China accuses Pelosi and McConnell of inciting ‘chaos’ in Hong Kong

Months of protests, violence and large-scale disruptions in Hong Kong have thrust the city into the global spotlight. “The U.S. denied on many occasions its involvement in the ongoing violent incidents in Hong Kong. A host of public statements show it’s accurate to say American officials have been commenting about Hong Kong — which has seen increasing violence between pro-democracy protesters, counter-protesters, and police. U.S. President Donald Trump said in a Tuesday Twitter post that he “can


Months of protests, violence and large-scale disruptions in Hong Kong have thrust the city into the global spotlight. “The U.S. denied on many occasions its involvement in the ongoing violent incidents in Hong Kong. A host of public statements show it’s accurate to say American officials have been commenting about Hong Kong — which has seen increasing violence between pro-democracy protesters, counter-protesters, and police. U.S. President Donald Trump said in a Tuesday Twitter post that he “can
China accuses Pelosi and McConnell of inciting ‘chaos’ in Hong Kong Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inciting, country, pelosi, kongs, protests, chaos, chinas, mcconnell, kong, china, accuses, foreign, hong, violent, autonomy, hua


China accuses Pelosi and McConnell of inciting 'chaos' in Hong Kong

Months of protests, violence and large-scale disruptions in Hong Kong have thrust the city into the global spotlight. According to China, there’s “powerful evidence” that the United States has been involved.

A spokeswoman for China’s Foreign Ministry claimed Tuesday that recent comments from American lawmakers — including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. — demonstrate that Washington’s real goal is to incite chaos in the city.

“The U.S. denied on many occasions its involvement in the ongoing violent incidents in Hong Kong. However, the comments from those members of the U.S. Congress have provided the world with new and powerful evidence on the country’s involvement,” Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying said, according to an official translation of her remarks.

A host of public statements show it’s accurate to say American officials have been commenting about Hong Kong — which has seen increasing violence between pro-democracy protesters, counter-protesters, and police. Still, Hua accused U.S. politicians of intentionally distorting their assessments and spurring clashes.

“By neglecting and distorting the truth, they whitewashed violent crimes as a struggle for human rights and freedom, and deliberately misinterpreted the work of Hong Kong police as violent repression when the police were only enforcing the law, fighting crimes and upholding social order,” she said.

“They even incited the Hong Kong residents to engage in confrontation with the (special administrative region) government and the central government,” Hua added. “How anxious are they to instigate and see chaos!”

U.S. President Donald Trump said in a Tuesday Twitter post that he “can’t imagine why” anyone would blame the United States for “the problems” in Hong Kong.

The ongoing protests can be traced back to March when thousands marched against a proposed bill that would allow Hong Kong to extradite people to mainland China. Although the former British colony has been part of the country since 1997, it’s designated as a Chinese “special administrative region” and has been allowed a degree of autonomy in legal and financial matters. That arrangement has been known as “one country, two systems” and it guides Hong Kong’s constitutionally enshrined mandate that the city will maintain its “previous capitalist system” for 50 years after it officially rejoined China.

Given that background, many in Hong Kong said the proposed extradition law would erode their city’s autonomy. Hong Kong’s leader, Carrie Lam, eventually announced the government would indefinitely halt the bill, but protests continued as demonstrators called for it to be officially withdrawn and for an investigation into police actions. As hundreds of thousands, by some counts, have continued to take to the streets, the messages have increasingly become about democracy, autonomy and even independence.

That’s been a red line for China’s leadership, and Beijing mouthpieces and officials have repeatedly emphasized that Hong Kong’s relationship with the rest of the country is not up for discussion. And that’s the topic now inducing the Foreign Ministry’s criticisms of U.S. officials.

“We solemnly remind you this plain truth: Hong Kong affairs are entirely China’s internal affairs, and you are neither entitled nor qualified to wantonly comment on them,” Hua said Tuesday. “Mind your own business and stay out of Hong Kong affairs.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-14  Authors: everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, inciting, country, pelosi, kongs, protests, chaos, chinas, mcconnell, kong, china, accuses, foreign, hong, violent, autonomy, hua


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Trump visits Dayton, Ohio after mass shooting that shocked country

Demonstrators protest the visit of US President Donald Trump to the site of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on August 7, 2019. The El Paso massacre is being investigated as a hate crime and the FBI said the Dayton shooter had explored violent ideologies. It admonished Trump for calling El Paso one of the country’s most dangerous cities in his February State of the Union address. “The violence that pierced El Paso, drawing you here today, is not of our own community,” wrote editor Tim Archulet


Demonstrators protest the visit of US President Donald Trump to the site of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on August 7, 2019. The El Paso massacre is being investigated as a hate crime and the FBI said the Dayton shooter had explored violent ideologies. It admonished Trump for calling El Paso one of the country’s most dangerous cities in his February State of the Union address. “The violence that pierced El Paso, drawing you here today, is not of our own community,” wrote editor Tim Archulet
Trump visits Dayton, Ohio after mass shooting that shocked country Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, el, white, protesters, visits, country, texas, paso, city, dayton, shocked, mass, ohio, gun, trump, shooting


Trump visits Dayton, Ohio after mass shooting that shocked country

Demonstrators protest the visit of US President Donald Trump to the site of the mass shooting in Dayton, Ohio, on August 7, 2019.

U.S. President Donald Trump on Wednesday visited the Ohio city that suffered one of last weekend’s two deadly mass shootings that shocked the country, even as critics and protesters accused him of inflaming tensions with anti-immigrant and racially charged rhetoric.

Trump visited survivors, first responders and staff at Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton, Ohio, where nine people and the suspect were killed in a rampage early on Sunday.

Dozens of protesters outside the hospital set up a “baby Trump” blimp balloon and held signs reading “Do Something,” “Save our city,” and “You are why.”

Later in the day, Trump will visit the Texas city of El Paso, on the border with Mexico, where 22 people were killed at a Walmart store on Saturday by a 21-year-old man who had posted an anti-immigrant manifesto online.

The back-to-back massacres, occurring 13 hours apart, have reopened the national debate over gun safety and led protesters in Dayton to heckle Ohio’s Republican governor, Mike DeWine, at a vigil for the shooting victims with chants of “Do something!”

As he left the White House, Trump said he wanted to strengthen background checks for gun purchases and make sure mentally ill people did not carry guns. He predicted congressional support for those two measures but not for banning assault rifles.

“I can tell you that there is no political appetite for that at this moment,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “But I will certainly bring that up … There is a great appetite, and I mean a very strong appetite, for background checks.”

In Dayton, Trump was greeted at the airport by a bipartisan group of state and local officials, including Democratic Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley, who had said she would welcome Trump but planned to tell him he had been “unhelpful” on the issue of gun violence.

Critics have said Trump stokes violence with racially incendiary rhetoric. The El Paso massacre is being investigated as a hate crime and the FBI said the Dayton shooter had explored violent ideologies.

On Monday, Trump gave a speech focusing on mental health reforms, tighter internet regulation and wider use of the death penalty. Democrats accuse Trump of hiding behind talk of mental illness and the influence of social media rather than committing to laws they insist are needed to restrict gun ownership and the types of weapons that are legal.

In Iowa, Democratic presidential front-runner Joe Biden planned to say in a campaign speech, “We have a president with a toxic tongue who has publicly and unapologetically embraced a political strategy of hate, racism, and division.”

In a sign of higher tensions after the shootings, a motorcycle backfiring on Tuesday night in New York’s Times Square sent crowds running for fear of another gun attack.

“People are obviously very frightened,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo told CNN.

Authorities in Texas have said they are investigating Saturday’s shooting spree in the predominantly Hispanic west Texas border city of El Paso as a hate crime and an act of domestic terrorism. They cited a racist manifesto posted online shortly before the shooting, which they attributed to the suspect.

An open letter to Trump on Wednesday in the El Paso Times described the border city as having “a deep tradition of racial harmony” whose people came together after the tragedy. It admonished Trump for calling El Paso one of the country’s most dangerous cities in his February State of the Union address.

“The violence that pierced El Paso, drawing you here today, is not of our own community,” wrote editor Tim Archuleta. “An outsider came here to shatter our city, to murder our neighbors. A white man from another Texas city came to target the more than 80% of us who share Hispanic roots.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-07  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, el, white, protesters, visits, country, texas, paso, city, dayton, shocked, mass, ohio, gun, trump, shooting


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Google to charge rivals to become default search engine for Android users in Europe

Google said it will require other search providers to pay to become one of the default options available to European users when setting up their Android device. Rival search engines will have to bid in a blind auction to become one of those default options, Google said. In the event that fewer than three eligible search providers meet or exceed the bid threshold, Google will fill any remaining slots randomly from the pool of eligible search providers. A screen capture shared by the firm showed t


Google said it will require other search providers to pay to become one of the default options available to European users when setting up their Android device. Rival search engines will have to bid in a blind auction to become one of those default options, Google said. In the event that fewer than three eligible search providers meet or exceed the bid threshold, Google will fill any remaining slots randomly from the pool of eligible search providers. A screen capture shared by the firm showed t
Google to charge rivals to become default search engine for Android users in Europe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, choice, android, default, providers, europe, search, rivals, bid, charge, engine, screen, threshold, google, users, country


Google to charge rivals to become default search engine for Android users in Europe

Google said it will require other search providers to pay to become one of the default options available to European users when setting up their Android device.

The company said in a blog post on Friday that European users will see a new choice screen when setting up their device, showing a list of options they can select to be their default search engine for the search box on their home screen and Google Chrome.

Google already lets Android users change their default provider at any time, but the new set up page allows them to change it when setting up their device.

Rival search engines will have to bid in a blind auction to become one of those default options, Google said. The company explained that process in a separate page on Android’s website:

In each country auction, search providers will state the price that they are willing to pay each time a user selects them from the choice screen in the given country. Each country will have a minimum bid threshold. The three highest bidders that meet or exceed the bid threshold for a given country will appear in the choice screen for that country. The auction winners, and Google, will be ordered randomly in the choice screen. In the event of a tie, Google will allocate the slots randomly among the tied bidders. In the event that fewer than three eligible search providers meet or exceed the bid threshold, Google will fill any remaining slots randomly from the pool of eligible search providers. The pool of eligible providers will include those that applied to participate in the choice screen but did not submit bids.

A screen capture shared by the firm showed three alternative search providers, including Qwant, Ecosia and Yahoo. Google said other platforms can apply to be part of the new choice screen, adding it will be introduced on Android phones in Europe by early 2020.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-02  Authors: ryan browne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, choice, android, default, providers, europe, search, rivals, bid, charge, engine, screen, threshold, google, users, country


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Looking to retire someplace safe? Look north, and abroad

10 here, however, because it’s pretty pricey compared with the others on this list — coming in at sixth most expensive country (according to Numbeo). DenmarkCopenhagen, Denmark svetikd | iStock | Getty ImagesLife might just be a fairy tale in the homeland of Hans Christian Andersen. Ranked fifth in the Peace Index but 10th in Numbeo’s cost ranking, prosperous Denmark lands at No. 6, thanks to a second-place finish in the Peace Index race and status as the 21st most expensive country that Numbeo


10 here, however, because it’s pretty pricey compared with the others on this list — coming in at sixth most expensive country (according to Numbeo). DenmarkCopenhagen, Denmark svetikd | iStock | Getty ImagesLife might just be a fairy tale in the homeland of Hans Christian Andersen. Ranked fifth in the Peace Index but 10th in Numbeo’s cost ranking, prosperous Denmark lands at No. 6, thanks to a second-place finish in the Peace Index race and status as the 21st most expensive country that Numbeo
Looking to retire someplace safe? Look north, and abroad Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, safe, peace, index, visa, istock, looking, abroad, eu, retire, north, residency, someplace, retirement, expensive, getty, country, look


Looking to retire someplace safe? Look north, and abroad

Western Canada Steve Smith | Tetra images | Getty Images

Looking for some peace and quiet in retirement and willing to pay for the privilege? Try looking outside U.S. borders. We took the top 10 countries in this year’s Global Peace Index from the Sydney, Australia-based Institute for Economics and Peace and reordered them from most expensive to least, according to the cost of living index by country for midyear 2019 from Numbeo.com. The U.S. doesn’t make the list, but you don’t have to look too far to find suitable future digs, as one country in North America ranks high for safety and (relative) value. The nine other contenders — all orderly but varying in cost — are farther away in Europe, Asia and Oceania. Here they are, in order of cost from least to most affordable. Sources: Institute for Economics and Peace, Numbeo.com, SmartAsset.com, Investopedia, MoneyWise.com

10. Iceland

Hverir, Iceland arianarama | iStock | Getty Images

This tourism hot spot (literally — Iceland is famed for its geothermal springs) is home to just under 357,000 people, although it welcomes millions of vacationers each year. Isolated in the North Atlantic midway between Europe and North America, Iceland is actually ranked No. 1 on the Global Peace Index 2019. It’s No. 10 here, however, because it’s pretty pricey compared with the others on this list — coming in at sixth most expensive country (according to Numbeo). Most goods and foods are imported, and Icelanders are relatively well off, so you won’t be saving much. In addition, the weather can be brutal. According to website SmartAsset, getting a residence permit in Iceland so you can stay for more than three months at a time means proving you have at least $2,376 a month in income, health insurance valid in the country, a place to reside and no criminal record, among other criteria.

9. Japan

Cherry blossoms, Japan PonyWang | E+ | Getty Images

The Land of the Rising Sun can be a welcoming place for people in their golden years. Thanks to its partly Confucian cultural heritage, Japan traditionally honors and cares for its elderly. In terms of peace and quiet, the country is also right up there, coming in at No. 9 on the worldwide Peace Index. Its relatively high eighth-place finish in overall expense helps place it at No. 9 in our overseas retirement spot rankings. Given its safety, high-quality health care, First World economy and infrastructure, plus that heritage of respect for elders, Japan looks to be an ideal destination for U.S. retirees looking for a new abode abroad. However, its high costs and the difficulty in obtaining a residence visa — not to mention language differences — do up the ante in terms of difficulty in relocating there, says Investopedia.

8. Denmark

Copenhagen, Denmark svetikd | iStock | Getty Images

Life might just be a fairy tale in the homeland of Hans Christian Andersen. Ranked fifth in the Peace Index but 10th in Numbeo’s cost ranking, prosperous Denmark lands at No. 8. The country also consistently ranks at or near the top of happiness rankings, coming in at No. 2 in the 2019 World Happiness Report, just behind nearby Finland. OK, it’s idyllic but not cheap. Not put off by costs? Now it gets tricky. Getting a residence permit in Denmark can be difficult, even more so than in other European Union countries. You’re in luck (or are luckier) if you hold a passport from another EU nation, are married to a Dane, are (still) a student or can be an au pair, or — and this category might hold out some possibilities — can prove “strong ties to Denmark.” You can find more information at: www.nyidanmark.dk/en-GB.

7. Singapore

Tai chi group, Singapore morpheuse | iStock | Getty Images

It’s no surprise this Asian city-state places on a list of peaceful places, coming in at No. 7 in Peace Index rankings. “Safe,” however, is a relative term. Singapore is notorious for draconian laws punishing everything from littering, gum chewing and jay walking to expression of same-sex orientation. Singapore is also expensive, coming in at No. 12 worldwide. If paying a lot for not being able to do much appeals, the city might just be for you. Retiring there isn’t the easiest, as the country has no retirement visa program. But permanent residency is possible, especially if you have at least $1.8 million or so to invest in the local economy, according to Investopedia.

6. New Zealand

Henderson Bay, New Zealand chameleonseye | iStock Editorial | Getty Images

Kiwi country comes in at No. 6, thanks to a second-place finish in the Peace Index race and status as the 21st most expensive country that Numbeo ranked. New Zealand declared itself a nuclear-free zone in 1984, causing the U.S. to suspend its military treaty obligations to the country. (New Zealanders still deem that loss worth it, much to American officials’ ongoing chagrin.) Prices are pretty much on par with the U.S. to boot. Sound good? Consider applying for the country’s two-year Temporary Retirement Visitor Visa program. All you’ll need is around $495,000 (NZ $750,000) to invest in New Zealand for two years, another $330,000 or so (NZ$500,000) or so to live on, and an annual income of about $40,000 (NZ $60,000).

5. Austria

The Austrian Alps FamVeld | iStock | Getty Images

In Austria, the hills are alive … perhaps with the sound of retiree skiers happily swooshing down Alpine slopes. This landlocked European Union member ranks No. 5 overall, thanks to its fourth-place Peace Index finish and status as the 24th most expensive nation (according to Numbeo). Stereotypical Teutonic law and order rules the day in this land of Mozart and marzipan, which, for example, boasts the second-lowest homicide rate in the 28-member EU. (It’s about 0.66 per 100,000 inhabitants, compared with 5.03 per 100,000 people in the U.S.) As in Denmark, obtaining residency in Austria can be difficult for non-EU citizens. Information can be found at www.migration.gv.at/en. Of course, U.S. citizens can visit for up to 90 days without a visa, and foreigners are allowed to buy so-called holiday properties ( “Zweitwohnsitz”) with local government permission.

4. Canada

Fly fishing, Canada Hero Images | Hero Images | Getty Images

The Great White North is our No. 4 finisher, ranking as sixth-safest country in the world and, as 28th most expensive, a tad cheaper than the U.S. (No. 25). The Canadian dollar, or loonie, is worth about 75 U.S. cents, offering an instant 25% savings on many expenses. What really makes Canada a standout retirement destination is its cultural and geographic proximity to the States. (Although, for those looking for more foreign flair, French-speaking regions such as Quebec offer more exotic relocation destinations.) Obtaining actual residency might not be worth all the extra legal expense and effort, given Canada’s ease of access and the fact that Americans can stay there for up to six months without a visa. There are no restrictions on buying property in Canada, although nonpermanent residents must pay a special one-time 15% “speculation tax” upon closing.

3. Slovenia

Lake Bled, Slovenia susan.k. | Moment | Getty Images

Heading back across the Atlantic to the European Union, we find Slovenia, a scenic ex-Yugoslav state that is now the most prosperous of the former communist nations admitted to the EU (back in 2004). The Alpine nation bordering Austria and Italy ranks No. 8 on the Peace Index but is just 49th on Numbeo’s list of most expensive countries, twice as far down as the U.S. Even though Slovenians use the euro, prices are significantly lower than in the States or Western Europe. As an EU member, Slovenia doesn’t offer a retirement visa for non-Europeans, so prospective retiree residents would have to apply for a renewable annual temporary residence permit before arrival. After five years under this arrangement, permanent residency can be applied for. To gain temporary residency, you must have basic monthly income equal to Slovenia’s — around U.S. $1,000 — according to website MoneyWise.

2. Portugal

Ponte de Lima, Portugal THEGIFT777 | iStock Unreleased | Getty Images

Sunny and scenic Portugal — No. 3 on the Peace Index and Numbeo’s 54th most expensive country, with costs up to a third lower than in the U.S. — comes in second. Wildly popular with retirees from northern European countries, Portugal also offers possibilities for Americans. In fact, SmartAsset.com reports that the country has taken steps to make residency easier for all retiree takers (at least compared with other EU nations). Visit a Portuguese consulate in the States with proof of income, citizenship, health insurance and a conviction-free past, and you could walk away with a five-year residence permit. All that’s left is to book a flight to Lisbon, one of the closest EU destinations to the U.S. (just a 6½-hour flight from Boston).

1. Czech Republic

Prague, Czechia susan.k. | Moment | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: kenneth kiesnoski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, safe, peace, index, visa, istock, looking, abroad, eu, retire, north, residency, someplace, retirement, expensive, getty, country, look


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UK set to launch huge Brexit advertising campaign to get country ready to leave the EU

The U.K. will soon launch one of the largest public information advertising campaigns it has ever run to prepare people and businesses for Brexit, whether there is a withdrawal deal or not. Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, Britain’s new Finance Minister Sajid Javid said that the campaign would help to ensure the country’s readiness to leave the EU. “We are also going to fund a major nationwide communications campaign to ensure the people and businesses of this great country are ready and poised


The U.K. will soon launch one of the largest public information advertising campaigns it has ever run to prepare people and businesses for Brexit, whether there is a withdrawal deal or not. Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, Britain’s new Finance Minister Sajid Javid said that the campaign would help to ensure the country’s readiness to leave the EU. “We are also going to fund a major nationwide communications campaign to ensure the people and businesses of this great country are ready and poised
UK set to launch huge Brexit advertising campaign to get country ready to leave the EU Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nodeal, telegraph, huge, set, brexit, join, launch, public, country, uk, javid, deal, campaign, information, leave, party, eu, ready


UK set to launch huge Brexit advertising campaign to get country ready to leave the EU

The U.K. will soon launch one of the largest public information advertising campaigns it has ever run to prepare people and businesses for Brexit, whether there is a withdrawal deal or not.

Writing in The Sunday Telegraph, Britain’s new Finance Minister Sajid Javid said that the campaign would help to ensure the country’s readiness to leave the EU.

“We are also going to fund a major nationwide communications campaign to ensure the people and businesses of this great country are ready and poised to leave on October 31. More details will be announced soon, but I can say that this looks set to be one of the government’s biggest ever public information campaigns,” Javid wrote on Sunday.

Up to £100 million ($123.4 million) is thought to have been allocated to the ad campaign, according to a Telegraph source, and it is likely to use large-scale media such as billboards and TV, together with leaflets and online advertising.

It could also include a no-deal preparation leaflet delivered to every home in the U.K.

“Making sure Britain is prepared for no deal is the best way to get a great new deal,” Javid wrote. “That is why this government is turbocharging preparations to leave with no deal.” Javid is set to reveal plans to spend £1 billion on preparations for a no-deal Brexit, the Telegraph report suggested.

Boris Johnson, Britain’s new prime minister, has already said that the country must leave the EU by the October 31 deadline “do or die, come what may,” and on Monday the government stepped up its planning for a no-deal scenario.

Johnson and his Conservative Party have already been advertising on Facebook. One ad, which started running on the social network on Sunday, appealed to people to join the party. “No ifs, no buts. We’ll leave on 31st October — and whatever happens EU citizens here can be certain of their rights to stay. Agree? Join Boris’s team, ” it stated, with a link to join the Conservatives. The party spent £13,487 on Facebook ads for the seven days starting July 21, three days before Johnson took office as prime minister.

Previous large publicly-funded information campaigns include the launch of Britain’s National Health Service in 1948 and a “Don’t die of ignorance,” ad campaign about AIDS prevention in 1986, then the government’s largest ever public health campaign.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nodeal, telegraph, huge, set, brexit, join, launch, public, country, uk, javid, deal, campaign, information, leave, party, eu, ready


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China wants to track and grade each citizen’s actions — it’s in the testing phase

Since the push to build a social credit system kicked off in earnest five years ago, a few dozen pilot programs have emerged with varying tracking metrics, and consequences for violations. Worries about misuseThe overarching concern, whether or not a social credit system reaches national scale, is the potential for abuse. Especially as technology develops, a social credit system has the potential to be far more invasive, with few checks on its power in authoritarian China. He is a co-author of t


Since the push to build a social credit system kicked off in earnest five years ago, a few dozen pilot programs have emerged with varying tracking metrics, and consequences for violations. Worries about misuseThe overarching concern, whether or not a social credit system reaches national scale, is the potential for abuse. Especially as technology develops, a social credit system has the potential to be far more invasive, with few checks on its power in authoritarian China. He is a co-author of t
China wants to track and grade each citizen’s actions — it’s in the testing phase Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: evelyn cheng shirley tay, evelyn cheng, shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, month, credit, system, chinese, individuals, country, grade, testing, citizens, social, china, track, scores, peoples, actions, phase


China wants to track and grade each citizen's actions — it's in the testing phase

People walk past the Public Credit Information Service Hall in Suzhou, China, on May 6, 2019. Suzhou was one of several places chosen in 2018 by the Chinese government to run a social credit trial, which can reward or punish citizens for their behavior. Qilai Shen | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The Chinese government is forging ahead with official efforts to create a national social credit system, even as several academic analysts doubt whether authorities can ever reach that goal. Beijing affirmed its commitment last month to building out social credit, a plan which has sparked fears that the government will gain overt control over ordinary people’s lives. At its core, the proposed system tries to create a standard for trust by tracking individual actions across Chinese society, and rewarding or punishing accordingly. It’s unclear how fairly such a system could impose penalties on individuals, or how easy it would be to get off blacklists. Still, authorities already claim to have the records of 990 million individuals and 25.91 million enterprises, as the central government runs up against a self-imposed 2020 deadline to formulate a nationwide social credit plan that includes the capital city. Since the push to build a social credit system kicked off in earnest five years ago, a few dozen pilot programs have emerged with varying tracking metrics, and consequences for violations. In many respects, the measures are China’s attempt to manufacture a more law-abiding society in a country where respect for contracts has a far shorter history than that of the U.S. or England. Nevertheless, the trials have sparked concerns.

Worries about misuse

The overarching concern, whether or not a social credit system reaches national scale, is the potential for abuse. China has a far from stellar human rights record. Earlier this month, 22 countries issued a joint statement calling on the world’s most populous nation to “refrain from the arbitrary detention and restrictions on freedom of movement” of ethnic minorities in Xinjiang. The region in the westernmost part of the country is known for intense surveillance and is where the United Nations last year said more than a million people were being held in “counter-extremism centres” and another two million were forced into “re-education camps.” Especially as technology develops, a social credit system has the potential to be far more invasive, with few checks on its power in authoritarian China. Still, the country hasn’t crossed that threshold yet. “At the moment, the negative consequences (e.g., the sticks, not the carrots) are only carefully used, and if, only to those businesses and individuals, who clearly broke a law,” Genia Kostka, professor of Chinese politics at Freie Universitat Berlin (the Free University of Berlin), said in an email. “So the consequences are not huge at the moment,” she said, “but the system is developing fast and more sticks can quickly be added to the system once it is running.” That sentiment was echoed by the Economist Intelligence Unit, which said in a Monday report that “the social credit system is set to become a steadily more important aspect of daily life in China, including while doing business.”

It’s not yet a sure thing

For now, however, it remains to be seen how far-reaching the social credit system will be in practice, or when it will be implemented nationally. In fact, there are some who doubt it will ever realize its stated goals. “The social credit system is such a sprawling endeavor that it may never actually be ‘done’ in any meaningful sense,” said Martin Chorzempa, research fellow, at the Washington-based Peterson Institute For International Economics. He is a co-author of the June 2018 report “China’s Social Credit System: A Mark of Progress or a Threat to Privacy?” “They are years away from having some system that integrates all government data and data from the private sector into a unified nationwide system with a single score, and they may never actually achieve that because of bureaucratic infighting over data and growing privacy concerns, ” Chorzempa said in an email to CNBC last month. Launching social credit in the capital city would be significant for the country, but little has yet been divulged about Beijing’s plans to establish individual scores for permanent residents by the end of 2020, as was announced in November 2018. The major government entities involved in creating the China-wide system, the National Development and Reform Commission and the People’s Bank of China, did not respond to CNBC requests for comment. The Municipality of Beijing also did not respond. Currently, social credit is tied to a handful of disparate initiatives. One is the stringent garbage sorting regime that took effect in Shanghai this month, according to city regulations that were adopted in January. It’s not clear to what extent individual scores will be affected by adherence to the rules, although the Communist Party newspaper People’s Daily noted that in Xiamen, multiple violations of similar waste management statutes land individuals on a so-called blacklist. It was not clear from publicly available resources what that list does. Of various government efforts to track individuals in China, the Supreme People’s Court system of issuing travel restrictions for anyone who defies a court order is the most widely used, the EIU report said. These cases typically involve unpaid debt, and prevent offenders from taking flights or traveling by high-speed rail. Critics say such punishments are not enough to prevent fraudulent behavior, while the consequences would be rather extreme if tied to, say, a few improperly sorted pieces of garbage.

Low awareness in China

Despite the many pilot programs and government-run websites such as “Credit China,” the Chinese public so far generally does not know much about the country’s plans for social credit. Dev Lewis, research associate at Digital Asia Hub, said last month that most people he spoke with in Xiamen and Fuzhou did not know such scores existed, and that less than 4% of people in Xiamen had signed up. Lewis’ findings match other recent news reports about how few people in China actually know about a social credit test that is happening in their own city. However, while he noted that more rewards for high scores could improve awareness, other academic research and anecdotes indicate many in the country favor a system that steps up punishments on wrongdoers. “An algorithm with public criteria is more transparent than systems depending on human, possibly corrupt decision making, and it is supposed to supervise officials too,” Peterson Institute’s Chorzempa said. “There is a real problem with lack of rule of law in China that affects everyone, and lets people off (without punishment) when they’ve done terrible things.” The Chinese government’s push to move forward with social credit, and launch a system in Beijing, is part of the powerful State Council’s announcement in 2014 of a “Planning Outline for the Construction of a Social Credit System.” The document called for nationwide, uniform credit information collection, and for the regulations to be established by the year 2020. The council noted e-commerce, logistics and statistics as areas in which to use a credit system to build “social sincerity.” The idea for such a program has a longer history. The first well-known test for a local social credit system in China launched back in 2010 in the rural county of Suining in the province of Jiangsu. As much as modern China has moved toward an increasingly rigid system, the local environment was vastly different just half a century ago. During the decade-long Cultural Revolution that began in the late 1960s, “Mao’s word was the law, like that of the emperors who preceded him,” Weijian Shan, CEO of investment firm PAG, wrote in his 2019 book “Out of the Gobi: My Story of China and America.” “Even now (in the 1980s) that the chaos of the Mao era had ended, laws, policies, and rules were subject to change, sometimes arbitrarily or quite suddenly,” Shan said. “There was a common expression in China at that time: ‘ji hua (a plan) cannot catch up with bian hua (change).’ The resulting uncertainty and risk necessarily led to greater social costs. ”

Testing phase


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-26  Authors: evelyn cheng shirley tay, evelyn cheng, shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wants, month, credit, system, chinese, individuals, country, grade, testing, citizens, social, china, track, scores, peoples, actions, phase


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Civil rights groups file lawsuit challenging Trump asylum rule

Three civil rights groups filed a lawsuit on Tuesday challenging the Trump administration’s new asylum rule, which bars asylum claims from most noncitizens who travel through another country on their way to the United States. The suit alleges that the rule violates the Immigration and Nationality Act as well as federal laws governing administrative procedure. “This is the Trump administration’s most extreme run at an asylum ban yet. The rule also violates federal law requiring “that asylum canno


Three civil rights groups filed a lawsuit on Tuesday challenging the Trump administration’s new asylum rule, which bars asylum claims from most noncitizens who travel through another country on their way to the United States. The suit alleges that the rule violates the Immigration and Nationality Act as well as federal laws governing administrative procedure. “This is the Trump administration’s most extreme run at an asylum ban yet. The rule also violates federal law requiring “that asylum canno
Civil rights groups file lawsuit challenging Trump asylum rule Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, filed, lawsuit, federal, civil, country, rights, administrations, groups, trump, challenging, violates, file, rule, asylum, law


Civil rights groups file lawsuit challenging Trump asylum rule

Ana Maria, from El Salvador, carries her one-year-old son Mateo as they walk through a field with other asylum-seeking migrants from Central America after they illegally crossed the Rio Grande river into the U.S. from Mexico, in Penitas, Texas, March 31, 2019.

Three civil rights groups filed a lawsuit on Tuesday challenging the Trump administration’s new asylum rule, which bars asylum claims from most noncitizens who travel through another country on their way to the United States. The rule was published in the federal register on Tuesday and was supposed to take effect immediately.

The American Civil Liberties Union, Southern Poverty Law Center and Center for Constitutional Rights filed the suit in federal court in San Francisco. The suit alleges that the rule violates the Immigration and Nationality Act as well as federal laws governing administrative procedure.

“This is the Trump administration’s most extreme run at an asylum ban yet. It clearly violates domestic and international law, and cannot stand,” ACLU attorney Lee Gelernt said in a statement.

The 34-page complaint was filed on behalf of nonprofit groups that provide assistance to asylum seekers. It seeks a permanent ban on the enforcement of the rule along with a declaration that the rule is “unlawful and invalid.”

The lawsuit claims that the rule “directly violates Congress’s clear requirement” that noncitizens must be “firmly resettled” in a third country, and not just pass through it, for that passage to invalidate their asylum claim.

The rule also violates federal law requiring “that asylum cannot be categorically denied based on an asylum seeker’s route to the United States,” attorneys for the groups wrote.

The Department of Justice declined to comment.The Trump administration’s new rule was announced on Monday amid furor in Washington over the treatment of migrants in detention facilities along the border.

The asylum rule has exceptions for those who applied for asylum protection in a third country and were denied it, and those who qualify as victims of a “severe form of trafficking.”

WATCH: Trump considers ousting Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, filed, lawsuit, federal, civil, country, rights, administrations, groups, trump, challenging, violates, file, rule, asylum, law


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Kudlow: Jobs report shows country is in a ‘very strong prosperity cycle,’ but Fed should still cut

“We are still in a very strong prosperity cycle. I think the incentives of our supply-side policies are working,” Kudlow said Friday on Bloomberg Television after the release of the June jobs report. While seeing a strong economy, Kudlow still thinks the Fed should ease monetary policy, and the reason for that is the “rock-bottom” inflation rate. I just don’t want anything to interfere with this strong prosperity cycle.” After a blowout jobs report, traders are still pricing in an easing of mone


“We are still in a very strong prosperity cycle. I think the incentives of our supply-side policies are working,” Kudlow said Friday on Bloomberg Television after the release of the June jobs report. While seeing a strong economy, Kudlow still thinks the Fed should ease monetary policy, and the reason for that is the “rock-bottom” inflation rate. I just don’t want anything to interfere with this strong prosperity cycle.” After a blowout jobs report, traders are still pricing in an easing of mone
Kudlow: Jobs report shows country is in a ‘very strong prosperity cycle,’ but Fed should still cut Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policy, reason, cycle, prosperity, country, monetary, economy, kudlow, rate, policies, jobs, report, fed, cut, shows, strong


Kudlow: Jobs report shows country is in a 'very strong prosperity cycle,' but Fed should still cut

Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council, is “very optimistic” about the health of the U.S. economy but believes that because of low inflation, the Federal Reserve should “take back the interest rate hike” it made in December.

“We are still in a very strong prosperity cycle. … We have very good pro-growth policies, low taxes, deregulation, opening energy, trade reform. I think the incentives of our supply-side policies are working,” Kudlow said Friday on Bloomberg Television after the release of the June jobs report.

Payroll growth rebounded sharply in June as the U.S. economy added 224,000 jobs versus 165,000 expected, according to the Labor Department. Wage growth fell short of expectations however and the unemployment rate ticked higher.

While seeing a strong economy, Kudlow still thinks the Fed should ease monetary policy, and the reason for that is the “rock-bottom” inflation rate.

Inflation is “way below the Fed’s target and what most people want and that’s the reason they should take back the interest rate hike,” Kudlow said. “With a weak global economy taking out an insurance policy is not a bad thing … I just don’t want anything to interfere with this strong prosperity cycle.”

After a blowout jobs report, traders are still pricing in an easing of monetary policy next month, betting on a 94% chance of a quarter-point cut. The Fed will announce its policy decision at the conclusion of the July 30-31 meeting.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, policy, reason, cycle, prosperity, country, monetary, economy, kudlow, rate, policies, jobs, report, fed, cut, shows, strong


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This small European country has been ranked the world’s best place to live and work

Switzerland has been ranked the best place in the world to live and work, stealing the crown from Singapore which was at the top for five consecutive years. High living standards and competitive salaries have seen the Swiss nation become a regular fixture among the world’s most livable cities. About 82% of people who moved to Switzerland for work also said they enjoyed an improved standard of living compared to their home country. The top ten of HSBC’s “Best places to live and work” was rounded


Switzerland has been ranked the best place in the world to live and work, stealing the crown from Singapore which was at the top for five consecutive years. High living standards and competitive salaries have seen the Swiss nation become a regular fixture among the world’s most livable cities. About 82% of people who moved to Switzerland for work also said they enjoyed an improved standard of living compared to their home country. The top ten of HSBC’s “Best places to live and work” was rounded
This small European country has been ranked the world’s best place to live and work Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, getty, singapore, best, switzerland, zealand, spain, place, small, live, quality, ranked, work, worlds, european, country, moved


This small European country has been ranked the world's best place to live and work

Switzerland has been ranked the best place in the world to live and work, stealing the crown from Singapore which was at the top for five consecutive years. High living standards and competitive salaries have seen the Swiss nation become a regular fixture among the world’s most livable cities. But at a time of growing global uncertainty, Switzerland’s famed political and economic stability helped it climb the ranks of HSBC Expat’s annual survey to score the top spot for the first time. Switzerland jumped up the rankings from 8th place last year after the vast majority of people who had relocated there from overseas said they were happy with its economic (80%) and political (86%) climate. About 82% of people who moved to Switzerland for work also said they enjoyed an improved standard of living compared to their home country.

Mist above Lucerne City, Switzerland in October 2017. shan.shihan | Moment | Getty Images

Seven in 10 (71%) of those who have moved to Switzerland now enjoy higher levels of disposable income with their average salary being $111,587 — well above the global mean of $75,966. Meanwhile, 70% said their surroundings were cleaner and 42% felt physically healthier. This year’s report, which is based on responses from more than 18,000 expats across 163 markets, marks the first time in five years that Singapore was not ranked in first place. The Southeast Asian city-state shifted down one position to take second place. The top ten of HSBC’s “Best places to live and work” was rounded out in order by Canada, Spain, New Zealand, Australia, Turkey, Germany, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam.

Singapore

Best for families

Mother and child walk close to Singapore business district. Leren Lu | Photographer’s Choice | Getty Images

Though Singapore failed to make it to the top of HSBC’s ranking for the sixth consecutive year, it remained a strong performer, especially for those moving abroad with children. Some 62% of respondents said the schooling system in Singapore is better than in their home country, while 69% rated the opportunity it afforded their kids to learn new languages.

Canada

Welcoming to foreigners

Hero Images | Hero Images | Getty Images

A consistently high performer, Canada’s reputation for welcoming foreign visitors saw it take third place this year. The vast majority (80%) of respondents also said they enjoyed a better quality of life in their new home, compared to the global average of 65%.

Spain

High quality of living

View of The Alhambra in Granada City, Spain Gonzalo Azumendi | The Image Bank | Getty Images

While few respondents said they relocated to Spain for their careers, more than two-thirds (67%) said they’d seen an improvement in their work-life balance as a result of the move. That, coupled with the country’s top ranking for mental well-being, saw Spain jump up 10 spots this year.

New Zealand

A long-term destination

View of Queenstown, New Zealand just after sunset. Ramiro Torrents | Moment | Getty Images

Renowned for its stunning scenery and laid back way of life, more than half (57%) of people who moved to New Zealand said they did so to improve their quality of life. And it appears to pay off: 60% of those who moved stayed longer than expected. In fact, those who move to New Zealand are the most likely to stay in their new country for over 20 years. Don’t miss: Working abroad could boost your salary by more than a third Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-04  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, getty, singapore, best, switzerland, zealand, spain, place, small, live, quality, ranked, work, worlds, european, country, moved


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‘Our country is dying’: Guaido envoy urges international community to help Venezuela reclaim its freedom

Venezuelan opposition leader and National Assembly Leader Juan Guaido speaks during a press conference with international media at Centro Plaza on June 17, 2019 in Caracas, Venezuela. Our country is dying, our people are dying, and the international community is increasingly alarmed with what they are seeing. When asked whether she feared the failed uprising would represent the beginning of an enduring political stalemate in the crisis-stricken country, Neumann replied: “No. Our country is dying


Venezuelan opposition leader and National Assembly Leader Juan Guaido speaks during a press conference with international media at Centro Plaza on June 17, 2019 in Caracas, Venezuela. Our country is dying, our people are dying, and the international community is increasingly alarmed with what they are seeing. When asked whether she feared the failed uprising would represent the beginning of an enduring political stalemate in the crisis-stricken country, Neumann replied: “No. Our country is dying
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guaido, help, maduro, urges, international, freedom, dying, political, president, envoy, neumann, community, venezuela, country, reclaim


'Our country is dying': Guaido envoy urges international community to help Venezuela reclaim its freedom

Venezuelan opposition leader and National Assembly Leader Juan Guaido speaks during a press conference with international media at Centro Plaza on June 17, 2019 in Caracas, Venezuela. Matias Delacroix | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Venezuela’s internationally-recognized government believes there is still reason to be hopeful when it comes to dislodging President Nicolas Maduro from power. “Things are advancing. There is a strategy that is advancing,” Vanessa Neumann, the chief diplomat in London for Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, told CNBC in an exclusive interview. She did not go into specific details about the National Assembly leader’s plans over the coming months. The South American country is in the midst of one of the Western Hemisphere’s worst humanitarian crises in recent memory, with some 4 million people having fled the country since 2015 amid an economic meltdown. A protracted political stand-off has thrust the oil-rich, but cash-poor, country into uncharted territory — whereby it now has an internationally-recognized government, with no control over state functions, running parallel to Maduro’s regime.

Our country is dying, our people are dying, and the international community is increasingly alarmed with what they are seeing. Vanessa Neumann Official representative of Juan Guaido to the U.K.

Guaido assumed a rival interim presidency in January, citing Venezuela’s constitution, and denounced Maduro’s government as illegitimate after he secured re-election last year in a vote widely criticized as rigged. Guaido has since been recognized by more than 50 countries, including the U.S. and most Latin American and European countries. However, Maduro has refused to cede power. And, crucially, he still has the broad support of the military. “Maduro has not accepted the situation, but other countries have,” Neumann said, before adding that there was a growing sense that the “international community is coalescing at least around a diagnosis of the problem.” “They are starting to realize that this regime is criminal.”

‘None of us have accepted the status quo’

On April 30, Guaido appeared outside one of the most important military installations in the capital city of Caracas flanked by defecting soldiers and said “the time is now ” for Venezuela’s armed forces to turn on their embattled commander-in-chief. The dramatic pre-dawn declaration appeared to symbolize an extraordinary watershed moment in the country’s political history. “I remember saying to my friend at the time … It’s happened, we are free,” Neumann said, as she tearfully recalled what many believed would come to mark Maduro’s downfall. As it turned out, most of the military top brass remained loyal to their socialist president and Guaido’s attempt to trigger a nationwide uprising failed.

When asked whether she feared the failed uprising would represent the beginning of an enduring political stalemate in the crisis-stricken country, Neumann replied: “No. I am optimistic. They can’t hold much longer.” “It is perfectly clear that none of us have accepted the status quo. Our country is dying, our people are dying, and the international community is increasingly alarmed with what they are seeing.” “Diplomatically, we really need the international community to help us reclaim our freedom,” Neumann said. In the weeks after April’s failed rebellion, which was described by Maduro as a U.S.-orchestrated coup, many opposition lawmakers in the country have lost their parliamentary immunity and some have been arrested. Guaido has also lost his parliamentary immunity but has so far not been jailed.

Free and fair elections

Venezuela’s inflation rate fell under 1 million percent in May, after peaking above 1.3 million percent the previous month, nearly a year after Maduro instituted attempted reforms in August 2018 that cut five zeroes off the currency and prices. The largest note in circulation had been 500 bolivars, which is now reportedly not enough to buy a piece of candy. Officials in Venezuela blame the inflation crisis on U.S. sanctions that has restricted its ability to sell oil. Critics, though, say economic mismanagement and an oversupply of currency have been the main issues. Last year, Venezuelans filed more asylum claims than citizens of any other country — including war-torn Syria — according to a recent report from the United Nations refugee agency. That’s despite the fact more than 10% of the South American country’s population had already left.

Michelle Bachelet, high commissioner for human rights at the United Nations, left, shakes hands with Nicolas Maduro, Venezuela’s president, following a meeting at Miraflores Palace in Caracas, Venezuela, on Friday, June 21, 2019. Hundreds of protesters gathered in front of the UN’s Venezuela office to denounce what they say are the myriad rights abuses by the regime of President Maduro, including extrajudicial killings, and has held hundreds of political prisoners and detained journalists. Carlos Becerra | Bloomberg | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-26  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, guaido, help, maduro, urges, international, freedom, dying, political, president, envoy, neumann, community, venezuela, country, reclaim


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