US takes step to require DNA samples from asylum-seekers

Immigrant rights advocates were immediately critical following initial disclosure of the DNA collection plan two weeks ago. “That could really change the purpose of DNA collection from one of criminal investigation to population surveillance,” American Civil Liberties Union attorney Vera Eidleman said then. DNA profile collection is allowed under a law expanded in 2009 to require that any adult arrested for a federal crime provide a DNA sample. At least 23 states require DNA testing, but some oc


Immigrant rights advocates were immediately critical following initial disclosure of the DNA collection plan two weeks ago.
“That could really change the purpose of DNA collection from one of criminal investigation to population surveillance,” American Civil Liberties Union attorney Vera Eidleman said then.
DNA profile collection is allowed under a law expanded in 2009 to require that any adult arrested for a federal crime provide a DNA sample.
At least 23 states require DNA testing, but some oc
US takes step to require DNA samples from asylum-seekers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, require, officials, border, states, crime, data, asylumseekers, dna, migrants, official, collection, samples, regulations, step, takes


US takes step to require DNA samples from asylum-seekers

A U.S. Border Patrol agent takes down personal data from Salvadorian mother Ana Esmeralda and her son Manuel Alexander, 2, after they were taken into custody on July 02, 2019 in Los Ebanos, Texas.

The Trump administration is planning to collect DNA samples from asylum-seekers and other migrants detained by immigration officials and will add the information to a massive FBI database used by law enforcement hunting for criminals, a Justice Department official said.

The Justice Department on Monday issued amended regulations that would mandate DNA collection for almost all migrants who cross between official entry points and are held even temporarily.

The official said the rules would not apply to legal permanent residents or anyone entering the U.S. legally, and children under 14 are exempt, but it’s unclear whether asylum-seekers who come through official crossings will be exempt.

The official spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity before the regulations were published.

Homeland Security officials gave a broad outline of the plan to expand DNA collection at the border two weeks ago, but it was unclear then whether asylum-seekers would be included or when it would begin.

The new policy would allow the government to amass a trove of biometric data on hundreds of thousands of migrants, raising major privacy concerns and questions about whether such data should be compelled even when a person is not suspected of a crime other than crossing the border illegally. Civil rights groups already have expressed concerns that data could be misused, and the new policy is likely to lead to legal action.

Justice officials hope to have a pilot program in place shortly after the 20-day comment period ends and expand from there, the official said. The new regulations are effective Tuesday.

Trump administration officials say they hope to solve more crimes committed by immigrants through the increased collection of DNA from a group that can often slip through the cracks. The Justice official also said it would be a deterrent — the latest step aimed at discouraging migrants from trying to enter the United States between official crossings by adding hurdles to the immigration process.

Currently, officials collect DNA on a much more limited basis — when a migrant is prosecuted in federal court for a criminal offense. That includes illegal crossing, a charge that has affected mostly single adults. Those accompanied by children generally aren’t prosecuted because children can’t be detained.

President Donald Trump and others in his administration often single out crimes committed by immigrants as a reason for stricter border control. But multiple studies have found that people in the United States illegally are less likely to commit crime than U.S. citizens, and legal immigrants are even less likely to do so.

For example, a study last year in the journal Criminology found that from 1990 through 2014, states with bigger shares of migrants have lower crime rates.

Immigrant rights advocates were immediately critical following initial disclosure of the DNA collection plan two weeks ago.

“That could really change the purpose of DNA collection from one of criminal investigation to population surveillance,” American Civil Liberties Union attorney Vera Eidleman said then.

Curbing immigration is Trump’s signature issue, but his administration has struggled in dealing with the surge of people trying to enter the United States, mostly Central American families fleeing poverty and violence.

Authorities made more than 810,000 arrests at the border during the budget year that just ended in September, a high not seen for more than 10 years. Officials say numbers have since fallen following crackdowns, changes in asylum regulations and agreements with Central American countries, but they remain higher than in previous years.

DNA profile collection is allowed under a law expanded in 2009 to require that any adult arrested for a federal crime provide a DNA sample. At least 23 states require DNA testing, but some occur after a suspect is convicted of a crime.

The FBI database, known as the Combined DNA Index System, has nearly 14 million convicted offender profiles, plus 3.6 million arrestee profiles, and 966,782 forensic profiles as of August 2019. The profiles in the database do not contain names or other personal identifiers to protect privacy; only an agency identifier, specimen identification number and DNA lab associated with the analysis. That way, when people aren’t a match, their identification isn’t exposed.

The only way to get a profile out of the system is to request through an attorney that it be removed.

Federal and state investigators use the system to match DNA in crimes they are trying to solve. As of August 2019, the database produced about 480,000 hits, or matches with law enforcement seeking crime scene data, and assisted in more than 469,000 investigations.

Justice Department officials are striking a line in the regulations that gave the secretary of Homeland Security discretion to opt out of collecting DNA from immigrants because of resource limitations or operational hurdles.

Justice and Homeland Security officials are still working out details, but cheek swab kits would be provided by the FBI, the official said. The FBI will help train border officials on how to get a sample, which shouldn’t take more than a few minutes.

Customs and Border Protection already collects fingerprints on everyone over 14 in its custody.

The new regulations will apply to adults who cross the border illegally and are briefly detained by Customs and Border Protection, or for a longer period by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Those who come to official crossings and are considered inadmissible and not further detained will be exempt. Other exceptions are being worked out, the official said.

More than 51,000 detainees are in ICE custody. Border Patrol custody fluctuates its facilities only hold migrants until they are processed and either released or sent to ICE custody. At the height, more than 19,000 people were held. Recently it was down to fewer than 4,000.

The Justice Department charged the highest number of immigration-related offenses last year since the office began keeping the records: 25,426 with felony illegal re-entry and 80,866 with misdemeanor improper entry into the country.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-21
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, require, officials, border, states, crime, data, asylumseekers, dna, migrants, official, collection, samples, regulations, step, takes


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Big cities are posing a major threat to the economy by ignoring minor crimes

In fact it’s the opposite: we’re seeing a significant drop in arrests for minor offenses, or “quality of life” crimes. After all, the argument goes, shouldn’t the cops be spending their time focusing on more serious crimes? Strictly enforcing misdemeanor crime laws or restricting quality of life offenses isn’t really about reducing more serious crimes. That’s often overlooked by critics who portray minor crime enforcement in poorer neighborhoods as some kind of war on the people by the police. B


In fact it’s the opposite: we’re seeing a significant drop in arrests for minor offenses, or “quality of life” crimes. After all, the argument goes, shouldn’t the cops be spending their time focusing on more serious crimes? Strictly enforcing misdemeanor crime laws or restricting quality of life offenses isn’t really about reducing more serious crimes. That’s often overlooked by critics who portray minor crime enforcement in poorer neighborhoods as some kind of war on the people by the police. B
Big cities are posing a major threat to the economy by ignoring minor crimes Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, posing, major, crimes, big, economy, minorities, economic, neighborhoods, areas, minor, cities, serious, quality, crime, life, ignoring, enforcement, threat


Big cities are posing a major threat to the economy by ignoring minor crimes

Police allow someone though the perimeter outside the Time Warner Center in New York City after a suspicious package was found inside CNN Headquarters, October 24, 2018.

Of all the brewing threats to America’s continuing economic prosperity, one of the most serious comes straight out of the police blotter. No, it’s not a rise in murders or other serious felonies. In fact it’s the opposite: we’re seeing a significant drop in arrests for minor offenses, or “quality of life” crimes.

And it could destroy the momentum for one of the country’s most powerful economic growth engines.

The trend started to take hold in New York in 2016, when the city council passed a law easing stricter arrest rules initiated during Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s administration in the 1990s. But these moves have now spread to cities like Seattle and Austin. And as many critics of the homeless crisis in Los Angeles and San Francisco will tell you, police in those cities have not been used to permanently crack down on the growing tent cities in those areas.

Relaxing arrest policies for minor offenses such as graffiti, petty vandalism, public urination and public transportation fare-beating are often seen as compassionate or cost-cutting. After all, the argument goes, shouldn’t the cops be spending their time focusing on more serious crimes? There are even a number of fair-minded arguments and studies that say easing up on minor misdemeanor arrests won’t spark new crime waves or lead to much more serious felony crimes.

Those arguments miss the point. Strictly enforcing misdemeanor crime laws or restricting quality of life offenses isn’t really about reducing more serious crimes. It’s about saving and resurrecting economic opportunity.

Opponents of these quality of life crackdowns point to the fact that arrests for these crimes disproportionately hit African-Americans and other minorities. This is a legitimate concern too often dismissed by conservatives and law-and-order types. In fact, they sometimes come off as only being interested in cleaning up inner-city areas so they and their families can feel safer once in a while when they decide to go downtown to see a show or visit a trendy restaurant.

Yet the critics of these policies from the left and the right frequently miss the fact that petty crime enforcement benefits minority communities much more than anyone else. It’s the black and Latino neighborhoods that are being vandalized by “broken window” crimes, not the more affluent parts of town or the richer suburbs. Yes, the people arrested for these crimes are likelier to be minorities, but the economic victims are even more likely to be minorities. In short, quality of life crime enforcement isn’t a war on America’s minorities. It’s a war for them.

The transformation of New York in the 1990s from a high-crime, high-homicide-rate locale is really a story about the changes in several individual neighborhoods once deemed to be off-limits to decent people and businesses alike. Remember that even during the worst of times, Midtown Manhattan, Wall Street and the fancy apartment towers of Park and 5th Avenues were still always valuable and desirable addresses.

But when Harlem, Hell’s Kitchen, Williamsburg, the Lower East Side, and Bedford-Stuyvesant started to become hot areas, it was clear the majority of the old fears had melted away. Each one of those neighborhoods had been written off for years as too dangerous to invest in despite their attractive proximity to the established money-making centers in Manhattan.

Quality of life and community policing transformed the image of those neighborhoods and helped prove to the business world that the old risks and fears weren’t as serious anymore. New York’s urban resurgence was not isolated in the 1990s. It was a major trend across the country and was a significant factor in that decade’s economic boom.

Here’s the kicker: the quality of life enforcement in those neighborhoods in the 1990s came mostly at the request of the local residents and remaining business owners. That’s often overlooked by critics who portray minor crime enforcement in poorer neighborhoods as some kind of war on the people by the police.

By contrast, New York’s economic and cultural decline began in the mid-1950s when then Mayor Robert Wagner relaxed police enforcement of quality of life crimes. As documented in the brilliant book “The Ungovernable City,” by Vincent Cannato, Wagner’s ill-advised withdrawal of police presence began on the city’s subways which serviced many of the above-named neighborhoods. This ended up importing more economically devastating crime to those areas.

Reopening these areas to more economic opportunity starts with instilling a new confidence for entrepreneurs considering moving into these areas. Economic growth occurs when money is made where it hadn’t been made before. There are still many crime-ridden areas blighted for years by fear and neglect in America. These places need more police attention and care, not less.

These facts shine a light on another cultural and economic misconception that may be at the root of these ill-advised leniency policies.

Many of us have been taught since birth that much of the reason for crime, terrorism, drug abuse, etc. is because of poverty. Poor people with few prospects are supposedly more likely to turn to crime to get by and as a way to lash out at their difficult lot in life.

But the truth is the exact opposite, and not just because we know that billionaires are often caught committing just as many serious crimes as poorer folks. Poor people are the most affected by crime because more crime occurs in their neighborhoods.

These Americans and their communities remain a largely untapped resource for the U.S. economy. It would be a shame to rob them of their rightful place in spurring more economic growth all because of misplaced and misapplied compassion.

Jake Novak is a political and economic analyst at Jake Novak News and former CNBC TV producer. You can follow him on Twitter @jakejakeny.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jake novak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, posing, major, crimes, big, economy, minorities, economic, neighborhoods, areas, minor, cities, serious, quality, crime, life, ignoring, enforcement, threat


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UK police raise nearly $300,000 in auction of seized cryptocurrency

Police in the U.K. raised almost $300,000 by auctioning off a convicted hacker’s cryptocurrency haul. However, Wilsons Auctions, which orchestrated the sale, said a week before the auction that the cryptocurrency had a fluctuating value of up to £500,000. U.S. prosecutors have previously auctioned off seized bitcoin and cryptocurrency assets, with the U.S. Marshals Service raising $18.7 million from a bitcoin auction last year, according to Coindesk. Meanwhile, Wilsons Auctions raised £550,000 (


Police in the U.K. raised almost $300,000 by auctioning off a convicted hacker’s cryptocurrency haul. However, Wilsons Auctions, which orchestrated the sale, said a week before the auction that the cryptocurrency had a fluctuating value of up to £500,000. U.S. prosecutors have previously auctioned off seized bitcoin and cryptocurrency assets, with the U.S. Marshals Service raising $18.7 million from a bitcoin auction last year, according to Coindesk. Meanwhile, Wilsons Auctions raised £550,000 (
UK police raise nearly $300,000 in auction of seized cryptocurrency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, wilsons, bitcoin, raise, seized, ersou, auction, 300000, assets, crime, cryptocurrency, raised, nearly


UK police raise nearly $300,000 in auction of seized cryptocurrency

Police in the U.K. raised almost $300,000 by auctioning off a convicted hacker’s cryptocurrency haul.

The crypto assets, which included bitcoin, ripple and ether, raised more than £240,000 ($295,150) when they were sold off by the U.K.’s Eastern Region Special Operations Unit (ERSOU) on Wednesday and Thursday last week.

However, Wilsons Auctions, which orchestrated the sale, said a week before the auction that the cryptocurrency had a fluctuating value of up to £500,000.

It marked the first time a British police force had auctioned any form of cryptocurrency as part of an asset recovery order. Funds raised from the sale will be reinvested in crime prevention efforts, according to the ERSOU.

More than 7,500 bids were placed on the auction which was separated into 62 different sales, Wilsons Auctions said, with bids coming from various countries including Brazil, Australia, the U.S. and Singapore. It also noted that a single bitcoin achieved an average sale price of £6,798.80 — close to its current trading price.

The assets were seized from an unnamed hacker who “illegally supplied online personal data and hacking services in exchange for thousands of pounds worth of cryptocurrency,” ERSOU said in a press release Monday.

BBC News reported Monday that the digital currency had come from a teenager who received a jail sentence in August for hacking British internet provider TalkTalk.

“Asset recovery in a digital world has evolved, so it’s really important that we have a clear process for the storage and sale of cryptocurrency,” Detective Chief Inspector Martin Peters of the ERSOU cybercrime unit said in the press release.

“This goes to show there is no place to hide criminal assets — we are constantly developing our techniques and capabilities to ensure that proceeds of crime are either given back to the rightful owner or, as in this case, are reinvested in crime,” he added.

ERSOU noted that all of the buyers who took part in the auction were approved “ethical users of cryptocurrency,” with each participant’s background checked by a specialist.

Although last week’s auction was the first of its kind in the U.K., it was the latest in a series of seized crypto sales that have gone ahead internationally.

U.S. prosecutors have previously auctioned off seized bitcoin and cryptocurrency assets, with the U.S. Marshals Service raising $18.7 million from a bitcoin auction last year, according to Coindesk.

Meanwhile, Wilsons Auctions raised £550,000 ($676,580) in March from an auction of bitcoins seized by the Belgian government.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-01  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, wilsons, bitcoin, raise, seized, ersou, auction, 300000, assets, crime, cryptocurrency, raised, nearly


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Surveillance videos show alleged criminals attacking ATMs — and the crime is getting more common

The U.S. Secret Service gave CNBC surveillance video from two incidents that showed people attacking ATMs in broad daylight. These are two alleged criminals that dressed up as ATM workers to attack an ATM, according to the U.S. Secret Service. And there was pedestrian traffic,” said Greg Naranjo, a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. Greg Naranjo is a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. “When that street thug walks away with the mon


The U.S. Secret Service gave CNBC surveillance video from two incidents that showed people attacking ATMs in broad daylight. These are two alleged criminals that dressed up as ATM workers to attack an ATM, according to the U.S. Secret Service. And there was pedestrian traffic,” said Greg Naranjo, a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. Greg Naranjo is a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. “When that street thug walks away with the mon
Surveillance videos show alleged criminals attacking ATMs — and the crime is getting more common Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: jennifer schlesinger andrea day, jennifer schlesinger, andrea day
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attacking, alleged, atm, theyre, secret, money, ibm, attacks, criminals, videos, common, service, xforce, getting, crime, source, atms, surveillance


Surveillance videos show alleged criminals attacking ATMs — and the crime is getting more common

The recent Capital One breach of more than 100 million customer records has left consumers worrying about banking safety. But the threats extend far beyond customer records, as hackers are increasingly finding ways to attack ATMs. “We know for a fact that ATM crime and fraud does cost the banking industry and financial services industry billions of dollars per year,” said David Tente the executive director for the U.S. and Americas for the ATM Industry Association, ATMIA. The trade group includes financial institutions as well as ATM manufacturers. The U.S. Secret Service gave CNBC surveillance video from two incidents that showed people attacking ATMs in broad daylight.

These are two alleged criminals that dressed up as ATM workers to attack an ATM, according to the U.S. Secret Service. Source: U.S. Secret Service

“I’ve seen surveillance footage of technicians dressed up as actual technicians come up to a department store where the ATM was located right by the front door. And there was pedestrian traffic,” said Greg Naranjo, a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. “And they’re working on this ATM for approximately 30 minutes when they finally install their device and depart and then have the cashing crew come in and cash out the machine,” These attacks and others cost $3.5 million between late 2017 and early 2018, according to the Secret Service, which protects Americans from financial crimes.

Greg Naranjo is a Secret Service special agent in charge from the Miami field office. Source: CNBC

For these physical attacks, one criminal plants a device on the back of the ATM, which is one reason why . Depending on how it’s programmed, the machine could just spit out cash. But most of the time, criminal accomplices walk up and insert a card and enter a PIN to make it look like they’re real customers. To learn how to pull the attacks off, Naranjo says, criminal gangs have set up training facilities in South and Central America. “They have stolen machines from banks. They have training rooms with different types of ATMs,” he said. Physical attacks like these are on the rise. In a recent survey of ATM operators that the ATMIA shared with CNBC, 57 percent of respondents said physical attacks are increasing. The survey also found that stand-alone ATMs not connected to a bank were the most common for fraud. Stores and shopping malls were other common locations for fraud.

David Tente is the executive director for the U.S. and Americas for the ATM Industry Association, ATMIA. Source: CNBC

Physical attacks are not the only threat ATMs need to watch out for. Hackers can remotely access a bank’s servers to get it to allow ATM transactions, according to IBM Security’s X-Force Red, a team that does penetration testing. “We intercept the traffic, the response from the bank and change the ‘deny’ response to an approval,” said David Byrne, the global head of methodology for X-Force Red.

David Byrne is a global hacking methodology expert for IBM Security’s X-Force Red. He demonstrates how to refill an ATM. Source: CNBC

CNBC visited IBM’s ATM testing lab outside Toronto where the team demonstrated how this attack worked. Byrne demonstrated how a CNBC reporter could take out money using a grocery loyalty card and an old student ID. Any card with a magnetic stripe would work.

ATMs inside IBM Security’s ATM testing lab outside Toronto, Canada. Source: CNBC

“The street thug that the hacker mastermind sends out could conceivably sit here and just collect money after money after money until the ATM is empty,” said Charles Henderson, the global managing partner of X-Force Red. “When that street thug walks away with the money from an ATM, they’re gone forever.” IBM has seen a 500 percent increase in ATM testing demand from banks. “They’re seeing the attacks in the wild, and they’re trying to get ahead of the criminals,” Henderson said. “The thing about these machines is they’re very often connected to the internet…That’s a very important vulnerability, and one that we exploit in a lot of our ATM testing.”

Charles Henderson is the global managing partner of IBM Security’s X-Force Red. Source: CNBC


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-01  Authors: jennifer schlesinger andrea day, jennifer schlesinger, andrea day
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, attacking, alleged, atm, theyre, secret, money, ibm, attacks, criminals, videos, common, service, xforce, getting, crime, source, atms, surveillance


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These are the best places to live in America in 2019

Here are the states that lead the rankings for being the best places to live in the U.S. this year. 2019 Quality of Life score: 219 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)Strengths: Health, well-beingWeakness: Air quality2018 Quality of Life rank: 127. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)Strengths: Air quality, healthWeakness: Attractions2018 Quality of Life rank: 77. 2019 Quality of Life score: 235 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B+)Strengths: Well-being


Here are the states that lead the rankings for being the best places to live in the U.S. this year. 2019 Quality of Life score: 219 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)Strengths: Health, well-beingWeakness: Air quality2018 Quality of Life rank: 127. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)Strengths: Air quality, healthWeakness: Attractions2018 Quality of Life rank: 77. 2019 Quality of Life score: 235 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B+)Strengths: Well-being
These are the best places to live in America in 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: scott cohn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quality, best, states, crime, state, score, live, air, getty, places, america, life, 2019, points


These are the best places to live in America in 2019

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If you could live anywhere in America, where would that be? By the numbers, these are the states that offer the best quality of life. That’s because they offer everything people yearn for: job opportunities, affordable housing, great schools, a low cost of living, affordable health care and a clean environment. Good quality of life is also good business. What better selling point could there be for a company looking to attract the best talent than to offer a great location for employees to settle down and raise a family. In this tight labor market, companies are increasingly realizing how important this is for their strategic growth plans. It is why Quality of Life is one of the key categories worth 300 out of 2,500 points in CNBC’s annual America’s Top States for Business 2019 rankings. We use hard data to evaluate all 50 states as places to live — factors including crime rates, local attractions, environmental quality and inclusiveness as measured by legal protections written into state laws.

Here are the states that lead the rankings for being the best places to live in the U.S. this year.

10. Massachusetts

People running near Boston Harbor and Financial District at sunrise in Boston, Massachusetts. Prasit photo | Moment | Getty Images

Fewer than 3% of residents in the Bay State are without health insurance. That is the lowest uninsured rate in the nation, and it helps explain why this is one of America’s healthiest states. But that is not the only reason Massachusetts is a great place to live. Local attractions abound, from historic Boston and scenic Cape Cod in the east, to the beautiful Berkshires in the west. Boston prides itself as the Cradle of Liberty, and strong legal protections help ensure that freedom in Massachusetts applies to all. But Boston is also the cradle of some polluted air, hurting the state’s environmental quality. 2019 Quality of Life score: 217 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)

Strengths: Health, attractions, inclusiveness

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 10

9. Utah

Hiker in Arches Park Moab, Utah. Sportstock | E+ | Getty Images

The Beehive State gets its nickname from the industriousness of its citizens. Utahans not only work hard, they apparently love their work. According to Gallup’s 2018 Wellbeing Index, nowhere in the continental United States do people feel better about their careers. As busy as people are in Utah, they still find time to take care of themselves. They exercise frequently, and obesity rates are low. But air quality leaves a bit to be desired. 2019 Quality of Life score: 219 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B-)

Strengths: Health, well-being

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 12

7. (tie) Montana

Trail running in Big Sky. Jordan Siemens | Taxi | Getty Images

They call Montana Big Sky Country because all those unobstructed views really do make the sky seem bigger. And it turns out that big sky — and everything beneath it — contains the cleanest air in the nation according to the American Lung Association. Montana is a healthy, inclusive state, and crime is low. The state is lacking somewhat in attractions, at least in terms of places frequented by tourists. But if you are looking for breathtaking views, majestic mountains and crystal-clear waters — oh, and that big sky — this may be the place for you. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Air quality, health

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 7

7. (tie) Colorado

Skiing the Rockies in Colorado Getty Images

The Centennial State is home to rich natural beauty, vibrant cities, and robust inclusiveness provisions firmly enshrined in state law. Coloradans are healthy. Only 22.6% of the population is obese, the lowest rate in the nation. Air quality could be better, and the crime rate is slightly worse than the national average. 2019 Quality of Life score: 221 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Inclusiveness, health, attractions

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 9

5. (tie) Washington

A couple enjoy an extended hike in the Pacific Northwest RyanJLane | E+ | Getty Images

The Evergreen State is among America’s healthiest states, and its people are the most physically active. Who would not want to get out and enjoy a state with such natural beauty and so much to do. Washington prides itself on inclusiveness, with strong protections built into state law. Crime is low, but air quality may leave something to be desired. 2019 Quality of Life score: 232 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Health, inclusiveness, attractions

Weakness: Air quality

2018 Quality of Life rank: 5 (tie)

5. (tie) New Hampshire

White Mountains, New Hampshire Greg Dale | National Geographic Image Collection | Getty Images

With its famous motto, “Live Free or Die,” it stands to reason that the Granite State is among America’s most inclusive. Freedom also includes security. New Hampshire enjoys the third lowest violent crime rate in the nation. The state also boasts the nation’s lowest child poverty rate. On the other hand, air quality can suffer, partly due to the state’s proximity to Boston. And the quiet life here means New Hampshire can sometimes lack things to do. 2019 Quality of Life score: 232 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B)

Strengths: Inclusiveness, crime rate

Weaknesses: Air quality, attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 5 (tie)

4. North Dakota

The International Peace Garden along the US-Canada border in North Dakota. The central division divides Canada (right) from the USA (left). Photo: Dig Deeper | Wikipedia

The Peace Garden State derives its nickname from the International Peace Garden straddling the U.S.-Canadian border, a project that has its roots at the International Gardeners Association convention exactly 90 years ago. But the term “peace garden” could also refer to the idyllic lifestyle in this state. The crime rate is low, the population is healthy and happy, and anti-discrimination laws are stronger than most. But other than the aforementioned International Peace Garden, attractions can be sparse. 2019 Quality of Life score: 235 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: B+)

Strengths: Well-being, air quality, inclusiveness

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 4

3. Minnesota

Couple cross country skiing on a north woods trail. JMichl | iStock | Getty Images

One of the many features of the North Star state is what the locals call “Minnesota Nice,” which is exactly what it sounds like. Minnesotans are welcoming and inclusive, as evidenced by thorough legal protections against discrimination. Crime rates are low, the population is healthy, and the air is clean. We don’t factor weather into our rankings because it is too subjective. But it is worth pointing out that while winters can be brutal here, Minnesotans not only adapt to the frigid weather; they flourish in it. 2019 Quality of Life score: 259 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: A-)

Strengths: Inclusiveness, health, air quality, crime rate

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 3

2. Vermont

Man hiking in Vermont during Autumn Getty Images

The Green Mountain State has the nation’s second-lowest crime rate, inclusive state laws, and a healthy population. Vermont rode those attributes to a first-place finish in Quality of Life in 2018. The state still offers an enviable quality of life, but it slipped just enough in terms of air quality and its citizens’ perceived well-being in 2019 to drop out of the top spot. Vermont’s one discernible weakness is the fact that it offers few popular tourist attractions, but many people here would consider that a positive. 2019 Quality of Life score: 262 out of 325 points (Top States Grade: A-)

Strengths: Crime rate, health, inclusiveness

Weakness: Attractions

2018 Quality of Life rank: 1

1. Hawaii

Woman Kayaking, Oahu, Hawaii darekm101 | RooM | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: scott cohn
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quality, best, states, crime, state, score, live, air, getty, places, america, life, 2019, points


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White House lawyer Emmet Flood who helped Trump with Russia investigation is leaving

President Donald Trump said Saturday that White House lawyer Emmet Flood is “leaving service” on June 14. Flood was tasked with helping Trump deal with Mueller’s Russia investigation. Trump thanked Flood for doing “an outstanding job” and again claimed that the special counsel’s investigation found no evidence of collusion or obstruction. In his report, Mueller made clear that he did not investigate collusion, which has no legal definition. The relevant passages from the Mueller report “can be u


President Donald Trump said Saturday that White House lawyer Emmet Flood is “leaving service” on June 14. Flood was tasked with helping Trump deal with Mueller’s Russia investigation. Trump thanked Flood for doing “an outstanding job” and again claimed that the special counsel’s investigation found no evidence of collusion or obstruction. In his report, Mueller made clear that he did not investigate collusion, which has no legal definition. The relevant passages from the Mueller report “can be u
White House lawyer Emmet Flood who helped Trump with Russia investigation is leaving Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-01  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawyer, trump, leaving, special, report, mueller, house, flood, crime, helped, president, white, political, emmet, office, russia, investigation


White House lawyer Emmet Flood who helped Trump with Russia investigation is leaving

President Donald Trump said Saturday that White House lawyer Emmet Flood is “leaving service” on June 14. The announcement comes days after Robert Mueller announced that the special counsel’s office was closing.

Flood was tasked with helping Trump deal with Mueller’s Russia investigation. He replaced Ty Cobb, who convinced Trump to cooperate with the special counsel investigation.

Flood previously represented former President Bill Clinton during his impeachment.

Trump thanked Flood for doing “an outstanding job” and again claimed that the special counsel’s investigation found no evidence of collusion or obstruction.

In his report, Mueller made clear that he did not investigate collusion, which has no legal definition. The special counsel investigated whether or not the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Though Mueller found extensive contacts between Russians and Trump campaign officials, the investigation did not find sufficient evidence to establish a conspiracy or coordination.

On the question of obstruction, Mueller pointedly declined to exonerate Trump and laid out several instances in which the president may have tried to obstruct the investigation.

In his only press conference since he was appointed special counsel, Mueller said Wednesday if his office had confidence that Trump “clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so.”

His office, however, did not make a determination about whether the president committed crime.

Mueller made clear that Justice Department guidelines barred the prosecution of a sitting president for a federal crime. “Charging the president with a crime was not an option we could consider,” Mueller said.

Mueller said that the special counsel’s office was closing and he was returning to private life.

Flood had criticized Mueller’s final report as “political” and suffering “from an extraordinary legal defect” in a letter to Attorney General William Barr. “It quite deliberately fails to comply with the requirements of governing law,” he said.

Flood argued that conclusively finding innocence “is never the task of the federal prosecutor.” Instead, prosecutors complete their investigation and ask a grand jury to decide whether or not to seek charges.

The relevant passages from the Mueller report “can be understood only as political statements,” Flood argued. Prosecutors are “expected never to be political in the performance of their duties,” he said.

— CNBC’s Dan Mangan and Kevin Breuninger contributed to this report


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-01  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lawyer, trump, leaving, special, report, mueller, house, flood, crime, helped, president, white, political, emmet, office, russia, investigation


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Speaker Pelosi accuses Attorney General William Barr of committing a crime: ‘He lied to Congress’

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday accused Attorney General William Barr of committing a crime by lying to Congress about Robert Mueller’s report and Mueller’s issues with how Barr has characterized the special counsel’s findings. In a statement in response, Justice Department spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said Pelosi’s “baseless attack on the Attorney General is reckless, irresponsible and false.” Lawmakers asked him about reported frustrations Mueller’s team had with a summary the attorney gener


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday accused Attorney General William Barr of committing a crime by lying to Congress about Robert Mueller’s report and Mueller’s issues with how Barr has characterized the special counsel’s findings. In a statement in response, Justice Department spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said Pelosi’s “baseless attack on the Attorney General is reckless, irresponsible and false.” Lawmakers asked him about reported frustrations Mueller’s team had with a summary the attorney gener
Speaker Pelosi accuses Attorney General William Barr of committing a crime: ‘He lied to Congress’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, william, president, trump, investigation, pelosi, barr, general, speaker, muellers, justice, attorney, crime, lied, congress, committing


Speaker Pelosi accuses Attorney General William Barr of committing a crime: 'He lied to Congress'

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on May 2, 2019.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday accused Attorney General William Barr of committing a crime by lying to Congress about Robert Mueller’s report and Mueller’s issues with how Barr has characterized the special counsel’s findings.

“What is deadly serious about it is the attorney general of the United States of America is not telling the truth to the Congress of the United States. That’s a crime,” the California Democrat told reporters.

Pressed again about the accusation, Pelosi said, “He lied to Congress. If anybody else did that, it would be considered a crime. Nobody is above the law.” Asked whether Barr should go to jail, the speaker responded that “there’s a process involved here.”

In a statement in response, Justice Department spokeswoman Kerri Kupec said Pelosi’s “baseless attack on the Attorney General is reckless, irresponsible and false.”

Pelosi’s comments appeared to reference answers Barr gave during House testimony last month. Lawmakers asked him about reported frustrations Mueller’s team had with a summary the attorney general wrote about the special counsel’s report.

Barr said he was not aware of concerns the Mueller team had about his summary. But news reports revealed this week that Mueller had written a letter to Barr expressing concerns about how the attorney general depicted the “substance” of the report — before the attorney general testified.

Here is the exchange from an April 9 hearing that apparently sparked Pelosi’s accusation.

Rep. Charlie Crist, D-Fla.: “Reports have emerged recently, general, that members of the special counsel’s team are frustrated at some level with the limited information included in your March 24 letter. … Do you know what they are referencing with that?” Barr: “No, I don’t. I think I think, I suspect that they probably wanted more put out, but in my view I was not interested in putting out summaries.”

The comment from the highest-ranking Democrat in the country intensifies the party’s criticism of the top U.S. law enforcement official. While Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer have accused Barr of protecting Trump and having a conflict of interest, neither lawmaker has previously gone as far as alleging a crime.

Pelosi has so far resisted calls to impeach the president, which have intensified following the release of Mueller’s redacted report. Schumer, meanwhile, is writing a letter to Barr questioning the attorney general’s views on executive power, particularly his suggestion that a president could end an investigation if they feel they are falsely accused, NBC News reported. The senator wrote that “if these views are truly your views, you do not deserve to be Attorney General.”

Democrats want Mueller to testify publicly and have questioned why the Justice Department decided not to charge the president with obstructing justice by trying to influence Mueller’s investigation. While Mueller’s report declined to say whether Trump obstructed justice, he also noted that the report did not “exonerate” Trump. It also set out a detailed case for Congress to potentially investigate the president for obstruction.

Pelosi’s remarks Thursday follow a House Judiciary Committee hearing that Barr decided not to attend. The panel’s chairman, Democratic Rep. Jerry Nadler of New York, threatened to hold the attorney general in contempt of Congress if he does not give access to Mueller’s full, unredacted report on the Russia probe.

Barr repeatedly defended Trump during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday. The president has contended Mueller’s investigation fully exonerates him on both questions of whether he obstructed justice and whether his campaign coordinated with Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election. Trump repeatedly described the investigation as a “witch hunt” and has since falsely called the probe a “coup.”

This week’s events have escalated a partisan battle over congressional witnesses who have testified about the investigation and the president’s conduct. Democrats shot down a GOP resolution Wednesday to refer Trump’s former lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen to the Justice Department for accusations of lying to Congress in February.

— CNBC’s Kevin Breuninger and Dan Mangan contributed to this report

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, william, president, trump, investigation, pelosi, barr, general, speaker, muellers, justice, attorney, crime, lied, congress, committing


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Estee Lauder can rally 15% this year as China sales show no signs of slowing, analyst says

Pelosi accuses AG Barr of committing a crime: ‘He lied to…”The attorney general of the United States of America is not telling the truth to the Congress of the United States. That’s a crime,” Nancy Pelosi says of William Barr. Politicsread more


Pelosi accuses AG Barr of committing a crime: ‘He lied to…”The attorney general of the United States of America is not telling the truth to the Congress of the United States. That’s a crime,” Nancy Pelosi says of William Barr. Politicsread more
Estee Lauder can rally 15% this year as China sales show no signs of slowing, analyst says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thats, william, analyst, 15, states, sales, truth, pelosi, crime, telling, nancy, estee, lauder, slowing, china, rally, signs, united, tothe


Estee Lauder can rally 15% this year as China sales show no signs of slowing, analyst says

Pelosi accuses AG Barr of committing a crime: ‘He lied to…

“The attorney general of the United States of America is not telling the truth to the Congress of the United States. That’s a crime,” Nancy Pelosi says of William Barr.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-02  Authors: yun li
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China to execute driver who killed passenger of ride-hailing firm Didi Chuxing

A Chinese court on Friday sentenced a man to death for raping and killing a female passenger of ride-hailing company Didi Chuxing last year, while he was employed as a driver. The crime triggered fierce public and government criticism of Didi — whose backers include Uber Technologies, Apple and Japan’s SoftBank Group — and led to a safety overhaul at the company. The court in the eastern coastal city of Wenzhou announced the death penalty for 28-year-old Zhong Yuan, who committed the crime in Au


A Chinese court on Friday sentenced a man to death for raping and killing a female passenger of ride-hailing company Didi Chuxing last year, while he was employed as a driver. The crime triggered fierce public and government criticism of Didi — whose backers include Uber Technologies, Apple and Japan’s SoftBank Group — and led to a safety overhaul at the company. The court in the eastern coastal city of Wenzhou announced the death penalty for 28-year-old Zhong Yuan, who committed the crime in Au
China to execute driver who killed passenger of ride-hailing firm Didi Chuxing Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: zhang peng, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weibo, wenzhou, yuan, crime, passenger, firm, chuxing, killed, uber, driver, execute, ridehailing, didi, china, court, zhong, death, extremely


China to execute driver who killed passenger of ride-hailing firm Didi Chuxing

A Chinese court on Friday sentenced a man to death for raping and killing a female passenger of ride-hailing company Didi Chuxing last year, while he was employed as a driver.

The crime triggered fierce public and government criticism of Didi — whose backers include Uber Technologies, Apple and Japan’s SoftBank Group — and led to a safety overhaul at the company.

The court in the eastern coastal city of Wenzhou announced the death penalty for 28-year-old Zhong Yuan, who committed the crime in August, in a post on its Twitter-like Weibo account.

“The criminal means were extremely cruel and the consequences of the crime are extremely serious,” the court said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: zhang peng, lightrocket, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, weibo, wenzhou, yuan, crime, passenger, firm, chuxing, killed, uber, driver, execute, ridehailing, didi, china, court, zhong, death, extremely


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Crime still plagues cryptocurrencies as $1.7 billion was stolen from investors last year

Bad actors stole $1.7 billion worth of cryptocurrencies from investors last year, according to a new report the CipherTrace Cryptocurrency Intelligence published Tuesday. Of that total, roughly $1 billion was taken from exchanges. Jevans said they saw a “residual effect” after hackers finally figured out how to scam people, even months after the bubble popped. Initial coin offerings, or ICOs, became a popular but controversial way to make money where people to sell “tokens” to fund projects. Man


Bad actors stole $1.7 billion worth of cryptocurrencies from investors last year, according to a new report the CipherTrace Cryptocurrency Intelligence published Tuesday. Of that total, roughly $1 billion was taken from exchanges. Jevans said they saw a “residual effect” after hackers finally figured out how to scam people, even months after the bubble popped. Initial coin offerings, or ICOs, became a popular but controversial way to make money where people to sell “tokens” to fund projects. Man
Crime still plagues cryptocurrencies as $1.7 billion was stolen from investors last year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: kate rooney, andrew brookes, cultura, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raised, 17, crime, investors, cryptocurrencies, plagues, hackers, stolen, billion, money, total, jevans, prices, ciphertrace, report, crypto


Crime still plagues cryptocurrencies as $1.7 billion was stolen from investors last year

Cryptocurrency has a security problem it hasn’t been able to shake.

Bad actors stole $1.7 billion worth of cryptocurrencies from investors last year, according to a new report the CipherTrace Cryptocurrency Intelligence published Tuesday. Of that total, roughly $1 billion was taken from exchanges.

Even as prices dropped last year, crimes went up. The plunge in cryptocurrencies meant a lower total value for these stolen coins but the volume of coins stolen in 2018 was 3.6 times higher than it was in 2017, and seven-times what it was in 2016, according to the report.

“These numbers only represent the loot from crypto crimes that CipherTrace can validate; we have little doubt that the true number of crypto asset losses is much larger,” said Dave Jevans, CEO of CipherTrace.

The report underscores massive risks in the new asset class. Aside the reality of losing money as prices erode, the possibility of getting hacked is still one of its biggest challenges to mainstream adoption and acceptance by regulators.

Bitcoin became a household name as it rallied 1,300 percent to almost $20,000 at the end of 2017. Media coverage and a frenzy of buyers followed. But unfortunately, so did hackers. Jevans said they saw a “residual effect” after hackers finally figured out how to scam people, even months after the bubble popped.

Cryptocurrency payments are recorded on an open ledger known as blockchain, meaning they can be seen by anyone. The team at CipherTrace is able to track them but still might not know the anonymous parties that sent or received the money. The firm also scans the black market and criminal forums for data. The firm monitored chat rooms that advocated for targeting crypto and blockchain start-ups that raised mass amounts of money at the height of the price bubble.

“These aren’t street thugs — these are people who have masters degrees in computer science,” Jevans said. “We’re starting to see more organization in the space with professional gangs bankrolling computer scientists.”

In the beginning of the year, exchange hackers dominated the crypto crime scene, but the report showed a rise in “inside jobs” or fraud in the fourth quarter of last year. Something called SIM-swaps, where a hacker takes over a victim’s mobile device to steal credentials, then breaks into wallets or exchanges, was the top threat in 2018, the report said.

In addition to outright thefts, investors lost almost $750 million from threats like “exit scams,” where founders of initial coin offerings simply ran off with the funds they raised. Initial coin offerings, or ICOs, became a popular but controversial way to make money where people to sell “tokens” to fund projects. Many of those were backed by a promise to build a product or software that they never delivered.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: kate rooney, andrew brookes, cultura, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, raised, 17, crime, investors, cryptocurrencies, plagues, hackers, stolen, billion, money, total, jevans, prices, ciphertrace, report, crypto


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