’s inaugural NewFront presentation on Wednesday, the sports channel said a daily edition of its “SportsCenter” program will come soon to the ESPN app. Hosted by Scott Van Pelt and several other “SportsCenter” anchors, the series will feature clips and news, including top plays, highlights and what fans should expect in the coming day. New episodes will be prominently featured on the home screen when users first open ESPN’s app. Disney launched ESPN+ in April, the company’s first ever dire
ESPN is launching a daily ‘SportsCenter’ series on its app Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-02  Authors: chloe aiello, mike windle, espn, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, launching, daily, united, espn, van, sportscenter, series, app, cord, soon, states, espns, target


ESPN is launching a daily 'SportsCenter' series on its app

At ESPN’s inaugural NewFront presentation on Wednesday, the sports channel said a daily edition of its “SportsCenter” program will come soon to the ESPN app.

Hosted by Scott Van Pelt and several other “SportsCenter” anchors, the series will feature clips and news, including top plays, highlights and what fans should expect in the coming day. New episodes will be prominently featured on the home screen when users first open ESPN’s app.

The announcement follows the launch of a reimagined ESPN app.

Disney launched ESPN+ in April, the company’s first ever direct-to-consumer service in the United States. That and the ESPN app represent the latest efforts by Disney, parent company of ESPN, to target “cord cutters” or “cord nevers,” those customers who primarily use mobile devices and computers to consume media.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-02  Authors: chloe aiello, mike windle, espn, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, users, launching, daily, united, espn, van, sportscenter, series, app, cord, soon, states, espns, target


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Spinal cord stimulation market grows as way to treat chronic pain

Her only other option was opioid pain pills, but she refused to take them and risk slipping into addiction. Dr. Youssef Josephson of The Pain Management Center in New Jersey suggested she try Intellis, a spinal cord stimulator. The device emits electrical pulses to help treat pain. It’s the latest system from Medtronic, the company that created the spinal cord stimulation market. Once the market leader, Medtronic ceded ground to rivals, just as the opioid epidemic was putting more focus on alter


Her only other option was opioid pain pills, but she refused to take them and risk slipping into addiction. Dr. Youssef Josephson of The Pain Management Center in New Jersey suggested she try Intellis, a spinal cord stimulator. The device emits electrical pulses to help treat pain. It’s the latest system from Medtronic, the company that created the spinal cord stimulation market. Once the market leader, Medtronic ceded ground to rivals, just as the opioid epidemic was putting more focus on alter
Spinal cord stimulation market grows as way to treat chronic pain Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-29  Authors: angelica lavito, source, connie hanafy, brock ervie, jasmary alfonso-andaluz, boston scientific, university of texas at austin, -rami elghandour, nevro ceo, -maulik nanavaty
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leg, pain, grows, stimulation, cord, chronic, way, opioid, jersey, treat, months, intellis, medtronic, market, spinal


Spinal cord stimulation market grows as way to treat chronic pain

It was a quick decline.

In less than a year, Connie Hanafy went from hiking and rollerskating with her daughters to hardly being able to walk. She had a benign tumor removed from her right leg in January 2017. For months after, she felt pain that didn’t make sense. It wasn’t typical post-procedure aches. It was a sharp, stabbing, throbbing and crushing feeling rolled up into one.

“Before all of this happened, I was an extremely active person. I would hike all the time and was always doing things with my children,” Hanafy said. “I was always outside and very outdoorsy. When this happened, it was a huge setback.”

The 32-year-old hospice worker from New Jersey was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic condition that can develop after an injury or surgery. She tried treatments like steroid injections, nerve blocks and physical therapy, but the pain continued to worsen. Her only other option was opioid pain pills, but she refused to take them and risk slipping into addiction.

By November, she just wanted her leg amputated. Dr. Youssef Josephson of The Pain Management Center in New Jersey suggested she try Intellis, a spinal cord stimulator. The device emits electrical pulses to help treat pain.

The Food and Drug Administration had approved Intellis only a few months earlier. It’s the latest system from Medtronic, the company that created the spinal cord stimulation market. It’s one the medical device maker hopes will better help more patients — and turn its performance in the category. Once the market leader, Medtronic ceded ground to rivals, just as the opioid epidemic was putting more focus on alternative ways to treat pain.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-29  Authors: angelica lavito, source, connie hanafy, brock ervie, jasmary alfonso-andaluz, boston scientific, university of texas at austin, -rami elghandour, nevro ceo, -maulik nanavaty
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leg, pain, grows, stimulation, cord, chronic, way, opioid, jersey, treat, months, intellis, medtronic, market, spinal


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Former DirecTV CEO: Cord cutters don’t matter if broadband is the future

Former DirecTV CEO Michael White isn’t too worried about cord cutters. With products like DirecTV Now — an online subscription streaming service made with broadband users in mind — DirecTV and parent company AT&T feel prepared for the shift. The company now has 25 million broadband customers, compared to 22 million for video. While bundled packages, which provide cable, wireless and phone service, may be beneficial for churn, he recommended those companies stick to what they know. “If you can se


Former DirecTV CEO Michael White isn’t too worried about cord cutters. With products like DirecTV Now — an online subscription streaming service made with broadband users in mind — DirecTV and parent company AT&T feel prepared for the shift. The company now has 25 million broadband customers, compared to 22 million for video. While bundled packages, which provide cable, wireless and phone service, may be beneficial for churn, he recommended those companies stick to what they know. “If you can se
Former DirecTV CEO: Cord cutters don’t matter if broadband is the future Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-26  Authors: chloe aiello
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, wireless, streaming, comcast, matter, told, ceo, cord, future, white, directv, dont, cable, company, customers, cutters, broadband


Former DirecTV CEO: Cord cutters don't matter if broadband is the future

Former DirecTV CEO Michael White isn’t too worried about cord cutters.

Recent evidence suggests that large numbers of subscribers, a large share of them being millennials, are actively canceling cable packages. For White, however, broadband is the future, and already a major revenue generator as more consumers flock to streaming platforms to consume content, he told CNBC on Thursday.

“The whole issue of the growth in streaming: Millennials’ habits are different. There’s no question about that,” White said. “You are seeing cord cutting, that’s a reality. The advantage is, we can sell broadband still.”

With products like DirecTV Now — an online subscription streaming service made with broadband users in mind — DirecTV and parent company AT&T feel prepared for the shift. However, White didn’t write off the struggle cable-forward companies are facing.

Companies like Comcast and AT&T, which routinely report subscriber metrics on quarterly earnings, appear to be taking a hit from customers ditching pricey cable packages.

This quarter, Comcast reported its largest quarterly loss of cable subscribers in three years. The company now has 25 million broadband customers, compared to 22 million for video. However, Comcast emphasized that broadband now makes up the majority of the company’s cash flow, CEO Brian Roberts told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” recently.

As far as big players in cable go, White doesn’t anticipate them picking up wireless to attract or retain customers. While bundled packages, which provide cable, wireless and phone service, may be beneficial for churn, he recommended those companies stick to what they know.

“If you can sell more good products to good customers, it’s better than chasing customers you don’t know,” White said.

Comcast is the owner of NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-10-26  Authors: chloe aiello
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, wireless, streaming, comcast, matter, told, ceo, cord, future, white, directv, dont, cable, company, customers, cutters, broadband


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Cord cutting is accelerating thanks to Hulu, not Netflix, analyst says

Hulu, not Netflix, appears to be driving the recent increase in cord-cutting, according to Corey Barrett, a senior media analyst at M Science. Barrett said a recent study from M Science shows the trend is on the rise. “What really stood out to us was that [cord-cutting] was most pronounced among Hulu subscribers,” Barrett told “Power Lunch” on Friday. The study found that Netflix subscribers eliminated their cable package at similar rates to the average consumer, while Hulu members saw a higher


Hulu, not Netflix, appears to be driving the recent increase in cord-cutting, according to Corey Barrett, a senior media analyst at M Science. Barrett said a recent study from M Science shows the trend is on the rise. “What really stood out to us was that [cord-cutting] was most pronounced among Hulu subscribers,” Barrett told “Power Lunch” on Friday. The study found that Netflix subscribers eliminated their cable package at similar rates to the average consumer, while Hulu members saw a higher
Cord cutting is accelerating thanks to Hulu, not Netflix, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-23  Authors: david gernon, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, barrett, subscribers, cutting, accelerating, study, thanks, practice, parent, cordcutting, nbcuniversal, cord, analyst, recent, netflix, hulu


Cord cutting is accelerating thanks to Hulu, not Netflix, analyst says

Hulu, not Netflix, appears to be driving the recent increase in cord-cutting, according to Corey Barrett, a senior media analyst at M Science.

Cord-cutting, long said to represent the demise of cable companies, is when customers eliminate paid TV from their service provider bundle. Barrett said a recent study from M Science shows the trend is on the rise.

“What really stood out to us was that [cord-cutting] was most pronounced among Hulu subscribers,” Barrett told “Power Lunch” on Friday. “There’s a misconception that Netflix is actively driving cord-cutting behavior.”

The study found that Netflix subscribers eliminated their cable package at similar rates to the average consumer, while Hulu members saw a higher rate of cord-cutting.

The findings also identified Charter Communications as potentially a victim of the practice, “relative to Comcast,” according to Barrett.

He called the practice “a generational shift” and warned disruption could grow in the coming years thanks to more nontraditional firms entering the field.

“As a function of that, you have players coming from outside the existing pay-TV ecosystem that are likely much more disruptive to the current ecosystem and drive heavier cord-cutting than what we’ve seen,” Barrett said.

Disclosure: CNBC parent company NBCUniversal is an investor in Hulu. Comcast is the owner of NBCUniversal, the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-23  Authors: david gernon, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, barrett, subscribers, cutting, accelerating, study, thanks, practice, parent, cordcutting, nbcuniversal, cord, analyst, recent, netflix, hulu


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Amazon is ‘awfully scary,’ says Netflix CEO Reed Hastings

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings came on CNBC’s Squawk Box to talk about a variety of topics, including his thoughts on Amazon and what he’s currently watching. Netflix fears AmazonHastings sees Amazon an “awfully scary” competitor, though he stopped short of saying it was Netflix’ biggest threat. “They are awfully scary I would say,” Hastings added. Hastings has “obscure” taste in moviesWhat’s on Hasting’s Netflix queue? “I have obscure taste,” Hastings admitted.


Netflix CEO Reed Hastings came on CNBC’s Squawk Box to talk about a variety of topics, including his thoughts on Amazon and what he’s currently watching. Netflix fears AmazonHastings sees Amazon an “awfully scary” competitor, though he stopped short of saying it was Netflix’ biggest threat. “They are awfully scary I would say,” Hastings added. Hastings has “obscure” taste in moviesWhat’s on Hasting’s Netflix queue? “I have obscure taste,” Hastings admitted.
Amazon is ‘awfully scary,’ says Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-31  Authors: michelle castillo, michael newberg
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, scary, taste, amazon, cord, reed, awfully, hastings, shows, say, netflix, base, ceo, spend


Amazon is 'awfully scary,' says Netflix CEO Reed Hastings

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings came on CNBC’s Squawk Box to talk about a variety of topics, including his thoughts on Amazon and what he’s currently watching. Here’s some key takeaways.

Netflix fears Amazon

Hastings sees Amazon an “awfully scary” competitor, though he stopped short of saying it was Netflix’ biggest threat.

“Everything Amazon does is so amazing,” Hastings told CNBC. “How are they doing so many business areas so well? They are trying to repeal the basic laws of business.”

“They are awfully scary I would say,” Hastings added.

Netflix is prepared to spend more money

Netflix is prepared to spend $6 billion on original content in 2017 – and the budget is going to go up “a lot” in the future, Hastings said. He also pointed out that the company has kept its base price at $7.99 for eight years, although he didn’t say if it will increase prices in the future.

“As we grow the membership base, we want to grow the current budget,” he said. “There are so many great shows we don’t have yet. We are going to continue as we growth the member ship base to try and get more shows and more movies.”

The rate of cord cutting hasn’t affected the company’s projected growth

Netflix isn’t the reason why people are quitting cable, Hastings said.

“Very few people have cut the cord,” he said. “We have seen maybe 2 million or 3 million of 50 cut the cord. We don’t think of it as a big overlap that we are driving cord cutting. In general, it is like 2 to 3 percent per year, like broadcast ratings over the last 30 years. It will take a slow, secular decline, then they will adjust the economics.

Hastings has “obscure” taste in movies

What’s on Hasting’s Netflix queue? The CEO just watched Swedish film “Force Majeure,” a drama-comedy about a family that has to piece itself together after the father runs away instead of saving his family during a natural disaster.

“I have obscure taste,” Hastings admitted.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-05-31  Authors: michelle castillo, michael newberg
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, scary, taste, amazon, cord, reed, awfully, hastings, shows, say, netflix, base, ceo, spend


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