Ethiopian Airlines crash shows a ‘clear similarity’ with Lion Air accident, official says

Preliminary data retrieved from the flight data recorder of the Ethiopian Airlines plane that crashed shows “a clear similarity” with an earlier disaster in Indonesia, Ethiopia’s transport minister said Sunday. Dagmawit Moges told reporters that the Ethiopian government intends to release detailed findings within one month. “The black box has been found in a good condition that enabled us to extract almost all the data inside,” she told reporters Sunday evening. Family members confirmed they wer


Preliminary data retrieved from the flight data recorder of the Ethiopian Airlines plane that crashed shows “a clear similarity” with an earlier disaster in Indonesia, Ethiopia’s transport minister said Sunday. Dagmawit Moges told reporters that the Ethiopian government intends to release detailed findings within one month. “The black box has been found in a good condition that enabled us to extract almost all the data inside,” she told reporters Sunday evening. Family members confirmed they wer
Ethiopian Airlines crash shows a ‘clear similarity’ with Lion Air accident, official says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-17  Authors: tiksa negeri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, software, boeing, official, similarity, lion, air, data, told, crash, ethiopian, clear, accident, victims, flight, airlines, shows, crashed, site


Ethiopian Airlines crash shows a 'clear similarity' with Lion Air accident, official says

Preliminary data retrieved from the flight data recorder of the Ethiopian Airlines plane that crashed shows “a clear similarity” with an earlier disaster in Indonesia, Ethiopia’s transport minister said Sunday.

Dagmawit Moges told reporters that the Ethiopian government intends to release detailed findings within one month.

“The black box has been found in a good condition that enabled us to extract almost all the data inside,” she told reporters Sunday evening.

Following Moges’ remarks, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg said the company “continues to support the investigation, and is working with authorities to evaluate new information as it becomes available.”

“While investigators continue to work to establish definitive conclusions, Boeing is finalizing its development of a previously-announced software update and pilot training revision that will address the MCAS flight control law’s behavior in response to erroneous sensor inputs,” he said in a statement.

Officials say 157 people from 35 different countries were killed when the Nairobi-bound plane crashed shortly after takeoff. The United States and many other countries then grounded the Boeing 737 Max 8 as it had also been used in the Lion Air crash in October in Indonesia.

Suspicions emerged that faulty sensors and software may have contributed to the two crashes in less than six months.

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration already has said satellite-based tracking data showed that the movements of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 were similar to those of Lion Air Flight 610, which crashed off Indonesia in October, killing 189 people.

The planes in both crashes flew with erratic altitude changes that could indicate the pilots struggled to control the aircraft. Shortly after their takeoffs, both crews tried to return to the airports but crashed.

Earlier Sunday, thousands in the capital of Addis Ababa mourned the country’s victims in the crash, accompanying 17 empty caskets draped in the national flag through the streets of the capital. Some victims’ relatives fainted and fell to the ground.

The service came one day after officials began delivering bags of earth to family members of the 157 victims of the crash instead of the remains of their loved ones because the identification process is expected to take such a long time.

Family members confirmed they were given a 1 kilogram (2.2 pound) sack of scorched earth taken from the crash site. Many relatives already have gathered at the rural, dusty crash site outside Ethiopia’s capital.

Elias Bilew said he had worked with one of the victims, Sintayehu Shafi, for the past eight years.

“He was such a good person,” Bilew said. “He doesn’t deserve this. He was the pillar for his whole family.”

— CNBC contributed to this report


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-17  Authors: tiksa negeri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, software, boeing, official, similarity, lion, air, data, told, crash, ethiopian, clear, accident, victims, flight, airlines, shows, crashed, site


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If you invested $1,000 in Boeing 10 years ago, here’s how much you’d have now

Still, if you invested in Boeing 10 years ago, that decision would have paid off: According to CNBC calculations, a $1,000 investment in 2009 would be worth more than $14,000 as of March 15, 2019, a total return over 1,000 percent. Boeing paused delivery of 737 Max planes after the Ethiopia crash, which came less than five months after another deadly crash in Indonesia involving the same model. CNBC: Boeing stock as of Mar. In the meantime, Boeing said in a statement it will “continue to build 7


Still, if you invested in Boeing 10 years ago, that decision would have paid off: According to CNBC calculations, a $1,000 investment in 2009 would be worth more than $14,000 as of March 15, 2019, a total return over 1,000 percent. Boeing paused delivery of 737 Max planes after the Ethiopia crash, which came less than five months after another deadly crash in Indonesia involving the same model. CNBC: Boeing stock as of Mar. In the meantime, Boeing said in a statement it will “continue to build 7
If you invested $1,000 in Boeing 10 years ago, here’s how much you’d have now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: shawn m carter, jason lee, daniel slim, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, youd, invested, planes, months, fix, max, ago, 1000, company, 737, stock, crash, boeing


If you invested $1,000 in Boeing 10 years ago, here's how much you'd have now

Shares of aircraft-manufacturing company Boeing took a hit early this week, losing $26.6 billion in market value Monday and Tuesday, following a deadly crash of one of its 737 Max 8 airplanes in Ethiopia.

That model has since been grounded by the Federal Aviation Administration, as well as by aviation regulators around the world.

Still, if you invested in Boeing 10 years ago, that decision would have paid off: According to CNBC calculations, a $1,000 investment in 2009 would be worth more than $14,000 as of March 15, 2019, a total return over 1,000 percent. In the same time frame, the S&P 500 was up 270 percent. So, your $1,000 would be worth just over $3,700, by comparison.

Any individual stock can over- or under-perform, however, and past returns do not predict future results. Boeing paused delivery of 737 Max planes after the Ethiopia crash, which came less than five months after another deadly crash in Indonesia involving the same model.

This left several major airlines, including United, American and Southwest scrambling to rebook passengers and reassign planes. Those companies said they would waive ticket-change fees and fare differences for those affected by the FAA’s grounding order.

Flight-booking site Kayak even introduced a new search feature that allows users to exclude specific plane models, according to co-founder and chief executive officer Steve Hafner.

CNBC: Boeing stock as of Mar. 15, 2019

Fortunately for Boeing, while shares plunged more than 10 percent early this week, they ticked back up by as much as 3 percent Friday. And the company announced plans to roll out a software fix in the next few weeks.

Though, Bank of America analyst Ronald Epstein said Thursday that the fix could take a lot longer: “Once Boeing identifies the issue … the most likely scenario is the company will take about 3-6 months to come up with and certify the fix,” he said in a note.

Hafner says he expects the 737 models to be grounded only a few months and that travelers will likely be booking flights on them again soon: “They’re out of service on a temporary basis,” he said on CNBC’s “Squawk Alley.” “In reality, airlines are still planning on flying those planes in the summer. People want security and comfort when they fly.”

In the meantime, Boeing said in a statement it will “continue to build 737 Max airplanes, while assessing how the situation, including potential capacity constraints, will impact our production system.”

If you’re looking to get into investing, expert investors like Warren Buffett and Mark Cuban suggest you start with index funds, which hold every stock in an index, offer low turnover rates, attendant fees and tax bills. They also fluctuate with the market to eliminate the risk of picking individual stocks.

Here’s a snapshot of how the markets look now.

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Don’t miss: If you invested $1,000 in IBM 10 years ago, here’s how much you’d have now


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: shawn m carter, jason lee, daniel slim, afp, getty images
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Cathay Pacific says it’s ‘very happy’ with its Boeing fleet, despite recent 737 Max crash

U.S. plane manufacturer Boeing has been mired in controversy since its 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed minutes after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board. Despite recent safety concerns surrounding the 737 Max 8, Cathay Pacific’s CEO said Thursday he was “very happy” with the Hong Kong-based carrier’s Boeing fleet. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia,” Rupert Hogg said “about 50-50” of the airline’s fleet is made up of Boeing and Airbus planes — namely, the Boeing


U.S. plane manufacturer Boeing has been mired in controversy since its 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed minutes after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board. Despite recent safety concerns surrounding the 737 Max 8, Cathay Pacific’s CEO said Thursday he was “very happy” with the Hong Kong-based carrier’s Boeing fleet. Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia,” Rupert Hogg said “about 50-50” of the airline’s fleet is made up of Boeing and Airbus planes — namely, the Boeing
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: shirley tay, marcio rodrigo machado, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cathay, crash, pacific, despite, 737, airlines, plane, recent, fleet, hogg, boeing, happy, operated, max, killing, ethiopian


Cathay Pacific says it's 'very happy' with its Boeing fleet, despite recent 737 Max crash

U.S. plane manufacturer Boeing has been mired in controversy since its 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed minutes after takeoff on Sunday, killing all 157 people on board.

Despite recent safety concerns surrounding the 737 Max 8, Cathay Pacific’s CEO said Thursday he was “very happy” with the Hong Kong-based carrier’s Boeing fleet.

Speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia,” Rupert Hogg said “about 50-50” of the airline’s fleet is made up of Boeing and Airbus planes — namely, the Boeing 777, Airbus A350 and A330. The airline does not fly the Boeing 737 Max.

“It is a tragedy, but we’re very happy with both sets of aircraft that we have,” Hogg said, in reference to Sunday’s deadly crash.

The fatal accident involving Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 — which killed all 149 passengers and eight crew members — comes less than five months after the same model plane operated by Indonesia’s Lion Air crashed shortly after taking off from Jakarta, killing all 189 on board.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: shirley tay, marcio rodrigo machado, getty images
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Boeing lost $26.6 billion in market value since Sunday’s 737 Max 8 crash

Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week following the deadly crash of one of its popular 737 Max 8 jets in Ethiopia. The share slide cut its market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday as international aviation regulators and airlines moved to ground 737 Max jets from China to Mexico. Sunday’s crash of a passenger jet en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi killed all 157 people on board. The disaster came five months after a Lion A


Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week following the deadly crash of one of its popular 737 Max 8 jets in Ethiopia. The share slide cut its market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday as international aviation regulators and airlines moved to ground 737 Max jets from China to Mexico. Sunday’s crash of a passenger jet en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi killed all 157 people on board. The disaster came five months after a Lion A
Boeing lost $26.6 billion in market value since Sunday’s 737 Max 8 crash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, leslie josephs, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crash, boeing, 737, week, lost, aviation, market, shares, 266, jets, max, sundays, wednesdayedward, billion, airlines, value


Boeing lost $26.6 billion in market value since Sunday's 737 Max 8 crash

Boeing investors lost $26.6 billion in the first two trading days this week following the deadly crash of one of its popular 737 Max 8 jets in Ethiopia.

Boeing’s shares slid 11 percent from $422.54 Friday to $375.41 at Tuesday’s close before turning positive Wednesday morning. The share slide cut its market value from $238.7 billion to $212.1 billion over Monday and Tuesday as international aviation regulators and airlines moved to ground 737 Max jets from China to Mexico.

Its shares were up by less than 1 percent Wednesday.

Edward Jones downgraded Boeing’s stock to hold from buy, noting a possible “delay in orders.”

Sunday’s crash of a passenger jet en route from Addis Ababa to Nairobi killed all 157 people on board. The disaster came five months after a Lion Air 737 Max 8 crashed in Indonesia, killing all 189 people aboard. The cause of the Ethiopian Airlines plane is under investigation.

The U.S. is increasingly alone in defending the American-made jets since the Federal Aviation Administration deemed the 737 Max to be “airworthy” earlier this week. The aircraft hasn’t been grounded in the U.S.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: jessica bursztynsky, leslie josephs, dimas ardian, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, crash, boeing, 737, week, lost, aviation, market, shares, 266, jets, max, sundays, wednesdayedward, billion, airlines, value


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David Stockman: Rally is ‘just day traders, chart monkeys,’ crash coming

It’s a subject that’s in his new book, “Peak Trump: The Undrainable Swamp and The Fantasy of MAGA.” “We hit peak Trump and peak market at 2,940 on the S&P back in September. I think that’s the peak for a long time to come, and I think Trump foolishly embraced the stock market,” Stockman added. He also emphasizes the record budget deficit as an unnerving headwind. “We should be having almost no deficit at the top of a business cycle,” Stockman said.


It’s a subject that’s in his new book, “Peak Trump: The Undrainable Swamp and The Fantasy of MAGA.” “We hit peak Trump and peak market at 2,940 on the S&P back in September. I think that’s the peak for a long time to come, and I think Trump foolishly embraced the stock market,” Stockman added. He also emphasizes the record budget deficit as an unnerving headwind. “We should be having almost no deficit at the top of a business cycle,” Stockman said.
David Stockman: Rally is ‘just day traders, chart monkeys,’ crash coming Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: stephanie landsman, chris goodney, bloomberg, getty images, spencer platt, daniel acker, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, crash, deficit, traders, coming, thats, going, monkeys, market, peak, day, budget, trump, cycle, rally, chart, david, stockman


David Stockman: Rally is 'just day traders, chart monkeys,' crash coming

David Stockman: Market’s bounce off low ‘has nothing to do with rationality’ 20 Hours Ago | 01:31

Not even a 20 percent rebound off the December low is changing David Stockman’s bearish prognosis for the stock market.

Stockman, who served as President Ronald Reagan’s director of Office of Management and Budget, suggests fundamentals are not driving the 2019 rally.

“This is just day traders, chart monkeys, robo machines. This has nothing to do with rationality or investment analysis on any reasonable time basis,” Stockman said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Futures Now.” “There’s no Trump boom. We’re near the end of this cycle. Recessions haven’t been outlawed. It will happen in the next year or two.”

It’s a subject that’s in his new book, “Peak Trump: The Undrainable Swamp and The Fantasy of MAGA.”

“We hit peak Trump and peak market at 2,940 on the S&P back in September. I think that’s the peak for a long time to come, and I think Trump foolishly embraced the stock market,” Stockman added.

He sees the S&P 500 plunging to 1,600 or lower — a more than 40 percent drop from current levels.

For years, Stockman has been warning investors a sell-off of that magnitude is inevitable. Two years ago, he predicted a “horrendous storm” would hit stocks. It never happened. Last year, he called it a “daredevil market.”

Yet, he’s unwavering in his bearish case.

“We’ve got headwinds coming from all over the world, and you can see it in the export data, in the European economy, in the big troubles going on in China, [and] you can see it in our own data, which has been really weak,” said Stockman.

He also emphasizes the record budget deficit as an unnerving headwind.

“It is a huge risk. I mean it’s actually crazy time that this market and Washington, both ends of the Acela corridor, are totally ignoring,” Stockman said. “We’re going to go into a fiscal crisis in the 2020s when the entire baby boomers are retiring and Social Security and Medicare are soaring that we won’t come out of. That’s the big elephant in the room.”

According to Stockman, President Donald Trump’s budget released this week reinforces and underscores how bad the deficit has gotten.

“We should be having almost no deficit at the top of a business cycle,” Stockman said. “We have a serious problem of unhinged central banking, and we have a Washington that has totally been euthanized by cheap yields on the debt. And, they pretend you can borrow $4 trillion at the top of a business cycle and live to tell about it.”

He contends a resolution to the U.S.-China trade war wouldn’t alter his negative view.

“The idea that somehow there is going to be a China deal and that will make everything better, I think, is laughable,” Stockman said.

Asked about Stockman’s comments, White House deputy press secretary Lindsay Walters said via email: “Due to the President’s pro growth policies the economy is booming. More people are employed today than previously were and more jobs are remaining on our shores. The President’s budget calls for economic policies that drive down the deficit and continue to bring prosperity to all Americans.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: stephanie landsman, chris goodney, bloomberg, getty images, spencer platt, daniel acker, david a grogan
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Global airlines ground Boeing 737 Max jets after second fatal crash

Aviation regulators from China to Britain have grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 planes, joining a growing list of countries suspending the plane’s operation and banning it from their airspace after the second deadly crash of the popular aircraft in less than five months. On Sunday, an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people aboard. That came after a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 plunged into the Java Sea in October, killing the 189 people a


Aviation regulators from China to Britain have grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 planes, joining a growing list of countries suspending the plane’s operation and banning it from their airspace after the second deadly crash of the popular aircraft in less than five months. On Sunday, an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people aboard. That came after a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 plunged into the Java Sea in October, killing the 189 people a
Global airlines ground Boeing 737 Max jets after second fatal crash Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: leslie josephs, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ground, planes, information, global, jets, fatal, crash, 737, second, boeing, uk, max, aviation, airlines


Global airlines ground Boeing 737 Max jets after second fatal crash

Aviation regulators from China to Britain have grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 planes, joining a growing list of countries suspending the plane’s operation and banning it from their airspace after the second deadly crash of the popular aircraft in less than five months.

“The UK Civil Aviation Authority has been closely monitoring the situation, however, as we do not currently have sufficient information from the flight data recorder we have, as a precautionary measure, issued instructions to stop any commercial passenger flights from any operator arriving, departing or overflying UK airspace,” the regulator said Tuesday.

Ireland’s aviation regulator followed suit Tuesday.

The moves by European governments come a day after the Federal Aviation Administration said it did not see a reason to ground the best-selling Boeing jet. On Sunday, an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed shortly after takeoff from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people aboard. That came after a Lion Air Boeing 737 Max 8 plunged into the Java Sea in October, killing the 189 people aboard.

Boeing noted that the FAA decided not to ground the planes and it wasn’t planning to issue new guidance to pilots “based on the information currently available.”

“We understand that regulatory agencies and customers have made decisions that they believe are most appropriate for their home markets,” Boeing said. “We’ll continue to engage with all of them to ensure they have all the information they need to have the confidence they need safely continue to operate their fleets or return them to service.”

Boeing shares were down more than 6 percent in late morning trading.

Automated systems on the Boeing 737 Max have been under scrutiny since the Lion Air crash, and Boeing said it is preparing software fixes as well as changes to pilot training and manuals.

After the U.K. issued its statement about the planes, President Donald Trump on Tuesday tweeted: “Airplanes are becoming far too complex to fly. Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT.

“I see it all the time in many products,” he said. “Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better.”

The FAA did not immediately respond to request for comment.

A growing number of aviation regulators and airlines around the world have decided to temporarily ground the planes, of which there are more than 370 in fleets worldwide, pending more information about the Ethiopian Airlines crash. China, Indonesia, Singapore, Australia and airlines in Mexico, Brazil and Argentina have grounded the planes.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: leslie josephs, stephen brashear, getty images
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Trump says planes too complex after crash of Boeing jet in Ethiopia

In the wake of the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet crash that killed 157 people in Ethiopia, President Donald Trump said Tuesday that airplanes are becoming “far too complex to fly.” “Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT,” Trump wrote in a morning tweet. The FAA said Monday it did not see a reason to ground Boeing 737 Max planes, though regulators around the world have stated to ground the planes. On Tuesday, a regulator in Vietnam said it would not license Boeing 737 Max ai


In the wake of the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet crash that killed 157 people in Ethiopia, President Donald Trump said Tuesday that airplanes are becoming “far too complex to fly.” “Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT,” Trump wrote in a morning tweet. The FAA said Monday it did not see a reason to ground Boeing 737 Max planes, though regulators around the world have stated to ground the planes. On Tuesday, a regulator in Vietnam said it would not license Boeing 737 Max ai
Trump says planes too complex after crash of Boeing jet in Ethiopia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: tucker higgins, kevin lamarque, tiksa negeri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, complex, jet, aircraft, planes, ethiopia, crash, 737, vietnam, second, boeing, max, trump, shares, wrote


Trump says planes too complex after crash of Boeing jet in Ethiopia

In the wake of the Boeing 737 Max 8 jet crash that killed 157 people in Ethiopia, President Donald Trump said Tuesday that airplanes are becoming “far too complex to fly.”

“Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT,” Trump wrote in a morning tweet. “I see it all the time in many products. Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better.”

The FAA said Monday it did not see a reason to ground Boeing 737 Max planes, though regulators around the world have stated to ground the planes.

The crash near Addis Ababa on Sunday marked the second time the Boeing plane has sustained a fatal crash in five months.

Boeing has said it is too early to tell the cause of the Sunday crash, though investigators are looking into whether the plane’s automatic controls were responsible for the crash of the 737 Max in October that killed 189 people after the plane dove into the Java Sea in Indonesia. Both crashes occurred shortly after takeoff.

“I don’t know about you, but I don’t want Albert Einstein to be my pilot,” Trump wrote in a second post on Twitter. “I want great flying professionals that are allowed to easily and quickly take control of a plane!”

Regulators in China, Mexico, Indonesia, Australia and the United Kingdom have all grounded the aircraft. On Tuesday, a regulator in Vietnam said it would not license Boeing 737 Max aircraft in the country, according to Xinhua, a Chinese news agency. Companies in Vietnam had placed orders with Boeing to purchase the aircraft last month during Trump’s summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi.

Boeing shares have fallen steeply as questions have mounted about the company’s popular new jetliner. The company’s shares were down 6 percent in morning trade on Tuesday.

Boeing said Monday a software update was in the works and would be ready by April. Boeing did not respond to a request for comment on the president’s tweets Tuesday.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-12  Authors: tucker higgins, kevin lamarque, tiksa negeri
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US airlines try to calm nervous travelers after fatal crash of Boeing 737 MAX jet in Ethiopia

U.S. airlines attempted Monday to assure nervous customers that the Boeing 737 MAX jets they fly are safe, a day after one of the new jets operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed outside of Addis Ababa and killed all 157 people on board. “We have not relaxed our fare rules or restrictions at this point,” said Southwest Airlines spokesman Chris Mainz. The airline has 14 of the Boeing 737 MAX 8s in its fleet and has not changed its ticket-change polices as of Monday morning. The Association of Flig


U.S. airlines attempted Monday to assure nervous customers that the Boeing 737 MAX jets they fly are safe, a day after one of the new jets operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed outside of Addis Ababa and killed all 157 people on board. “We have not relaxed our fare rules or restrictions at this point,” said Southwest Airlines spokesman Chris Mainz. The airline has 14 of the Boeing 737 MAX 8s in its fleet and has not changed its ticket-change polices as of Monday morning. The Association of Flig
US airlines try to calm nervous travelers after fatal crash of Boeing 737 MAX jet in Ethiopia Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: leslie josephs, wang shoubao, xinhua news agency, getty images, tiksa negeri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calm, travelers, airlines, fatal, jet, boeing, flight, southwest, safe, max, crash, 737, planes, nervous, ethiopia, try, attendants, united


US airlines try to calm nervous travelers after fatal crash of Boeing 737 MAX jet in Ethiopia

U.S. airlines attempted Monday to assure nervous customers that the Boeing 737 MAX jets they fly are safe, a day after one of the new jets operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed outside of Addis Ababa and killed all 157 people on board.

Accident investigators from Ethiopia and the U.S. are looking for clues in what brought down the flight and analysts have cautioned that it’s too early to know the cause.

The crash has sparked concern among some flight attendants and members of the public, who asked airlines on social media whether these planes are safe and in some cases, whether they can switch their flights.

“We have not relaxed our fare rules or restrictions at this point,” said Southwest Airlines spokesman Chris Mainz. Southwest had 34 of Boeing 737 MAX 8 planes in its fleet of about 750 as of the end of last year and remains “confident in the safety and airworthiness” of its aircraft, the carrier said in a statement.

Southwest doesn’t charge flight-change fees like other airlines but passengers flying on different days and flights will have to pay a difference in fare.

American Airlines issued a similar statement and said it had full confidence in its planes and crewmembers. The airline has 14 of the Boeing 737 MAX 8s in its fleet and has not changed its ticket-change polices as of Monday morning.

Some cabin crewmembers have expressed concerns about the crash.

The Association of Flight Attendants, which represents 50,000 flight attendants at 20 airlines including United, said it was formally requesting that the Federal Aviation Administration investigate the plane. United operates a larger model of the Boeing 737 MAX.

“While it is important that we not draw conclusions without all of the facts, in the wake of a second accident, regulators, manufacturers and airlines must take steps to address concerns immediately,” said AFA’s international President Sara Nelson.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: leslie josephs, wang shoubao, xinhua news agency, getty images, tiksa negeri
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, calm, travelers, airlines, fatal, jet, boeing, flight, southwest, safe, max, crash, 737, planes, nervous, ethiopia, try, attendants, united


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China suspends commercial operations of Boeing 737-8 planes

China’s civil aviation regulator said on Monday that it had ordered Chinese airlines to suspend the commercial operations of all Boeing 737 MAX aircraft by 6 p.m. local time (1000 GMT) following a deadly crash of one of the planes in Ethiopia. It was the second crash of the 737 MAX, the latest version of Boeing’s workhorse narrowbody jet that first entered service in 2017. The airline has a fleet of four 737 MAX 8 jets, not counting the one that crashed on Sunday, according to flight tracking we


China’s civil aviation regulator said on Monday that it had ordered Chinese airlines to suspend the commercial operations of all Boeing 737 MAX aircraft by 6 p.m. local time (1000 GMT) following a deadly crash of one of the planes in Ethiopia. It was the second crash of the 737 MAX, the latest version of Boeing’s workhorse narrowbody jet that first entered service in 2017. The airline has a fleet of four 737 MAX 8 jets, not counting the one that crashed on Sunday, according to flight tracking we
China suspends commercial operations of Boeing 737-8 planes Cached Page below :
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China suspends commercial operations of Boeing 737-8 planes

China’s civil aviation regulator said on Monday that it had ordered Chinese airlines to suspend the commercial operations of all Boeing 737 MAX aircraft by 6 p.m. local time (1000 GMT) following a deadly crash of one of the planes in Ethiopia.

Ethiopian Airlines has also grounded its Boeing 737 MAX 8 fleet until further notice, the airline said on its Twitter account on Monday, a day after one of its MAX 8 jets bound for Nairobi crashed minutes after take-off, killing all 157 people on board.

It was the second crash of the 737 MAX, the latest version of Boeing’s workhorse narrowbody jet that first entered service in 2017.

“Although we don’t yet know the cause of the crash, we had to decide to ground the particular fleet as extra safety precaution,” Ethiopian Airlines said.

The airline has a fleet of four 737 MAX 8 jets, not counting the one that crashed on Sunday, according to flight tracking website FlightRadar24.

In October, a 737 MAX flown by Indonesian budget carrier Lion Air flying from Jakarta on a domestic flight crashed 13 minutes after take-off, killing all 189 passengers and crew on board.

The Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) said in a statement it would notify airlines as to when they could resume flying the jets after contacting Boeing and the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to ensure flight safety.

“Given that two accidents both involved newly delivered Boeing 737-8 planes and happened during take-off phase, they have some degree of similarity,” the CAAC said, adding that the order was in line with its principle of zero-tolerance on safety harzards.

The cause of the Indonesian crash is still being investigated. A preliminary report issued in November, before the cockpit voice recorder was recovered, focused on airline maintenance and training and the response of a Boeing anti-stall system to a recently replaced sensor but did not give a reason for the crash.

Chinese airlines have 96 737 MAX jets in service, the state company regulator said on Weibo.

Caijing, a Chinese state-run news outlet that covers finance and economics, said many flights scheduled to use 737 MAX planes would instead use the 737-800 models.

A Boeing spokesman declined to comment.

A U.S. official told Reuters the United States was unsure of what information China was acting on.

The U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity due to the sensitivity of the matter, said there were no plans to follow suit given the 737 MAX had a stellar safety record in the United States and there was a lack of information about the cause of the Ethiopian crash.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-11  Authors: michael tewelde, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, flight, planes, boeing, safety, operations, takeoff, 737, crash, airlines, commercial, 7378, jets, max, suspends


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Boeing’s top-selling plane raises safety concerns after second deadly crash in 5 months

Boeing’s fastest-ever selling aircraft is sparking safety concerns after an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX jet crashed shortly after takeoff on Sunday, killing everyone on board. It is the second deadly crash for the plane in less than five months. Cayman Airways grounded its two Boeing 737 MAX planes until more information about the crash emerges. Flight-tracking site Flightradar24, said that data “show that vertical speed was unstable after take off” on the Ethiopian Airlines plane, a sign it stru


Boeing’s fastest-ever selling aircraft is sparking safety concerns after an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX jet crashed shortly after takeoff on Sunday, killing everyone on board. It is the second deadly crash for the plane in less than five months. Cayman Airways grounded its two Boeing 737 MAX planes until more information about the crash emerges. Flight-tracking site Flightradar24, said that data “show that vertical speed was unstable after take off” on the Ethiopian Airlines plane, a sign it stru
Boeing’s top-selling plane raises safety concerns after second deadly crash in 5 months Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-10  Authors: leslie josephs, michael tewelde, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeings, planes, safety, boeing, topselling, ethiopian, takeoff, killing, months, crash, concerns, airlines, 737, max, deadly, raises, plane, second


Boeing's top-selling plane raises safety concerns after second deadly crash in 5 months

Boeing’s fastest-ever selling aircraft is sparking safety concerns after an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX jet crashed shortly after takeoff on Sunday, killing everyone on board. It is the second deadly crash for the plane in less than five months.

Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed in a rural area southeast of Addis Ababa, killing all 149 passengers and eight crew members on board. The aircraft left the Ethiopian capital at 8:38 a.m. local time in clear weather and lost contact six minutes later, the airline said. Victims included citizens of over a dozen countries, including Kenya, Canada, the United States, Great Britain, China and Italy.

The flight was operated on a new Boeing 737 MAX 8, the same type that went down in the Java Sea, just after takeoff from Jakarta, Indonesia, in October, killing all 189 aboard.

What brought down the four-month-old Ethiopian Airlines plane is not clear, but it is uncommon to have two fatal crashes of new planes so close together, industry experts said.

“It’s almost unheard of,” said John Cox, a senior crash investigator and former airline pilot. Cox and others warned that it is early in the crash investigation and there is no indication yet whether the two crashes were caused by the same factors.

Chinese aviation officials told domestic airlines to temporarily ground theirBoeing 737 MAX 8 jets following the crash and of Monday morning, many had complied, according to flight trackers. China’s Civil Aviation Authority said in a statement that it will contact Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration and let airlines know when to resume flights after it makes sure the planes can fly safely.

Cayman Airways grounded its two Boeing 737 MAX planes until more information about the crash emerges. Its CEO Fabian Whorms said that the airline stands by “our commitment to putting the safety of our passengers and crew first by maintaining complete and undoubtable safe operations.”

While both the Ethiopian and Lion Air planes had crashed minutes after takeoff, Lion Air had reported problems aboard its plane leading up to the crash, which did not appear to be the case in the Ethiopian crash, Cox noted. Flight-tracking site Flightradar24, said that data “show that vertical speed was unstable after take off” on the Ethiopian Airlines plane, a sign it struggled to gain altitude.

The Boeing 737 MAX has been flying for less than two years and is a best-seller for the Chicago-based aircraft manufacturer. Boeing has delivered 350 MAX jets to airlines around the world since May 2017 and had more than 4,660 in its order book as of January, according to the company.

The Ethiopian crash raises questions about the top-selling plane made by Boeing, whose commercial airplane business generated nearly 60 percent of the company’s record $101.1 billion in revenue last year, as airlines around the world race to bolster their fleets to cater to growing demand. The manufacturer’s stock is up 31 percent this year, making it the top gainer in the Dow Jones Industrial Average.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-10  Authors: leslie josephs, michael tewelde, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeings, planes, safety, boeing, topselling, ethiopian, takeoff, killing, months, crash, concerns, airlines, 737, max, deadly, raises, plane, second


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