The top 10 metro areas for millennials to buy homes

Millennials may have waited longer than previous generations to buy homes, but now they’re keeping real estate agents busy. In some metro areas, high costs keep millennials from buying, or there aren’t enough good jobs for prospective buyers to get approved for mortgages. Based on our analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau and Zillow on salary, home prices, and the share of homes owned by people aged 21 to 38, here’s our list of the top 10 metro areas where millennials can actually afford


Millennials may have waited longer than previous generations to buy homes, but now they’re keeping real estate agents busy. In some metro areas, high costs keep millennials from buying, or there aren’t enough good jobs for prospective buyers to get approved for mortgages. Based on our analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau and Zillow on salary, home prices, and the share of homes owned by people aged 21 to 38, here’s our list of the top 10 metro areas where millennials can actually afford
The top 10 metro areas for millennials to buy homes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: lance lambert, ivana pino, sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mortgage, rent, millennials, cost, median, prices, list, areas, st, metro, buy, homes


The top 10 metro areas for millennials to buy homes

Millennials may have waited longer than previous generations to buy homes, but now they’re keeping real estate agents busy. This generation that some experts warned could be destined to rent forever is actually America’s biggest group of homebuyers. But the situation is a lot more stable in some places than in others. In some metro areas, high costs keep millennials from buying, or there aren’t enough good jobs for prospective buyers to get approved for mortgages. Other areas offer the right mix of affordability and, usually, higher-than-normal salaries — and those places are generally where 20- and 30-somethings are becoming owners. Based on our analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau and Zillow on salary, home prices, and the share of homes owned by people aged 21 to 38, here’s our list of the top 10 metro areas where millennials can actually afford to buy homes. On average, millennials in these top 10 metros are 25% more likely to own a home than their peers across the country.

Metro areas where millennials can afford to buy homes

Des Moines, Iowa Grand Rapids, Michigan Wichita, Kansas Omaha, Nebraska Toledo, Ohio Dayton, Ohio Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Little Rock, Arkansas St. Louis, Missouri Syracuse, New York The places that topped our ranking on average have 3% lower earnings for folks age 25 to 44, a range that includes most millennials. They make up for it, however, with home prices that are 38% lower than the national median list price of $291,900, according to Zillow. That’s much better bang for the buck. Here’s what we found these metro areas have in common.

They offer good employers and solid paychecks

The places that made our top 10 manage to strike a middle ground between good pay and reasonable home prices. Wichita, at No. 3, is home to the corporate headquarters of Koch Industries, the country’s second-largest private firm. And paychecks stretch a lot further in Wichita, where the median list price, $184,900, is 44% lower the nationwide median. In Des Moines, which ranks No. 1, as it does on our list of the top 10 cities where millennials are doing the best financially, the unemployment rate is just 2.1%. Millennial median household income in Des Moines is $78,200, or 17% higher than the nationwide figure, while housing prices are 20% lower.

Any buyer that comes in and starts looking at what it cost to rent vs. buy and weighing the options, they’ll see it’s better to own. John Blair regional sales manager at Commerce Bank in St. Louis

Millennials benefit from Midwestern affordability

In 2018, David Kranker decided he was tired of the big-city cost and hassle and wanted a change of scenery. The 25-year-old’s digital marketing employer in Chicago allowed him to work remotely, so he started researching where his dollars would go the furthest. He didn’t have to go far: In November he bought a home in Grand Rapids, Michigan, which ranks No. 2 on our list. “For the same price as a little 600-square-foot box in Chicago, you get a full two-story home in Grand Rapids,” Kranker said. He snagged a home for just $180,000. “I have definitely felt the cost savings. My grocery bill went from $115 per week to $45 per week. And that’s more money you can put towards mortgage payments.” That helps explain why eight of the top 10 metros we ranked are located in more affordable Midwestern states.

Here, a mortgage payment can be less than rent

In cities like New York and Seattle, the price of a mortgage is often more than people pay in rent. But in the metros we ranked, usually the cost of a monthly mortgage payment is lower than the cost of rent. It would cost just under $800 per month to get a mortgage on a median priced home of $209,900 in St. Louis, if you put down 20%. That looks like a good deal when considering the median one-bedroom rent in St. Louis is $865, according to Zillow. You “can own an asset versus paying off someone else’s asset,” says John Blair, regional sales manager at Commerce Bank in St. Louis. “Any buyer that comes in and starts looking at what it cost to rent vs. buy and weighing the options, they’ll see it’s better to own.” More from Grow: The 10 US cities where millennials are doing the best financially

‘Millionaires are made in their 20s and 30s,’ expert says — here’s how

3 steps a 29-year-old Colorado couple took that helped them buy their first home


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-20  Authors: lance lambert, ivana pino, sam becker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mortgage, rent, millennials, cost, median, prices, list, areas, st, metro, buy, homes


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Battle of the airport commute: CNBC tests Lyft, Uber Copter, Blade helicopter and mass transit in race to NYC’s busiest airport

Blade’s airport dealBlade’s airport helicopter service is $195 per seat anytime to any airport. BLADEUber Copter’s offerUber’s on-demand helicopter service, Uber Copter, doesn’t have fixed prices like Blade. The Uber service uses dual-engine aircraft that carry up to five passengers, with flights operated by HeliFlite a third-party charter company. BLADE – Blade, the Uber of helicopters is adding a new service to Teterboro, cutting a 45-minute drive from Manhattan to 4 minutes. Total cost for th


Blade’s airport dealBlade’s airport helicopter service is $195 per seat anytime to any airport. BLADEUber Copter’s offerUber’s on-demand helicopter service, Uber Copter, doesn’t have fixed prices like Blade. The Uber service uses dual-engine aircraft that carry up to five passengers, with flights operated by HeliFlite a third-party charter company. BLADE – Blade, the Uber of helicopters is adding a new service to Teterboro, cutting a 45-minute drive from Manhattan to 4 minutes. Total cost for th
Battle of the airport commute: CNBC tests Lyft, Uber Copter, Blade helicopter and mass transit in race to NYC’s busiest airport Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: ray parisi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airport, uber, mass, copter, jfk, lyft, total, nycs, blade, manhattan, service, minutes, helicopter, tests, terminal, cost, transit, race


Battle of the airport commute: CNBC tests Lyft, Uber Copter, Blade helicopter and mass transit in race to NYC's busiest airport

Few things are more annoying than suffering through the bumper-to-bumper traffic along the 10 to 20 miles that separate Manhattan from its three metro area airports. Two companies are now offering a cure for that God-awful commute: “affordable” chopper rides to New York’s three major airports — John F. Kennedy International Airport, Newark Liberty International and La Guardia, which served a combined 137.7 million passengers last year, according to the Port Authority of NY & NJ. That’s a lot of people clogging up roadways to make their flights. We tested the best way to cut that commute time, taking to the roads, air and rail to find out the fastest and most cost-efficient way to get to and from your terminal.

Blade is offering $95 private chopper rides to avoid pope congestion. Source: Blade

On-demand choppers

Two companies are making the dream of zooming over horrible traffic at 120 knots an hour a reality for New Yorkers. Blade Urban Mobility started offering on-demand helicopter service to New York-area airports this spring, followed by Uber Copter on July 9. Both companies allow users to book a chopper via an app on their smartphone. It’s almost as easy as ordering a car. The companies work like an on-demand car-pooling service for helicopters. Users reserve a seat over a window of time and then share the ride with other passengers. The competition and shared costs have turned a luxury once reserved for the super wealthy into one that’s still pricey, but more affordable than ever.

Blade’s airport deal

Blade’s airport helicopter service is $195 per seat anytime to any airport. The Bell 407GXP choppers can carry up to six passengers and operate from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday thru Friday and Sundays from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. The company flies back and forth from three helipads in Manhattan and typically offers on-demand flights several times an hour: Wall Street to LaGuardia

30th Street to JFK

Street to JFK and East 34th St. to Newark. Passengers can take one commercial carry-on that weighs up to 25 pounds per passenger and one personal item on board. Checked luggage is extra. Tote Taxi will shuttle two extra pieces of checked luggage weighing up to 200 pounds combined to JFK or LaGuardia for an additional $85 or Newark for $120. Blade users have to get themselves to the helipad, but a Blade SUV picks up clients at the JFK heliport and drops them at their terminal. Users can reserve seats on the app in real time and as far out as December. For return trips, the company’s website says it will monitor a user’s commercial flight’s arrival time so he or she can be transported to the next available Blade helicopter. And the company is also offering yearly memberships called Airport Pass with an up-front fee of $295 or $795 that reduces the price of every seat you book by $50 and $100 respectively.

BLADE

Uber Copter’s offer

Uber’s on-demand helicopter service, Uber Copter, doesn’t have fixed prices like Blade. It’s determined based on demand and is a bit pricier. The average cost typically ranges between $200 to $225, but could be more, depending on demand, Uber spokesman Matt Wing said. The deal includes an UberX, the app’s budget car option, that picks users up in select areas of New York, currently parts of lower Manhattan and the West Side. It drops them off at the Wall Street helipad to catch a chopper to JFK where another Uber vehicle transfers clients to their terminal. According to the company’s website, the service only operates between Wall Street and JFK during afternoon rush hours from Monday to Friday. It’s only available to Uber’s platinum and diamond reward members, lower status users won’t even see the chopper option on their apps, but Wing said Uber plans to expand to a wider user base. Uber’s service can be ordered in real time or up to five days in advance. Passengers can bring one carry-on weighing 40 pounds or less, plus a personal bag. The Uber service uses dual-engine aircraft that carry up to five passengers, with flights operated by HeliFlite a third-party charter company.

BLADE – Blade, the Uber of helicopters is adding a new service to Teterboro, cutting a 45-minute drive from Manhattan to 4 minutes. Source: Blade

Blade’s airport chopper

On Blade’s website, a promotional video suggests the airborne commute from Manhattan to JFK is 5 minutes, but that’s just time in the air. It doesn’t include time getting to the helipad or from the airport helipad to your terminal. CNBC sent four employees to test each service in an airport run during rush hour from Sullivan Street between Spring and Prince Streets in lower Manhattan to Kennedy Airport, the Big Apple’s busiest airport, which served 61.6 million passengers last year. The four modes of transportation measured were Uber Copter, Blade chopper, Lyft car service and mass transit. Each employee started their rush-hour commute from Manhattan’s Soho neighborhood at precisely 3:50 p.m. on a Wednesday in July. The finish line was JFK’s Terminal 8, an international terminal for American Airlines, British Airways and others that served 9 million passengers alone last year. Here are the results:

Uber Copter

CNBC producer Jessi Joseph scheduled an Uber Copter ride the day before, selecting a time window of 4 p.m. to 4:10 p.m. Her budget UberX was scheduled to pick her up at 3:52 p.m. and estimated her arrival at JFK Terminal 8 at between 4:47 p.m. and 4:52 p.m. On the day of the commute her driver arrived two minutes early. She departed from lower Manhattan at 3:50 p.m. and drove for 17 minutes to the Wall Street heliport. After checking in, she waited 18 minutes to board her chopper. Her helicopter took off at 4:25 p.m. Her total time in the air was 7 minutes and 7 seconds. At JFK, she waited 3 minutes for another Uber to pick her up and take her to Terminal 8. Her arrival time was 4:42 p.m., earlier than the the app’s estimate, bringing her total travel time to 52 minutes. Total cost for the all-inclusive Uber Copter deal: $228.57 or about $4.40 per minute.

Blade

BLADE

I reserved a Blade helicopter flight the day before with a time window of 4:11 p.m. to 4:50 p.m. The app processed my request and delivered a flight time of 4:25 p.m. I got into a Yellow Cab in Soho at 3:50 p.m., which took 17 minutes and cost $17.15, including tip. Check-in at the Blade lounge took seconds, leaving no time for a complimentary cocktail since my 4:25 p.m. departure was moved up to 4:10 p.m. because everyone arrived early at the helipad. The flight, which is promoted on the company’s website as “5 minutes” was 8 minutes and 12 seconds from liftoff to landing. Blade’s CEO Rob Wiesenthal tells CNBC flight times can be impacted by wind, weather and even temperature. A Blade SUV was ready and waiting at the JFK helipad, and within minutes I was delivered to Terminal 8. My total travel time from lower Manhattan was 42 minutes and the tab included $17.15 plus $195 for my seat in the Blade chopper. Total cost for the Blade airport commute was $212.15 or about $5.05 per minute.

Comparing the time and cost of four real-world commutes from Lower Manhattan to JFK Airport.

Mass transit

CNBC intern Phillip Minton walked about a minute to the Spring Street subway station. He took seven-minute ride on the uptown E train to Penn Station for $2.75 where he connected to a Long Island Rail Road train to Jamaica, which cost $7.75 and took about 19 minutes. The cost rises to $10.75 during peak hours.

A Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) train Spencer Platt | Getty Images

The AirTrain to Kennedy’s Terminal 8 cost $5 and took 16 minutes. Total travel time from lower Manhattan to Terminal 8 via mass transit was 66 minutes, the subway fare plus the tickets for the LIRR and Air Train cost a total of $15.50 or about 24 cents per minute.

Lyft

CNBC producer Erica Wright selected a Lux Black Lyft at 3:50 p.m. The company’s luxury black car took nearly six minutes to arrive at the same location in Soho. Waze originally estimated her drive would take an hour and 24 minutes, but it took just 63 minutes. Her total wait time, plus travel time from lower Manhattan to Terminal 8, was 72 minutes.

Lyft pricing is dynamic and on the the company’s site the cost estimate ranged from $140 to $160. Her final fare was $151.80, bringing her total cost for car service to about $2.11 per minute.

Reality check


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: ray parisi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airport, uber, mass, copter, jfk, lyft, total, nycs, blade, manhattan, service, minutes, helicopter, tests, terminal, cost, transit, race


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here’s why your workplace health insurance is so expensive

Even if your employer offers you health insurance at work, chances are you’re shelling out more money for medical care. Last year, employers spent an average of $15,159 in premiums to cover a family of four, according to an analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation. The cost of coverage has even outpaced wage growth, which has gone up by 26% over the last decade. “Insurance companies get a lot of heat for raising deductibles and premiums,” said Cynthia Cox, vice president at the Kaiser Family F


Even if your employer offers you health insurance at work, chances are you’re shelling out more money for medical care. Last year, employers spent an average of $15,159 in premiums to cover a family of four, according to an analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation. The cost of coverage has even outpaced wage growth, which has gone up by 26% over the last decade. “Insurance companies get a lot of heat for raising deductibles and premiums,” said Cynthia Cox, vice president at the Kaiser Family F
Here’s why your workplace health insurance is so expensive Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, insurance, expensive, premiums, health, cost, family, coverage, heres, thats, work, workplace, whats, deductibles, according


Here's why your workplace health insurance is so expensive

Even if your employer offers you health insurance at work, chances are you’re shelling out more money for medical care.

Last year, employers spent an average of $15,159 in premiums to cover a family of four, according to an analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation. In all, that’s an increase of 51% from a decade ago.

Things haven’t become any more affordable for workers, either.

The average family of four paid a total of $7,726 in 2018, according to the foundation. That’s an increase of 67% from 10 years ago.

Of that amount, families paid $4,706 in premium contributions for coverage at work, plus $3,020 in cost-sharing — that is, deductibles, coinsurance and copayments.

The cost of coverage has even outpaced wage growth, which has gone up by 26% over the last decade.

Bear in mind, employers still shoulder a large share of premiums. Employees also have the advantage of paying premiums on a pretax basis, as opposed to buying coverage elsewhere with after-tax dollars.

In contrast, on the private market, a family of four with an annual household income of $80,000 would pay $7,888 per year in premiums for a silver plan purchased through the health insurance marketplace — provided they are eligible for a premium tax credit of $9,961 per year, according to Kaiser.

Without the credit, the plan would cost close to $18,000 per year.

“Insurance companies get a lot of heat for raising deductibles and premiums,” said Cynthia Cox, vice president at the Kaiser Family Foundation.

“But if you look at what’s driving health-care costs year to year, it’s the price of health care: the cost of doctor’s visit, the cost of a hospital stay,” she added. “That’s really what’s making those premiums and deductibles go up each year.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, insurance, expensive, premiums, health, cost, family, coverage, heres, thats, work, workplace, whats, deductibles, according


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here’s what new tariffs will cost the average American household

The average American household will be down $1,000 per year thanks to the newest round of tariffs on Chinese goods, according to J.P. Morgan. The firm estimates the average annual tariff cost per household will increase from $600 from the first two rounds of tariffs. This third tranche of duties affect consumer goods more than the previous levies did. Retailers’ stocks have suffered this month as the list of new tariff goods impact apparel, footwear, consumer electronics and toys. Despite the la


The average American household will be down $1,000 per year thanks to the newest round of tariffs on Chinese goods, according to J.P. Morgan. The firm estimates the average annual tariff cost per household will increase from $600 from the first two rounds of tariffs. This third tranche of duties affect consumer goods more than the previous levies did. Retailers’ stocks have suffered this month as the list of new tariff goods impact apparel, footwear, consumer electronics and toys. Despite the la
Here’s what new tariffs will cost the average American household Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, way, tariff, larger, tariffs, month, goods, impact, estimates, heres, consumer, household, average, cost, american


Here's what new tariffs will cost the average American household

The average American household will be down $1,000 per year thanks to the newest round of tariffs on Chinese goods, according to J.P. Morgan.

The firm estimates the average annual tariff cost per household will increase from $600 from the first two rounds of tariffs. The new tariffs are scheduled to begin Sept. 1 and in mid-December.

“What distinguishes China Phase III tariffs from preceding tariffs is the impact to Consumption and Capital goods whereas previous tariffs focused more on Intermediate goods,” J.P. Morgan head of U.S. equity strategy Dubravko Lakos-Bujas said in a note to clients. “This suggests that the expected consumer impact should be larger in the latest round.”

President Donald Trump surprised investors earlier this month by ending a tariff ceasefire with China and announcing new tariffs of 10% on the remaining $300 billion in Chinese imports, starting next month. He later delayed some of the tariffs until Dec. 15. This third tranche of duties affect consumer goods more than the previous levies did.

Lakos-Bujas said unlike the agriculture sector, which is receiving subsidies from the government to offset some of the tariffs, “there is no simple way to compensate consumer.”

Retailers’ stocks have suffered this month as the list of new tariff goods impact apparel, footwear, consumer electronics and toys. In announcing his delay or cancellation of some of the tariffs, Trump said he wanted to avoid hurting the Christmas shopping season.

Despite the larger tariff impact, the U.S. consumer appears strong. July retail sales grew more than expected from June and posted the strongest five-month growth streak since 2005-2006. About 70% of economic activity is tied to consumer spending.

Given the larger impact on the wallet of the U.S. consumer going in the 2020 election, Lakos-Bujas said the administration will likely rollback tariffs or compromise on a trade agreement.

“We believe there is a good chance they end up reversing their decision and finding a way to reach some common ground with Chinese negotiators,” he said.

The firm estimates that Trump’s new tariffs will cost Americans the majority of the tax break they are getting from Trump’s 2017 tax overhaul, which it estimates is around $1,300 per year.

— with reporting from CNBC’s Michael Bloom


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-19  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, chinese, way, tariff, larger, tariffs, month, goods, impact, estimates, heres, consumer, household, average, cost, american


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

At age 22, she gave up studying law to sell $63,000 swimsuits and $2,300 bras

Claudia Lambeth inside her Luna Mae boutique Luna MaeLuna Mae debuted in the U.S. in 2015, and Lambeth now calls some of the wealthiest women on the planet devoted clients. Luna Mae lingerie Luna Mae”One of my largest commissions was listing out a quote for a 50-piece bridal collection,” said Lambeth. Claudia Lambeth looking at Luna Mae lingerie Luna MaeLambeth’s journey to become a successful CEO and entrepreneur is almost as interesting as the beautiful garments she builds from scratch. “It wa


Claudia Lambeth inside her Luna Mae boutique Luna MaeLuna Mae debuted in the U.S. in 2015, and Lambeth now calls some of the wealthiest women on the planet devoted clients. Luna Mae lingerie Luna Mae”One of my largest commissions was listing out a quote for a 50-piece bridal collection,” said Lambeth. Claudia Lambeth looking at Luna Mae lingerie Luna MaeLambeth’s journey to become a successful CEO and entrepreneur is almost as interesting as the beautiful garments she builds from scratch. “It wa
At age 22, she gave up studying law to sell $63,000 swimsuits and $2,300 bras Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-18  Authors: jessi joseph
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lambeths, law, studying, swimsuits, sell, cost, 63000, bras, shes, lingerie, gave, 2300, luna, mae, lambeth, 22, age, fashion


At age 22, she gave up studying law to sell $63,000 swimsuits and $2,300 bras

At age 22, with no formal fashion education Claudia Lambeth took a giant leap and started a one-of-a-kind luxury lingerie line while she was in law school. With just a little seed money she inherited from her grandfather, Lambeth was able to purchase fabrics and other materials she needed to build her first bra and develop lingerie patterns that helped start her company, Luna Mae London, in October 2012.

Claudia Lambeth inside her Luna Mae boutique Luna Mae

Luna Mae debuted in the U.S. in 2015, and Lambeth now calls some of the wealthiest women on the planet devoted clients. Sales have tripled for the past two years in a row, she said. Lambeth’s vision was to create an ultra-high-end bespoke line of sexy undergarments. She wanted to bring Savile Row to women’s lingerie using luxe fabrics and high-craft tailoring with prices that rival and sometimes surpass the cost of custom-tailored suits for men.

Luna Mae lingerie Luna Mae

“My quest was just building the most beautiful, luxurious, comfortable, best-fitting bra I could and I knew that because I didn’t come from a fashion background, I had to really understand and sink my teeth into understanding the construction of a bra,” she said. Lambeth sells knickers (that’s what they call panties in England) made of French silk that start at $800, and bras of the same material that cost around $2,300. And she’s now designing bathing suits that cost more than a car. Lambeth invited CNBC to the English countryside for a behind the scenes look at a couture black one-piece swimsuit she’s selling for over $63,000.

Luna Mae $63,000 black one-piece CNBC

The corseted suit is covered in seven hand-sewn butterflies made out of a rare metallic thread and layered with Swarovski crystals and beads that cost more than $600 a piece.

Hand-sewn butterflies that cost $600 a piece Luna Mae

The bespoke piece also has 18-karat yellow gold fasteners and is accented by a 9-carat diamond broach created by celebrity jeweler Stephen Webster. Webster’s diamond butterfly is included in the price and is not sold separately.

9-karat diamond broach designed by Stephen Webster Luna Mae

But Lambeth’s globetrotting clientele don’t seem to mind spending tens of thousands of dollars for her custom couture. The designer said she’s sold several swimsuits in this price range inspired by her black one-piece and no two pieces she creates are alike. Plus, her clients are willing to wait months for a personal fitting. Some make appointments at her flagship store in London while they’re in town. Others prefer Lambeth come to them, and she’s willing to travel anywhere in the world for a fitting.

Luna Mae lingerie Luna Mae

“One of my largest commissions was listing out a quote for a 50-piece bridal collection,” said Lambeth. The collection was designed for a client in the Middle East who ended up purchasing every undergarment she sketched. Lambeth signs non-disclosure agreements with her ultra-high-net-worth clients, so she’s not allowed to disclose the total for that commission but given her price points, one can imagine that single order could be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Claudia Lambeth looking at Luna Mae lingerie Luna Mae

Lambeth’s journey to become a successful CEO and entrepreneur is almost as interesting as the beautiful garments she builds from scratch. From a young age, Lambeth was obsessed with lingerie and knew she wanted to be a designer but after graduating from high school, her father insisted she pursue more practical academic studies like the law. Lambeth thought, “he must be joking,” but after some consideration she felt that because fashion was a huge passion of hers she would be able to learn it on her own. “I definitely could not teach myself law!” she said. “I wanted to be treated as a businesswoman and a female entrepreneur and I considered a law degree to be a subject that people respected.” Lambeth chose Kings College in the U.K. for her studies. “I would sit in my lectures sketching things,” she recalled. “Everyone was taking serious notes and I wasn’t.”

Luna Mae

Refusing to give up on her vision, Lambeth relentlessly focused on getting her fashion fix by interning with high-end clothing brands instead of law firms. “I wanted to get a glimpse of all sides of the fashion industry so I could broaden my understanding and learn how each role is different,” Lambeth recalled. “I assumed that if I knew a little about each different area, I would have enough of an understanding to start my own company.” Within fashion, her internships included public relations and marketing, designing, writing for a magazine, styling and general operations.

Luna Mae

None of the internships were credited towards her degree and landing the positions outside of her field of study wasn’t easy. “For one of the internships, I turned up at their offices with just my CV and when I was told I would have to come back another time, I just sat in reception and waited until someone would see me,” she said. “I got the internship the following afternoon.” And because Lambeth was particularly obsessed with designing lingerie, she was determined to learn how to make the perfect bra.

“Because I haven’t studied design, I was self-taught, I used to pull apart bras to look at the under-workings and how could I make the straps more beautiful and how can I change the hook and eye and look at the cradle and that was a really big development process, it just came from me sort of tearing up bras.” She also spent time looking for the best suppliers of various bra components and would challenge them by asking what they could do to make each piece more comfortable and longer lasting. Lambeth also did extensive research on sizing and spoke to women about their own experiences with ill fitting bras. “It was a lengthy process but one that I really feel helps to set Luna Mae apart.” It took Lambeth two years of working non-stop through law school to perfect her vision.

Luna Mae

During that time, she was researching the lingerie industry and trying to understand what a customer’s journey was like when buying bras. “This is where I discovered the gap for a completely personalized service, which focused on making the woman feel celebrated and special and didn’t limit her to a standard bra size.” She also spent time visiting expert tailors to understand how their business operated. Incredibly, Lambeth was able to graduate with her law degree despite much of her time and focus being spent creating her brand, Luna Mae.

Claudia’s law school graduation photo Luna Mae

“Luckily, I had friends who took great notes on the actual lectures so I was still able to get through the degree!” Lambeth graduated in 2012 and launched Luna Mae in the U.S. three years later. Lambeth’s big break came after she visited Vogue Magazine in New York to introduce them to her new brand. One of the journalists Lambeth met during that visit recommended Luna Mae to a colleague who could not find a lingerie designer to make a custom bustier for her wedding gown. That recommendation landed Lambeth her first big client in the U.S. Lambeth’s client then presented the custom bustier to Valentino, who built the rest of her wedding dress around Lambeth’s design.

Claudia opening the Luna Mae boutique in Belgravia, London Luna Mae


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-18  Authors: jessi joseph
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lambeths, law, studying, swimsuits, sell, cost, 63000, bras, shes, lingerie, gave, 2300, luna, mae, lambeth, 22, age, fashion


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

SoftBank Vision Fund makes its first-ever investment in an energy company

SoftBank’s Vision Fund announced its first investment in an energy company on Thursday, marking a shift for the $100 billion fund that has made its name pouring money into big tech companies like Uber, WeWork and Slack. The Vision Fund said it completed a $110 million investment in Swiss start-up Energy Vault, which creates renewable energy storage products. Energy Vault’s system uses recycled concrete blocks built into a tower that can store and release energy. SoftBank’s Vision Fund, which lau


SoftBank’s Vision Fund announced its first investment in an energy company on Thursday, marking a shift for the $100 billion fund that has made its name pouring money into big tech companies like Uber, WeWork and Slack. The Vision Fund said it completed a $110 million investment in Swiss start-up Energy Vault, which creates renewable energy storage products. Energy Vault’s system uses recycled concrete blocks built into a tower that can store and release energy. SoftBank’s Vision Fund, which lau
SoftBank Vision Fund makes its first-ever investment in an energy company Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, energy, tech, vault, softbank, company, storage, cost, investment, fund, makes, companies, vision, billion, firstever


SoftBank Vision Fund makes its first-ever investment in an energy company

SoftBank’s Vision Fund announced its first investment in an energy company on Thursday, marking a shift for the $100 billion fund that has made its name pouring money into big tech companies like Uber, WeWork and Slack.

The Vision Fund said it completed a $110 million investment in Swiss start-up Energy Vault, which creates renewable energy storage products. Energy Vault’s system uses recycled concrete blocks built into a tower that can store and release energy.

“For the first time, we’ve got a cost point in economics with energy storage that enables renewables to be deployed below the cost of fossil fuel,” Energy Vault co-founder and CEO Robert Piconi told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” Thursday.

SoftBank’s Vision Fund, which launched in 2017, has disrupted the venture capital model by injecting billions of dollars into start-ups, driving up their valuations. The Fund said last week its operating profit had jumped 66% year-on-year in the last quarter, thanks to valuation increases companies like food delivery platform Doordash and Indian hotel-booking firm Oyo. It said its $66.3 billion investment in 81 tech firms is now worth $82.billion.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: elizabeth schulze
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, energy, tech, vault, softbank, company, storage, cost, investment, fund, makes, companies, vision, billion, firstever


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

It costs almost $80,000 to go to the most expensive college in the US—but here’s how much students actually pay

According to Statista and Business Insider , Harvey Mudd is the most expensive college in the country. Harvey Mudd College, in Claremont, California, is a small school of just 889 students. Harvey Mudd students can take classes at any of the consortium’s schools. The school claims that 29% of incoming first-year students qualify for merit-based aid and/or Harvey Mudd College National Merit Awards. The majority of the college’s students come from families in the top-earning bracket.


According to Statista and Business Insider , Harvey Mudd is the most expensive college in the country. Harvey Mudd College, in Claremont, California, is a small school of just 889 students. Harvey Mudd students can take classes at any of the consortium’s schools. The school claims that 29% of incoming first-year students qualify for merit-based aid and/or Harvey Mudd College National Merit Awards. The majority of the college’s students come from families in the top-earning bracket.
It costs almost $80,000 to go to the most expensive college in the US—but here’s how much students actually pay Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, costs, harvey, usbut, school, pay, making, mudd, colleges, net, average, expensive, actually, cost, students, heres, college, 80000, aid


It costs almost $80,000 to go to the most expensive college in the US—but here's how much students actually pay

According to Statista and Business Insider , Harvey Mudd is the most expensive college in the country. But Harvey Mudd also graduates the highest-earning alumni in the country, and many of the college’s students end up paying far less than the sky-high sticker price.

According to Harvey Mudd , the total cost of attendance for the 2019-2020 school year is $79,539, including $58,359 for tuition, $10,234 for a double dorm room, $8,445 for a 16-meals-per-week meal plan, $1,400 for personal expenses, $800 for books and supplies and $301 to cover a student body fee. Entering first-year and transfer students also must pay an additional $250 orientation fee.

Harvey Mudd College, in Claremont, California, is a small school of just 889 students. The school is known for its strong science, engineering and mathematics programs, for its high-earning alumni and for being one of the most expensive schools in the country.

Room & Board: $13,858Harvey Mudd College is a liberal arts institution in Claremont, Calif. The average cost of attendance for 2011-2012 is Of that amount, $13,858 covers room and board.The school is one of seven members of the Claremont Colleges consortium, which also includes Claremont McKenna and Pomona colleges. Harvey Mudd students can take classes at any of the consortium’s schools.

When PayScale analyzed 2,646 associate and bachelor’s degree-granting institutions throughout the U.S., they found that Harvey Mudd alumni earn an average of $85,600 five years into their careers, and $157,400 10 years into their careers.

Additionally, Harvey Mudd aims to meet 100% of demonstrated financial need and about 73% of students receive some kind of financial assistance in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and/or work-study. The average financial aid award is $42,080.

The school reports that nearly half (48%) of students receive need-based aid. Interested students can estimate how much attending Harvey Mudd will cost them by using the school’s net price calculator.

The net price for each student varies further by family income. Here is the average net price, generated by subtracting the average amount of federal, state, local or institutional aid from the total cost of attendance, for Harvey Mudd students during the 2017 – 2018 school year by income bracket, according to the Department of Education:

Families making less than $30,000: $23,837

Families making between $30,001 and $48,000: $13,571

Families making between $48,001 and $75,000: $22,469

Families making between $75,001 and $110,000: $20,701

Families making over $110,001: $49,247

These net costs are impacted by merit aid. The school claims that 29% of incoming first-year students qualify for merit-based aid and/or Harvey Mudd College National Merit Awards. The majority of the college’s students come from families in the top-earning bracket.

The New York Times reports that the median family income of a student from Harvey Mudd is $145,400, and 68% come from the highest-earning 20% of American households.

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!

Don’t miss:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, costs, harvey, usbut, school, pay, making, mudd, colleges, net, average, expensive, actually, cost, students, heres, college, 80000, aid


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Netflix just spent $200 million for ‘Game of Thrones’ creators, but the cost could be greater

Executive Creators and Producers of “Game of Thrones”, David Benioff, George R. R. Martin and D.B Weiss attend the “Game Of Thrones” Season 8 NY Premiere on April 3, 2019 in New York City. Jeff Kravitz | FilmMagic, Inc | Getty Images”Game of Thrones” showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are leaving HBO for a $200 million paycheck from rival streaming service Netflix. These costs come as Netflix is expected to report $20.2 billion in revenue in 2019, according to analysts surveyed by Refiniti


Executive Creators and Producers of “Game of Thrones”, David Benioff, George R. R. Martin and D.B Weiss attend the “Game Of Thrones” Season 8 NY Premiere on April 3, 2019 in New York City. Jeff Kravitz | FilmMagic, Inc | Getty Images”Game of Thrones” showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are leaving HBO for a $200 million paycheck from rival streaming service Netflix. These costs come as Netflix is expected to report $20.2 billion in revenue in 2019, according to analysts surveyed by Refiniti
Netflix just spent $200 million for ‘Game of Thrones’ creators, but the cost could be greater Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, game, creators, spent, 200, tv, cimino, greater, billion, netflix, million, thrones, weiss, benioff, worth, cost


Netflix just spent $200 million for 'Game of Thrones' creators, but the cost could be greater

Executive Creators and Producers of “Game of Thrones”, David Benioff, George R. R. Martin and D.B Weiss attend the “Game Of Thrones” Season 8 NY Premiere on April 3, 2019 in New York City. Jeff Kravitz | FilmMagic, Inc | Getty Images

“Game of Thrones” showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss are leaving HBO for a $200 million paycheck from rival streaming service Netflix. The deal is one of many that Netflix has made in the last year to bring in top-tier talent to make TV shows and films exclusive to the platform to better compete with rival streaming services like Hulu and Amazon Prime as well as up-and-coming ones like Disney+ and Comcast’s yet-to-be-named service. However, analysts wonder if these deals are worth the money for Netflix. Netflix has been burning through cash for the last decade, signing names like Guillermo del Toro ( “Shape of Water”), Ryan Murphy (“Glee”) and Shonda Rhimes (“Grey’s Anatomy”). Last year, Netflix shelled out more than $12 billion to purchase, license and produce content. This year, that figure will rise to $15 billion. It will spend $2.9 billion more on marketing. These costs come as Netflix is expected to report $20.2 billion in revenue in 2019, according to analysts surveyed by Refinitiv.

While Benioff and Weiss were the shepherds of the Emmy Award-winning “Game of Thrones,” there has been criticism about their writing on the show in later seasons, when the pair no longer had author George R. R. Martin’s source material to work from. “Either [Benioff and Weiss] are the next Steven Spielberg or they are the next Michael Cimino,” Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter said. While Spielberg has continued to thrive in the industry, Cimino famously wrote and directed “Heaven’s Gate,” a film that flopped so badly at the box office it caused Transamerica to shutter its film production and sell its studio to MGM. This was just two years after Cimino made the Academy Award-winning “Deer Hunter.” “I’d say somewhere in between,” Pachter said. “They might be good enough to justify the price, but they might not be. Remember, they still have to produce something, and if it’s not great, it isn’t worth it.” And that’s been an issue for Netflix. While someone like Murphy, whom they paid a reported $300 million for a five-year contract, has said he has 10 greenlit projects in the pipeline for Netflix — three documentaries, four TV shows and three movies — only one has been given a release date. “The Politician” is an eight-episode show about the lengths the super rich will go to stay on top, including paying to get their children into elite colleges. The show, whose premise predates the college cheating scandal, is due out at the end of September.

“Stranger Things” season three picks up in the summer of 1985. The Hawkins crew are on the cusp of adulthood and faced with enemies old and new. Netflix


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, game, creators, spent, 200, tv, cimino, greater, billion, netflix, million, thrones, weiss, benioff, worth, cost


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Christmas in August: What you should buy now as trade tensions heat up

Kamil Krzaczynski | ReutersIt’s time to shop — not only for back to school, but for Christmas. (Exactly how those higher prices are passed on depends on a number of factors, including whether suppliers absorb the additional cost, source production in another country or increase prices.) “This round is much more consumer-focused,” said Katheryn Russ, a University of California, Davis, professor of economics and specialist in international trade. In all, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and re


Kamil Krzaczynski | ReutersIt’s time to shop — not only for back to school, but for Christmas. (Exactly how those higher prices are passed on depends on a number of factors, including whether suppliers absorb the additional cost, source production in another country or increase prices.) “This round is much more consumer-focused,” said Katheryn Russ, a University of California, Davis, professor of economics and specialist in international trade. In all, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and re
Christmas in August: What you should buy now as trade tensions heat up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prices, start, tariffs, billion, cost, buy, american, higher, trade, tensions, university, costs, consumers, heat, christmas


Christmas in August: What you should buy now as trade tensions heat up

An employee works on a display ahead of Black Friday at a Walmart store in Chicago, November 20, 2018. Kamil Krzaczynski | Reuters

It’s time to shop — not only for back to school, but for Christmas. President Donald Trump’s latest threat to slap elevated tariffs on a widening selection of Chinese products could mean American shoppers will face higher prices throughout the fall and into the holidays. Tariffs on goods traded between the U.S. and China have already increased in several stages since early 2018. Now, Trump has announced another round of tariffs on the roughly $300 billion of Chinese goods that had not already been targeted by American levies. The charge will take effect from Sept. 1. That is in addition to the 25% tariff Trump imposed in May (up from his original proposal of 10%) on another $200 billion worth of Chinese imports. The president has said that China will bear the brunt of the costs from the tariffs, yet experts say the burden will land squarely on U.S. consumers. (Exactly how those higher prices are passed on depends on a number of factors, including whether suppliers absorb the additional cost, source production in another country or increase prices.)

As of the latest tally, the new tariffs will mean higher prices on consumer staples, such as clothing, shoes, toys and household appliances, including toasters, coffee makers, irons, microwave ovens and hair dryers. “This round is much more consumer-focused,” said Katheryn Russ, a University of California, Davis, professor of economics and specialist in international trade. And once implemented, “price increases should start filtering through from mid-October.”

Price increases should start filtering through from mid-October. Katheryn Russ professor of economics at the University of California, Davis

A report prepared for National Retail Federation found the proposed new round of tariffs would cost Americans $4.4 billion each year for apparel, $3.7 billion for toys, $2.5 billion for footwear and $1.6 billion for household appliances. “These additional tariffs will only threaten U.S. jobs and raise costs for American families on everyday goods,” said David French, senior vice president of government relations at the NRF. They will also hit hardest on lower-income households, who spend a much larger percentage of their income on these staples, he said. “Tariffs are a very regressive form of taxation,” he said. “The supply chain will try to absorb as much of the blow as they can, then they will move those costs forward to consumers.” In preparation, retailers are stocking up on merchandise. Imports at the nation’s major container ports are near record high levels this summer, according to the NRF’s monthly Global Port Tracker report. However, French said, “you can only have so much inventory.” It’s more likely that consumers will end up shouldering most, if not all, of the added costs, he added. More from Personal Finance:

Coming soon to a store near you: more expensive items

How to take control of your spending and start saving

Are you afraid of running out of money? When tariffs were imposed on imported washing machines last year, U.S. manufacturers responded to reduced competition from imports by raising their prices, and as a result, more than the full amount of the tariff was passed on in the way of higher prices. “U.S. consumers paid 125% to 225% more,” French said, referring to a working paper co-authored by Ali Hortacsu and Felix Tintelnot of the University of Chicago and Federal Reserve Board economist Aaron Flaaen. In all, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and researchers at Princeton and Columbia universities conservatively estimated that U.S. tariffs cost American consumers at least $6.9 billion last year. A separate report from Oxford Economics estimated that tariffs could cost every American household about $800.

Buy what you can now, then buy less


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-09  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prices, start, tariffs, billion, cost, buy, american, higher, trade, tensions, university, costs, consumers, heat, christmas


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post