Patriots’ Joejuan Williams lives off 10% of his income and says a high school finance class taught him how to save

Joejuan Williams is a rookie cornerback in the NFL who currently plays for the New England Patriots. But when thinking about his long-term financial plans, Williams says, “I’m going to sacrifice now for me to be happy later.” “I can go buy me a really nice car, I can go buy me a really nice house if I wanted to, I can go buy me a really nice chain — multiple chains — if I wanted to,” he adds. “But that’s not going to suffice me for when I’m 40, 50, or 60. Who knows when I’m going to need that br


Joejuan Williams is a rookie cornerback in the NFL who currently plays for the New England Patriots.
But when thinking about his long-term financial plans, Williams says, “I’m going to sacrifice now for me to be happy later.”
“I can go buy me a really nice car, I can go buy me a really nice house if I wanted to, I can go buy me a really nice chain — multiple chains — if I wanted to,” he adds.
“But that’s not going to suffice me for when I’m 40, 50, or 60. Who knows when I’m going to need that br
Patriots’ Joejuan Williams lives off 10% of his income and says a high school finance class taught him how to save Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: courtney connley
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Patriots' Joejuan Williams lives off 10% of his income and says a high school finance class taught him how to save

The Vanderbilt University alum says he first learned about the importance of investing and saving from a personal finance class he took in high school. In that class, the rookie says he learned about mutual funds, hedge funds, 401(k) plans, certificates of deposit and Roth IRAs. Those financial lessons, he says, influenced his decision to invest roughly 90% of his income from NFL checks, leaving him to live off the remaining 10%.

“I’ve been stingy with money ever since I was young just because I saw what my mom had to go through,” says Williams, who grew up in public housing with his family in Tennessee.

Joejuan Williams is a rookie cornerback in the NFL who currently plays for the New England Patriots. Though he’s signed to a four-year, $6.6 million contract, he tells Boston.com that he’s still super careful with how he spends his money.

Joejuan Williams #33 of the New England Patriots during the preseason game between the New York Giants and the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on August 29, 2019 in Foxborough, Massachusetts.

“It changed my life,” Williams says about the class. “It completely changed my life.”

He admits, however, that investments from his first few checks were a little below 90% because he helped pay off his mom’s student loans and he bought her a car. But when thinking about his long-term financial plans, Williams says, “I’m going to sacrifice now for me to be happy later.”

“I can go buy me a really nice car, I can go buy me a really nice house if I wanted to, I can go buy me a really nice chain — multiple chains — if I wanted to,” he adds. “But that’s not going to suffice me for when I’m 40, 50, or 60. Who knows when I’m going to need that bread.”

Williams, who was selected 45th overall in the 2019 draft, says he hopes to one day start a financial literacy program so other high school students in disadvantaged neighborhoods can learn about the importance of saving and investing.

“For a lot of public schools in inner cities, it’s not required to take any personal finance classes to graduate or even learn about money in that sense,” he says. “That’s not the real world. The real world revolves around money. It really puts a lot of inner-city kids who don’t have much at a disadvantage.”

Like Williams, several other NFL players have talked openly about how they’re spending their money carefully now so they can be financially secure in the future.

In 2017, New York Jets linebacker Brandon Copeland told ESPN that he lives off 10% to 15% of his income, while saving and investing the rest.

“I’ve literally hoarded money,” he says. “I’m literally stacking, stacking, stacking.”

Copeland, who taught a money class at the University of Pennsylvania earlier this year, says nearly 60% of his post-tax salary goes towards “safe, long-term” investments, while another 30% goes toward savings.

“I still hold myself to strict guidelines in terms of what I touch in terms of that money,” he says. “It’s guaranteed football is going to be over one day. I tell kids that all the time.”

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Don’t miss: Why NFL star Michael Bennett skips direct deposit and keeps his checks ‘until the end of the season’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: courtney connley
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New report from members of The Washington Post’s union shows women and people of color are paid less

A new comprehensive study released by The Washington Post Newspaper Guild, a union started by company employees in 1934, shows that women and people of color are paid significantly less than their white male counterparts on staff. All of this information is based on pay data for Guild-covered employees that the union requested in July 2019. Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist Steven Rich led efforts on the study, alongside a team of other Post Guild members. Office of the Washington Post on M


A new comprehensive study released by The Washington Post Newspaper Guild, a union started by company employees in 1934, shows that women and people of color are paid significantly less than their white male counterparts on staff.
All of this information is based on pay data for Guild-covered employees that the union requested in July 2019.
Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist Steven Rich led efforts on the study, alongside a team of other Post Guild members.
Office of the Washington Post on M
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, washington, members, post, paid, employees, company, women, posts, guild, report, union, shows, color, men, study, data, pay


New report from members of The Washington Post's union shows women and people of color are paid less

A new comprehensive study released by The Washington Post Newspaper Guild, a union started by company employees in 1934, shows that women and people of color are paid significantly less than their white male counterparts on staff. The study, which looks at pay disparities in both the newsroom and in the commercial division, says that “women as a group are paid less than men” and that “women of color in the newsroom receive $30,000 [per year] less than white men.” All of this information is based on pay data for Guild-covered employees that the union requested in July 2019. Pulitzer Prize-winning data journalist Steven Rich led efforts on the study, alongside a team of other Post Guild members. He tells CNBC Make It via email that he hopes the data will move the company closer to achieving pay equity.

Office of the Washington Post on May 03, 2012, in Washington, United States. The Washington Post is an American daily newspaper. Thomas Imo | Photothek | Getty Images

“The Post has been on a hiring spree in recent years, and one thing we’ve heard from many members of the Guild was that they’d like to better understand pay across the organization,” he says. “The Post has never conducted and released to the public a comprehensive pay study, so The Guild felt it was time to do so again since it had been three years since the last such study.” In addition to highlighting a pay gap among women and people of color, the study also found that the pay disparity between men and women is most prevalent in journalists under the age of 40. Based on the data, the median salary for men and women over 40 in the newsroom is $127,765 per year and $126,000 per year, respectively. That’s a 1.5% gap. But, when looking at journalists under 40, that gap widens to 14% with men earning $95,890 per year, compared to women earning $84,030 per year. For young employees of color, the study found that on average they make 7% less than white journalists, with median salaries of $84,780 and $90,780, respectively. In a series of testimonies given by employees, one 35-year-old award-winning journalist says she started her career as an intern at the company in the mid-2000s. Recently, she says, she found out that all of the men on her team are paid more than she is, despite her having more experience than most of them. One of the men, she says, even makes $30,000 more than she does. The journalist continues by saying that the only time she received a significant raise at the company was when a competitor presented her with another job offer several years ago. “It’s always disgusted me that the only way we can get what we deserve is by getting an offer somewhere else,” she says. “How is that a way to show that you value someone?”

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos attends the Amazon Prime Video’s Golden Globe Awards After Party in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Jan. 6, 2019. Emma McIntyre | Getty Images


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Regina Romero becomes first Latina mayor of Tucson, Arizona — and the only Latina mayor in the 50 largest cities in the US

Tucson, Arizona’s former city council member, Regina Romero, made history Tuesday night by becoming the first Latina to be elected mayor of the city. Romero, a Democrat, beat Independent Ed Ackerley and Green Party candidate Mike Cease by roughly 87,000 ballots, reports Tucson.com. Romero, who is the youngest of six children, was raised by immigrant farm workers in Somerton, Arizona, according to her campaign website. Right now, minimum wage workers in Tucson earn $11 per hour. Romero’s historic


Tucson, Arizona’s former city council member, Regina Romero, made history Tuesday night by becoming the first Latina to be elected mayor of the city.
Romero, a Democrat, beat Independent Ed Ackerley and Green Party candidate Mike Cease by roughly 87,000 ballots, reports Tucson.com.
Romero, who is the youngest of six children, was raised by immigrant farm workers in Somerton, Arizona, according to her campaign website.
Right now, minimum wage workers in Tucson earn $11 per hour.
Romero’s historic
Regina Romero becomes first Latina mayor of Tucson, Arizona — and the only Latina mayor in the 50 largest cities in the US Cached Page below :
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Regina Romero becomes first Latina mayor of Tucson, Arizona — and the only Latina mayor in the 50 largest cities in the US

Tucson, Arizona’s former city council member, Regina Romero, made history Tuesday night by becoming the first Latina to be elected mayor of the city.

Romero, a Democrat, beat Independent Ed Ackerley and Green Party candidate Mike Cease by roughly 87,000 ballots, reports Tucson.com. When she steps into her new role next month, she will succeed current Mayor Jonathan Rothschild.

“At a time when our national politics have been sown with division, Tucsonans remain united by our shared desire to promote a safe, just and sustainable city that provides economic opportunity for our families and future generations,” Tucson.com reports the former councilwoman saying after her victory. “This movement is open to everyone — whatever your background, whatever your party, whoever you voted for — let’s work together! We will always be one Tucson — somos uno.”

The wife and mom of two also took to Twitter Tuesday to thank her supporters for leading her to victory.

Romero, who is the youngest of six children, was raised by immigrant farm workers in Somerton, Arizona, according to her campaign website. In addition to being the first person in her family to vote and graduate from college, Romero also became the first woman to represent Tucson’s Ward 1 as a city council member in 2007. In that role, she says she “championed issues such as equal pay for equal work and spearheaded the effort to pass universal earned sick and parental leave for City of Tucson families.”

The University of Arizona graduate, who also earned a post-graduate certificate from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, ran her campaign with a focus on climate change, local infrastructure solutions, job opportunities, education, homelessness and neighborhood safety.

In addition to focusing on these issues, Romero also places a significant emphasis on “delivering equality, inclusion and opportunity for all” as mayor. This includes, according to her website, a race and social justice initiative that contains an advancement agenda for immigrants, a criminal justice reform plan and a $15 minimum wage plan for city employees. Right now, minimum wage workers in Tucson earn $11 per hour.

Romero’s historic victory also makes her the only Latina mayor in the 50 largest cities in the country, reports Tucson.com.

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Don’t miss: Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: courtney connley
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Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate

Former community college professor Ghazala Hashmi just became the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate. Hashmi, a Democrat who ran for public office for the first time, unseated Republican state Sen. Glen Sturtevant on Tuesday to represent the state’s 10th Senate District. In 1991, Hashmi, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgia Southern University and a PhD from Emory University, moved to Richmond, Virginia with her husband. As a representative of the state’s 10th Senate Di


Former community college professor Ghazala Hashmi just became the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate.
Hashmi, a Democrat who ran for public office for the first time, unseated Republican state Sen. Glen Sturtevant on Tuesday to represent the state’s 10th Senate District.
In 1991, Hashmi, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgia Southern University and a PhD from Emory University, moved to Richmond, Virginia with her husband.
As a representative of the state’s 10th Senate Di
Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate Cached Page below :
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Meet Ghazala Hashmi, the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia's state Senate

Former community college professor Ghazala Hashmi just became the first Muslim woman elected to Virginia’s state Senate.

Hashmi, a Democrat who ran for public office for the first time, unseated Republican state Sen. Glen Sturtevant on Tuesday to represent the state’s 10th Senate District.

In a series of tweets sent out Tuesday night, Hashmi thanked her supporters for the win and said, “This victory is not mine alone. It belongs to all of you who believed that we need to make progressive change here in Virginia.”

As a child, Hashmi immigrated from India to the U.S. with her family, reports The Hill. According to her campaign website, she was raised in a small town in Georgia where she “saw firsthand how community-building and open dialogue can bridge cultural and socioeconomic divisions.”

In 1991, Hashmi, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Georgia Southern University and a PhD from Emory University, moved to Richmond, Virginia with her husband. For the past 25 years, she’s devoted her career to being an educator in the state. Before winning her election, she served as the Founding Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Reynolds Community College in Richmond.

The wife and mom of two ran her campaign with a focus on education, healthcare, gun violence prevention, environmental protection and workforce development. In her newly-appointed role, she says she plans to focus on establishing a paid family leave and medical leave program in Virginia that “will provide security for workers who need to temporarily take time away to care for themselves or a loved one.”

As a representative of the state’s 10th Senate District, Hashmi will oversee Richmond, Powhatan County and parts of Chesterfield County in Virginia. The Richmond Times-Dispatch reports that Hashmi and Sturtevant’s race was among the most competitive in the state, with more than $1.5 million in media buys including TV advertising. Between Oct. 1 and Oct. 24, the two public officials also received more than $1.1 million each in contributions.

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Don’t miss: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib and 13 others who made history in the 2018 midterm election


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: courtney connley
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This JPMorgan executive likes to ask 3 simple questions in an interview—here’s how to answer them

For more than two years, Pamela Lipp-Hendricks has served as the head of executive talent management and diversity at JPMorgan Chase & Co. That’s why, she says, one of her go-to questions she asks in an interview is: “Where do you get your ideas from?” In order to see just how well a candidate responds to these obstacles, she relies on this simple interview question: “Tell me about a time you failed, and how did you bounce back from that?” With this question, Lipp-Hendricks emphasizes that she l


For more than two years, Pamela Lipp-Hendricks has served as the head of executive talent management and diversity at JPMorgan Chase & Co.
That’s why, she says, one of her go-to questions she asks in an interview is: “Where do you get your ideas from?”
In order to see just how well a candidate responds to these obstacles, she relies on this simple interview question: “Tell me about a time you failed, and how did you bounce back from that?”
With this question, Lipp-Hendricks emphasizes that she l
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This JPMorgan executive likes to ask 3 simple questions in an interview—here's how to answer them

For more than two years, Pamela Lipp-Hendricks has served as the head of executive talent management and diversity at JPMorgan Chase & Co. In this role, she oversees talent management at the senior level and focuses on the company’s diversity and inclusion efforts to ensure that an inclusive and engaging work environment is created for all employees. As someone who manages a team of 18 people directly and about 80 people indirectly, Lipp-Hendricks tells CNBC Make It at Fairygodboss’s Galvanize event that there are three simple interview questions she likes to ask to see if a candidate is a good fit for her team.

The headquarters of JP Morgan Chase on Park Avenue December 12, 2013 in New York. Stan Honda | AFP | Getty Images

1. Where do you get your ideas from?

When searching to hire a new employee, Lipp-Hendricks says she always looks for people who are curious about learning new things. That’s why, she says, one of her go-to questions she asks in an interview is: “Where do you get your ideas from?” “We want people who are going to innovate,” she says, while explaining that with this question she loves to hear how people have used external resources to come up with new ideas. For example, the talent executive says candidates can detail how they learned something new from a book, a conference or from a simple conversation they had with someone who works in a different career field.

2. Tell me about a time you failed, and how did you bounce back from that?

Like many executives, Lipp-Hendricks prefers to hire employees who know how to overcome challenges and situations that don’t always work in their favor. In order to see just how well a candidate responds to these obstacles, she relies on this simple interview question: “Tell me about a time you failed, and how did you bounce back from that?” “I like to see people who can really try new things and fail because that leads to innovation,” she says. With this question, Lipp-Hendricks emphasizes that she likes to hear what a candidate learned from their failure and how they grew from the experience. “If people say they don’t view things as a failure and they don’t have an answer, then I’ll say, ‘Tell me about a time you did something outside of your comfort zone. What was it and why did you do it?'” Similar to Lipp-Hendricks, Lyft executive Kristin Sverchek also likes to hear about a candidate’s failures during their career. She tells CNBC Make It, “I’m actually not looking for somebody who has 100% perfection because that’s not achievable. I’m looking for somebody who knows how to manage a difficult situation under extreme stress.”

3. What do you do for fun?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-05  Authors: courtney connley
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Panthers linebacker Luke Kuechly on the financial lesson he learned as a teen working in his dad’s auto shop

After working extra long hours in a hot shop, Kuechly says he would often get his paycheck and think to himself, “Dang, that’s it?” “And you start to realize that stuff costs money, and then you start to assign value to money,” he explains. Kuechly adds that working his first job as a young teen ultimately helped him to assign more value to the things he had growing up. Bennett, who grew up as one of five children in Louisiana, says the budgeting lessons he learned as a young teen have stuck wit


After working extra long hours in a hot shop, Kuechly says he would often get his paycheck and think to himself, “Dang, that’s it?”
“And you start to realize that stuff costs money, and then you start to assign value to money,” he explains.
Kuechly adds that working his first job as a young teen ultimately helped him to assign more value to the things he had growing up.
Bennett, who grew up as one of five children in Louisiana, says the budgeting lessons he learned as a young teen have stuck wit
Panthers linebacker Luke Kuechly on the financial lesson he learned as a teen working in his dad’s auto shop Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-03  Authors: courtney connley
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Panthers linebacker Luke Kuechly on the financial lesson he learned as a teen working in his dad's auto shop

After working extra long hours in a hot shop, Kuechly says he would often get his paycheck and think to himself, “Dang, that’s it?”

“I worked in the warehouse, and I would pick up orders,” he says. “I would go to the computer screen, print off the order from a customer and then it would have where all the stuff was located in the warehouse. I’d go get a big gray cart, and you had to fill up these bins with all the parts. And it wasn’t air-conditioned in there.”

Though he’s made millions throughout his NFL career, the 28-year-old has not lost sight of what it means to properly manage his money. That lesson, he tells The Charlotte Observer , is all thanks to his first job in high school, when he worked at his dad’s auto shop in Ohio.

Luke Kuechly #59 of the Carolina Panthers before their game against the Los Angeles Rams at Bank of America Stadium on September 08, 2019 in Charlotte, North Carolina.

“And you start to realize that stuff costs money, and then you start to assign value to money,” he explains. “Like if my mom goes to the grocery store and she buys a gallon of milk and the gallon of milk costs this, then you start to run it back in your head, and you’re like, ‘Dang, that’s a half hour of work!'”

Kuechly adds that working his first job as a young teen ultimately helped him to assign more value to the things he had growing up. “Because once I was working, my Dad’s like, ‘You’ve got money now. You can go buy things if you want them. And then it starts to teach you: ‘Oh, do I really need it?’ You start to understand what 20 bucks really means.”

Besides Kuechly, several other professional athletes have held menial first jobs as a teen. In fact, on an episode of the “Kneading Dough” podcast, three-time Pro Bowler and NFL star Michael Bennett says he used to save his money as a young kid to help buy clothes for some of his siblings.

“I had different jobs, and I used to save my money to buy me and my brother’s school clothes,” he says. “I worked at a water park, a grocery store and most of the time I was a lifeguard. I was a lifeguard for four years.”

Bennett, who grew up as one of five children in Louisiana, says the budgeting lessons he learned as a young teen have stuck with him throughout his NFL career. Not only does he admit to being tight with his money, but he also says that he opts out of direct deposit so that he can receive all of his checks by hand and save them until the end of the season.

“I keep my checks until the end of the season to make sure I don’t spend any money,” he says. “And then at the end of the season, I deposit it.”

To survive, the football veteran says he lives off the money he budgeted and saved from previous years.

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Don’t miss: Why NFL star Michael Bennett skips direct deposit and keeps his checks ‘until the end of the season’


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Former NFL and Twitter executive shares his No.1 piece of advice for negotiating your first raise

“My advice is to understand what the standard is for the job,” he tells CNBC Make It at SoFi’s recent “Get That Raise” event. Throughout his professional journey, he says he’s learned one key thing about asking for a raise that he thinks all young people should follow. As a long-standing executive in business and finance, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto knows what it’s like to negotiate your salary at work. Noto explains that knowing the standard for how much you should earn based on your performance is a


“My advice is to understand what the standard is for the job,” he tells CNBC Make It at SoFi’s recent “Get That Raise” event.
Throughout his professional journey, he says he’s learned one key thing about asking for a raise that he thinks all young people should follow.
As a long-standing executive in business and finance, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto knows what it’s like to negotiate your salary at work.
Noto explains that knowing the standard for how much you should earn based on your performance is a
Former NFL and Twitter executive shares his No.1 piece of advice for negotiating your first raise Cached Page below :
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Former NFL and Twitter executive shares his No.1 piece of advice for negotiating your first raise

“My advice is to understand what the standard is for the job,” he tells CNBC Make It at SoFi’s recent “Get That Raise” event. “What is the average compensation for that position? What’s the above average compensation for that position, and establish with your employer where you are.”

Throughout his professional journey, he says he’s learned one key thing about asking for a raise that he thinks all young people should follow.

Prior to joining the personal-finance company in 2018, Noto worked as the chief operating officer at Twitter, the co-head of telecommunications, media and technology investment banking at Goldman Sachs and the executive vice president and chief financial officer for the National Football League.

As a long-standing executive in business and finance, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto knows what it’s like to negotiate your salary at work.

Anthony Noto onstage at TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2013 at The Manhattan Center on May 1, 2013 in New York City.

Noto explains that knowing the standard for how much you should earn based on your performance is a key component to negotiating the raise you deserve. “Having this framework and understanding that this is a principle-based conversation and not a demand is critical to the [negotiation] process,” he says, while emphasizing that the discussion should always be a “two-way street” between you and your employer.

In addition to setting a standard for appropriate pay, Noto says you should also set a reasonable time frame for when you will go in and ask for your raise.

“Being on the job for three months is probably not the right time because you haven’t built a track record,” he says. “But as you get your annual reviews and accomplish something really meaningful, you’ll then be ready to receive a promotion and a corresponding piece of compensation.”

New York Times bestselling author and award-winning journalist Elaine Welteroth agrees with Noto. She tells CNBC Make It that after researching their market value, candidates should always go into the negotiation process with a standard idea of the salary they’d like to make.

“Know your floor and know your ceiling,” says the former Teen Vogue editor-in-chief. “Go in at your ceiling and do not drop below your floor, because it will only lead to dissatisfaction.”

Welteroth adds that if the first salary offered is below your satisfactory level, then you should not be afraid to ask for more time to consider the offer.

“There are so many tactics that employers often use to intimidate you and make you feel as though you need to give an answer in the moment, but you actually do not,” she says. “I think the most powerful thing can sometimes be to just take your time.”

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Don’t miss: 12-time gold medalist Allyson Felix on the negotiating advice she wishes she knew at the start of her career


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12-time gold medalist Allyson Felix on the negotiating advice she wishes she knew at the start of her career

Like many athletes, Felix said she relied solely on her agent at the start of her career to negotiate all of her business deals. “You know, you’re coming in either straight from college or even younger than that, and you don’t have experience in this,” she said. “So, you don’t know what to ask for. But being grateful for any deal that comes your way can be problematic, she said, especially when you don’t know the details of the contract. After facing a lot of backlash for its policies surroundin


Like many athletes, Felix said she relied solely on her agent at the start of her career to negotiate all of her business deals.
“You know, you’re coming in either straight from college or even younger than that, and you don’t have experience in this,” she said.
“So, you don’t know what to ask for.
But being grateful for any deal that comes your way can be problematic, she said, especially when you don’t know the details of the contract.
After facing a lot of backlash for its policies surroundin
12-time gold medalist Allyson Felix on the negotiating advice she wishes she knew at the start of her career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, athletes, gold, dont, wishes, deal, months, told, know, negotiating, experience, career, start, felix, knew, nike, allyson, lot, medalist, advice


12-time gold medalist Allyson Felix on the negotiating advice she wishes she knew at the start of her career

Though the 33-year-old has seen a lot of success in her career, she says there is one piece of advice she wishes she knew as a young athlete who was turning pro. “I look back at when I did my first deal at 17 to where I am now,” she told CNBC Make It at a recent event for personal finance company SoFi, “and I wish I was being more present in those conversations and had more knowledge about what was going on in the negotiation process.”

Her win, which came just 10 months after giving birth to her daughter Camryn, broke Usain Bolt’s record for the most track-and-field gold medals at a world championship.

Allyson Felix of the United States competes in the 4×400 Metres Mixed Relay during day three of 17th IAAF World Athletics Championships Doha 2019 at Khalifa International Stadium on September 29, 2019 in Doha, Qatar.

Like many athletes, Felix said she relied solely on her agent at the start of her career to negotiate all of her business deals. “You know, you’re coming in either straight from college or even younger than that, and you don’t have experience in this,” she said. “So, you don’t know what to ask for. A lot of times I think we’re just grateful to get offered something.”

But being grateful for any deal that comes your way can be problematic, she said, especially when you don’t know the details of the contract. Earlier this year, Felix penned an op-ed for The New York Times where she opened up about her experience with renegotiating her contract with Nike as a pregnant athlete.

Despite being one of the most decorated athletes in history, Felix said Nike wanted to pay her 70% less than before, and they didn’t want to offer her maternity protection during the months following her child’s birth. “I asked Nike to contractually guarantee that I wouldn’t be punished if I didn’t perform at my best in the months surrounding childbirth,” she wrote. “I wanted to set a new standard. If I, one of Nike’s most widely marketed athletes, couldn’t secure these protections, who could?”

After facing a lot of backlash for its policies surrounding female athletes, Nike later announced that it was updating its contracts to protect its pregnant clients more. Under the new terms, the sportswear brand said that no performance-related reductions could take place for an 18-month period, starting eight months prior to a woman’s due date.

Nike did not immediately respond to Make It’s request for comment.

Felix, who signed a new sponsorship deal with Athleta in July, said her experience with Nike taught her that you have to be ready to negotiate for more than just money.

“I’m excited about this new partnership deal, and it’s different,” she told the crowd at SoFi’s “Get That Raise” event. “I had been with Nike for so long, and I really don’t think they thought I would leave the brand. But, I realized there are things that are more valuable than money.”

College and career coach Kat Cohen agrees with Felix and explained that even if you aren’t an athlete, you should still consider more than just money when negotiating with an employer.

“You should look at compensation holistically,” she told CNBC Make It. “This means reviewing the retirement savings, paid time off, commuter benefits and whatever other benefits are offered.”

Cohen added that in some cases, such as with tuition reimbursement, your benefits can actually help to cut down your monthly payments on a bill. In this situation, she said, it should not be a deal breaker if a company can’t increase your pay.

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Don’t miss: 8 successful women share how they negotiated their first big raise—and the advice they’d give others looking to do the same


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-29  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, athletes, gold, dont, wishes, deal, months, told, know, negotiating, experience, career, start, felix, knew, nike, allyson, lot, medalist, advice


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Pete Buttigieg’s women’s rights agenda includes nominating a cabinet that’s 50% women

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg released a 26-page women’s rights agenda on Thursday that outlines how he will make women’s advancement inside and outside of the workforce a top priority if elected president. In the detailed document, Buttigieg says he would close the leadership gap that women currently face by nominating at least 50% women to cabinet positions and judicial seats in his administration, if he were elected. Additionally, he pledges to reinstate the White House Council on


South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg released a 26-page women’s rights agenda on Thursday that outlines how he will make women’s advancement inside and outside of the workforce a top priority if elected president.
In the detailed document, Buttigieg says he would close the leadership gap that women currently face by nominating at least 50% women to cabinet positions and judicial seats in his administration, if he were elected.
Additionally, he pledges to reinstate the White House Council on
Pete Buttigieg’s women’s rights agenda includes nominating a cabinet that’s 50% women Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, includes, workforce, thats, womens, nominating, indiana, rights, gender, buttigiegs, cabinet, provide, work, mayor, gap, women, pete, buttigieg, agenda


Pete Buttigieg's women's rights agenda includes nominating a cabinet that's 50% women

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg released a 26-page women’s rights agenda on Thursday that outlines how he will make women’s advancement inside and outside of the workforce a top priority if elected president.

In the detailed document, Buttigieg says he would close the leadership gap that women currently face by nominating at least 50% women to cabinet positions and judicial seats in his administration, if he were elected. Additionally, he pledges to reinstate the White House Council on Women and Girls that was formed under the Obama administration to ensure gender equality is at the forefront of policy decisions.

Similar to the promises many of the other democratic presidential candidates have already pledged, Buttigieg says he would close the gender pay gap women face at work (but did not provide many details on how he would do that), and he would provide 12 weeks of paid family leave to “all working Americans.”

Though his plan around child care is vague in his proposal, the Indiana mayor says he would also make childcare free for families in need, as a “lack of access to high-quality, affordable child care prevents women from joining or remaining in the workforce.” Buttigieg also adds that he would invest $10 billion to end workplace sexual harassment and gender discrimination, as these issues “deprive women of income and opportunities to advance at work.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, includes, workforce, thats, womens, nominating, indiana, rights, gender, buttigiegs, cabinet, provide, work, mayor, gap, women, pete, buttigieg, agenda


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An all-female panel will moderate November’s Democratic debate for MSNBC

The next Democratic presidential primary debate will be held next month in Georgia with a panel of four female journalists moderating the conversation, MSNBC announced on Wednesday. November’s debate, which is co-hosted by MSNBC and The Washington Post, will likely include fewer candidates than the 12 who participated in October’s debate. November’s debate will not be the first presidential event to feature a lineup of women moderators. According to The New York Times, only four women have been


The next Democratic presidential primary debate will be held next month in Georgia with a panel of four female journalists moderating the conversation, MSNBC announced on Wednesday.
November’s debate, which is co-hosted by MSNBC and The Washington Post, will likely include fewer candidates than the 12 who participated in October’s debate.
November’s debate will not be the first presidential event to feature a lineup of women moderators.
According to The New York Times, only four women have been
An all-female panel will moderate November’s Democratic debate for MSNBC Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, novembers, allfemale, presidential, women, white, msnbc, candidates, moderate, democratic, receive, moderated, debate, sen, panel


An all-female panel will moderate November's Democratic debate for MSNBC

The next Democratic presidential primary debate will be held next month in Georgia with a panel of four female journalists moderating the conversation, MSNBC announced on Wednesday.

Rachel Maddow, who moderated the debate in June, will be joined by Andrea Mitchell, host of “Andrea Mitchell Reports” on MSNBC; Kristen Welker, NBC News’ White House correspondent; and Ashley Parker, a White House reporter for The Washington Post. The debate, which is scheduled to take place on Nov. 20 from 9 to 11 p.m. ET, will be an hour shorter than the three-hour debate that took place in October.

Mitchell, who also serves as NBC News’ chief foreign affairs correspondent, tweeted out her excitement about the news and said she’s “thrilled to be part of this team.”

November’s debate, which is co-hosted by MSNBC and The Washington Post, will likely include fewer candidates than the 12 who participated in October’s debate. Right now, according to The New York Times, only nine candidates have qualified to debate in November.

To make the cut, MSNBC says each candidate has to receive monetary contributions from 165,000 unique donors, including 600 unique donors in 20 states. Candidates also have to receive at least 3% of voter support in early nominating states or national polls, or they have to receive at least 5% of support in two qualifying state polls.

So far, Vice President Joe Biden; Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren; Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders; New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker; South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg; California Sen. Kamala Harris; billionaire Tom Steyer; entrepreneur Andrew Yang; and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar have all qualified for the next debate. Former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and former Housing Secretary Julián Castro have until Nov. 13 to meet the necessary qualifications.

November’s debate will not be the first presidential event to feature a lineup of women moderators. In January 2016, Trish Regan and Sandra Smith moderated one of two Republican presidential debates. And in February 2016, Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff moderated a Democratic debate.

According to The New York Times, only four women have been the sole moderator of a general election presidential debate. These women include Pauline Frederick in 1976, Barbara Walters in 1976 and 1984, Carole Simpson in 1992 and Candy Crowley in 2012.

Disclosure: NBCUniversal is the parent company of MSNBC and CNBC.

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Don’t miss: #MeToo founder Tarana Burke has a new hashtag to encourage presidential candidates to address sexual violence


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-24  Authors: courtney connley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, novembers, allfemale, presidential, women, white, msnbc, candidates, moderate, democratic, receive, moderated, debate, sen, panel


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