Stocks rise as US and China reportedly get closer to trade deal

U.S. stock index futures rose on Monday on a report that U.S. and China are getting close to a trade deal. The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday that China had proposed to bring down duties on certain American goods in an attempt to strike a deal with the Trump administration. The Trump administration touted last week significant progress being made in U.S. negotiations with China. However, The New York Times said in another report that the trade deal being discussed would do little to address


U.S. stock index futures rose on Monday on a report that U.S. and China are getting close to a trade deal. The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday that China had proposed to bring down duties on certain American goods in an attempt to strike a deal with the Trump administration. The Trump administration touted last week significant progress being made in U.S. negotiations with China. However, The New York Times said in another report that the trade deal being discussed would do little to address
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: fred imbert, silvia amaro
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Stocks rise as US and China reportedly get closer to trade deal

U.S. stock index futures rose on Monday on a report that U.S. and China are getting close to a trade deal.

At around 7 a.m. ET, Dow Jones Industrial Average futures were up 65 points, indicating a gain of more than 70 points at the open. Futures on the S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 were also higher.

The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday that China had proposed to bring down duties on certain American goods in an attempt to strike a deal with the Trump administration. The same report suggested both countries are at the final stage of their negotiations, which could see the country’s leaders meeting at a special summit to sign a trade deal soon.

“Markets expect a deal by the end of March, but the key here will be whether the deal results in the removal of all tariffs,” said Tom Essaye, founder of The Sevens Report. “The reports this morning imply that might happen, but it will have to become reality for US-China trade to provide a sustainable positive catalyst for stocks.”

The Trump administration touted last week significant progress being made in U.S. negotiations with China. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNBC on Thursday the two sides were getting closer to a deal. White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow also told CNBC “the progress [between the two countries] has been terrific.”

However, The New York Times said in another report that the trade deal being discussed would do little to address key structural issues. These include efforts by the Chinese to curb cybertheft and subsidies the Trump administration argues make it harder for U.S. companies to do business in China.

Shares of global trade bellwethers Caterpillar, Boeing and Deere were all up in the premarket.

The back-and-forth on trade between the two countries has sent ripples through financial markets since last year, with investors fretting how tighter trade conditions could impact corporate profits.

On the economic front, there will be construction spending figures out at 10 a.m. ET.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-04  Authors: fred imbert, silvia amaro
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Timeline: India and Pakistan’s latest confrontation over Kashmir

Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Feb. 20: India halted an important bus service between Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, and Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, without explanation. The Line of Control is the de-facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir. Pakistan’s Khan then called for talks with India and said he hoped “


Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. Feb. 20: India halted an important bus service between Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, and Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, without explanation. The Line of Control is the de-facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir. Pakistan’s Khan then called for talks with India and said he hoped “
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Timeline: India and Pakistan's latest confrontation over Kashmir

Tensions between nuclear rivals India and Pakistan flared up this week after both sides carried out tit-for-tat air strikes and shot down each other’s fighter jets, prompting global concerns over a potential outbreak of war in South Asia. Pakistan said it also captured an Indian pilot who was released on Friday as a gesture of peace towards New Delhi from Islamabad.

The mountainous region of Kashmir has been a source of conflict between the two countries since their independence from British colonial rule in 1947.

Jammu and Kashmir was a former princely state where a large number of people were killed and others were driven away by the violence during the partition. Since then, India and Pakistan have fought multiple wars over the region — both countries claim the region in full but control only parts of it. This has led to innumerable conflicts between the two countries.

While this week’s escalation appears to be cooling for now, here is a timeline of how the events unfolded over the last two weeks.

Feb. 14: A suicide bomber rammed a car into a bus carrying Indian paramilitary police in Kashmir, killing more than 40 in what was described as one of the deadliest attacks on security forces in the region in decades.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted that “a befitting reply will be given to the perpetrators of the heinous attack and their patrons.”

Feb. 15: A Pakistan-based terror group, Jaish-e-Mohammed, claimed responsibility for the attack.

Pakistan’s foreign ministry said it has “always condemned heightened acts of violence” in Kashmir but it strongly rejected “any insinuation by elements in the Indian government and media circles that seek to link the attack to the State of Pakistan without investigations.”

India’s Ministry of External Affairs said Jaish-E-Mohammed and its leadership are located in Pakistan. “(They) cannot claim that it is unaware of their presence and their activities. They have not taken any action against these groups despite international demands,” the official spokesperson said.

Feb. 16: Indian Finance Minister Arun Jaitley tweeted New Delhi withdrew Pakistan’s “most favored nation” status, which is usually given to countries receiving certain trade advantages such as low tariffs. Following that, basic customs duty on Pakistani exports to India were raised to 200 percent, he said.

Feb. 18: Nine people, including four Indian soldiers and a policeman, were killed during a gun battle in India-controlled Kashmir, further escalating tensions between the two countries. Reports said the operation targeted a residential area said to be a hideout for suspected militants.

Feb. 19: Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan offered India assistance to investigate the suicide bombing but he warned that his country will retaliate against any acts of aggression from New Delhi. India dismissed Khan’s offer, citing previous terror attacks in Mumbai and an airbase.

Feb. 20: India halted an important bus service between Srinagar, the capital of India-controlled Kashmir, and Muzaffarabad, the capital of the Pakistan-controlled Kashmir, without explanation.

Feb. 23—24: New Delhi stepped up its crackdown in Kashmir by detaining more than 160 separatists, reports said. Five people were killed as Indian security forces clashed with members of a Pakistani militant group in the disputed region.

Feb. 26: India said its air force conducted strikes against a Jaish-e-Mohammed training base at Balakot in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province and that the attack killed a “very large number” of terrorists, trainers and senior commanders. Pakistan denied there were any casualties from that attack and said the strikes missed any targets.

Pakistan’s foreign ministry said the “Indian aggression was a threat to regional peace and stability and would get a befitting response by Pakistan at a time and place of its choosing.”

Feb. 27: Pakistani media reported that Khan chaired a meeting of the National Command Authority, the body that oversees the country’s nuclear warheads.

Pakistan said its air force carried out strikes across the so-called Line of Control to demonstrate its “right, will and capability for self defense.” The Line of Control is the de-facto border between the Indian and Pakistani parts of Kashmir.

A spokesman for the Pakistani armed forces said Indian planes entered its air space and two jets were shot down. One of the aircraft fell on India’s side of Kashmir while the second came down in Pakistani territory, and its pilot was captured.

India’s foreign ministry acknowledged that a pilot was missing and a combat jet had been lost. The ministry spokesperson also claimed a Pakistani jet had been shot down in the altercation.

Then, a video emerged of a man identified by Islamabad identified as the captured Indian pilot.

India also said it handed over a dossier to its counterpart with specific details of Jaish-e-Mohammed’s role in the Feb. 14 terror attack and their presence in Pakistan.

Pakistan’s Khan then called for talks with India and said he hoped “better sense” would prevail to de-escalate the situation.

Feb. 28: Khan told his parliament that Pakistan will release the captured Indian pilot the next day as a “peace gesture” towards India.

The move was welcomed by the chiefs of India’s three armed forces during a joint press conference Thursday evening — but they would not say if New Delhi considered the return a de-escalation in the conflict.

Mar. 1: Pakistan handed over Wing Commander Abhinanda to India at the Wagah border crossing between the two countries.

— Reuters contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-01  Authors: saheli roy choudhury, saqib majeed, sopa images, lightrocket, getty images
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The US is no longer threatening to jack up tariffs on China, the clearest sign a trade deal is close

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said Wednesday the U.S. is working towards formally abandoning plans to hike tariffs on Chinese goods from 10 percent to 25 percent, according to the Wall Street Journal. The report said those plans would be shelved as long as the two countries continue talking, marking the clearest signal that a trade deal between them could be on the horizon. Originally, the U.S. planned on hiking tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods if a deal could not be


U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said Wednesday the U.S. is working towards formally abandoning plans to hike tariffs on Chinese goods from 10 percent to 25 percent, according to the Wall Street Journal. The report said those plans would be shelved as long as the two countries continue talking, marking the clearest signal that a trade deal between them could be on the horizon. Originally, the U.S. planned on hiking tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods if a deal could not be
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The US is no longer threatening to jack up tariffs on China, the clearest sign a trade deal is close

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said Wednesday the U.S. is working towards formally abandoning plans to hike tariffs on Chinese goods from 10 percent to 25 percent, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The report said those plans would be shelved as long as the two countries continue talking, marking the clearest signal that a trade deal between them could be on the horizon.

Originally, the U.S. planned on hiking tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods if a deal could not be reached by 12:01 a.m. on Saturday.

The Journal said Lighthizer made those remarks following his testimony to the House Ways and Means Committee. Lighthizer testified that China needs to do more than just buy additional U.S. goods for the two countries to strike a trade deal.

He also testified that “much still needs to be done both before an agreement is reached and, more importantly, after it is reached, if one is reached.”

Click here to read the Journal’s full report.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


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The battle over 5G and Huawei is the biggest test yet for Trump’s approach for China

It also marks the most significant test yet for the Trump administration’s shift in China policy to strategic competition from strategic engagement. The significance of the challenge is a result of three issues: the game-changing nature of 5G technology, the rapid growth of Huawei and the dearth in many parts of the world of ready alternatives. Being first in 4G wireless technology allowed the U.S. to dominate mobile platforms from Facebook to Netflix. U.S. officials believe that the sheer speed


It also marks the most significant test yet for the Trump administration’s shift in China policy to strategic competition from strategic engagement. The significance of the challenge is a result of three issues: the game-changing nature of 5G technology, the rapid growth of Huawei and the dearth in many parts of the world of ready alternatives. Being first in 4G wireless technology allowed the U.S. to dominate mobile platforms from Facebook to Netflix. U.S. officials believe that the sheer speed
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The battle over 5G and Huawei is the biggest test yet for Trump's approach for China

The escalating U.S. global offensive against China’s Huawei – the world’s largest telecom equipment provider and second largest mobile phone manufacturer – provides an unsettling glimpse into the messy, high-stakes multibillion-dollar future of U.S.-Chinese great power competition.

It also marks the most significant test yet for the Trump administration’s shift in China policy to strategic competition from strategic engagement.

Both Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo were in Europe last week, which lies at the heart of the tech contest with China. Mentioning Huawei by name at the Munich Security Conference, the vice president called “on all security partners to be vigilant and to reject any enterprise that would compromise the integrity of our communications technology or our national security systems.”

To win this particular battle, the U.S. will have to play the long game, engage in painstaking global diplomacy and rediscover NATO and the European Union not as distasteful multilateral institutions but instead as crucial instruments of influence. It must deploy carrots where sticks fail, conjure innovative tech alternatives to China’s market lead, and play the unfamiliar role of underdog in places where Beijing has won the upper hand – and dominant market share.

It wasn’t so long ago that it was mostly telecom geeks and tech traders who enthused about the revolutionary nature of next generation 5G wireless technology as the world-changing platform to support everything from autonomous vehicles and life-saving medical devices to just-on-time manufacturing and fatally precise military drones.

However, what began as a scientific and commercial contest now has evolved into a technological arms race. American legislators, Western intelligence officers and even four-star generals are raising the alarm that America and its allies have fallen perilously behind in developing 5G, whose security implications are both far-reaching and generational.

“If China controls the digital infrastructure of the 21st century, it will exploit this position for national security purposes and be capable of coercive leverage over the United States and its allies,” writes General James L. Jones, former U.S. national security advisor and NATO supreme allied commander, in a recently-released Atlantic Council Strategic Insights Memo.

The significance of the challenge is a result of three issues: the game-changing nature of 5G technology, the rapid growth of Huawei and the dearth in many parts of the world of ready alternatives.

Being first in 4G wireless technology allowed the U.S. to dominate mobile platforms from Facebook to Netflix. In a report commissioned by the wireless trade association CTIA, Roger Entner from the telecom research company Recon Analytics reckons that position brought the U.S. $125 billion in revenues and expanded wireless-related jobs to 4.6 million from 2.5 million.

First-mover advantage in 5G will have far more dramatic consequences, due to the exponential growth of objects that would be connected to the internet. Entner has said that while 4G could connect 2,000 devices in a square kilometer, 5G will be able to seamlessly connect a million. U.S. officials believe that the sheer speed and countless military applications of 5G make the risk of using any Chinese equipment in a 5G network too high.

The problem is that Huawei’s reach is so broad and global that a U.S. offensive could slow it and even block it in some countries, but will be unlikely to turn it back. The danger is growing of two spheres of tech influence, with many Huawei customers arguing that the Chinese are offering far better prices, with direct and indirect subsidies, while providing better service and fielding more advanced equipment. The company now has 180,000 employees in 170 countries, 80,000 of whom are working in research and development. It counts 45 of the world’s biggest 50 wireless carries as customers.

For any country to remove Huawei from its current networks or ban it from 5G development would be costly both in money and time – sometimes in the billions of the dollars and at the expense of delaying 5G deployment for as long as two years. In Europe, Huawei has gone from a standing start a decade ago to controlling a third of the European market and, in some countries, controlling more than 70 percent of the market.

Jones spent most of the last month warning of the Chinese 5G perils in Europe – where much of the U.S. effort has focused due to the fact that its countries are closest to launching 5G networks. He tells his interlocutors this contest is too existential to be measured in money and time.

“This race, and its outcome,” he says, “rises to the level of importance of such projects as the Manhattan Project and the ‘man-on-the-moon’ efforts of the 20th century. For countries who select the Chinese alternative and the consequences attendant to such a decision, the costs of reversal will increase exponentially as they proceed.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-23  Authors: fred kempe, lluis gene, afp, getty images
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The battle over 5G and Huawei is the biggest test yet for Trump’s approach for China

It also marks the most significant test yet for the Trump administration’s shift in China policy to strategic competition from strategic engagement. The significance of the challenge is a result of three issues: the game-changing nature of 5G technology, the rapid growth of Huawei and the dearth in many parts of the world of ready alternatives. Being first in 4G wireless technology allowed the U.S. to dominate mobile platforms from Facebook to Netflix. U.S. officials believe that the sheer speed


It also marks the most significant test yet for the Trump administration’s shift in China policy to strategic competition from strategic engagement. The significance of the challenge is a result of three issues: the game-changing nature of 5G technology, the rapid growth of Huawei and the dearth in many parts of the world of ready alternatives. Being first in 4G wireless technology allowed the U.S. to dominate mobile platforms from Facebook to Netflix. U.S. officials believe that the sheer speed
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-23  Authors: fred kempe, lluis gene, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, battle, trumps, wireless, technology, biggest, china, huawei, security, chinese, strategic, approach, countries, telecom, test, tech, 5g


The battle over 5G and Huawei is the biggest test yet for Trump's approach for China

The escalating U.S. global offensive against China’s Huawei – the world’s largest telecom equipment provider and second largest mobile phone manufacturer – provides an unsettling glimpse into the messy, high-stakes multibillion-dollar future of U.S.-Chinese great power competition.

It also marks the most significant test yet for the Trump administration’s shift in China policy to strategic competition from strategic engagement.

Both Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo were in Europe last week, which lies at the heart of the tech contest with China. Mentioning Huawei by name at the Munich Security Conference, the vice president called “on all security partners to be vigilant and to reject any enterprise that would compromise the integrity of our communications technology or our national security systems.”

To win this particular battle, the U.S. will have to play the long game, engage in painstaking global diplomacy and rediscover NATO and the European Union not as distasteful multilateral institutions but instead as crucial instruments of influence. It must deploy carrots where sticks fail, conjure innovative tech alternatives to China’s market lead, and play the unfamiliar role of underdog in places where Beijing has won the upper hand – and dominant market share.

It wasn’t so long ago that it was mostly telecom geeks and tech traders who enthused about the revolutionary nature of next generation 5G wireless technology as the world-changing platform to support everything from autonomous vehicles and life-saving medical devices to just-on-time manufacturing and fatally precise military drones.

However, what began as a scientific and commercial contest now has evolved into a technological arms race. American legislators, Western intelligence officers and even four-star generals are raising the alarm that America and its allies have fallen perilously behind in developing 5G, whose security implications are both far-reaching and generational.

“If China controls the digital infrastructure of the 21st century, it will exploit this position for national security purposes and be capable of coercive leverage over the United States and its allies,” writes General James L. Jones, former U.S. national security advisor and NATO supreme allied commander, in a recently-released Atlantic Council Strategic Insights Memo.

The significance of the challenge is a result of three issues: the game-changing nature of 5G technology, the rapid growth of Huawei and the dearth in many parts of the world of ready alternatives.

Being first in 4G wireless technology allowed the U.S. to dominate mobile platforms from Facebook to Netflix. In a report commissioned by the wireless trade association CTIA, Roger Entner from the telecom research company Recon Analytics reckons that position brought the U.S. $125 billion in revenues and expanded wireless-related jobs to 4.6 million from 2.5 million.

First-mover advantage in 5G will have far more dramatic consequences, due to the exponential growth of objects that would be connected to the internet. Entner has said that while 4G could connect 2,000 devices in a square kilometer, 5G will be able to seamlessly connect a million. U.S. officials believe that the sheer speed and countless military applications of 5G make the risk of using any Chinese equipment in a 5G network too high.

The problem is that Huawei’s reach is so broad and global that a U.S. offensive could slow it and even block it in some countries, but will be unlikely to turn it back. The danger is growing of two spheres of tech influence, with many Huawei customers arguing that the Chinese are offering far better prices, with direct and indirect subsidies, while providing better service and fielding more advanced equipment. The company now has 180,000 employees in 170 countries, 80,000 of whom are working in research and development. It counts 45 of the world’s biggest 50 wireless carries as customers.

For any country to remove Huawei from its current networks or ban it from 5G development would be costly both in money and time – sometimes in the billions of the dollars and at the expense of delaying 5G deployment for as long as two years. In Europe, Huawei has gone from a standing start a decade ago to controlling a third of the European market and, in some countries, controlling more than 70 percent of the market.

Jones spent most of the last month warning of the Chinese 5G perils in Europe – where much of the U.S. effort has focused due to the fact that its countries are closest to launching 5G networks. He tells his interlocutors this contest is too existential to be measured in money and time.

“This race, and its outcome,” he says, “rises to the level of importance of such projects as the Manhattan Project and the ‘man-on-the-moon’ efforts of the 20th century. For countries who select the Chinese alternative and the consequences attendant to such a decision, the costs of reversal will increase exponentially as they proceed.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-23  Authors: fred kempe, lluis gene, afp, getty images
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A trade deal may not be ‘priced in’ yet as study shows S&P 500 should be 11% higher

But stocks are up sharply this year in part because of perceived progress in the trade talks. U.S. trade negotiators met with Chinese officials in Beijing last week and negotiations continue this week in Washington. Reuters reported earlier on Thursday the two countries are outlining commitments in principle on the stickiest issues in their trade dispute. Perceived progress in U.S.-China trade talks are one of the factors cited by investors for the big move higher. Reports earlier on Thursday sa


But stocks are up sharply this year in part because of perceived progress in the trade talks. U.S. trade negotiators met with Chinese officials in Beijing last week and negotiations continue this week in Washington. Reuters reported earlier on Thursday the two countries are outlining commitments in principle on the stickiest issues in their trade dispute. Perceived progress in U.S.-China trade talks are one of the factors cited by investors for the big move higher. Reports earlier on Thursday sa
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A trade deal may not be 'priced in' yet as study shows S&P 500 should be 11% higher

China and the U.S. have slapped tariffs on billions of dollars worth of each other’s goods. Investors around the globe have been fretting over this as tariffs can have a significant impact on corporate profits. The two countries have until early March to strike a deal to end the trade skirmish or additional U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods could take effect.

But stocks are up sharply this year in part because of perceived progress in the trade talks. The S&P 500 is up more than 10 percent in 2019. The index has also posted weekly gains in seven of the past eight weeks.

U.S. trade negotiators met with Chinese officials in Beijing last week and negotiations continue this week in Washington. Reuters reported earlier on Thursday the two countries are outlining commitments in principle on the stickiest issues in their trade dispute.

“With the market off its lows, a popular view is that the equity market has priced in all the good news already,” Dutta said. “We are skeptical; the equity market only partially retraced the losses associated with trade tensions.”

Perceived progress in U.S.-China trade talks are one of the factors cited by investors for the big move higher. Reports earlier on Thursday said negotiators from the two countries are outlining commitments in principle on the stickiest issues in their trade dispute.

WATCH: Art Cashin says we’re back to worrying about China


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Putin threatens to target the US if it deploys new missiles in Europe

President Vladimir Putin warned of a resolute response if the U.S. decides to station missiles in neighboring countries to Russia. However, he said Russia would respond to any deployment of new intermediate-range missiles in Europe by targeting the United States itself and not just the countries were they were held, according to a Reuters translation. He said he would field new weapons that would target U.S. decision-making centers. He warned U.S. policymakers, some of whom he said were obsessed


President Vladimir Putin warned of a resolute response if the U.S. decides to station missiles in neighboring countries to Russia. However, he said Russia would respond to any deployment of new intermediate-range missiles in Europe by targeting the United States itself and not just the countries were they were held, according to a Reuters translation. He said he would field new weapons that would target U.S. decision-making centers. He warned U.S. policymakers, some of whom he said were obsessed
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Putin threatens to target the US if it deploys new missiles in Europe

President Vladimir Putin warned of a resolute response if the U.S. decides to station missiles in neighboring countries to Russia.

Putin, at his annual address to parliament on Wednesday, said his country would not seek confrontation and would not take the first step in deploying missiles after the suspension of the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty.

However, he said Russia would respond to any deployment of new intermediate-range missiles in Europe by targeting the United States itself and not just the countries were they were held, according to a Reuters translation. He said he would field new weapons that would target U.S. decision-making centers.

He warned U.S. policymakers, some of whom he said were obsessed with U.S. exceptionalism, about being careful before taking new measures.

“It’s their right to think how they want. But can they count? I’m sure they can. Let them count the speed and the range of the weapons systems we are developing,” Putin said to applause, according to Reuters.

“Russia will be forced to create and deploy types of weapons which can be used not only in respect of those territories from which the direct threat to us originates, but also in respect of those territories where the centers of decision-making are located.”


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Putin threatens to target US if it deploys missiles in nearby European countries

Let them count the speed and the range of the weapons systems we are developing,” Putin said to applause, according to Reuters. The next day, Putin reacted by also halting his country’s obligations to the treaty. On Wednesday, Putin rejected the U.S. claim that its withdrawal from the treaty was prompted by Russian violations, according to an Associated Press translation. The White House and the U.S. Department of Defense didn’t immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment. WATCH: NATO call


Let them count the speed and the range of the weapons systems we are developing,” Putin said to applause, according to Reuters. The next day, Putin reacted by also halting his country’s obligations to the treaty. On Wednesday, Putin rejected the U.S. claim that its withdrawal from the treaty was prompted by Russian violations, according to an Associated Press translation. The White House and the U.S. Department of Defense didn’t immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment. WATCH: NATO call
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Putin threatens to target US if it deploys missiles in nearby European countries

“It’s their right to think how they want. But can they count? I’m sure they can. Let them count the speed and the range of the weapons systems we are developing,” Putin said to applause, according to Reuters.

“Russia will be forced to create and deploy types of weapons which can be used not only in respect of those territories from which the direct threat to us originates, but also in respect of those territories where the centers of decision-making are located.”

In early February, the U.S. confirmed it would suspend its participation in the decades-old INF treaty, which bans ground-launched medium-range missiles with a range of 310 to 3,400 miles. The U.S. administration said it had taken the measure following Russia’s refusal to accept that its SSC-8 missile directly contravenes the Cold War-era agreement.

The next day, Putin reacted by also halting his country’s obligations to the treaty. Speaking to media that day, Putin said Russia would provide a “mirror like response” to the U.S. by engaging in fresh research and development for nuclear missile technology but would not “get involved in a costly arms race.”

On Wednesday, Putin rejected the U.S. claim that its withdrawal from the treaty was prompted by Russian violations, according to an Associated Press translation. He claimed that the U.S. had made false accusations to justify its decision to opt out of the pact and said the U.S. had breached the treaty itself.

He concluded by saying Russia would always make sure it is secure. He said the country would be ready for further talks on arms control but would not keep knocking on a locked door.

The White House and the U.S. Department of Defense didn’t immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

WATCH: NATO calls on Russia to comply with missile treaty


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-20  Authors: matt clinch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respect, range, treaty, territories, putin, countries, sure, target, day, russia, european, missile, deploys, nearby, threatens, weapons, missiles


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US Treasury yields lower amid US-China trade talks

U.S. government debt prices rose on Tuesday as investors awaited details from the latest round of U.S.-China trade talks. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note slipped to 3.661 percent, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond fell to 3.993 percent. Fixed income traders turned their attention to the latest session of trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing. The White House said Monday that a new session of trade discussions would take place Tuesday, with higher level tal


U.S. government debt prices rose on Tuesday as investors awaited details from the latest round of U.S.-China trade talks. The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note slipped to 3.661 percent, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond fell to 3.993 percent. Fixed income traders turned their attention to the latest session of trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing. The White House said Monday that a new session of trade discussions would take place Tuesday, with higher level tal
US Treasury yields lower amid US-China trade talks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yield, talks, yields, later, policy, session, traders, trade, latest, countries, uschina, treasury, chinese, lower, amid


US Treasury yields lower amid US-China trade talks

U.S. government debt prices rose on Tuesday as investors awaited details from the latest round of U.S.-China trade talks.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note slipped to 3.661 percent, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond fell to 3.993 percent. Bond yields move inversely to prices.

Fixed income traders turned their attention to the latest session of trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing. The White House said Monday that a new session of trade discussions would take place Tuesday, with higher level talks due later this week.

Tensions between the two countries have heightened as they attempt to strike a deal to prevent any further escalation in tariffs. China on Monday accused the U.S. of blocking its industrial development by claiming Chinese mobile gear could pose a cybersecurity threat to countries rolling out next-generation 5G networks.

Washington has been putting particular pressure on Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications giant, and is attempting to extradite Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou over charges of bank and wire fraud to violate Iran sanctions. The company’s founder Ren Zhengfei — who is also Meng’s father — labelled the move “politically motivated” in an interview with the BBC Monday.

Elsewhere, traders will be on the lookout for the NAHB housing market index on Tuesday, and are anticipating minutes from the Federal Reserve’s latest policy meeting and other economic data later in the week.

Meanwhile Cleveland Fed President Loretta Mester is due to give a speech about the economy and monetary policy at Newark, Delaware, on Tuesday.

In auctions news, $45 billion in 13-week Treasury bills and $39 billion in 26-week Treasury bills will be auctioned on Tuesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yield, talks, yields, later, policy, session, traders, trade, latest, countries, uschina, treasury, chinese, lower, amid


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A ‘no-deal’ Brexit could hit 100,000 German jobs, study claims

A U.K. exit from the European Union (EU) with no pre-arranged deal could affect more than 100,000 jobs in Germany, according to a new academic study. Researchers assumed that British imports from the European Union would collapse by 25 percent following a contract-free exit. At that decline, the authors estimated around 612,000 employed people in 43 countries around the world would be affected. They then estimated that, in- terms of overall employment, Germany would be the worst hit of all the c


A U.K. exit from the European Union (EU) with no pre-arranged deal could affect more than 100,000 jobs in Germany, according to a new academic study. Researchers assumed that British imports from the European Union would collapse by 25 percent following a contract-free exit. At that decline, the authors estimated around 612,000 employed people in 43 countries around the world would be affected. They then estimated that, in- terms of overall employment, Germany would be the worst hit of all the c
A ‘no-deal’ Brexit could hit 100,000 German jobs, study claims Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-18  Authors: david reid, krisztian bocsi, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, affected, nodeal, brexit, jobs, uk, countries, union, european, employed, german, study, claims, hit, 100000, germany


A 'no-deal' Brexit could hit 100,000 German jobs, study claims

A U.K. exit from the European Union (EU) with no pre-arranged deal could affect more than 100,000 jobs in Germany, according to a new academic study.

The Leibniz Institute for Economic Research Halle (IWH) and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg looked at the effect of a hard Brexit, breaking it down to the impact on countries, districts and cities.

Researchers assumed that British imports from the European Union would collapse by 25 percent following a contract-free exit. At that decline, the authors estimated around 612,000 employed people in 43 countries around the world would be affected.

They then estimated that, in- terms of overall employment, Germany would be the worst hit of all the countries that the U.K. trades with, offering a potential impact on more than 100,000 jobs.

The report, published last week, said that the motor industry is the sector most affected by Brexit, noting that in Germany alone around 15,000 people are employed solely to facilitate exports to the U.K.

Around 59,000 jobs servicing Chinese buying of U.K. imports would also be affected according to the study, although these would be related to intermediary companies rather than direct Chinese employees.

Relative to a country’s size, Ireland and Malta rate the worst with as many as 1 and 1.7 percent of people employed in those countries affected by a “no-deal” Brexit, respectively.

The prospect of the U.K. leaving the EU without a deal is a risk, especially after the British Parliament rejected a draft agreement reached between Prime Theresa May’s government and the European Union.

Britain is due to leave the 28-nation bloc at 11:00 p.m. GMT on March 29.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-18  Authors: david reid, krisztian bocsi, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worst, affected, nodeal, brexit, jobs, uk, countries, union, european, employed, german, study, claims, hit, 100000, germany


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