Suzy Welch: A simple quiz can help you determine if your ego is hurting your success at work

To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.” To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:1. How annoying”Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasize


To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.” To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:1. How annoying”Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasize
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16  Authors: courtney connley
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Suzy Welch: A simple quiz can help you determine if your ego is hurting your success at work

Meanwhile, Welch says, “people who swell — all they are is arrogant, which gets old fast, and thus, is usually a one-way ticket to self-destruction.”

“Stars, you must make sure you’re in the former category,” she tells CNBC Make It . “People who grow exude a healthy self-confidence. They’re learners, builders and team players, and because of that, their career tends to keep soaring.”

But others respond differently to a taste of success. They act exclusively in their own interest, talk over people, and curtail others’ advancement. To sum up this dilemma, bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch quotes her husband, former GE CEO Jack Welch: “Success makes some people grow, and it makes some people swell.”

Maybe you’ve seen this unfold in your workplace. Some people, given more responsibility, rise to the challenge. They build new skills, take on bigger projects, and stretch themselves to meet the demands of their new role.

To help you determine which category you fall into, Welch developed the following quiz:

1. Do you spend more time thinking about…

A. Your next promotion

B. The career growth of the people who work with you

“Answer A,” says Welch, “is for arrogant in this case, because arrogant people are so me, me, me.” On the other hand, she says, “self-confident people are you, you, you, which, for every reason under the sun, including trust and loyalty, is better, better, better.”

2. In meetings do you usually…

A. Urge subordinates or colleagues to jump in and answer questions

B. Jump in and answer every question yourself

If you’re someone who loves the sound of your own voice, Welch says, “that’s a surefire red flag that you are too focused on yourself.”

3. If someone on your team is smarter than you are, do you think…

A. How great!

B. How annoying

“Self-confident people love being around those who expand their thinking and up the performance bar for everyone,” says Welch. Meanwhile, arrogant people “don’t think anyone is smarter than they are, and it bugs them that other people do.”

As a result, she says, “instead of listening to their intelligent teammates, they try to shut them down or shove them out,” which is, ultimately, “team killing and self-defeating.”

Though this type of personal analysis can be challenging, Welch emphasizes that it’s essential to your future professional success. And arrogance, she says, isn’t actually all that difficult to unlearn.

After all, “it’s all in your head.”

Suzy Welch is the co-founder of the Jack Welch Management Institute and a noted business journalist, TV commentator and public speaker. Think you need Suzy to fix your career? Email her at gettowork@cnbc.com.

Video by Helen Zhao

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More from Suzy Welch:

There’s a specific type of employee that always gets the promotion—here’s why

Why working from home can be terrible for your career

3 signs it’s time to quit a bad boss


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15 of the most common flexible side jobs and how much they pay

Today, roughly 30% of Americans with a side hustle say they need the extra income to help cover their living expenses. Using data from its platform, FlexJobs created a list of the 15 most common side jobs that you can apply to today. Each of these positions are either part-time employee roles or freelance jobs, with many of them providing the flexibility to work from home. All of these jobs also pay an average salary of at least $14 per hour, with management consulting roles paying $60 per hour,


Today, roughly 30% of Americans with a side hustle say they need the extra income to help cover their living expenses. Using data from its platform, FlexJobs created a list of the 15 most common side jobs that you can apply to today. Each of these positions are either part-time employee roles or freelance jobs, with many of them providing the flexibility to work from home. All of these jobs also pay an average salary of at least $14 per hour, with management consulting roles paying $60 per hour,
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15 of the most common flexible side jobs and how much they pay

Today, roughly 30% of Americans with a side hustle say they need the extra income to help cover their living expenses.

Using data from its platform, FlexJobs created a list of the 15 most common side jobs that you can apply to today. Each of these positions are either part-time employee roles or freelance jobs, with many of them providing the flexibility to work from home. All of these jobs also pay an average salary of at least $14 per hour, with management consulting roles paying $60 per hour, according to PayScale data.

Check below to see which common side jobs you should apply to if you’re looking to bring in some extra income:


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After US women’s World Cup victory, the fight for equal pay takes center stage

On Wednesday, New York City held a ticker-tape parade and a ceremony for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team (USWNT) to celebrate the team’s 2019 FIFA World Cup victory. When FIFA president Gianni Infantino walked onto the field to award the players their medals, the crowd instead chanted “Equal pay!” I think he’s with us. I think he’s on the right side of things. I think he’s going to make things right.”


On Wednesday, New York City held a ticker-tape parade and a ceremony for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team (USWNT) to celebrate the team’s 2019 FIFA World Cup victory. When FIFA president Gianni Infantino walked onto the field to award the players their medals, the crowd instead chanted “Equal pay!” I think he’s with us. I think he’s on the right side of things. I think he’s going to make things right.”
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After US women's World Cup victory, the fight for equal pay takes center stage

On Wednesday, New York City held a ticker-tape parade and a ceremony for the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team (USWNT) to celebrate the team’s 2019 FIFA World Cup victory.

The event made it clear that after their victory, the USWNT has set their sights on equal pay — and they’ve earned plenty of support in the process.

When the USWNT defeated Netherlands 2-0 in the 2019 FIFA World Cup Final, the sold out crowd of nearly 60,000 people gathered at France’s Parc Olympique Lyonnais burst into cheers. When FIFA president Gianni Infantino walked onto the field to award the players their medals, the crowd instead chanted “Equal pay!”

The same was true on Wednesday when United States Soccer Federation (USSF) President Carlos Cordeiro took the stage of the celebration ceremony for the USWNT at New York City Hall — the crowd chanted “Pay them!” and “Equal pay!” as he took the podium.

“In recent months, you have raised your voices for equality,” said Cordeiro. “Today, on behalf of all of us at U.S. Soccer, I want to say we hear you, we believe in you and we are committed to doing right by you.”

“We believe at U.S. Soccer that all female athletes deserve fair and equitable pay,” he continued, “and together, I believe we can get this done, because as this team has taught us, being the greatest isn’t just about how you play on the field, it’s about what you stand for off the field. It’s about who we are as a sport and a country.”

When USWNT co-captain Megan Rapinoe later addressed the crowd she joked about the cheers, but eventually came to Cordeiro’s defense. “Everybody in power gets booed” said Rapinoe. “But I’m going to stick my neck out a little bit, I’m going to endorse Carlos. I think he’s with us. I think he’s on the right side of things. I think he’s going to make things right.”


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This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni


She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination. On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work. Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “The gap in weekly earni
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This is how Elizabeth Warren plans to close the pay gap for women of color

Warren cited data that indicates that more than 70% of black mothers and more than 40% of Latina mothers are the sole breadwinners in their families, compared to less than a quarter of white mothers. She says that “while millions of families count on Latinas and black women to deliver financially, they face a steeper climb to provide that financial security” due to bias and discrimination.

In a Medium post, the Massachusetts senator writes that if elected, on day one of her presidency she would implement a set of executive actions that would “boost wages for women of color and open up new pathways to the leadership positions they deserve.”

On Friday, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren released an ambitious plan to close the pay gaps that women of color face at work.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks on during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida.

Currently, black women, Native American women and Latina women make 61 cents, 58 cents and 53 cents, respectively, compared to white men. “And it’s getting worse,” writes Warren. “The gap in weekly earnings between white and black women is higher today than it was 40 years ago. ”

To fix this problem, Warren says that as president she would deny federal contracts to companies with a poor track record of diversity and equal pay, implement a minimum wage salary of $15 an hour (since black and brown women disproportionately occupy low-wage jobs), ban companies from asking applicants about their salary and criminal histories, and ban companies from using forced arbitration and non-compete clauses that “make it harder for employees to fight wage theft, discrimination and harassment.”

Additionally, Warren points out that women of color also face a steeper climb to higher-level management positions. “Even though black women and Latinas are often the leaders and decision-makers in their own homes and communities, they hold only one spot on the Fortune 500 CEO list and less than 5% of Fortune 500 Board positions, ” she writes.

Currently, Mary Winston, who was appointed interim CEO of Bed, Bath & Beyond in May, is the only black woman leading a Fortune 500 company.

Warren writes that she would provide companies with resources to attract applicants from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities and other minority-serving institutions. She says she would also create paid fellowship programs for federal jobs for minority and low-income candidates and she would require every federal agency to make diversity a core part of its strategic plan. This includes, she says, creating a government-wide mentorship program focused on black and brown employees.

“It’s time to build an America that recognizes the role that women of color play in their families and in the economy,” writes Warren, “that fairly values their work, and that delivers equal opportunity for everyone.”

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Don’t miss: Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far


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Suzy Welch: There’s a specific type of employee that always gets the promotion—here’s why

There can be a number of reasons for this, but bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch says there’s a particularly common one. The people speeding ahead, she tells CNBC Make It, tend to be “happy extroverts.” CNBC Contributor Suzy WelchShe says she first observed this 30 years ago when she noticed that it wasn’t the smartest person among her Harvard Business School classmates who got hired first, but rather the most popular. “Happy extroverts help make that happen.” And whe


There can be a number of reasons for this, but bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch says there’s a particularly common one. The people speeding ahead, she tells CNBC Make It, tend to be “happy extroverts.” CNBC Contributor Suzy WelchShe says she first observed this 30 years ago when she noticed that it wasn’t the smartest person among her Harvard Business School classmates who got hired first, but rather the most popular. “Happy extroverts help make that happen.” And whe
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Suzy Welch: There's a specific type of employee that always gets the promotion—here's why

It’s a familiar scenario in most workplaces: A few employees whose skills and performance seem average keep getting promoted — sometimes over their top-performing colleagues. There can be a number of reasons for this, but bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch says there’s a particularly common one. The people speeding ahead, she tells CNBC Make It, tend to be “happy extroverts.” It’s a personality type that gives some people “a real career advantage.”

CNBC Contributor Suzy Welch

She says she first observed this 30 years ago when she noticed that it wasn’t the smartest person among her Harvard Business School classmates who got hired first, but rather the most popular. These people, she says, were “the ones who were outgoing and friendly — warm, authentic and highly verbal — the ones who planned the beach picnics and tracked you down after class to compliment you on a good answer.” At first, Welch says, she found this dynamic irritating. “I remember calling home and moaning, ‘Mom, I don’t think my grades here actually count at all!'” But since then, she says, “I’ve watched the happy extrovert phenomenon play out in companies of every kind. And now, as a boss myself, I understand why.” “Organizations run so much better when teamwork is high and drama is low,” says Welch. “Happy extroverts help make that happen.” And when these individuals over-deliver on their work, they can become, ultimately, a boss’s “favorite type of employee.” But Welch says if you’re an introvert there’s no need to despair. “Two of my own kids are your comrades, and they’ve done just fine professionally.” In addition to performing at a high level, she says her introverted kids also “make sure to tell everyone, bosses included, not to mistake their reserve for negativity.”


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12 companies that let you work from home and help pay for your vacation

In 2018, roughly 54% of American employees took advantage of their eligible vacation time/paid time off, according to a Glassdoor study. Of those who took time off, 66% said they still did work while on vacation. FlexJobs, a job posting site for companies that offer remote work, took a look at its data to determine which companies will help their employees pay for their vacation. That means each of the companies listed offers flexible job openings, and they also provide stipends, discounts or re


In 2018, roughly 54% of American employees took advantage of their eligible vacation time/paid time off, according to a Glassdoor study. Of those who took time off, 66% said they still did work while on vacation. FlexJobs, a job posting site for companies that offer remote work, took a look at its data to determine which companies will help their employees pay for their vacation. That means each of the companies listed offers flexible job openings, and they also provide stipends, discounts or re
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12 companies that let you work from home and help pay for your vacation

In 2018, roughly 54% of American employees took advantage of their eligible vacation time/paid time off, according to a Glassdoor study. Of those who took time off, 66% said they still did work while on vacation. And over one in four Americans have decided to forgo a summer vacation altogether this year, with 60% saying it’s because they can’t afford it, according to a recent Bankrate survey.

As a perk, some companies are helping with all that.

FlexJobs, a job posting site for companies that offer remote work, took a look at its data to determine which companies will help their employees pay for their vacation. That means each of the companies listed offers flexible job openings, and they also provide stipends, discounts or reimbursements to encourage employees to take time off.

Take a look below to see which employers you should consider if you want more flexibility at work and an incentive to take vacation.


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Here’s how much President Trump’s 28-year-old director of Oval Office operations makes

In 2017, the Trump administration tapped the then-26-year-old to serve as a special assistant and executive assistant to the president, a role in which she earned $95,000 a year . In February of 2019, she was promoted to director of Oval Office operations, a position that comes with an annual salary of $145,000, according to White House salary data released July 1. Madeleine Westerhout, 28, is one of the longest-tenured members of President Trump’s White House staff, a group often noted for its


In 2017, the Trump administration tapped the then-26-year-old to serve as a special assistant and executive assistant to the president, a role in which she earned $95,000 a year . In February of 2019, she was promoted to director of Oval Office operations, a position that comes with an annual salary of $145,000, according to White House salary data released July 1. Madeleine Westerhout, 28, is one of the longest-tenured members of President Trump’s White House staff, a group often noted for its
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Here's how much President Trump's 28-year-old director of Oval Office operations makes

In 2017, the Trump administration tapped the then-26-year-old to serve as a special assistant and executive assistant to the president, a role in which she earned $95,000 a year . In February of 2019, she was promoted to director of Oval Office operations, a position that comes with an annual salary of $145,000, according to White House salary data released July 1.

Madeleine Westerhout, 28, is one of the longest-tenured members of President Trump’s White House staff, a group often noted for its high turnover rate.

That’s up from the $130,000 salary she earned last year as Trump’s assistant. It’s also significantly higher than the annual median income of $69,000 that most millennial households bring in, according to a Pew Research Center analysis.

Anita Decker Breckenridge, who started as former President Barack Obama’s executive assistant during his second term, at age 32, also made $95,000 during her two years in the White House. Meanwhile, Obama’s first executive assistant, Katie Johnson, who started in 2009, made $90,000 during her second year in the role.

Originally from California, Westerhout first caught media attention in 2016 when she was photographed escorting high-profile individuals through the hallways of Trump Tower. At the time, she was an assistant to Republican National Committee chief of staff Katie Walsh.

She graduated from the College of Charleston in 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in political science. According to her college’s website, the young politico took the fall semester off in her senior year to intern for Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential campaign. After graduation, she moved to Washington, D.C., to intern for former California Republican Rep. John Campbell, before taking on a staff role with the Republican National Committee.

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Suzy Welch: Why working from home can be terrible for your career

The flexibility to work remotely is a perk many workers dream of having. But according to bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch, working from the comfort of your home or coffee shop can easily become “a career killer.” “I understand that as an employee, sometimes remote work is the only way work is possible,” Welch tells CNBC Make It. However, she says, though working remotely has a few “very real upsides,” it has serious drawbacks as well. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch”Her


The flexibility to work remotely is a perk many workers dream of having. But according to bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch, working from the comfort of your home or coffee shop can easily become “a career killer.” “I understand that as an employee, sometimes remote work is the only way work is possible,” Welch tells CNBC Make It. However, she says, though working remotely has a few “very real upsides,” it has serious drawbacks as well. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch”Her
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Suzy Welch: Why working from home can be terrible for your career

The flexibility to work remotely is a perk many workers dream of having. But according to bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch, working from the comfort of your home or coffee shop can easily become “a career killer.” “I understand that as an employee, sometimes remote work is the only way work is possible,” Welch tells CNBC Make It. “And I understand as a boss, sometimes remote work is the only way to get the person you need.” However, she says, though working remotely has a few “very real upsides,” it has serious drawbacks as well.

CNBC contributor Suzy Welch

“Here’s the truth,” says Welch. “The best work in an organization, the important work, it never gets done on the phone, or over email or on Slack.” Instead, she says, “it is almost always facilitated by relationships and understandings that only happen when people are together physically.” Great teams are built on “the banter, the lunches, the late nights, the jokes, the asides, the shared ah-has!” That type of bonding, she says, “builds layers of trust, and trust is a career’s rocket fuel. You can fly without it, but you can’t soar.”


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The 10 best CEOs for women, according to Comparably

Employee review site Comparably examined the ratings and reviews of anonymous women employees to come up with its list of the 50 best CEOs for women, and these CEOs earned top marks. CEOs of small/mid-size companies with fewer than 500 employees had to receive at least 25 employee reviews during that same time frame. This year, T-Mobile CEO John Legere ranked No.1 on the list of large companies, a bump up from his No. Last year no women CEOs made the top 10, but this year’s list includes Shipt C


Employee review site Comparably examined the ratings and reviews of anonymous women employees to come up with its list of the 50 best CEOs for women, and these CEOs earned top marks. CEOs of small/mid-size companies with fewer than 500 employees had to receive at least 25 employee reviews during that same time frame. This year, T-Mobile CEO John Legere ranked No.1 on the list of large companies, a bump up from his No. Last year no women CEOs made the top 10, but this year’s list includes Shipt C
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The 10 best CEOs for women, according to Comparably

Employee review site Comparably examined the ratings and reviews of anonymous women employees to come up with its list of the 50 best CEOs for women, and these CEOs earned top marks.

Looking at responses for more than 60,000 organizations, Comparably focused on how female employees rated company culture and their CEO’s management style on a scale of one to 10. To qualify, CEOs of large companies with 500 employees or more had to receive a minimum of 75 reviews between June 7th, 2018 and June 7th, 2019. CEOs of small/mid-size companies with fewer than 500 employees had to receive at least 25 employee reviews during that same time frame.

This year, T-Mobile CEO John Legere ranked No.1 on the list of large companies, a bump up from his No. 6 last year. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella dropped to No. 19 on the list this year, after coming in at No. 2 last year. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Apple’s Tim Cook, and Amazon’s Jeff Bezos all landed outside the top 20.

Last year no women CEOs made the top 10, but this year’s list includes Shipt CEO Kelly Caruso, at No. 6, and Deloitte CEO Cathy Engelbert at No. 9 (Engelbert will start a new role as commissioner of the WNBA on July 17.)

Take a look below to see which leaders are the 10 list of best CEOs for women, according to Comparably:


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Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women’s rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far

“Already, Democratic candidates entering the presidential race have acknowledged the importance of women — women of color — black women — in their pathways to victory,” former Congresswoman Donna Edwards writes in an op-ed for The Washington Post. CNBC Make It took a closer look at how Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and a few other Democrats are leading the way with proposed plans on women’s issues. Elizabeth Warren In response to Alabama’s b


“Already, Democratic candidates entering the presidential race have acknowledged the importance of women — women of color — black women — in their pathways to victory,” former Congresswoman Donna Edwards writes in an op-ed for The Washington Post. CNBC Make It took a closer look at how Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and a few other Democrats are leading the way with proposed plans on women’s issues. Elizabeth Warren In response to Alabama’s b
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Abortion, equal pay, family leave: Here are all the women's rights policies proposed by 2020 candidates so far

Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, center, speaks during a health care bill news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017.

As the 2020 presidential campaign continues to heat up — with 23 democratic candidates in the race so far — conversations around women’s rights and policies have taken center stage in many political discussions. From the fight for equal pay and paid parental leave to the push for abortion rights and better maternal healthcare, many presidential hopefuls are aware that they’ll need to address these key issues in order to win over women, who, have historically voted at higher rates than men. “Already, Democratic candidates entering the presidential race have acknowledged the importance of women — women of color — black women — in their pathways to victory,” former Congresswoman Donna Edwards writes in an op-ed for The Washington Post. Though many dismiss identity politics, she writes, “for many women/women of color/black women, identity is politics,” and it will be critical for presidential candidates to recognize that. CNBC Make It took a closer look at how Sen. Kamala Harris, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Cory Booker, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and a few other Democrats are leading the way with proposed plans on women’s issues.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) talk with each other as they listen to Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of his Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill September 6, 2018 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer | Getty Images

Abortion and reproductive rights

On May 15, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey signed a bill that bans doctors from performing an abortion at any stage during a pregnancy. Alabama is one of more than 10 states — including Georgia, Louisiana and Arkansas — that have passed, or are working to pass, anti-abortion laws. Though these policies have led many presidential hopefuls to speak out against abortion bans on their campaign trail, very few have released actual plans for protecting abortion once in office. Elizabeth Warren In response to Alabama’s bill, Sen. Warren shared her plan for protecting abortion rights in a post published on Medium on May 17. Warren called the bill “the most extreme abortion ban in over 40 years” and writes that as president, she would pass new federal laws to uphold the Roe v. Wade ruling and ensure all women have access to birth control and abortion. She writes that she would do this by making reproductive health coverage part of overall health coverage and she would “[repeal] the Hyde Amendment, which blocks abortion coverage for women under federally funded health care programs like Medicaid, the VA, and the Indian Health Service.” Corey Booker On May 22, Sen. Booker released a plan to create a White House Office for Reproductive Freedom. He says that in addition to increasing the budget for Title X family planning — which has dropped from roughly $297.4 million in 2012 to $286.4 million now — he would reverse Trump’s “gag rule,” which bans doctors from telling women how they can safely and legally access an abortion. Booker says that as president he would also guarantee access to employer-covered contraceptive care and restore evidence-based guidelines for the Teen Pregnancy Prevention program so that young people are educated about their healthcare options. Kamala Harris On May 28, Sen. Harris released a plan on her campaign website that, she says, for the first time would require “states and localities with a history of violating Roe v. Wade to obtain approval from her Department of Justice before any abortion law or practice can take effect.” Additionally, she says she would protect funding for Planned Parenthood and she would nominate judges who support the Roe v. Wade decision. Gillibrand, Beto O’Rourke, Sen. Bernie Sanders and Andrew Yang all say they would appoint judges who support abortion rights. John Hickenlooper On May 29, former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper wrote in a Medium post that as president he would expand the long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) plan that he oversaw in Colorado, which makes healthcare and contraception more accessible and affordable for women. As president, he said he would be “committed to ensuring that every woman has access to the full range of contraceptive options, so she can choose the method that best fits her needs and preferences, and that providers are educated and trained to provide the full range of options in a way that respects decision-making and autonomy.” Additional measures In addition to Warren, many other presidential candidates including Harris, Booker, Gillibrand, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg and former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke said they would repeal the Hyde Amendment. And like Booker, Sanders, Warren, Gillibrand, O’Rourke and Hickenlooper stated that they would also increase the budget for Title X family planning. Meanwhile, Gillibrand and O’Rourke say they would reverse the Trump Administration’s gag rule. “This is about the fundamental question of whether we value women and see them as human beings equal to anyone else,” Gillibrand wrote in a Medium post, “and any Democrat who expects to win the presidency must answer definitively.”

Entrepreneur and 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang speaks during a campaign stop at the train depot on February 1, 2019 in Jefferson, Iowa. Joshua Lott | AFP | Getty Images

Equal pay

Women, on average, earn $.80 cents for every dollar paid to men. When broken down by race, Asian-American women earn $0.85 compared to white men, white women earn $0.77 compared to white men and African-American, Native American and Latina women earn $0.61, $0.58 and $0.53, respectively, compared to white men. When it comes to closing the pay gap, Harris leads the way with a detailed plan for how she would enforce equality in the workplace. Kamala Harris On May 20, Harris released an ambitious plan that outlines how she would hold companies responsible for paying and promoting women fairly. Calling her plan “the most aggressive pay proposal in history,” the California senator said that as president she would give companies with 100 or more employees three years to obtain an Equal Pay Certification from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), and companies with 500 or more employees two years to obtain certification. In order to receive this certification, Harris writes that companies would have to prove that they’ve eliminated all pay disparities for men and women who are doing equal work. If a pay gap does exist, then the company would have to prove that it exists based on merit, performance or seniority, and not gender. Any company that fails to meet these requirements would be fined 1% of their profits for every 1% wage gap they allow to persist in their organization. Bernie Sanders Sanders’ campaign website says that he would “adopt equal pay for equal work through the Paycheck Fairness Act,” a proposed law that addresses gaps in the Equal Pay Act of 1963 in order to ensure men and women are paid fairly. Andrew Yang Yang says on his website he would work with states to implement salary disclosure laws and implement pilot studies to test whether policy changes result in more equitable hiring and pay. Pete Buttigieg Buttigieg also says he would sign the Paycheck Fairness Act and he would mandate that companies publicly submit an annual report detailing how much men make in comparison to women at their organization. He says he will also strengthen anti-discrimination laws in order to prevent gender and sexual-identity discrimination, as well as discrimination against pregnant workers. Additional measures Warren and Booker haven’t released specific plans for addressing pay gap issues, but they are co-sponsors of the Paycheck Fairness Act, along with presidential hopefuls Sen. Michael F. Bennet, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, Rep. Seth Moulton, Rep. Tim Ryan and Rep. Eric Swalwell. Refinery29 notes that Warren also leads by example when it comes to equal pay — the average women-to-men earnings ratio among staffers in her office is 1: 0.08.

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks at a campaign stop on May 15, 2019 in Nashua, New Hampshire. Spencer Platt | Getty Images

Maternal mortality

The U.S. is one of 13 countries where the maternal mortality rate has worsened in the last 25 years. Data shows that black women are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy or child-birth related causes than white women. Elizabeth Warren In an op-ed for Essence, Warren writes that she would incentivize health systems that keep mothers healthy, push for more inclusive best practices that have historically benefited mothers of color, diversify hospital staffs and hold hospitals accountable for preventable failures. Kamala Harris Similarly, Harris told Elle.com that she would reintroduce the Maternal Care Access and Reducing Emergencies (Maternal CARE) Act, which includes a $25 million grant for training programs and medical schools to fight racial bias in maternal health. The bill will also include an allocation of $125 million to identify high-risk pregnancies and to provide mothers with the culturally competent health care and resources they need. Harris first introduced this bill in 2018, but it did not receive a vote prior to the 115th Congress ending in December. Additional measures Though Booker has not released a detailed presidential plan for addressing the maternal mortality rate, in May, he and Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna Pressley introduced the Maximizing Outcomes for Moms through Medicaid Improvement and Enhancement of Services (MOMMIES) Act. The act would extend the time in which Medicaid will cover postpartum women from two months after giving birth to one year.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand Zach Gibson | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Paid family leave


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sen, women, leave, plan, rights, pay, far, equal, abortion, family, harris, booker, presidential, proposed, warren, candidates, womens, policies


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