Amazon is hiring over 30,000 workers in these 6 US cities

Amazon wants to add 30,000 people to its workforce, and it’s putting on major hiring events in six cities to recruit. Amazon Career Day will be held Tuesday, Sept. 17, in Arlington, Virginia (the company’s newly-minted second U.S. headquarters); Boston; Chicago; Dallas; Nashville and Seattle. The e-commerce giant is hiring for permanent jobs that range in experience from entry-level roles at fulfillment centers to software developers to computer vision scientists. Outside of tech, the company ha


Amazon wants to add 30,000 people to its workforce, and it’s putting on major hiring events in six cities to recruit. Amazon Career Day will be held Tuesday, Sept. 17, in Arlington, Virginia (the company’s newly-minted second U.S. headquarters); Boston; Chicago; Dallas; Nashville and Seattle. The e-commerce giant is hiring for permanent jobs that range in experience from entry-level roles at fulfillment centers to software developers to computer vision scientists. Outside of tech, the company ha
Amazon is hiring over 30,000 workers in these 6 US cities Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companys, tech, company, job, fulfillment, cities, 30000, data, workers, day, jobs, hiring, amazon


Amazon is hiring over 30,000 workers in these 6 US cities

Amazon wants to add 30,000 people to its workforce, and it’s putting on major hiring events in six cities to recruit.

Amazon Career Day will be held Tuesday, Sept. 17, in Arlington, Virginia (the company’s newly-minted second U.S. headquarters); Boston; Chicago; Dallas; Nashville and Seattle. The e-commerce giant is hiring for permanent jobs that range in experience from entry-level roles at fulfillment centers to software developers to computer vision scientists.

Both part- and full-time jobs are up for grabs and will work out of the company’s headquarters, tech hubs, data centers and fulfillment centers. Pay starts at the company’s minimum wage of $15 per hour.

Attendees are encouraged to apply for a job directly with Amazon or participate in information sessions about starting a business with the company as an online seller, delivery service partner, self-published author and more. Job-seekers can also get interviewing and resume advice.

New company hires will also be a part of its Upskilling 2025 initiative, a $700 million investment in skills training programs for up to 100,000 employees. Some of the company’s fastest-growing tech jobs in the past five years include data scientist, solutions architect, network development engineer and web development engineer. Outside of tech, the company has significantly scaled its contingent of data mapping specialists, fulfillment center workers, program managers and marketers.

Full-time employees can expect health care benefits from their first day, 401(k) match and up to 20 weeks of paid parental leave.

“Amazon has created more than 300,000 new jobs in the U.S. over the last decade – and we’re proud to continue investing and creating opportunities for people across the country,” said founder and CEO Jeff Bezos said in a statement. “These are jobs with highly competitive compensation and full-benefits from day one, as well as training opportunities to gain new skills in high-demand fields such as robotics and machine learning.”

The company is also gearing up for the holiday season by hiring tens of thousands of part-time, seasonal roles across the country.

Those interested snagging a job with Amazon can register for the Career Day and search for openings online.

In the past, Amazon recruiters have told CNBC Make It that those looking to land a job at the company should study the e-commerce behemoth’s 14 leadership principles and be able to clearly explain why they’d be a great fit for the job.

“We’re really looking for reasons to say ‘yes,’ not to say ‘no,'” said Sean Kelley, Amazon Worldwide Operations Talent Acquisition Director, in 2018.

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Don’t miss: Shaq: As soon as I started investing like Jeff Bezos, ‘I probably quadrupled what I’m worth’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companys, tech, company, job, fulfillment, cities, 30000, data, workers, day, jobs, hiring, amazon


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CEOs from Amazon, IBM, Salesforce and more ask Congress to pass a consumer data privacy law

CEOs of 51 companies from the Business Roundtable, including Amazon, IBM and Salesforce, signed a letter to U.S. congressional leaders Tuesday urging them to create “a comprehensive consumer data privacy law.” We are committed to protecting consumer privacy and want consumers to have confidence that companies treat their personal information responsibly.” Cook advocated for “a comprehensive federal privacy law” in the U.S. during a speech at a privacy conference in Brussels last year. A federal


CEOs of 51 companies from the Business Roundtable, including Amazon, IBM and Salesforce, signed a letter to U.S. congressional leaders Tuesday urging them to create “a comprehensive consumer data privacy law.” We are committed to protecting consumer privacy and want consumers to have confidence that companies treat their personal information responsibly.” Cook advocated for “a comprehensive federal privacy law” in the U.S. during a speech at a privacy conference in Brussels last year. A federal
CEOs from Amazon, IBM, Salesforce and more ask Congress to pass a consumer data privacy law Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ibm, pass, companies, salesforce, consumer, privacy, ceos, consumers, services, congress, comprehensive, law, ask, data, letter, federal


CEOs from Amazon, IBM, Salesforce and more ask Congress to pass a consumer data privacy law

CEOs of 51 companies from the Business Roundtable, including Amazon, IBM and Salesforce, signed a letter to U.S. congressional leaders Tuesday urging them to create “a comprehensive consumer data privacy law.”

The executives, who span a range of industries, said a federal law is necessary to ensure “strong, consistent protections for American consumers” and allow “American companies to continue to lead a globally competitive market.” The letter was addressed to leaders of the House Energy and Commerce committees and the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation committees, in addition to House and Senate leaders.

“As Chief Executive Officers of leading companies across industries, our companies reach virtually every American consumer and rely on data and digital platforms every day to deliver and improve our products and services,” the CEOs wrote in the letter. “Consumer trust and confidence are essential to our businesses. We are committed to protecting consumer privacy and want consumers to have confidence that companies treat their personal information responsibly.”

The letter comes as lawmakers have been more closely scrutinizing Big Tech over its data practices. The Federal Trade Commission recently issued two major fines to Google and Facebook over their handling of user data. And on Monday, 50 attorneys general from U.S. states and territories announced an investigation into Google’s advertising business, which heavily relies on data. With this new message, tech leaders are offering their help in forming legislation that could regulate their own industry.

“We urgently need a comprehensive federal consumer data privacy law to strengthen consumer trust and establish a stable policy environment in which new services and technologies can flourish within a well-understood legal and regulatory framework,” the CEOs said in the letter. “Innovation thrives under clearly defined and consistently applied rules.”

The CEOs who signed the letter represented a subset of the Business Roundtable, a group of top executives from U.S. corporations. The group made headlines last month when nearly 200 members signed a statement disavowing shareholder value as the primary focus of a corporation, marking a major shift in business philosophy. Instead, the executives said other considerations, such as investing in employees and dealing ethically with suppliers, should become key business goals.

Notably missing from Tuesday’s letter to congressional leaders was Apple CEO Tim Cook, who has been a vocal supporter of data privacy measures. Cook advocated for “a comprehensive federal privacy law” in the U.S. during a speech at a privacy conference in Brussels last year.

Read the full letter below:

Dear Leader McConnell, Speaker Pelosi, Leader Schumer, Leader McCarthy, Chairman Wicker, Chairman Pallone, Ranking Member Cantwell and Ranking Member Walden: We write to urge you to pass, as soon as possible, a comprehensive consumer data privacy law that strengthens protections for consumers and establishes a national privacy framework to enable continued innovation and growth in the digital economy. There is now widespread agreement among companies across all sectors of the economy, policymakers and consumer groups about the need for a comprehensive federal consumer data privacy law that provides strong, consistent protections for American consumers. A federal consumer privacy law should also ensure that American companies continue to lead a globally competitive market. As Chief Executive Officers of leading companies across industries, our companies reach virtually every American consumer and rely on data and digital platforms every day to deliver and improve our products and services. Consumer trust and confidence are essential to our businesses. We are committed to protecting consumer privacy and want consumers to have confidence that companies treat their personal information responsibly. We are also united in our belief that consumers should have meaningful rights over their personal information and that companies that access this information should be held consistently accountable under a comprehensive federal consumer data privacy law. Consumers have grown accustomed to a breadth of resources and services made available over the internet across state borders and even globally. Consumers should not and cannot be expected to understand rules that may change depending upon the state in which they reside, the state in which they are accessing the internet, and the state in which the company’s operation is providing those resources or services. Now is the time for Congress to act and ensure that consumers are not faced with confusion about their rights and protections based on a patchwork of inconsistent state laws. Further, as the regulatory landscape becomes increasingly fragmented and more complex, U.S. innovation and global competitiveness in the digital economy are threatened. We urgently need a comprehensive federal consumer data privacy law to strengthen consumer trust and establish a stable policy environment in which new services and technologies can flourish within a well-understood legal and regulatory framework. Innovation thrives under clearly defined and consistently applied rules. Business Roundtable has released a Framework for Consumer Privacy Legislation (attached to this letter), which provides a detailed roadmap of issues that a federal consumer privacy law should address. As the Framework describes, a comprehensive federal consumer data privacy law should create robust protections for consumers by requiring businesses to take responsibility for the collection, use and sharing of personal information. The United States has been a global leader in technology and data-driven innovation and now has the opportunity to lead on consumer data privacy for the benefit of all consumers, companies and commerce. We stand ready to work with you.

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Watch: FTC consumer protection director on YouTube’s $170M fine for violating kids’ privacy


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ibm, pass, companies, salesforce, consumer, privacy, ceos, consumers, services, congress, comprehensive, law, ask, data, letter, federal


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This algorithm can predict when workers are about to quit—here’s how

If they’re willing to invest in retention, they’ll avoid the time and financial cost of replacing workers. Here’s how digging into the data could help businesses and workers thrive. The first was “turnover shocks,” which are events that prompt workers to consider leaving an organization. “Even if you can predict who’s leaving, it still requires you to respond thoughtfully,” he says. The nature of HR and talent acquisition are constantly evolving as we find ways to streamline processes and create


If they’re willing to invest in retention, they’ll avoid the time and financial cost of replacing workers. Here’s how digging into the data could help businesses and workers thrive. The first was “turnover shocks,” which are events that prompt workers to consider leaving an organization. “Even if you can predict who’s leaving, it still requires you to respond thoughtfully,” he says. The nature of HR and talent acquisition are constantly evolving as we find ways to streamline processes and create
This algorithm can predict when workers are about to quit—here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, holtom, algorithm, quitheres, create, better, going, leaving, data, employers, predict, job, employees


This algorithm can predict when workers are about to quit—here's how

Workers are quitting their jobs at record rates, thanks to a tight labor market and high confidence that moving on will also mean moving up, particularly in pay. Besides leaving in search of more money, recent job-quitters have also cited toxic work environments and limited room for growth as major reasons for putting in their notice. For employers, this kind of insight might only become clear during an employee’s exit interview, if at all. But with the help of artificial intelligence and machine learning, researchers have developed an algorithm that may be a better predictor of when a worker is at risk of quitting. That could be a good thing — for employers and employees alike. By understanding who’s at risk of leaving, companies may be able to pinpoint the main reasons why employees are seeking other opportunities. If they’re willing to invest in retention, they’ll avoid the time and financial cost of replacing workers. The flip side, of course, is that employers have to put measures in place to improve employee satisfaction, whether that’s in the form of better compensation, workplace culture or career advancement. Here’s how digging into the data could help businesses and workers thrive.

The quitting algorithm

In a recent article for Harvard Business Review, Professors Brooks Holtom of Georgetown University and David Allen of Texas Christian University describe the results of their latest research. Using big data and machine-learning algorithms, the two developed a real-time indicator to measure two main indicators that an employee is about to quit. The first was “turnover shocks,” which are events that prompt workers to consider leaving an organization. This could be a change in leadership or major acquisition, for example, and was measured with events including news articles about a company, changes in stock value and legal action taken against the firm. Researchers also measured “job embeddedness,” or how deeply connected a worker felt to their organization, based on publicly available data like number of past jobs, employment anniversary and tenure, skills, education, gender and geography. When put to the test, the algorithm identified that those marked as “most likely” to be receptive to a new opportunity were, in fact, 63% more likely to be in a new job by the end of the three-month study period.

Your boss might be able to predict when you’re about to quit—and that could be a good thing

Knowing that HR can use this information to determine who’s a flight risk might feel like an overstep. There’s a financial benefit to re-engaging dissatisfied employees rather than having to hire someone new. By some estimates, the cost of replacing a highly skilled professional could be one to two times their salary, in terms of time and money spent recruiting, selecting and training a new hire, Holtom tells CNBC Make It. “There are hard costs, like training and selection, as well as soft costs, like reduced customer service or inability to deliver in the short-term when someone leaves,” he says.

Even if you can predict who’s leaving, it still requires you to respond thoughtfully. Brooks Holtom Professor, Georgetown University

In a worst-case scenario, 50% of HR managers say they have open positions they can’t fill, and extended job vacancies are costing companies $800,000 annually, says Michelle Armer, Chief People Officer at CareerBuilder. But beyond a company’s desire to protect the bottom line, workers could stand to benefit from a more focused approach to employee engagement — so long as employers use machine learning results in a productive way. “The very best organizations develop a listening culture,” Holtom says. “They want to hear from their employees what’s going well, what’s not going well, and they want to do all that they can to improve conditions for their employees that are cost-effective. AI is complemented by a thoughtful dialogue and one-on-ones or other types of engagement with employees. “Even if you can predict who’s leaving, it still requires you to respond thoughtfully,” he says. Collecting and analyzing these data points can yield better results than gathering answers from what can be time-consuming company-wide surveys. With surveys, for example, it’s possible companies aren’t asking the right questions, or employees who do opt in to provide feedback aren’t being as candid as they could be. By using available data, “The potential benefit to employees is that, over time, sophisticated managers and employers learn more about what their people really value — not just say they value — and are able to create a more positive and perhaps more personalized work environment,” Allen says. Of course, there are downsides to letting machines predict employee engagement. “My major concerns are around privacy boundaries,” Holtom says. In the study, researchers worked with a talent intelligence firm to gather only publicly available data, including social media feeds. “At some level, that might start to become invasive. Pulling information from Instagram, Snapchat or Facebook — information that people post publicly whether it’s controlled or password protected or not — there’s risk for employees.” Algorithms could become outdated, be applied out of context or rely on attributes such as protected class characteristics, Allen adds, which could create a host of other issues.

The nature of HR and talent acquisition are constantly evolving as we find ways to streamline processes and create better experiences for both employers and job seekers. Michelle Armer Chief People Officer at CareerBuilder

AI in hiring and retention is here to stay

It’s crucial to take privacy concerns into consideration, especially as information-gathering in hiring and retention becomes more commonplace. “The nature of HR and talent acquisition are constantly evolving as we find ways to streamline processes and create better experiences for both employers and job seekers,” Armer says, adding that CareerBuilder itself uses AI, semantic search and machine learning to help job seekers create their resumes, match job seekers with open roles and aid other elements of the search and hiring process. In other words, the researchers’ quitting algorithm is just one example of how companies are investing to leverage technology and change the way they source and hire — hopefully, in a more efficient and constructive way that stands to benefit all involved parties. “The genie is out of the bottle, and I think this is the direction most organizations are going to head,” Holtom says. “They’re going to collect more data and they’re going to analyze it more thoughtfully, more carefully, to increase the odds that they can attract and keep good people.” Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Don’t miss: 75% of Americans agree: If bosses want happier employees, start by saying ‘thank you’


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: jennifer liu
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, holtom, algorithm, quitheres, create, better, going, leaving, data, employers, predict, job, employees


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Trump can spin economic numbers – but he likely can’t manipulate them, experts say

Experts and former top economic officials say that the economic data that underpins major government programs and forms the basis for private financial forecasts is likely safe from presidential interference. But, those with knowledge of the inner workings of the agencies and the White House economic advisory process say that any attempt to do so likely wouldn’t work. The White House did not respond to a request for comment. There are also procedural safeguards against the White House playing wi


Experts and former top economic officials say that the economic data that underpins major government programs and forms the basis for private financial forecasts is likely safe from presidential interference. But, those with knowledge of the inner workings of the agencies and the White House economic advisory process say that any attempt to do so likely wouldn’t work. The White House did not respond to a request for comment. There are also procedural safeguards against the White House playing wi
Trump can spin economic numbers – but he likely can’t manipulate them, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, economic, likely, manipulate, experts, agencies, house, numbers, report, data, work, say, spin, cant, president, white


Trump can spin economic numbers – but he likely can't manipulate them, experts say

US President Donald Trump speaks to the press before he departs for North Carolina on the South Lawn of the White House on September 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chen Mengtong/China News Service/VCG via Getty Images) Chen Mengtong | Visual China Group | Getty Images

President Donald Trump can spin the numbers, but he can’t fudge them. Experts and former top economic officials say that the economic data that underpins major government programs and forms the basis for private financial forecasts is likely safe from presidential interference. Questions about the integrity of government data arose following a report in The New York Times on Monday that said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross threatened to fire senior officials at a federal scientific agency his department oversees after the agency contradicted the president’s claims about Hurricane Dorian. In the wake of that report, some former officials worried that it could suggest a willingness on the part of the Trump administration to intervene in other independent federal agencies, such as those that maintain the nation’s economic data. The Bureau of Economic Analysis, for example, produces quarterly reports on the nation’s gross domestic product, a data point Trump has touted as a metric of his performance as president and a credential for his 2020 reelection bid. But, those with knowledge of the inner workings of the agencies and the White House economic advisory process say that any attempt to do so likely wouldn’t work. In short, the people who work at those agencies likely wouldn’t put up with any kind of data manipulation. “Let me put it this way — if they tried to do anything with the data, I think they would get caught,” said Dean Baker, a senior economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington. In a statement, a Commerce Department spokesperson said the report in the Times was “false.” The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

Long tradition of independence

The main thing standing in the way of political interference in the work of the government’s statistical agencies is the long tradition of independence at the bureaus, according to Katharine Abraham, a former commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The BLS, which is under the Labor Department, and the BEA and Census Bureau, which are both under the Commerce Department, produce the major government statistics. “There is, at all of these agencies, a culture of extreme independence,” Abraham said. “In all of these places, people talk to reporters.” There are also procedural safeguards against the White House playing with the numbers, she said. No one outside of the BLS — and even most of those inside the agency — sees the most politically fraught figures, such as jobs data, until the commissioner and a relatively small group of career officials have written the accompanying press release. The White House receives the numbers, with the release, the night before the public.

In all of these places, people talk to reporters. Katharine Abraham former BLS commissioner

“There are a lot of things that I worry about under this current administration. There are a lot of terrible things this administration has done. But I have never had any doubt that any of the economic data from BLS or BEA is legitimate,” said Jacob Leibenluft, a former deputy director of the National Economic Council under President Barack Obama, and the head of Hillary Clinton’s 2016 economic policy team during the general election campaign. “I have high confidence that if there was political pressure put on those agencies to juice the stats, that we would hear about it,” Leibenluft said. On top of the procedural barriers, it would require a great deal of coordinated, specialized work to swap in new numbers without people immediately noticing, experts said. Baker, the CEPR economist, pointed out that in some of the surveys, the underlying data behind the top-level numbers are released to the public. “You’ve collected this survey from 60,000 households, and if you didn’t have someone go in and change at least a substantial portion of them, people would catch it,” Baker said. He added that it would take a well-coordinated “large-scale conspiracy” to pull it off. “You would have to have a lot of people in on it,” he said. “And they would have to know what they were doing.” The last president known to attempt to interfere in the work of the Bureau of Labor Statistics was Richard Nixon, who ordered an aide to tally the number of Jews and Democrats who worked at the agency, then had a number of them removed from their posts. Nixon’s efforts were documented in the 1976 book “The Final Days” by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.

Eyes on final jobs report before 2020 election


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-10  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, economic, likely, manipulate, experts, agencies, house, numbers, report, data, work, say, spin, cant, president, white


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Equifax adds extra step to claim $125 damage award

If you signed up for the Equifax settlement to get $125 as a result of their massive data breach, you now have until Oct. 15 to verify your claim. The credit-reporting company’s $700 million settlement, announced in late July, gave consumers affected by its huge 2017 data breach the choice of free credit monitoring — up to 10 years — or $125 if they already have such a service. Alternatively, people who had paid anything out of pocket due to the breach could seek to recover that money. Over the


If you signed up for the Equifax settlement to get $125 as a result of their massive data breach, you now have until Oct. 15 to verify your claim. The credit-reporting company’s $700 million settlement, announced in late July, gave consumers affected by its huge 2017 data breach the choice of free credit monitoring — up to 10 years — or $125 if they already have such a service. Alternatively, people who had paid anything out of pocket due to the breach could seek to recover that money. Over the
Equifax adds extra step to claim $125 damage award Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, damage, adds, verify, extra, settlement, claim, award, 125, step, consumers, breach, equifax, data, oct, valid


Equifax adds extra step to claim $125 damage award

If you signed up for the Equifax settlement to get $125 as a result of their massive data breach, you now have until Oct. 15 to verify your claim.

Just remember you may get far less than that.

The credit-reporting company’s $700 million settlement, announced in late July, gave consumers affected by its huge 2017 data breach the choice of free credit monitoring — up to 10 years — or $125 if they already have such a service. Alternatively, people who had paid anything out of pocket due to the breach could seek to recover that money.

Over the last several days, consumers have been receiving emails alerting them that they must verify their $125 claim by the Oct. 15 deadline. The email also notes that “depending on the number of valid claims that are filed, the amount you receive for alternative compensation may be a small percentage of your initial claim.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: sarah obrien
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Why Mastercard is betting on middle school girls to detect cyberthreats and protect our personal data

To boost their workforce and help close America’s skills gap, MasterCard’s Girls4Tech program has reached more than 400,000 girls in 26 countries, surpassing its 2017 goal to reach 200,000 girls by 2020. The company plans to inspire 1 million girls by 2025. 1 million girls by 2025Mastercard gives employees five paid days off a year to do philanthropic volunteer work. Their goal is to reach 1 million girls by 2025. Her mother encouraged her to try the Girls4Tech program on coding and she agreed t


To boost their workforce and help close America’s skills gap, MasterCard’s Girls4Tech program has reached more than 400,000 girls in 26 countries, surpassing its 2017 goal to reach 200,000 girls by 2020. The company plans to inspire 1 million girls by 2025. 1 million girls by 2025Mastercard gives employees five paid days off a year to do philanthropic volunteer work. Their goal is to reach 1 million girls by 2025. Her mother encouraged her to try the Girls4Tech program on coding and she agreed t
Why Mastercard is betting on middle school girls to detect cyberthreats and protect our personal data Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-07  Authors: christopher west davis, special to cnbccom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protect, million, girls, role, girls4tech, personal, school, data, betting, technology, program, mastercards, middle, detect, women, mastercard, cyberthreats


Why Mastercard is betting on middle school girls to detect cyberthreats and protect our personal data

Source: Nutty Scientists

Cybersecurity and artificial intelligence are two of the hottest technology fields today, yet there’s no encrypted secret there’s a skills and gender gap in the U.S. in these high-tech fields. According to the Center for Cyber Safety and Education, unfilled cybersecurity jobs are expected to reach 1.8 million by 2022, up 20% from 1.5 million in 2015. Mastercard is trying to change that, by showing 1 million middle school girls worldwide that they have what it takes to play a role in the technology landscape of the future. Mastercard’s mission is not only to close the gender gap — Cybersecurity Ventures found that women fill less than 20% of these roles — but to prove that women can play a pivotal role in encryption, fraud detection, biometrics and data analysis. The U.S. Department of Commerce finds that only 1 in 20 girls aspire to be in STEM-based careers compared to 1 in 5 boys. That’s unfortunate, said Dana Lorberg, executive vice president of operations and technology at Mastercard. “Finding a woman in cybersecurity is like finding a unicorn. How can we possibly create products that are good for consumers if we don’t have representation of that gender in the decision-making and engineering processes?” According to UN Women, females today control about $20 trillion in annual consumer spending and by 2028 will control nearly 75% of consumer discretionary spending worldwide. And that’s what Mastercard is banking on. For more than 50 years the financial services company has been transforming how consumers, businesses and governments pay and get paid. They are now in more than 210 countries and territories. With security a top concern — last month’s Capital One data breach, where the personal information of some 100 million Americans and 6 million Canadians who are Capital One credit card holders or applicants had been hacked did not even rank in the top 10 of the biggest such hackings — the company continuously looks for ways to innovate, and they believe women are key to their future. So five years ago Mastercard launched Girls4Tech, an effort that aims to put more women in the high-tech workplace by inspiring young girls to build their skills in science, technology, engineering and math. With its employees serving as role models and mentors, the program incorporates Mastercard’s expertise in payments technology and innovation and includes topics such as encryption, fraud detection, data analysis and digital convergence.

MasterCard believes women can play a pivotal role in cybersecurity and AI. To boost their workforce and help close America’s skills gap, MasterCard’s Girls4Tech program has reached more than 400,000 girls in 26 countries, surpassing its 2017 goal to reach 200,000 girls by 2020. The company plans to inspire 1 million girls by 2025. MasterCard

“We have a crisis on our planet where there are not enough kids graduating with engineering degrees,” says Lorberg, who runs the program. “We’ve got more jobs that need these kinds of skills than we have kids graduating with these degrees, and much less women and girls.” Working out of all 80 of Mastercard’s business centers around the world, Girls4Tech sends employees out to schools to show girls that women can handle technology just as well as men do.

Finding a woman in cybersecurity is like finding a unicorn. How can we possibly create products that are good for consumers if we don’t have representation of that gender in the decision-making and engineering processes? Dana Lorberg executive vice president of operations and technology at Mastercard

A self-professed “girl geek” herself, Lorberg says young girls need to be exposed to different opportunities in life. “They can’t be what they don’t see, and they don’t see enough women in technology.” Lauren Ottolich, Mastercard’s manager of global volunteerism, says girls will also offer additional perspectives. “It’s critical that girls play a role in evolving technology so that we have different opinions at the table and we have different perspectives and experiences,” she says.

1 million girls by 2025

Mastercard gives employees five paid days off a year to do philanthropic volunteer work. “We believe in doing well by doing good,” says Lorberg. “It’s in our DNA.” Since its inception in 2014, Girls4Tech has put 3,600 Mastercard employees before 400,000 students in 26 countries. Their goal is to reach 1 million girls by 2025. “A lot of girls need more confidence,” Lorberg says. “They need to have good role models so they can see that they can do it, too.” The typical half-day program is set within school hours and presents global science and math exercises in a fun format, utilizing Mastercard’s expertise in subjects like encryption, fraud detection and data analysis. To ensure they are making a positive impact, Mastercard polls the students after every program. Their typical findings: 98% of the girls polled learn something new about STEM; 88% say they are interested in learning more about fraud detection and cryptology. Kyra, 11, a sixth-grader from Millstone, New Jersey, attended a Girls4Tech seminar at her school, thinking that fraud detection was the field for her. Then she stopped at the data science table and an exercise there made her realize she had a knack for managing large amounts of information. Now she wants to be a data scientist.

Kyra, a sixth-grader from Millstone, New Jersey, realized her interest in data science after attending a Girls4Tech seminar.

“They collect data on problems and then organize it and eliminate the data that isn’t needed and then they analyze it,” she explained, adding that she frequently asks her father, a software architect, to give her problems to help her hone her skills. Beatrice Karp, a sophomore at the University of Pennsylvania studying science technology and society, credits Girls4Tech for launching her on the journey that brought her to where she is today. When Karp was a 14-year-old freshman at Mamaroneck High School in New York, she was not interested at all in STEM subjects. Her mother encouraged her to try the Girls4Tech program on coding and she agreed to go, without much enthusiasm. But that soon changed. Over the 20-week extended Girls4Tech course, she and her team created an “outfit generator,” an app that chooses what clothes to wear, depending on the occasion. Inspired by the experience, she went on to take computer classes at school and during summers and parlayed her enthusiasm into a spot at a prestigious Ivy League college. The whole concept of identifying a social issue and figuring out how to address it using a platform and programming is an idea that has never left her — and remains a major part of what she is doing now. “What they’re doing is teaching girls how to think and how to approach a problem critically,” Karp said.

Expanding beyond the US


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-07  Authors: christopher west davis, special to cnbccom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protect, million, girls, role, girls4tech, personal, school, data, betting, technology, program, mastercards, middle, detect, women, mastercard, cyberthreats


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Treasury yields tick higher ahead of US jobs data

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note traded higher at 1.5874%. while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond traded higher at 2.0858%. Treasury yields across the board jumped on Thursday after the U.S. and China agreed to hold high-level talks in early October. China insiders have also hinted that the upcoming trade talks could lead to a “breakthrough.” On the data front, investors will be keeping an eye on August nonfarm payroll and unemployment data that will be released at 08:30 a.


The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note traded higher at 1.5874%. while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond traded higher at 2.0858%. Treasury yields across the board jumped on Thursday after the U.S. and China agreed to hold high-level talks in early October. China insiders have also hinted that the upcoming trade talks could lead to a “breakthrough.” On the data front, investors will be keeping an eye on August nonfarm payroll and unemployment data that will be released at 08:30 a.
Treasury yields tick higher ahead of US jobs data Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, early, data, higher, investors, tick, yield, ahead, recession, treasury, trade, talks, jobs, traded


Treasury yields tick higher ahead of US jobs data

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note traded higher at 1.5874%. while the yield on the 30-year Treasury bond traded higher at 2.0858%. Bond yields move inversely to prices.

U.S. government debt prices ticked lower on Friday as investors looked ahead to nonfarm payroll numbers expected later in the day.

Treasury yields across the board jumped on Thursday after the U.S. and China agreed to hold high-level talks in early October. The news raised hopes that the world’s two largest economies could soon make substantial progress in de-escalating their protracted trade dispute.

China’s Ministry of Commerce said Thursday that Liu He, the country’s top trade negotiator, spoke by phone with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. They agreed to meet in early October for another round of negotiations, according to the Chinese Commerce Ministry. China insiders have also hinted that the upcoming trade talks could lead to a “breakthrough.”

Meanwhile, risk sentiment was also helped by upbeat U.S. economic data on Thursday. U.S. private payrolls increased at their fastest pace in four months in August, according to ADP. The numbers came amid speculation that the decade-long economic expansion is coming to an end. The New York Federal Reserve puts the chance of a recession at 39% in the next 12 months, the highest level since the Great Recession that ended in mid-2009.

On the data front, investors will be keeping an eye on August nonfarm payroll and unemployment data that will be released at 08:30 a.m. ET, where investors will look for signs about the health of the U.S. economy.

Oil prices, meanwhile, rose in the early European trading hours following an earlier dip, with international benchmark Brent crude futures gaining 0.15% to $61.04 per barrel and U.S. crude futures up 0.21% to $56.42 per barrel.

—CNBC’s Sam Meredith contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, yields, early, data, higher, investors, tick, yield, ahead, recession, treasury, trade, talks, jobs, traded


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Dow futures trade higher ahead of jobs data

U.S. stock index futures traded higher on Friday morning as investors looked ahead to nonfarm payroll numbers due later in the day. ET Dow futures traded 85 points higher, implying a positive open of more than 57 points. Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq also traded higher but pointed to a slightly negative open. China insiders have also hinted that the upcoming trade talks could lead to a “breakthrough.” On the data front, investors will be keeping an eye on August nonfarm payroll and unemployment


U.S. stock index futures traded higher on Friday morning as investors looked ahead to nonfarm payroll numbers due later in the day. ET Dow futures traded 85 points higher, implying a positive open of more than 57 points. Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq also traded higher but pointed to a slightly negative open. China insiders have also hinted that the upcoming trade talks could lead to a “breakthrough.” On the data front, investors will be keeping an eye on August nonfarm payroll and unemployment
Dow futures trade higher ahead of jobs data Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, early, data, higher, investors, dow, ahead, recession, trade, futures, talks, jobs, traded


Dow futures trade higher ahead of jobs data

U.S. stock index futures traded higher on Friday morning as investors looked ahead to nonfarm payroll numbers due later in the day.

At 03:33 a.m. ET Dow futures traded 85 points higher, implying a positive open of more than 57 points. Futures on the S&P and Nasdaq also traded higher but pointed to a slightly negative open.

Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, after the U.S. and China agreed to hold high-level talks in early October. The news raised hopes that the world’s two largest economies could soon make substantial progress in de-escalating their protracted trade dispute.

China’s Ministry of Commerce said Thursday that Liu He, the country’s top trade negotiator, spoke by phone with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. They agreed to meet in early October for another round of negotiations, according to the Chinese Commerce Ministry. China insiders have also hinted that the upcoming trade talks could lead to a “breakthrough.”

Meanwhile, risk sentiment was also helped by upbeat U.S. economic data on Thursday. U.S. private payrolls increased at their fastest pace in four months in August, according to ADP. The numbers came amid speculation that the decade-long economic expansion is coming to an end. The New York Federal Reserve puts the chance of a recession at 39% in the next 12 months, the highest level since the Great Recession that ended in mid-2009.

On the data front, investors will be keeping an eye on August nonfarm payroll and unemployment data that will be released at 08:30 a.m. ET, where investors will look for signs about the health of the U.S. economy.

Oil prices, meanwhile, rose in the early European trading hours following an earlier dip, with international benchmark Brent crude futures gaining 0.15% to $61.04 per barrel and U.S. crude futures up 0.21% to $56.42 per barrel.

—CNBC’s Sam Meredith contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, points, early, data, higher, investors, dow, ahead, recession, trade, futures, talks, jobs, traded


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European markets trade mixed amid Brexit uncertainty

The pan-European Stoxx 600 hovered around the flatline during early trade, with sectors and major bourses pointing in opposite directions. European markets traded mixed on Friday morning, as investors monitored Brexit uncertainty and awaited a fresh batch of economic data. Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, after the U.S. and China agreed to hold high-level talks in early October. The news raised hopes that the world’s two largest economies could soon make substantial


The pan-European Stoxx 600 hovered around the flatline during early trade, with sectors and major bourses pointing in opposite directions. European markets traded mixed on Friday morning, as investors monitored Brexit uncertainty and awaited a fresh batch of economic data. Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, after the U.S. and China agreed to hold high-level talks in early October. The news raised hopes that the world’s two largest economies could soon make substantial
European markets trade mixed amid Brexit uncertainty Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: chloe taylor sam meredith, chloe taylor, sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, announced, mixed, worlds, uncertainty, economic, amid, european, shares, brexit, stoxx, markets, trade, talks, early


European markets trade mixed amid Brexit uncertainty

The pan-European Stoxx 600 hovered around the flatline during early trade, with sectors and major bourses pointing in opposite directions.

European markets traded mixed on Friday morning, as investors monitored Brexit uncertainty and awaited a fresh batch of economic data.

Market focus is largely attuned to global trade developments, after the U.S. and China agreed to hold high-level talks in early October.

The news raised hopes that the world’s two largest economies could soon make substantial progress in de-escalating their protracted trade dispute.

Risk sentiment was also helped by upbeat U.S. economic data on Thursday. U.S. private payrolls increased at their fastest pace in four months in August, according to ADP. The numbers came amid speculation that the decade-long economic expansion is coming to an end.

The New York Federal Reserve puts the chance of a recession at 39% in the next 12 months, the highest level since the Great Recession that ended in mid-2009.

Back in Europe, market participants continue to monitor political uncertainty in Britain, with 55 days to go until the world’s fifth-largest economy is scheduled to leave the European Union.

On Thursday, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson was dealt a blow when his brother, Jo Johnson, announced he was quitting the cabinet, citing “unresolvable tension” between his family loyalty and the national interest.

Sterling hovered close to a six-week peak of $1.2353 Friday morning, amid hopes Britain could avoid departing the EU without a deal. The U.K. currency had fallen to a three-year low earlier in the week, after the new prime minister stoked fears of a so-called “no-deal” Brexit.

On the data front, monthly German industrial output figures will be released at around 7 a.m. London time.

A final reading of euro zone employment data and revised quarter-on-quarter GDP (gross domestic product) figures will follow slightly later in the session.

Looking at individual stocks, Danish jewelry maker Pandora’s shares gained 2.4% to top the Stoxx 600 during early deals. The company recently announced that it would undergo a complete rebrand in a bid to boost sales.

At the other end of the European index was Norwegian telecoms firm Telenor. Shares of the company were down 6% after it was announced that talks with Malaysia’s Axiata about a potential joint venture had ended without a deal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: chloe taylor sam meredith, chloe taylor, sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, announced, mixed, worlds, uncertainty, economic, amid, european, shares, brexit, stoxx, markets, trade, talks, early


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How to save a bunch of money on your monthly cell phone bill

If you’re like me, you just set your monthly carrier bill to autopay and pay it every month without a second thought. You can check how much data you use in your monthly statement online, which breaks this down by phone line. All the carriers list their plans in plain sight, so see how they stack up to what you’re paying now. Get rid of the extras you don’t useAutomatically share your phone’s data hotspot with family members in iOS 13. Get on a family planTwenty/20If you’re flying solo on a wire


If you’re like me, you just set your monthly carrier bill to autopay and pay it every month without a second thought. You can check how much data you use in your monthly statement online, which breaks this down by phone line. All the carriers list their plans in plain sight, so see how they stack up to what you’re paying now. Get rid of the extras you don’t useAutomatically share your phone’s data hotspot with family members in iOS 13. Get on a family planTwenty/20If you’re flying solo on a wire
How to save a bunch of money on your monthly cell phone bill Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, phone, save, hotspot, youre, data, monthly, month, plan, pay, family, bunch, paying, bill, cell


How to save a bunch of money on your monthly cell phone bill

If you’re like me, you just set your monthly carrier bill to autopay and pay it every month without a second thought. But you may be spending more than you need to. If your monthly bill is creeping up, here are a few ways to cut down on the cost.

See how much data you use and adjust your plan

People walk by a T-Mobile store in San Francisco, California Justin Sullivan | Getty Images

The first thing you want to do is see how much data you use each month and adjust your plan accordingly. You might have signed up for a 10GB family plan, for example, and your family might only be using 8GB of data, which means you’re overpaying for the additional 2GB you never use. You can check how much data you use in your monthly statement online, which breaks this down by phone line. Maybe you’ll find out that one family member is using wireless data when they’re at home — switching to Wi-Fi could help save a few bucks.

Always look for new plans

A Verizon store in New York City. Getty Images

Carriers frequently adjust their plans to attract customers away from competitors. This means you should check your carrier’s options a couple of times a year to see if there are any new options available. In some cases, you might automatically be switched to a better plan, but sometimes you have to ask. All the carriers list their plans in plain sight, so see how they stack up to what you’re paying now.

Ask your employer about corporate discounts

NBCU

Your employer might provide a company-wide discount for a wireless carrier. CNBC employees have a choice of several major carriers, for example, and I recently switched my family to a new plan that offered more features, such as HD streaming and hotspot access, for the same price as I was paying without them.

Get rid of the extras you don’t use

Automatically share your phone’s data hotspot with family members in iOS 13. Todd Haselton | CNBC

A lot of the carriers let you add in extra features for a monthly fee. So, you might pay a few extra bucks per line each month to stream HD video instead of 480p. Or maybe a couple of lines are hotspot-enabled, which lets you use your phone as a Wi-Fi hotspot to connect your computer to the internet. If you don’t use the hotspot feature, or usually only stream movies at home anyway, cut out these add-ons.

Pay off your phone

Apple iPhone Xs and iPhone Xs Max CNBC | Magdalena Petrova

One of the best ways to cut back on your monthly phone bill is to pay off your cell phones, then hang on to them as long as possible so that you don’t need to pay a new fee. If you have decent credit, you probably aren’t paying interest on your devices, but the monthly fees can still give you heartburn. If everyone in your family of four upgraded to an iPhone XS last year, for example, then you’re probably paying around $166 a month in equipment installment plans each month.

Get on a family plan

Twenty/20

If you’re flying solo on a wireless plan, try to hitch on to a family member’s family plan. Often, the first line pays the most, while additional lines can cost about $40 a month or so. I have my brother on my family plan, for example, so that he doesn’t need to pay around $100-$130 each month and instead pays me the $40 or so it costs to add him to my existing bill. Just offer to pay a bit more if you want to seem like less of a mooch.

Consider a prepaid carrier or Google Fi

The storefront of a Boost mobile phone store is seen in the Brooklyn borough of New York, U.S., May 20, 2019. Shannon Stapleton | Reuters


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-06  Authors: todd haselton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, phone, save, hotspot, youre, data, monthly, month, plan, pay, family, bunch, paying, bill, cell


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