Protests against Kazakhstan’s presidential election lead to violence in the capital

Though that may seem a sweeping victory for Jomart-Tokayev, the transfer of office has spurred unrest in the country’s capital Nur-Sultan and largest city Almaty. About 500 protesters were arrested by police, the BBC reported, citing local officials. The demonstration, decrying what protests called a “dictatorship” in the country, is the largest Kazakhstan has seen in recent years. As protest is not tolerated in the country, the demonstration led to violence in the streets. A BBC correspondent i


Though that may seem a sweeping victory for Jomart-Tokayev, the transfer of office has spurred unrest in the country’s capital Nur-Sultan and largest city Almaty. About 500 protesters were arrested by police, the BBC reported, citing local officials. The demonstration, decrying what protests called a “dictatorship” in the country, is the largest Kazakhstan has seen in recent years. As protest is not tolerated in the country, the demonstration led to violence in the streets. A BBC correspondent i
Protests against Kazakhstan’s presidential election lead to violence in the capital Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nearly, protests, protest, violence, capital, reported, bbc, largest, election, country, kazakhstans, jomarttokayev, lead, demonstration, yearsas, presidential, nursultan


Protests against Kazakhstan's presidential election lead to violence in the capital

Kazakhstan’s first president, Nursultan Nazarbayev, has stepped down after a nearly three-decade-long tenure.

His successor, Kassym Jomart-Tokayev, confirmed his position after taking nearly 71% of the vote in Sunday’s election against six other government-approved candidates, according to Foreign Policy. His closest opposition candidate trailed behind with 16.2%.

Though that may seem a sweeping victory for Jomart-Tokayev, the transfer of office has spurred unrest in the country’s capital Nur-Sultan and largest city Almaty.

About 500 protesters were arrested by police, the BBC reported, citing local officials. The demonstration, decrying what protests called a “dictatorship” in the country, is the largest Kazakhstan has seen in recent years.

As protest is not tolerated in the country, the demonstration led to violence in the streets. A BBC correspondent in Nur-Sultan reported people being dragged onto buses by riot police. Many journalists were also detained covering the protest, while social media platforms such as Facebook and Telegram were reportedly inaccessible in the country during that time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: grace shao
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, nearly, protests, protest, violence, capital, reported, bbc, largest, election, country, kazakhstans, jomarttokayev, lead, demonstration, yearsas, presidential, nursultan


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No country in the world meets the mark on gender equality, but these are the best performers

As many as 40% of the world’s female population live in countries that fail to meet the mark on basic measures of gender equality, while a further 40% face substandard equality conditions. The Gender Index measured the countries’ success in achieving gender equality across 14 of the 17 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). It found that no country in the world has yet “achieved the promise of gender equality,” nor does any one country score consistently well across all measures. D


As many as 40% of the world’s female population live in countries that fail to meet the mark on basic measures of gender equality, while a further 40% face substandard equality conditions. The Gender Index measured the countries’ success in achieving gender equality across 14 of the 17 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). It found that no country in the world has yet “achieved the promise of gender equality,” nor does any one country score consistently well across all measures. D
No country in the world meets the mark on gender equality, but these are the best performers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, performers, country, measures, score, equality, report, sdg, poor, meets, world, countries, gender, mark, 100


No country in the world meets the mark on gender equality, but these are the best performers

As many as 40% of the world’s female population live in countries that fail to meet the mark on basic measures of gender equality, while a further 40% face substandard equality conditions. That’s according to a new report released Monday by Equal Measures 2030, which found that 2.8 billion women and girls globally live in countries with “poor” or “very poor” levels of gender equality, despite ongoing efforts to bridge the gap. The Gender Index measured the countries’ success in achieving gender equality across 14 of the 17 United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). It found that no country in the world has yet “achieved the promise of gender equality,” nor does any one country score consistently well across all measures. The SDGs are a range of measures laid out in 2015 in a bid to improve global living standards by 2030. For the purposes of the study, those categories were broken down into 51 subsections measuring factors such as health, education, gender-based violence, work and politics.

Equal Measures 2030’S 2019 SDG Gender Index

Best and worst performers

Just 8% percent of the 129 countries measured scored a “good” rating of 80 or more — out of 100 — for their progress in achieving gender equality, the report found. Meanwhile, 12% managed a “fair” rating of 70 to 79. The remaining 80% of countries measured scored either “poor” (60 to 69 points) or “very poor” (below 60). No single country achieved an “excellent” score of 90 or above. The global average score was 65.7 out of 100, which the report said was “barely (a) pass.” More than 60 countries were omitted from the list due to lack of data. Denmark emerged as the world’s most progressive country in terms of gender equality, achieving a near-excellent score of 89.3 out of 100. It was joined in the top 10 by Finland, Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, Slovenia, Germany, Canada, Ireland and Australia. The U.K. ranked 17th and the U.S. came in at 28th. At the other end of the spectrum, Chad came out at the bottom of the list, with a score of 33.4 out of 100. Other countries in the bottom 10 of the index included Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Yemen, Congo, DR Congo. All those countries also appeared on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s 2018 list of fragile states.

Equal Measures 2030’S 2019 SDG Gender Index Equal Measures 2030

A ‘wake up’ call

Overall, Europe and North America were the best performing regions, with an average regional score of 79.1. That was due in large part to the more advanced economies and greater levels of resources there. However, the report noted that even leading countries have to address a number of outstanding issues — such as gender-based violence, poverty and women’s participation in the economy — in order to reach “the last mile.” Latin America and the Caribbean ranked in second place (66.5), followed by Asia-Pacific (64.6), the Middle East and North Africa (60.8) and, lastly, Sub-Saharan Africa (51.1). The report shows there’s still a long way to go to achieve gender equality on a global level, said Alison Holder, director of Equal Measures 203, who called on governments and businesses to take coordinated action. That includes allocating more funds to equality programs and improving data, the report suggested. Melinda Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, one of the report’s contributors, said the findings should act as a “wake-up call” for policymakers. But she also highlighted the work that some of the least developed countries have made in recent years, saying that it provided hope for greater progress going forward. “Many countries with the most limited resources are making huge strides in removing the barriers for girls and women across economies, politics and society – demonstrating that when it comes to gender equality, governments shouldn’t have excuses for inaction,” said Gates. Don’t miss: Meet the woman who won over Google, Apple and Intel to get more girls into tech Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, best, performers, country, measures, score, equality, report, sdg, poor, meets, world, countries, gender, mark, 100


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John Negroponte: Trump’s new tariff on Mexico is ‘bad politically and bad economically’

A widely followed former American diplomat questioned on Friday whether President Donald Trump was adopting the right strategy by threatening Mexico with a new tariff because of immigration issues. Trump announced Thursday that his country plans to impose a 5% tariff on all Mexican imports from June 10. Speaking with CNBC’s “Street Signs” on Thursday evening U.S. time, John Negroponte questioned whether Trump’s move would have the desired effect. Mexico, for its part, has said it would not respo


A widely followed former American diplomat questioned on Friday whether President Donald Trump was adopting the right strategy by threatening Mexico with a new tariff because of immigration issues. Trump announced Thursday that his country plans to impose a 5% tariff on all Mexican imports from June 10. Speaking with CNBC’s “Street Signs” on Thursday evening U.S. time, John Negroponte questioned whether Trump’s move would have the desired effect. Mexico, for its part, has said it would not respo
John Negroponte: Trump’s new tariff on Mexico is ‘bad politically and bad economically’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economically, country, mexico, negroponte, politically, immigration, questioned, trumps, president, trump, john, mexican, bad, think, tariff


John Negroponte: Trump's new tariff on Mexico is 'bad politically and bad economically'

A widely followed former American diplomat questioned on Friday whether President Donald Trump was adopting the right strategy by threatening Mexico with a new tariff because of immigration issues.

Trump announced Thursday that his country plans to impose a 5% tariff on all Mexican imports from June 10. In a statement, he attributed that unexpected move to a “border crisis” that has resulted in America being “invaded by hundreds of thousands of people.” He even suggested that he could raise the tariff on Mexico’s goods to 25% by Oct. 1 this year if the country did not sufficiently halt the flow of migrants into the U.S.

Speaking with CNBC’s “Street Signs” on Thursday evening U.S. time, John Negroponte questioned whether Trump’s move would have the desired effect.

“I think it’s both bad politically and bad economically and I don’t think it’s really going to help solve the immigration problem, either, which is what Mr. Trump said he’s trying to attack,” said Negroponte, current vice chairman of consultancy McLarty Associates and formerly U.S. ambassador to Honduras, Mexico, the Philippines, the United Nations, and Iraq.

Mexico, for its part, has said it would not respond well to economic threats.

In a letter addressed to Trump, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said he did not want confrontation, and that leaders have a responsibility to seek peaceful solutions to controversies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, economically, country, mexico, negroponte, politically, immigration, questioned, trumps, president, trump, john, mexican, bad, think, tariff


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These Americans fled the country to escape their giant student debt

Chadd Haag said he left the United States to escape his student debt. Outstanding student debt in the U.S. has tripled over the last decade and is projected to swell to $2 trillion by 2022. Source: Chris HaagMoving to another country to escape student debt is risky, experts say. There are more reasonable ways of dealing with student debt, said Nassirian, at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. But the fact that people are taking this drastic measure should bring scrutiny


Chadd Haag said he left the United States to escape his student debt. Outstanding student debt in the U.S. has tripled over the last decade and is projected to swell to $2 trillion by 2022. Source: Chris HaagMoving to another country to escape student debt is risky, experts say. There are more reasonable ways of dealing with student debt, said Nassirian, at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. But the fact that people are taking this drastic measure should bring scrutiny
These Americans fled the country to escape their giant student debt Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-25  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, united, escape, living, haag, debt, source, giant, couldnt, americans, loan, fled, states, student, albright


These Americans fled the country to escape their giant student debt

Chadd Haag said he left the United States to escape his student debt. Now he lives in India. Source: Chadd Haag

Chad Haag considered living in a cave to escape his student debt. He had a friend doing it. But after some plotting, he settled on what he considered a less risky plan. This year, he relocated to a jungle in India. “I’ve put America behind me,” Haag, 29, said. Today he lives in a concrete house in the village of Uchakkada for $50 a month. His backyard is filled with coconut trees and chickens. “I saw four elephants just yesterday,” he said, adding that he hopes never to set foot in a Walmart again. More than 9,000 miles away from Colorado, Haag said, his student loans don’t feel real anymore. “It’s kind of like, if a tree falls in the woods and no one hears it, does it really exist?” he said.

Some student loan borrowers are packing their bags and fleeing from the U.S. to other countries, where the cost of living is often lower and debt collectors wield less power over them. Although there is no national data on how many people have left the United States because of student debt, borrowers tell their stories of doing so in Facebook groups and Reddit channels and how-to advice is offered on personal finance websites. “It may be an issue we see an uptick in if the trends keep up,” said Barmak Nassirian, director of federal relations at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. Outstanding student debt in the U.S. has tripled over the last decade and is projected to swell to $2 trillion by 2022. Average debt at graduation is currently around $30,000, up from an inflation-adjusted $16,000 in the early 1990s. Meanwhile, salaries for new bachelor degree recipients, also accounting for inflation, have remained almost flat over the last few decades.

Chad Haag at 1 years old. He grew up in Colorado. Source: Chad Haag

Haag’s student loan balance of around $20,000 isn’t as large as the burden shouldered by many other borrowers, but, he said, his difficultly finding a college-level job in the U.S. has made that debt oppressive nonetheless. “If you’re not making a living wage,” he said, “$20,000 in debt is devastating.” He struggled to come up with the $300 a month he owed upon graduation. The first work he found after he left the University of Northern Colorado in 2011 — when the recession’s effects were still palpable — was on-again, off-again hours at a factory, unloading trucks and constructing toy rockets on an assembly line. He then went back to school to pursue a master’s degree in comparative literature at the University of Colorado Boulder. After that, he tried to make it as an adjunct professor, but still he could barely scrape a living together with the one class a semester he was assigned. Haag had some hope restored when he landed full-time work as a medical courier in Denver, delivering urine and blood samples to hospitals. However, he was disappointed to find that he brought home just $1,700 a month. He had little money left over after he paid his student loan bill. He couldn’t afford an apartment in the city, where rents have been rising sharply. He lived with his mother and rarely went out with friends. “I couldn’t make the math work in America,” Haag said. Milestones that seemed like pipe dreams back home, like starting a family,and owning a house, are now on his horizon in India. Last year, he married an Indian citizen, a professor at a local college. He has a five-year spousal visa.

If you’re not making a living wage, $20,000 in debt is devastating. Chad Haag

Adjusting to a new country, he admitted, has not been entirely easy. “Some toilets here are holes in the ground you squat over,” Haag said. Recently, he ate spoiled goat meat at a local restaurant and landed in the emergency room. Still, he said, “I have a higher standard of living in a Third World country than I would in America, because of my student loans.”

Chad Haag with his wife at their wedding this year. Source: Chris Haag

Moving to another country to escape student debt is risky, experts say. If the person wants or needs to return to the United States, they’ll find their loan balance has only grown while they were gone, thanks to compound interest, collection charges and late fees.

Although the Education Department typically can’t garnish someone’s wages if they’re working for a company outside of the United States, it can take up to 15 percent of their Social Security benefits when they start collecting. “The loans do not disappear when you become an expat,” said Mark Kantrowitz, a student loan expert. The Education Department did not respond to a request for comment.

Chad Albright hasn’t checked his student loan account in eight years. Source: Chad Albright

Chad Albright attended Millersville University, in Pennsylvania, where he studied communications and history. He graduated as the Great Recession was beginning in December 2007, and couldn’t find anyone to hire him in his chosen field. “I went to interview after interview after interview,” Albright, 39, said. Still, he had $30,000 in student loans and was soon faced with a monthly bill of around $400. Unable to support himself, he moved in with his parents in Lancaster and worked as a pizza deliveryman. “There was anger,” Albright said. “I couldn’t believe I couldn’t find a job in America.”

He fell behind on his student loans and feared the Education Department would garnish his wages. Albright’s credit score tanked as a result of his repayment troubles, making it difficult for him to buy a car and to land certain jobs, since some employers now pull credit reports. “I feel that college ruined my life,” Albright said.

“I’m much happier in Ukraine,” said Albright. Source: Chad Albright

Seeing no future for himself in the United States, he decided to move to China in 2011. In the city of Zhongshan, he discovered he loved teaching students English. Unlike when he was delivering greasy boxes of pizza, he found his work meaningful and fulfilling. Though he earned just around $1,000 a month in China, the school where he was teaching covered most of his rent and the cost of living was much lower than in Pennsylvania. A few years later, Albright moved to Ukraine, where he is now a permanent resident. He first taught in Kiev and now does so in Odessa, a port city on the Black Sea. He has no plans to return to the United States. “I am much happier in Ukraine,” he said, adding that he hasn’t checked his student loan account in nearly eight years. There are more reasonable ways of dealing with student debt, said Nassirian, at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. Struggling borrowers should enter into one of the government’s income-based repayment plans instead, in which their monthly bill will be capped at a portion of their income, he said. Some payments wind up being as little as $0 a month. But the fact that people are taking this drastic measure should bring scrutiny to the larger student loan system, said Alan Collinge, founder of Student Loan Justice. “Any rational person who learns that people are fleeing the country as a result of their student loan debt will conclude that something has gone horribly awry with this lending system,” Collinge said.

“I try not to think about America,” Williams said. “It’s heartbreaking.” Source: Katrina Williams

Katrina Williams was in a rush to find a job after she graduated from the University of South Alabama in 2013. She was looking at a monthly student loan bill of $700. “I had to take whatever I could so I could pay on the loans,” Williams said. She picked up multiple jobs, as a part-time barista at Starbucks, a substitute teacher and a delivery-woman for the United States Postal Service. At one point, she worked full time at a call center for Sears. “I was working every day,” Williams said. “I had enough money left over to put gas in the car.” She lived with her mother and couldn’t afford health insurance. Williams had a friend who had moved to Japan, and the idea of leaving the United States grew on her. In 2015, she moved to Chiba, also to teach English to students. “I love my work,” she said. Her job sponsors her visa.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-25  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, united, escape, living, haag, debt, source, giant, couldnt, americans, loan, fled, states, student, albright


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Theresa May resigns as UK prime minister amid Brexit crisis

Britain’s Theresa May announced her resignation as prime minister on Friday morning, drawing her turbulent three-year premiership to an abrupt end. But, she said it was with “deep regret” that she had ultimately failed to reach a consensus among lawmakers. “I will shortly leave the job that it has been the honor of my life to hold. The second female prime minister but certainly not the last.” Sterling briefly rose 0.5% to climb above $1.27 shortly after May’s statement, before paring gains as in


Britain’s Theresa May announced her resignation as prime minister on Friday morning, drawing her turbulent three-year premiership to an abrupt end. But, she said it was with “deep regret” that she had ultimately failed to reach a consensus among lawmakers. “I will shortly leave the job that it has been the honor of my life to hold. The second female prime minister but certainly not the last.” Sterling briefly rose 0.5% to climb above $1.27 shortly after May’s statement, before paring gains as in
Theresa May resigns as UK prime minister amid Brexit crisis Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: sam meredith, david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, ultimately, crisis, minister, resigns, theresa, threeyear, withdrawal, union, shortly, turbulent, country, uk, prime, brexit, voice


Theresa May resigns as UK prime minister amid Brexit crisis

Britain’s Theresa May announced her resignation as prime minister on Friday morning, drawing her turbulent three-year premiership to an abrupt end.

She will step down as Conservative Party leader on June 7.

In an emotional speech outside 10 Downing Street, May said she had “done everything” she could to convince members of Parliament to back the Brexit withdrawal agreement she had negotiated with the European Union. But, she said it was with “deep regret” that she had ultimately failed to reach a consensus among lawmakers.

“I believe it was right to persevere even when the odds against success seemed high, but it is now clear to me that it is in the best interests of the country for a new prime minister to lead that effort,” May said at a hastily arranged press conference.

“I will shortly leave the job that it has been the honor of my life to hold. The second female prime minister but certainly not the last.”

“I do so with no ill will but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love,” May said, her voice shaking.

Sterling briefly rose 0.5% to climb above $1.27 shortly after May’s statement, before paring gains as investors digested the news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: sam meredith, david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amid, ultimately, crisis, minister, resigns, theresa, threeyear, withdrawal, union, shortly, turbulent, country, uk, prime, brexit, voice


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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Trump’s family or staff should do ‘an intervention for the good of the country’

US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press conference at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on May 23, 2019. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Thursday that she wishes President Donald Trump’s family or staff would stage an intervention, citing Trump’s abrupt move to end negotiations on infrastructure during a meeting the day before. “I wish that his family or his administration or his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country.” The comment comes a day


US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press conference at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on May 23, 2019. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Thursday that she wishes President Donald Trump’s family or staff would stage an intervention, citing Trump’s abrupt move to end negotiations on infrastructure during a meeting the day before. “I wish that his family or his administration or his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country.” The comment comes a day
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Trump’s family or staff should do ‘an intervention for the good of the country’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, family, house, told, trumps, speaker, intervention, meeting, good, president, nancy, staff, country, pelosi


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says Trump's family or staff should do 'an intervention for the good of the country'

US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press conference at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on May 23, 2019.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Thursday that she wishes President Donald Trump’s family or staff would stage an intervention, citing Trump’s abrupt move to end negotiations on infrastructure during a meeting the day before.

“This time, another temper tantrum, again. I pray for the president of the United States,” Pelosi said. “I wish that his family or his administration or his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country.”

The comment comes a day after Trump left a meeting with Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., at the White House. Trump told the Democrats that he will not deal with them on legislation while they pursue investigations into his businesses and personal finances.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-23  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, family, house, told, trumps, speaker, intervention, meeting, good, president, nancy, staff, country, pelosi


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As China’s growth slows, CEO of Burger King’s parent focuses on the long-term opportunities

Restaurant Brands International CEO Jose Cil speaks during a television interview on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. As China’s economy slows amid tensions with trade partners, Restaurant Brands International CEO Jose Cil said that the company is taking a long-term perspective on growing its brands in the country. The expansion is supposed to make Restaurant Brands one of the largest restaurant companies in the world. Tim Hortons plans to open 1,500 locations across the country in the


Restaurant Brands International CEO Jose Cil speaks during a television interview on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. As China’s economy slows amid tensions with trade partners, Restaurant Brands International CEO Jose Cil said that the company is taking a long-term perspective on growing its brands in the country. The expansion is supposed to make Restaurant Brands one of the largest restaurant companies in the world. Tim Hortons plans to open 1,500 locations across the country in the
As China’s growth slows, CEO of Burger King’s parent focuses on the long-term opportunities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, chinas, growth, opportunities, longterm, view, slows, restaurant, plans, kings, parent, ceo, brands, country, open, focuses, trade, stores, cil, burger


As China's growth slows, CEO of Burger King's parent focuses on the long-term opportunities

Restaurant Brands International CEO Jose Cil speaks during a television interview on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

As China’s economy slows amid tensions with trade partners, Restaurant Brands International CEO Jose Cil said that the company is taking a long-term perspective on growing its brands in the country.

“Our view is that we want to be there, and we will be there for the long term. It’s an amazing consumption market, growing tremendously,” Cil said in an interview.

At its first investor day Wednesday, the parent company of Burger King, Tim Hortons and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen said that it plans to surpass 40,000 stores in the next eight to 10 years. The expansion is supposed to make Restaurant Brands one of the largest restaurant companies in the world.

Chinese consumers’ appetite for burgers, coffee and fried chicken make the country an attractive market for the Toronto-based company, particularly as its sales growth in other markets declines. But the Chinese economy is slowing, and escalations in the trade war over the last week between China and the United States could mean a worse slowdown than expected.

Before the latest developments in the trade war, the International Monetary Fund predicted that China’s GDP will grow by 6.3% this year, which would mark its worst performance in 29 years.

“Our view on China — it’s a similar view for other markets as well — is that over time things will fluctuate, the economies will fluctuate, commodity costs, labor costs, even administrations will change from time to time,” Cil said.

Tim Hortons plans to open 1,500 locations across the country in the next decade as growth in its Canadian home market slows. It currently has 4 locations open in China.

Burger King already has a large footprint in the country, with more than 1,000 locations in China. In 2018 alone, it added about 140 new stores there.

Other companies see similar long-term opportunities. Yum China, the Chinese spinoff of Yum Brands, is accelerating its expansion of KFC. The Popeyes competitor opened its first store in the country more than three decades ago and added 191 new units during its first quarter.

Starbucks, which opened its first store in China 20 years ago, plans to open nearly 600 there in the second half of 2019 as part of its plan to remain the largest coffee chain in the country. China’s own Luckin Coffee, slated for a public debut on the New York Stock Exchange soon, has been trying to beat Starbucks with discounts and stores created for convenience.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: amelia lucas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, chinas, growth, opportunities, longterm, view, slows, restaurant, plans, kings, parent, ceo, brands, country, open, focuses, trade, stores, cil, burger


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One year after Malaysia’s shock election, here’s how Mahathir’s government is doing

The historic election win surprised even the victors themselves. That surprise election outcome rocked financial markets, with investors selling down Malaysian stocks, bonds and currency in the immediate aftermath. But within the country, many were optimistic about the future under the rule of the opposition alliance Pakatan Harapan — the Malay language term for “alliance of hope.” “When Pakatan won the election, there were a lot of elevated expectations,” said Harrison Cheng, associate director


The historic election win surprised even the victors themselves. That surprise election outcome rocked financial markets, with investors selling down Malaysian stocks, bonds and currency in the immediate aftermath. But within the country, many were optimistic about the future under the rule of the opposition alliance Pakatan Harapan — the Malay language term for “alliance of hope.” “When Pakatan won the election, there were a lot of elevated expectations,” said Harrison Cheng, associate director
One year after Malaysia’s shock election, here’s how Mahathir’s government is doing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: yen nee lee, lai seng sin, ulet ifansasti l getty images, -azmil tayeb, lecturer at universiti sains malaysia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mahathirs, shock, pakatan, doing, missing, election, country, financial, world, alliance, won, malaysias, opposition, billions, heres


One year after Malaysia's shock election, here's how Mahathir's government is doing

One year ago, Malaysians stunned the world when they toppled the political coalition that had governed the country for more than 60 years, and voted the opposition into power. The historic election win surprised even the victors themselves.

That surprise election outcome rocked financial markets, with investors selling down Malaysian stocks, bonds and currency in the immediate aftermath. But within the country, many were optimistic about the future under the rule of the opposition alliance Pakatan Harapan — the Malay language term for “alliance of hope.”

“When Pakatan won the election, there were a lot of elevated expectations,” said Harrison Cheng, associate director and lead analyst for Malaysia at risk consultancy Control Risks.

The Southeast Asian country had made international headlines for a financial scandal involving former Prime Minister Najib Razak, Hollywood, Wall Street banking giant Goldman Sachs and billions of dollars missing from state fund 1MDB. Questions around the missing billions contributed to Najib’s defeat in the vote, with the former leader still facing charges now over money-laundering and corruption.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: yen nee lee, lai seng sin, ulet ifansasti l getty images, -azmil tayeb, lecturer at universiti sains malaysia
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mahathirs, shock, pakatan, doing, missing, election, country, financial, world, alliance, won, malaysias, opposition, billions, heres


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New Zealand should always ‘speak its mind’ to China, former prime minister says

New Zealand’s relationship with China had become “too transactional” in recent years, but it needs to be able to raise concerns with Asia’s superpower, according to former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark. “But you never want to limit your freedom as a country to be able to raise issues that are on your mind.” Clark emphasized the need for New Zealand to keep its foreign policy position — which she described as “very much of a small country with its own values that will speak its mind when


New Zealand’s relationship with China had become “too transactional” in recent years, but it needs to be able to raise concerns with Asia’s superpower, according to former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark. “But you never want to limit your freedom as a country to be able to raise issues that are on your mind.” Clark emphasized the need for New Zealand to keep its foreign policy position — which she described as “very much of a small country with its own values that will speak its mind when
New Zealand should always ‘speak its mind’ to China, former prime minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speak, tech, country, mind, china, zealand, relationship, clark, raise, able, minister, transactional, issues, prime


New Zealand should always 'speak its mind' to China, former prime minister says

New Zealand’s relationship with China had become “too transactional” in recent years, but it needs to be able to raise concerns with Asia’s superpower, according to former New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark.

Speaking to CNBC at the Asian Development Bank’s annual meeting in Fiji, Clark was reflecting on how New Zealand-China relations had become strained after Chinese tech giant Huawei was temporarily banned from participating in the country’s rollout of 5G — a new generation of mobile network that’s set to bring about a variety of tech innovations.

“Before the government of (current Prime Minister) Jacinda Ardern, the relationship had probably become rather too transactional, very focused on material benefit,” Clark said in a Friday interview with CNBC at the Asian Development Bank’s annual meeting in Fiji.

During her tenure leading the country, from 1999 to 2008, she said she was able to broach tough subjects with Beijing when visiting the country — her administration “always kept the space where we could raise issues of concern.”

“A small Western democracy has to be able to raise those issues, and of course the Chinese will respond, and there will be a robust response,” she told CNBC. “But you never want to limit your freedom as a country to be able to raise issues that are on your mind.”

Clark emphasized the need for New Zealand to keep its foreign policy position — which she described as “very much of a small country with its own values that will speak its mind when it needs to” — in the “China relationship story.”

“When (New Zealand) speaks, no one thinks: ‘Who are they speaking for?’ No. New Zealand speaks for itself,” Clark said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: shirley tay
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speak, tech, country, mind, china, zealand, relationship, clark, raise, able, minister, transactional, issues, prime


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Could Russia and the US come to a deal over Venezuela’s Maduro?

Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) and President of Venezuela Nicolas Maduro (L) speak at a bilateral meeting on September 3, 2015 in Beijing, China. On Tuesday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that Maduro was prepared to leave the protest-wracked country Tuesday morning but said he had changed his mind after Russia intervened. CNBC contacted the Russian Foreign Ministry for comment Wednesday but no one was immediately available. The military stayed loyal to President Nicolas Maduro,


Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) and President of Venezuela Nicolas Maduro (L) speak at a bilateral meeting on September 3, 2015 in Beijing, China. On Tuesday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that Maduro was prepared to leave the protest-wracked country Tuesday morning but said he had changed his mind after Russia intervened. CNBC contacted the Russian Foreign Ministry for comment Wednesday but no one was immediately available. The military stayed loyal to President Nicolas Maduro,
Could Russia and the US come to a deal over Venezuela’s Maduro? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, country, foreign, sanctions, come, russian, russia, moscow, president, venezuelas, maduro, venezuela


Could Russia and the US come to a deal over Venezuela's Maduro?

Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) and President of Venezuela Nicolas Maduro (L) speak at a bilateral meeting on September 3, 2015 in Beijing, China. Sasha Mordovets | Getty Images News | Getty Images

As unrest continues in Venezuela, some analysts are questioning how much support Russia will give beleaguered President Nicolas Maduro and if Moscow could be ready to strike a deal with the U.S. to end the Latin American country’s political and humanitarian crisis. The U.S. and Russia have traded fresh barbs over Venezuela, each accusing the other of interfering in the country as protesters took to the streets for a second day in support of opposition leader Juan Guaido. On Tuesday, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that Maduro was prepared to leave the protest-wracked country Tuesday morning but said he had changed his mind after Russia intervened. “They had an airplane on the tarmac. He was ready to leave this morning, as we understand it. Russians indicated he should stay,” Pompeo told CNN. Russia rebuffed that accusation, with Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova saying Wednesday that the U.S. assertion was part of an “information war,” Reuters reported.

Deal discussions?

The two sides may be more open to discussing what to do about Venezuela behind closed doors. On Wednesday, during an interview on ‘Fox & Friends,’ U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton suggested that Pompeo could later hold a call with Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. CNBC contacted the Russian Foreign Ministry for comment Wednesday but no one was immediately available.

The U.S. and Russia have already discussed Venezuela at a meeting held in Rome in mid-March between Russia’s deputy foreign minister and the U.S. special representative for Venezuela. Some analysts think that the two heavyweight countries might be coming to some kind of deal over Maduro’s potential departure. “(There’s) little doubt in my mind that the Russians and the U.S. have been talking for weeks about some kind of deal to ease Maduro out of office,” Timothy Ash, a senior emerging markets strategist at Bluebay Asset Management, said in a note Wednesday. He said several factors led his to this conclusion — firstly, that Moscow had gained leverage to negotiate with the U.S. by sending military advisers to Caracas and, secondly, that President Trump had so far not signed off on new sanctions on Russia for its alleged use of a chemical weapon following the nerve agent poisoning of former Russian spy, Sergei Skripal, in the U.K. in 2018. “I think the U.S. administration held back getting Trump to sign this as something was cooking on Venezuela. They saw sanctions as a negotiating chip with Moscow.” Ash believed that, for the Russians, the “deal” was no more sanctions, allowing Russian oil companies to retain the right to operate in Venezuela and get paid back in full for debts owed, and some deal around “spheres of influence.”

Battle for influence

The international battle for influence over Venezuela’s future kicked off in January when opposition leader Juan Guaido declared himself president. Many countries, including the U.S., endorsed that leadership bid and backed regime change in a country wracked by poverty and political unrest. The military stayed loyal to President Nicolas Maduro, however, and Russia (as well as allies in China, Syria and Iran) backed the incumbent leader. Russia has a vested interest in backing Maduro after it gave the country financial aid. Reuters estimates that the Russian government and state energy company Rosneft have handed Venezuela at least $17 billion in loans and credit lines since 2006. It has also provided the Venezuelan government with military equipment and it has stakes in the country’s energy sector. As such, Moscow wants to protect its assets from regime change as well as preventing the U.S. from increasing its sphere of influence. “Russia’s bottom line is to stop regime change by external intervention, but if it falls from within they’ll go with the flow,” Christopher Granville, managing director of EMEA and Global Political Research at TS Lombard, told CNBC Wednesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, country, foreign, sanctions, come, russian, russia, moscow, president, venezuelas, maduro, venezuela


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