Ex-White House cybersecurity chief says Peter Thiel is right to call out Google for working with China

Silicon Valley venture capitalist Peter Thiel was right to call out Alphabet’s Google for working with China, former Barack Obama White House cybersecurity chief Richard Clarke told CNBC on Wednesday. Clarke was responding to Thiel’s weekend accusations that Google works with the Chinese military and Thiel’s calls for the FBI and CIA to investigate. Google has denied working with the Chinese military. When asked by CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin if Clarke had evidence of Google working with China, th


Silicon Valley venture capitalist Peter Thiel was right to call out Alphabet’s Google for working with China, former Barack Obama White House cybersecurity chief Richard Clarke told CNBC on Wednesday. Clarke was responding to Thiel’s weekend accusations that Google works with the Chinese military and Thiel’s calls for the FBI and CIA to investigate. Google has denied working with the Chinese military. When asked by CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin if Clarke had evidence of Google working with China, th
Ex-White House cybersecurity chief says Peter Thiel is right to call out Google for working with China Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, china, peter, white, exwhite, clarke, working, work, google, cybersecurity, thiel, chinese, think, chief, right, thiels


Ex-White House cybersecurity chief says Peter Thiel is right to call out Google for working with China

Silicon Valley venture capitalist Peter Thiel was right to call out Alphabet’s Google for working with China, former Barack Obama White House cybersecurity chief Richard Clarke told CNBC on Wednesday.

“Here’s what I think is true: Google refused to work for the Pentagon on artificial intelligence,” said Richard Clarke, whose 30-year government career also included stints as White House counterterrorism coordinator under former presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Clarke was referencing Google’s contract with the Defense Department, which expired earlier this year and was not renewed.

“If you turn around and you work on artificial intelligence in China, and you don’t really know what they’re going to do with that, I think there’s an issue,” Clarke said in a “Squawk Box” interview.

In 2017, Google opened an AI center in Shanghai to focus on education and machine language learning. However, the search engine is still blocked in the country.

Clarke was responding to Thiel’s weekend accusations that Google works with the Chinese military and Thiel’s calls for the FBI and CIA to investigate.

In response, President Donald Trump tweeted Tuesday that his administration will “take a look” into Google. Thiel was a supporter of Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign.

Google has denied working with the Chinese military.

When asked by CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin if Clarke had evidence of Google working with China, the cybersecurity expert said Wednesday that the U.S. tech giant is working on AI projects there. “Do you think there’s a real distinction” between Chinese companies and the Chinese government, he asked, rhetorically.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-17  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, china, peter, white, exwhite, clarke, working, work, google, cybersecurity, thiel, chinese, think, chief, right, thiels


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AI is becoming the ‘linchpin of cybersecurity’: Microsoft

AI is becoming the ‘linchpin of cybersecurity’: Microsoft13 Hours AgoDiana Kelley of Microsoft explains why she says “air gapping” as a security measure may be less effective than connecting to the cloud.


AI is becoming the ‘linchpin of cybersecurity’: Microsoft13 Hours AgoDiana Kelley of Microsoft explains why she says “air gapping” as a security measure may be less effective than connecting to the cloud.
AI is becoming the ‘linchpin of cybersecurity’: Microsoft Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-16
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ai, kelley, measure, effective, gapping, microsoft, microsoft13, hours, cybersecurity, security, linchpin, explains


AI is becoming the 'linchpin of cybersecurity': Microsoft

AI is becoming the ‘linchpin of cybersecurity’: Microsoft

13 Hours Ago

Diana Kelley of Microsoft explains why she says “air gapping” as a security measure may be less effective than connecting to the cloud.


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This blind spot is putting financial advisors and their clients at risk

The Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as state securities regulators, are paying close attention to financial advisors’ cybersecurity practices. Whether you directly manage clients’ assets or your practice specializes in financial planning, you’ll need to protect your customers’ data. Last September, New York-based Voya Financial Advisors paid the SEC $1 million to settle charges regarding a data breach that compromised customers’ personal information. These alerts highlight vulnerabil


The Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as state securities regulators, are paying close attention to financial advisors’ cybersecurity practices. Whether you directly manage clients’ assets or your practice specializes in financial planning, you’ll need to protect your customers’ data. Last September, New York-based Voya Financial Advisors paid the SEC $1 million to settle charges regarding a data breach that compromised customers’ personal information. These alerts highlight vulnerabil
This blind spot is putting financial advisors and their clients at risk Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, sec, clients, firms, putting, risk, cybersecurity, blind, advisors, staff, spot, client, compliance, data


This blind spot is putting financial advisors and their clients at risk

Maskot | Maskot | Getty Images

It’s an email every financial advisor should expect to receive at least once. Financial advisor Charles Failla recalls receiving an email from a client asking for about $5,000. She was vacationing in the Caribbean and claimed the hotel where she was staying didn’t accept credit cards. “She needed cash,” said Failla, certified financial planner and principal at Sovereign Financial Group in New York. “I said, ‘I know you’re on vacation, but call me collect. I need to confirm it’s you before I send money to a Caribbean island.'” After several emails, the client was able to track down a phone and confirm her identity. “She understood and appreciated it,” Failla said. “It’s definitely a policy at our firm: You get an email asking for money? Verify it with the client via telephone.”

He was right to be suspicious. Last year, victims lost $2.7 billion to cybercrime, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as state securities regulators, are paying close attention to financial advisors’ cybersecurity practices. Whether you directly manage clients’ assets or your practice specializes in financial planning, you’ll need to protect your customers’ data. Even large companies aren’t immune to internet scammers. Last September, New York-based Voya Financial Advisors paid the SEC $1 million to settle charges regarding a data breach that compromised customers’ personal information. Though advisors themselves are under pressure to protect their firms from cyberattacks, they’re often unsure where to start. “We’re always getting hackers trying to break into the firewall and go on phishing expeditions, but people don’t think about what they will do when they have a breach,” said Michelle Jacko, CEO of Core Compliance & Legal Services in San Diego.

SEC priorities

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington, D.C. Adam Jeffery | CNBC

The SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations highlighted cybersecurity as a 2019 examination priority. There are two types of audits advisors should expect from the federal regulator, according to Wes Stillman, CEO of RightSize Solutions, a cybersecurity consultancy in Lenexa, Kansas. “Cybersecurity is part of the normal SEC exam: There might be 13 to 15 questions around information technology and cybersecurity,” he said. “Then there’s the big cyber sweep: Forty-plus questions around policy, cybersecurity and all that good stuff.”

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In either case, regulators want to make sure advisors have written policies and procedures around the rules and methods used to safeguard devices and data. This manual should include the firm’s approach toward mobile computing, virus protection, remote access and more. It needs to be kept current, and staff members must be trained on how to follow it. “We run into people who say ‘Sure, we have a written policy,’ and it’s referencing SkyTel pagers and 56K modems,” said Greg Goldstein, president of Highridge Technology in Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey. “That’s almost worse than not having a policy at all.” Firms need a written incident response plan, spelling out the necessary steps to address a cybersecurity incident, vulnerability assessments and details on who is responsible for implementing the plan after a data breach. “Everyone needs to know their role, including legal counsel,” said Bryan Baas, managing director of compliance for TD Ameritrade Institutional. “When the roof comes crashing down, you won’t have the time or the patience to field questions on what happened and what do we do.”

Taking a cue

Hero Images | Getty Images

Advisors should be aware of three key risk alerts from the SEC Inspections and Examinations, said Jacko of Core Compliance. These alerts highlight vulnerabilities SEC staff has spotted while examining advisory practices. One recommends establishing rules around electronic communication, including reviewing employees’ use of social media and ramping up security around remote access to email. A second risk alert addresses the use of policies and procedures on customer privacy and establishing safeguards to protect client records. During its exams, SEC staff “observed registrants’ employees who regularly stored and maintained customer information on their personal laptops,” according to the risk alert. Firm policies and procedures didn’t address how to safeguard clients’ data, the SEC said.

When the roof comes crashing down, you won’t have the time or the patience to field questions on what happened and what do we do. Bryan Baas managing director of compliance for TD Ameritrade Institutional

Finally, a third risk alert, issued in May, covers client data protection when firms use cloud-based storage. Indeed, the SEC’s exam staff found that some firms didn’t properly configure the security settings on their network storage solutions to protect against hackers. The SEC also uncovered another vulnerability: Some advisory firms failed to make sure their third-party vendors’ cybersecurity practices were up to snuff. “These cybersecurity issues transcend registered investment advisors,” said Failla. “A lot of these cracks in security come from the relationships businesses have with third-party vendors.”

Establishing practices

Linus Strandholm | EyeEm | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: darla mercado
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, financial, sec, clients, firms, putting, risk, cybersecurity, blind, advisors, staff, spot, client, compliance, data


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Alphabet’s cybersecurity company Chronicle is merging into Google’s cloud business

Alphabet will fold its enterprise security company Chronicle into Google Cloud later this year. Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian is making wide-ranging changes to the group as he surpasses six months on the job. “At Google Cloud, our customers’ need to securely store data and defend against threats—either in the cloud or on premise—is a top priority.” Chronicle will join Google Cloud in “the coming weeks,” the company said, adding that the integration will happen this fall. It wasn’t immediately c


Alphabet will fold its enterprise security company Chronicle into Google Cloud later this year. Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian is making wide-ranging changes to the group as he surpasses six months on the job. “At Google Cloud, our customers’ need to securely store data and defend against threats—either in the cloud or on premise—is a top priority.” Chronicle will join Google Cloud in “the coming weeks,” the company said, adding that the integration will happen this fall. It wasn’t immediately c
Alphabet’s cybersecurity company Chronicle is merging into Google’s cloud business Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, alphabets, google, way, cloud, chronicle, ceo, security, kurian, data, thomas, googles, company, oracle, cybersecurity, merging, business


Alphabet's cybersecurity company Chronicle is merging into Google's cloud business

Thomas Kurian, CEO of Google Cloud and formerly president of product development at Oracle, speaks at the Oracle OpenWorld conference in San Francisco on Oct. 3, 2017.

Alphabet will fold its enterprise security company Chronicle into Google Cloud later this year.

Chronicle originally spun out of X, the company’s experimental projects lab, and since January 2018 has been one of Alphabet’s “Other Bets,” which are Google sister companies aiming to produce the next big tech innovation.

In March, Chronicle released its first product, Backstory, which helps security analysts parse potential threats from anavalanche of alerts, helping them more quickly pinpoint the real vulnerabilities. In a crowded U.S. market for cybersecurity vendors, there are few existing ways for security teams to knit all of the data from their different products in a unified system.

The move comes more than a year after Alphabet folded its smart home subsidiary Nest back into the Google family.

Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian is making wide-ranging changes to the group as he surpasses six months on the job. Earlier this month, Google bought data analytics provider Looker for $2.6 billion, Kurian’s first big acquisition since the former Oracle executive replaced former Google Cloud leader Diane Greene.

“Threats posed by attackers to businesses, governments and organizations across the globe have only grown more sophisticated and urgent,” wrote Kurian in a blog post. “At Google Cloud, our customers’ need to securely store data and defend against threats—either in the cloud or on premise—is a top priority.”

Chronicle will join Google Cloud in “the coming weeks,” the company said, adding that the integration will happen this fall. It wasn’t immediately clear whether Chronicle CEO Stephen Gillett will remain leading Chronicle.

In a Medium post about the move, Gillett looked back at the group’s original goal.

At the core of our mission was the ability to look for the biggest way to have impact, and to bring the technology and services needed to “Give Good the Advantage.” Our goal was centered around delivering a way to 10X the capabilities of security teams around the world who are struggling to stay ahead… Combining our efforts will allow us to take the next step on our journey, and will significantly accelerate our impact globally, together.

WATCH: CEO of world’s largest ad conglomerate talks Facebook, Google


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: jennifer elias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, alphabets, google, way, cloud, chronicle, ceo, security, kurian, data, thomas, googles, company, oracle, cybersecurity, merging, business


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5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments


An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019. The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon. “I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday. Novak’s comments
5G rollout will ‘make things better’ for cybersecurity, according to Verizon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


5G rollout will 'make things better' for cybersecurity, according to Verizon

An illuminated 5G sign hangs behind a weave of electronic cables on the opening day of the MWC Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain, on Monday, Feb. 25, 2019.

The impending rollout of the next generation 5G wireless standard could be a boon for cybersecurity, according to an expert from Verizon.

“I actually think that the 5G rollout … will actually make things better,” Chris Novak, global director of the Threat Research Advisory Center at Verizon, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.

“I think there is a lot of research and development that we’ve done and I know others have done as well to make sure that 5G doesn’t just bring speed and reliability, but also that it’s done in a secure manner and addresses any of those kinds of concerns,” Novak said.

Novak’s comments come amid increasing scrutiny on companies seeking to win contracts to develop 5G capabilities for national networks. Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is chief among the firms under the spotlight as the U.S. seeks to dissuade America’s allies from purchasing its equipment, with claims that the firm is “too close to the government. ”

Recent moves by the U.S. have reportedly resulted in major tech companies limiting their employees’ access to Huawei. On May 16, the U.S. Department of Commerce put Huawei on a blacklist, barring it from doing business with American companies without government approval, then a few days later it authorized firms to interact with Huawei in standards bodies through August “as necessary for the development of 5G standards.”

For its part, U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration appears to have a conflicting stance on Huawei.

Trump told CNBC on Monday that Huawei could be part of the U.S. trade negotiation with China, contradicting remarks by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told CNBC on Sunday that Washington’s concerns surrounding the telecommunications behemoth are “national security” issues separate from trade.

On the subject of whether banning perceived bad actors from developing 5G networks would reduce the likelihood of data breaches, Novak said: “To be honest, it’s not even just the espionage element. In reality, the bigger percentage of that pie is actually financially motivated breaches.”

“If you actually roll back and look at the last decade, we’ve got almost about a half million security incidents that we’ve looked at over the course of that research,” he said. “While espionage plays a role in things and I think that’s kind of fired up a lot of the conversation here, I think ultimately there’s a lot of other facets to what we see happening in the cybersecurity and data breach landscape.”

— Reuters and CNBC’s Kate Fazzini contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, verizon, cybersecurity, according, 5g, things, think, novak, weve, rollout, companies, better, told, lot, actually, research, huawei


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It’s not just WhatsApp, most messaging apps likely have security vulnerabilities

The WhatsApp messaging app is displayed on an Apple iPhone on May 14, 2019 in San Anselmo, California. Facebook owned messaging app WhatsApp announced a cybersecurity breach that makes users vulnerable to malicious spyware installation iPhone and Android smartphones. WhatsApp is encouraging its 1.5 billion users to update the app as soon as possible. “The unfortunate reality is that most messaging apps have vulnerabilities that can be exploited by sophisticated cyber spies,” he said. He noted th


The WhatsApp messaging app is displayed on an Apple iPhone on May 14, 2019 in San Anselmo, California. Facebook owned messaging app WhatsApp announced a cybersecurity breach that makes users vulnerable to malicious spyware installation iPhone and Android smartphones. WhatsApp is encouraging its 1.5 billion users to update the app as soon as possible. “The unfortunate reality is that most messaging apps have vulnerabilities that can be exploited by sophisticated cyber spies,” he said. He noted th
It’s not just WhatsApp, most messaging apps likely have security vulnerabilities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: abigail ng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, iphone, messaging, users, security, vulnerabilities, secure, cybersecurity, apps, whatsapp, app


It's not just WhatsApp, most messaging apps likely have security vulnerabilities

The WhatsApp messaging app is displayed on an Apple iPhone on May 14, 2019 in San Anselmo, California. Facebook owned messaging app WhatsApp announced a cybersecurity breach that makes users vulnerable to malicious spyware installation iPhone and Android smartphones. WhatsApp is encouraging its 1.5 billion users to update the app as soon as possible.

It’s not just WhatsApp, almost everything connected to the internet is at risk of cyberattacks. That’s what experts are emphasizing following news that the messaging platform had been targeted by spyware.

The vulnerability in the world’s most popular messaging platform, which was first reported by the Financial Times, allegedly allowed an Israel-based company to install malware onto both iPhone and Android phones. The security weakness reportedly could have been used to tap calls made with the app.

A spokeswoman said Facebook-owned WhatsApp encouraged users to update the application in order to protect against “potential targeted exploits designed to compromise information stored on mobile devices.”

But even after the patch, users should keep in mind that there will always be vulnerabilities on mobile applications.

“It’s definitely possible or even likely that at least some other apps will have similar vulnerabilities,” said Tom Uren, a senior analyst in the Australian Strategic Policy Institute’s International Cyber Policy Centre. “Pretty much the entire suite of apps that ‘talk’ over the internet could be vulnerable.”

That’s because the apps are “constantly updated” to introduce new features, said Ori Sasson, founder of cyber-intelligence firm S2T.

“While updates can fix known defects and vulnerabilities, they can insert new unknown ones,” he said. In software development and testing, engineers can identify weaknesses, but it is “literally impossible” to prove the absence of a vulnerability in a “non-trivial application,” he added.

Tom Kellermann, chief cybersecurity officer of U.S.-based cybersecurity firm Carbon Black, echoed that sentiment.

“The unfortunate reality is that most messaging apps have vulnerabilities that can be exploited by sophisticated cyber spies,” he said. “No messaging service is bulletproof.”

Such platforms usually secure the transmission of messages between users, but that’s not a “panacea,” Kellermann said.

Most security ratings for such platforms relate to encryption, which implies reduced risk of eavesdropping on messages and calls, explained Sasson. He noted that WhatsApp, like BBMe and other apps that are “considered secure,” has end-to-end encryption.

In the case of the WhatsApp attack, however, it was about “secure application development” rather than how well the app protects privacy and security, said Uren of ASPI, a Canberra-based think tank.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-22  Authors: abigail ng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, iphone, messaging, users, security, vulnerabilities, secure, cybersecurity, apps, whatsapp, app


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Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert22 Hours AgoCNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.


Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert22 Hours AgoCNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.
Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, consumer, concern, security, real, cybersecurity, selling, profit, expert, data, companies, power, national


Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

22 Hours Ago

CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, team, consumer, concern, security, real, cybersecurity, selling, profit, expert, data, companies, power, national


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Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert3:28 PM ET Tue, 23 April 2019CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.


Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert3:28 PM ET Tue, 23 April 2019CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.
Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert Cached Page below :
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Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

Cybersecurity is a real concern as companies profit off consumer data: Security expert

3:28 PM ET Tue, 23 April 2019

CNBC’s “Power Lunch” team is joined by John Carlin, former assistant attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice’s National Security Division, to discuss how companies are selling consumer data.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23
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A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO

A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO7 Hours AgoTom Leighton of Akamai Technologies says 5G networks will bring a lot of opportunities to connect people and devices, but there will be challenges because billions of these devices are not secure.


A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO7 Hours AgoTom Leighton of Akamai Technologies says 5G networks will bring a lot of opportunities to connect people and devices, but there will be challenges because billions of these devices are not secure.
A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needed, ceo, secure, cybersecurity, technologies, devices, opportunities, hours, innovation, networks, leighton, lot


A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO

A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO

7 Hours Ago

Tom Leighton of Akamai Technologies says 5G networks will bring a lot of opportunities to connect people and devices, but there will be challenges because billions of these devices are not secure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, needed, ceo, secure, cybersecurity, technologies, devices, opportunities, hours, innovation, networks, leighton, lot


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A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO

A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO12:46 AM ET Mon, 15 April 2019Tom Leighton of Akamai Technologies says 5G networks will bring a lot of opportunities to connect people and devices, but there will be challenges because billions of these devices are not secure.


A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO12:46 AM ET Mon, 15 April 2019Tom Leighton of Akamai Technologies says 5G networks will bring a lot of opportunities to connect people and devices, but there will be challenges because billions of these devices are not secure.
A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15
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A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO

A lot of innovation is needed in cybersecurity, says CEO

12:46 AM ET Mon, 15 April 2019

Tom Leighton of Akamai Technologies says 5G networks will bring a lot of opportunities to connect people and devices, but there will be challenges because billions of these devices are not secure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leighton, et, opportunities, networks, ceo, needed, devices, cybersecurity, lot, technologies, secure, innovation


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