Google CEO Sundar Pichai testifies before Congress on bias, privacy

One of the first specific questions about Google’s plans in China came from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tx.) “Right now, we have no plans to launch search in China,” Pichai answered, adding that access to information is “an important human right.” At the hearing, Pichai said that more than 160 million people had checked their Google privacy settings in the last month, but that Google wanted to make it even easier for “average users” to control their data. One of the explicit focuses of the hearin


One of the first specific questions about Google’s plans in China came from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tx.) “Right now, we have no plans to launch search in China,” Pichai answered, adding that access to information is “an important human right.” At the hearing, Pichai said that more than 160 million people had checked their Google privacy settings in the last month, but that Google wanted to make it even easier for “average users” to control their data. One of the explicit focuses of the hearin
Google CEO Sundar Pichai testifies before Congress on bias, privacy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: jillian donfro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, china, bias, pichai, congress, plans, testifies, search, privacy, results, sundar, hearing, google, data, googles


Google CEO Sundar Pichai testifies before Congress on bias, privacy

It’s Sundar Pichai’s turn in the congressional hot seat.

Google’s CEO is testifying before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday where lawmakers are grilling him on a wide range of issues, including potential political bias on its platforms, its plans for a censored search app in China and its privacy practices.

This is the first time Pichai has appeared before Congress since Google declined to send him or Alphabet CEO Larry Page to a hearing on foreign election meddling earlier this year. That slight sparked anger among senators who portrayed Google as trying to skirt scrutiny.

The hearing culminates a tough year for big tech companies, as lawmakers and the public have become increasingly skeptical about Silicon Valley’s effects on democracy, misinformation and privacy. Tuesday’s proceedings have tested the soft-spoken executive’s ability to remain cool and confident while defending Google in the face intense questioning.

In their opening remarks, Representatives Kevin MCCarthy (R-Ca.) and Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) outlined how they hoped the hearing would focus on Google’s bias against conservative content, handling of misinformation and hate speech, data privacy, and plans for a censored search app in China.

In response, Pichai’s prepared remarks emphasized Google’s patriotism and focus on user privacy.

One of the first specific questions about Google’s plans in China came from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tx.) who expressed concern that Google would aid in the oppression of Chinese people “looking for a lifeline of freedom and democracy.”

“Right now, we have no plans to launch search in China,” Pichai answered, adding that access to information is “an important human right.”

Pichai’s has said in the past that Google is “not close” to launching a censored search result in China, though Tuesday’s comments appear to further distance the company from those efforts. The Intercept reported in September that at one point Google employees working on the “Project Dragonfly” efforts were told to get it in “launch-ready state” to roll out upon approval from Beijing officials.

Pichai would not, however, go so far as to commit not to launch “a tool for surveillance and censorship in China,” as he was asked to do by Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI).

“We always think it’s in our duty to explore possibilities to give users access to information,” Pichai said.

A handful of representatives also asked Pichai about how transparent (or not) Google is when it comes to its data collection practices. The company came under fire earlier this year after The Associated Press revealed that contrary to what a user might reasonably assume, pausing “Location History” tracking on a Google account didn’t actually stop the search giant from storing time-stamped location data. Google ended up clarifying the language of its policy.

At the hearing, Pichai said that more than 160 million people had checked their Google privacy settings in the last month, but that Google wanted to make it even easier for “average users” to control their data.

“We always think that there is more to do,” Pichai said. “It’s an ongoing area of effort.”

In response to a later question about the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that came into effect in the European Union earlier this year, Pichai said that there was “some value for companies to have consistent global regulation,” and highlighted how Google published its own framework to guide data privacy legislation earlier this year.

One of the explicit focuses of the hearing was whether or not Google’s search results were biased against conservative points of view. Multiple representatives posed questions on this topic, to which Pichai repeatedly responded that Google’s search algorithms did not favor any particular ideology, but instead surfaced the most relevant results, which could be affected by the time of a users’ search, as well as their geography.

One particularly fiery take against that line of questioning came from Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Ca.) who said that the queries on conservative bias “wasted time” given that private, profit-seeking companies like Google are protected by the First Amendment. Even if Google was biased, he said, that would be its right. However, he also used sample Google searches to show that Google would turn up positive search results about Republicans and negative search results about Democrats.

“If you want positive searches, do positive things,” Lieu said. “If you get bad press, don’t blame Google. Consider blaming yourself.”

Lieu has made similar points at past hearings that included Facebook, Twitter, and Alphabet.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: jillian donfro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, china, bias, pichai, congress, plans, testifies, search, privacy, results, sundar, hearing, google, data, googles


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US, China and Europe have different data laws — that could be a big headache for companies in 2019

GDPR: Why everyone is freaking out over four letters 12:10 PM ET Thu, 14 June 2018 | 02:53The U.S., meanwhile, has traditionally seen data as something to be commercialized but that approach has come into question after the data breach fallout from the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal, said the CEO. “So you have these … data trading blocks: GDPR in Europe, China pursuing its own very ambitious, long-range technology kind of economic strategy, and the U.S. adjusting to the fact that wha


GDPR: Why everyone is freaking out over four letters 12:10 PM ET Thu, 14 June 2018 | 02:53The U.S., meanwhile, has traditionally seen data as something to be commercialized but that approach has come into question after the data breach fallout from the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal, said the CEO. “So you have these … data trading blocks: GDPR in Europe, China pursuing its own very ambitious, long-range technology kind of economic strategy, and the U.S. adjusting to the fact that wha
US, China and Europe have different data laws — that could be a big headache for companies in 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, businesses, transferring, companies, tuesdaysuch, headache, traditionally, 2019, gdpr, china, major, yearcomplicating, data, economies, different, laws, europe, big


US, China and Europe have different data laws — that could be a big headache for companies in 2019

GDPR: Why everyone is freaking out over four letters 12:10 PM ET Thu, 14 June 2018 | 02:53

The U.S., meanwhile, has traditionally seen data as something to be commercialized but that approach has come into question after the data breach fallout from the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal, said the CEO.

“So you have these … data trading blocks: GDPR in Europe, China pursuing its own very ambitious, long-range technology kind of economic strategy, and the U.S. adjusting to the fact that what it regarded as a completely open playing field for the U.S. tech giants is suddenly looking a lot smaller,” Fenning told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.

Such different approaches mean that businesses would have a harder time collecting, storing and transferring data within and between those three major economies, Control Risks said in a report outlining the top challenges that firms would likely encounter next year.

Complicating the global backdrop is a rise in cyber security threats, which businesses must handle while navigating the different regulatory environment in the three major economies, the consultancy added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-11  Authors: yen nee lee
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, businesses, transferring, companies, tuesdaysuch, headache, traditionally, 2019, gdpr, china, major, yearcomplicating, data, economies, different, laws, europe, big


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Asia markets: China trade data, US-China, currencies trade in focus

China reported notably weaker than expected November exports and imports, which pointed to slower global and domestic demand and raised the possibility that Beijing may undertake more measures to boost growth. The customs data showed that annual growth for exports to all of China’s major partners slowed significantly. “China’s November trade data missed expectations by a hefty margin,” said analysts from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia in a morning note. “Softer export growth reflects slower


China reported notably weaker than expected November exports and imports, which pointed to slower global and domestic demand and raised the possibility that Beijing may undertake more measures to boost growth. The customs data showed that annual growth for exports to all of China’s major partners slowed significantly. “China’s November trade data missed expectations by a hefty margin,” said analysts from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia in a morning note. “Softer export growth reflects slower
Asia markets: China trade data, US-China, currencies trade in focus Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, currencies, imports, asia, markets, poll, china, demand, slower, data, trade, domestic, expected, exports, uschina, global, growth, focus


Asia markets: China trade data, US-China, currencies trade in focus

China reported notably weaker than expected November exports and imports, which pointed to slower global and domestic demand and raised the possibility that Beijing may undertake more measures to boost growth.

November exports rose 5.4 percent from a year earlier, according to Chinese customs data on Saturday, which was below the 10 percent jump predicted by a Reuters poll. That number was also the weakest performance since a 3 percent contraction in March. The customs data showed that annual growth for exports to all of China’s major partners slowed significantly.

Import growth was 3 percent, the slowest since October 2016, and a fraction of the 14.5 percent expected in the Reuters poll. Imports of iron ore fell for a second time, reflecting waning restocking demand at steel-mills as profit margins narrow.

“China’s November trade data missed expectations by a hefty margin,” said analysts from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia in a morning note.

“Softer export growth reflects slower global growth and the fading effect of US importers’ front‑loading shipments to avoid increases in tariffs. Falling import growth points to softening domestic demand. But we expect Chinese fiscal stimulus to support imports in 2019,” they said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, currencies, imports, asia, markets, poll, china, demand, slower, data, trade, domestic, expected, exports, uschina, global, growth, focus


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US Treasury yields move higher amid fears of an economic slowdown

ET, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 2.8611 percent, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at 3.1450 percent. Investors are increasingly concerned about a possible economic slowdown, shortly after the U.S., China and Japan all reported weaker-than-expected economic data. Meanwhile, the U.S. Treasury is set to auction $39 billion in 13-week bills and $36 billion in 26-week bills on Monday. In energy marke


ET, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 2.8611 percent, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at 3.1450 percent. Investors are increasingly concerned about a possible economic slowdown, shortly after the U.S., China and Japan all reported weaker-than-expected economic data. Meanwhile, the U.S. Treasury is set to auction $39 billion in 13-week bills and $36 billion in 26-week bills on Monday. In energy marke
US Treasury yields move higher amid fears of an economic slowdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lower, yields, economic, fears, higher, bills, price, data, slowdown, crude, yield, amid, treasury, billion


US Treasury yields move higher amid fears of an economic slowdown

At around 5 a.m. ET, the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note, which moves inversely to price, was higher at around 2.8611 percent, while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond was also higher at 3.1450 percent.

Investors are increasingly concerned about a possible economic slowdown, shortly after the U.S., China and Japan all reported weaker-than-expected economic data. It comes after Wall Street’s main indexes closed more than 2 percent lower on Friday, registering their largest weekly percentage declines since March.

On the data front, investors are likely to closely monitor the release of October’s Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) at around 10 a.m. ET.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Treasury is set to auction $39 billion in 13-week bills and $36 billion in 26-week bills on Monday.

In energy markets, crude prices were mixed after OPEC and allied non-OPEC oil producers agreed to implement a supply cut from January. Despite the news, the price outlook for 2019 remains uncertain on the back of an economic slowdown.

International benchmark Brent crude traded at around $61.66 on Monday, up around 0.05 percent, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) stood at around $52.40, more than 0.4 percent lower.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lower, yields, economic, fears, higher, bills, price, data, slowdown, crude, yield, amid, treasury, billion


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Dollar little changed after biggest weekly loss in three months

The dollar consolidated losses on Monday after posting its biggest weekly drop in more than three months last week as weak U.S. data undercut expectations of more interest rate increases in the world’s biggest economy. But weak data in recent weeks has clouded the currency’s prospects for next year. Against a basket of currencies, the dollar was flat after falling 0.8 percent last week, its biggest weekly drop since late August. In London, Theresa May faces an internal revolt against her Brexit


The dollar consolidated losses on Monday after posting its biggest weekly drop in more than three months last week as weak U.S. data undercut expectations of more interest rate increases in the world’s biggest economy. But weak data in recent weeks has clouded the currency’s prospects for next year. Against a basket of currencies, the dollar was flat after falling 0.8 percent last week, its biggest weekly drop since late August. In London, Theresa May faces an internal revolt against her Brexit
Dollar little changed after biggest weekly loss in three months Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, changed, week, months, loss, biggest, rate, expectations, data, little, vote, weekly, dollar, weak, plenty


Dollar little changed after biggest weekly loss in three months

The dollar consolidated losses on Monday after posting its biggest weekly drop in more than three months last week as weak U.S. data undercut expectations of more interest rate increases in the world’s biggest economy.

Widening interest rate differentials between the United States and the rest of the world, driven by a confident U.S. Federal Reserve, has fuelled an unlikely dollar rally this year. But weak data in recent weeks has clouded the currency’s prospects for next year.

U.S. non-farm payrolls increased by 155,000 jobs last month, below a median forecast of 200,000 jobs, and the wage increase was weaker than expected, even though its annual rise remained near the highest level in almost a decade.

Apart from weak data, some Fed policymakers have struck a cautious tone about the economic outlook, possibly flagging a turning point in its monetary policy and lowering the expectations of U.S. rate hikes priced into money markets.

Futures markets are now pricing in only a 44 percent chance of a U.S. rate increase next year compared with nearly 80 percent last Monday as the U.S. bond yield curve has flattened.

“Fed fund expectations are dropping like a stone and that is a big obstacle for the dollar, though there is plenty of event risk out there this week that will give plenty of thought for dollar bears,” said Ulrich Leuchtmann, an FX strategist at Commerzbank in Frankfurt.

Against a basket of currencies, the dollar was flat after falling 0.8 percent last week, its biggest weekly drop since late August.

The euro led gains, rising 0.34 percent at $1.1470 though market traders said currency markets will be in a wait-and-watch mode.

French President Emmanuel Macron will address the country at 2000 Paris time (1900 GMT) on Monday as he seeks to “yellow vest” anti-government protesters that have wreaked havoc in Paris during the weekend.

In London, Theresa May faces an internal revolt against her Brexit deal before a vote in the parliament on Tuesday. May plans to push ahead with the vote, but senior lawmakers in her own party put pressure on her to go back to Brussels and seek a better offer.

A rejection could throw plans for Britain’s exit into turmoil and leave her own political future hanging in the balance. Against the dollar, the British pound was flat at $1.2720.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, changed, week, months, loss, biggest, rate, expectations, data, little, vote, weekly, dollar, weak, plenty


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EU’s Vestager may investigate Apple Pay if there are formal complaints

“When we were looking at it … (at) first glance, we couldn’t see Apple being dominant. But when we looked some time ago, we didn’t find … the necessary (evidence) to start a case,” she said. “Obviously if we had official complaints, we would take that seriously because the entire payment market is a very important payment market.” Separately Vestager is reviewing whether Amazon is using merchants’ data illegally to make its own brand products similar to retailers’. “It could be (a fourth cas


“When we were looking at it … (at) first glance, we couldn’t see Apple being dominant. But when we looked some time ago, we didn’t find … the necessary (evidence) to start a case,” she said. “Obviously if we had official complaints, we would take that seriously because the entire payment market is a very important payment market.” Separately Vestager is reviewing whether Amazon is using merchants’ data illegally to make its own brand products similar to retailers’. “It could be (a fourth cas
EU’s Vestager may investigate Apple Pay if there are formal complaints Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: scott mlyn, sopa images, contributor, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, investigate, complaints, case, formal, eus, questions, course, vestager, pay, data, looking, apple, right, important, search, payment


EU's Vestager may investigate Apple Pay if there are formal complaints

“When we were looking at it … (at) first glance, we couldn’t see Apple being dominant. That doesn’t exclude in the future that we will have a second look. But when we looked some time ago, we didn’t find … the necessary (evidence) to start a case,” she said.

“Obviously if we had official complaints, we would take that seriously because the entire payment market is a very important payment market.”

A spokeswoman for Apple declined to comment.

Separately Vestager is reviewing whether Amazon is using merchants’ data illegally to make its own brand products similar to retailers’. She said she has been inundated with data, key to building a case against the U.S. online retailer.

“Now we have received not piles, but mountains of data and for us it is a priority to go through that, both from Amazon themselves but also coming in from some of the businesses that they actually host,” she said.

“For us, of course it is important to get the starting point right because, if we open a case, in order to be able to proceed with some speed, well then of course we need to get some of the basics right and we are in the process of doing that.”

Vestager recently asked Google’s rivals if the internet search engine unfairly demotes local search competitors, raising the possibility of a fourth antitrust case against the company.

“Now we ask questions when it comes to local search. This means a lot to many people because you use your phone or your table, you are looking for a place to eat, opening hours, where to go, museums, doctors, all kinds of stuff, and therefore of course it is a very important area, a very important service,” she said.

“It could be (a fourth case against Google) but of course we start asking questions without prejudice.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: scott mlyn, sopa images, contributor, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, start, investigate, complaints, case, formal, eus, questions, course, vestager, pay, data, looking, apple, right, important, search, payment


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Splunk CEO talks data analytics company’s new capabilities in voice, AR

Splunk’s data analytics business doesn’t stop at the keyboard, President and CEO Doug Merritt told CNBC on Monday in an exclusive interview with Jim Cramer. “You can now talk to Splunk through Alexa, Siri or other natural-language frameworks and have Splunk respond back to you,” the CEO said on “Mad Money.” Splunk has also recently announced some new business lines “that people wouldn’t always expect” from the cloud company, Merritt told Cramer. Ideally, companies that need to continuously monit


Splunk’s data analytics business doesn’t stop at the keyboard, President and CEO Doug Merritt told CNBC on Monday in an exclusive interview with Jim Cramer. “You can now talk to Splunk through Alexa, Siri or other natural-language frameworks and have Splunk respond back to you,” the CEO said on “Mad Money.” Splunk has also recently announced some new business lines “that people wouldn’t always expect” from the cloud company, Merritt told Cramer. Ideally, companies that need to continuously monit
Splunk CEO talks data analytics company’s new capabilities in voice, AR Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, splunk, ar, analytics, security, splunks, talks, voice, customers, capabilities, merritt, data, ceo, told, companys, revenue


Splunk CEO talks data analytics company's new capabilities in voice, AR

Splunk’s data analytics business doesn’t stop at the keyboard, President and CEO Doug Merritt told CNBC on Monday in an exclusive interview with Jim Cramer.

“You can now talk to Splunk through Alexa, Siri or other natural-language frameworks and have Splunk respond back to you,” the CEO said on “Mad Money.”

Merritt said that the idea to connect Splunk’s growing database with voice-enabled assistants came from the question of “how to bring the power of Splunk to everybody within the organization.”

That translated into the analytics software giant leveraging its massive data set to help individual customers, a move that has become somewhat of a running theme in Splunk’s ascent to its $15.9 billion market cap.

Splunk has also recently announced some new business lines “that people wouldn’t always expect” from the cloud company, Merritt told Cramer.

“We’ve got a whole next-gen[eration] mobile platform that has an augmented reality framework on top, so that customers like University of Connecticut, in their aquaponics lab, where they grow fish, can now use their mobile devices and walk through the lab to check things like UV light [and] pH balance,” the CEO said.

Ideally, companies that need to continuously monitor their operations will use this platform “to make sure that their businesses are being run well and effectively using Splunk,” Merritt said.

Splunk serves a host of corporate clients including Coca-Cola, Nordstrom, and Groupon, and helps federal customers like the state of Alaska manage compliance and security requirements. The company is also partnered with Amazon’s cloud division, Amazon Web Services.

The San Francisco-based analytics giant helps its corporate customers gather real-time data related to their businesses to smooth operations, boost security and gain eye-opening insights into consumer patterns.

In late November, Splunk topped Wall Street’s earnings and revenue estimates for its fiscal third quarter, posting 40 percent year-over-year revenue growth. Management raised its full-year revenue guidance as well as its outlook for 2019.

Splunk’s stock rose 2.59 percent Monday amid marketwide volatility, settling at $108.40 a share.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: elizabeth gurdus
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, splunk, ar, analytics, security, splunks, talks, voice, customers, capabilities, merritt, data, ceo, told, companys, revenue


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Google shutting down social network sooner because of new security bug

Google is shutting down its beleaguered social network sooner than expected in the wake of a new security issue that affected 52.5 million users. Google Plus received its initial kiss of death in early October, when the company revealed that a security bug had exposed the account information of 500,000 users, including their names, email addresses and occupations. At the time, Google planned to shut down the social network by August 2019. However, it now plans to shut down Google Plus by April 2


Google is shutting down its beleaguered social network sooner than expected in the wake of a new security issue that affected 52.5 million users. Google Plus received its initial kiss of death in early October, when the company revealed that a security bug had exposed the account information of 500,000 users, including their names, email addresses and occupations. At the time, Google planned to shut down the social network by August 2019. However, it now plans to shut down Google Plus by April 2
Google shutting down social network sooner because of new security bug Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, sean gallup, getty images, cnbc, jeniece pettitt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, shut, google, bug, plus, network, shutting, set, data, users, sooner, information, social


Google shutting down social network sooner because of new security bug

Google is shutting down its beleaguered social network sooner than expected in the wake of a new security issue that affected 52.5 million users.

Google Plus received its initial kiss of death in early October, when the company revealed that a security bug had exposed the account information of 500,000 users, including their names, email addresses and occupations. At the time, Google planned to shut down the social network by August 2019.

But in a blog post Monday Google wrote that it discovered a second bug that allowed the profile information of 52.5 million users to be viewable by developers, even if the profiles were set to private, using one of Google’s application programming interfaces, or APIs, for six days in November. Once again, the available data included information like users’ names, email addresses, occupations and ages.

Google said that the bug did not give third-party apps access to users’ financial data or passwords and that it didn’t find any evidence that the private profile information was accessed or misused. However, it now plans to shut down Google Plus by April 2019, and access to its APIs in the next 90 days.

Google’s initial security bug raised hackles in Washington and with the general public because The Wall Street Journal reported at the time that Google didn’t disclose it for months because it feared regulatory scrutiny and reputational damage.

Monday’s disclosure comes a day before Google CEO Sundar Pichai is set to testify before Congress about transparency and accountability.

“We understand that our ability to build reliable products that protect your data drives user trust,” Google’s blog post said.

“We have always taken this seriously, and we continue to invest in our privacy programs to refine internal privacy review processes, create powerful data controls, and engage with users, researchers, and policymakers to get their feedback and improve our programs.”

The enterprise version of Google Plus will remain active.

WATCH:Meet the man behind Google Assistant’s personality – Ryan Germick


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-10  Authors: jillian donfro, sean gallup, getty images, cnbc, jeniece pettitt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, security, shut, google, bug, plus, network, shutting, set, data, users, sooner, information, social


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Actor Edward Norton is trying to change how the TV industry measures viewership

During Edward Norton’s long acting career, the Golden Globe Award winner has enjoyed a side gig backing tech start-ups like Uber, data analytics firm Kenso and crowdfunding site CrowdRise. It doesn’t take long in start-up land to learn that data science and analytics are being applied to every industry, and quickly. Media companies can use that data to fund shows and films that have a greater chance of financial success. “We felt like EDO could bring the kind of rigorous data-driven and actionab


During Edward Norton’s long acting career, the Golden Globe Award winner has enjoyed a side gig backing tech start-ups like Uber, data analytics firm Kenso and crowdfunding site CrowdRise. It doesn’t take long in start-up land to learn that data science and analytics are being applied to every industry, and quickly. Media companies can use that data to fund shows and films that have a greater chance of financial success. “We felt like EDO could bring the kind of rigorous data-driven and actionab
Actor Edward Norton is trying to change how the TV industry measures viewership Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: michelle castillo, adam jeffery, source, house of cards
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, long, industry, measures, marketing, felt, tv, actor, measure, data, viewership, edward, norton, change, analytics, movies, trying, huge


Actor Edward Norton is trying to change how the TV industry measures viewership

During Edward Norton’s long acting career, the Golden Globe Award winner has enjoyed a side gig backing tech start-ups like Uber, data analytics firm Kenso and crowdfunding site CrowdRise. He started way back in 2000 as founding investor of wastewater treatment company Baswood.

It doesn’t take long in start-up land to learn that data science and analytics are being applied to every industry, and quickly. Norton is now working to bring some of that power to his own business.

For his latest endeavor, Norton has teamed with poet Daniel Nadler and one of Facebook’s first investors on a project designed to measure in real time the effectiveness of TV ads. The company is called EDO, which stands for Entertainment Data Oracle, and its technology is already being used by ESPN, Turner, CNBC owner NBCUniversal and Paramount, providing insights into which ads viewers like or what parts of movies audiences love.

Media companies can use that data to fund shows and films that have a greater chance of financial success.

“I saw firsthand in my work in making, marketing and distributing movies that TV advertising was a huge part of marketing budgets, yet the only measurement of whether that was effective was a very simplistic measure of exposure that’s not even very reliable in today’s world,” Norton said in an interview. “We felt like EDO could bring the kind of rigorous data-driven and actionable analytics that digital advertising has had for years to the huge budgets on TV. If we did that, we felt like we’d be able to help the efficiency of the entire media ecosystem for creators and consumers.”

EDO raised $12 million last month in a round led by Breyer Capital, whose founder, Jim Breyer, made a fortune from an early bet on Facebook.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-09  Authors: michelle castillo, adam jeffery, source, house of cards
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, long, industry, measures, marketing, felt, tv, actor, measure, data, viewership, edward, norton, change, analytics, movies, trying, huge


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China’s November export, import growth shrinks, showing weak demand

China reported far weaker than expected November exports and imports, showing slower global and domestic demand and raising the possibility authorities will take more measures to keep the country’s growth rate from slipping too much. Analysts say the export data showed that the “front-loading” impact as firms rushed out shipments to beat planned U.S. tariff hikes faded, and that export growth is likely to slow further as demand cools. The customs data showed that annual growth for exports to all


China reported far weaker than expected November exports and imports, showing slower global and domestic demand and raising the possibility authorities will take more measures to keep the country’s growth rate from slipping too much. Analysts say the export data showed that the “front-loading” impact as firms rushed out shipments to beat planned U.S. tariff hikes faded, and that export growth is likely to slow further as demand cools. The customs data showed that annual growth for exports to all
China’s November export, import growth shrinks, showing weak demand Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-08  Authors: photographer, collection, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, showing, rose, shrinks, data, shipments, customs, import, exports, earlier, demand, chinas, weak, growth, export, showed


China's November export, import growth shrinks, showing weak demand

China reported far weaker than expected November exports and imports, showing slower global and domestic demand and raising the possibility authorities will take more measures to keep the country’s growth rate from slipping too much.

November exports only rose 5.4 percent from a year earlier, Chinese customs data showed on Saturday, the weakest performance since a 3 percent contraction in March, and well short of the 10 percent forecast in a Reuters poll.

Analysts say the export data showed that the “front-loading” impact as firms rushed out shipments to beat planned U.S. tariff hikes faded, and that export growth is likely to slow further as demand cools.

The customs data showed that annual growth for exports to all of China’s major partners slowed significantly. Exports to the United States rose 9.8 percent in November from a year earlier, compared with 13.2 percent in October.

To the European Union, shipments increased 6.0 percent, compared with 14.6 percent in October. Exports to South Korea fell from a year earlier, while in October they rose 7.7 percent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-08  Authors: photographer, collection, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, showing, rose, shrinks, data, shipments, customs, import, exports, earlier, demand, chinas, weak, growth, export, showed


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