A quick US trade deal won’t help Britain avoid Brexit damage, economists say

A possible trade deal with the U.S. will do little to mitigate the impact of Britain leaving the EU without a deal in place, economists have told CNBC. In the event of a no-deal Brexit, the U.K. would lose this tariff-free access and would have to trade under World Trade Organization (WTO) rules. In order to avoid this, the U.K. government is trying to replicate many of the EU’s existing trade deals with other territories. It will, however, also need to renegotiate a trade deal with the EU in or


A possible trade deal with the U.S. will do little to mitigate the impact of Britain leaving the EU without a deal in place, economists have told CNBC. In the event of a no-deal Brexit, the U.K. would lose this tariff-free access and would have to trade under World Trade Organization (WTO) rules. In order to avoid this, the U.K. government is trying to replicate many of the EU’s existing trade deals with other territories. It will, however, also need to renegotiate a trade deal with the EU in or
A quick US trade deal won’t help Britain avoid Brexit damage, economists say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, damage, uk, deal, deals, help, say, brexit, economists, britain, eu, quick, trade, imports, pickering, political, wont, offset, told


A quick US trade deal won't help Britain avoid Brexit damage, economists say

A possible trade deal with the U.S. will do little to mitigate the impact of Britain leaving the EU without a deal in place, economists have told CNBC. Both the U.K. and U.S. governments have expressed a desire to forge a partial deal on trade as soon as possible after Britain’s anticipated departure from the EU on October 31. On a recent visit to London, U.S. national security advisor John Bolton said the U.S. would enthusiastically support a no-deal Brexit should Prime Minister Boris Johnson pursue it, adding that Washington would be ready to work fast on a free trade agreement. However, such an accord faces significant political hurdles on both sides of the Atlantic, while also falling short of the economic reprieve Britain will need to offset the loss of its existing trade arrangements with the EU, economists have argued. Limited impact In 2018, the EU accounted for 46% of all U.K. exports, 54% of all imports, and seven of the U.K.’s 10 largest export markets and sources of imports were from the other 27 EU nations, according to a House of Commons briefing paper published last week. The U.S. accounted for 19% of U.K. exports and 11% of imports, while Germany as a standalone partner represented 9% of exports and 12% of imports. Kallum Pickering, senior economist at Berenberg, told CNBC that given the larger impact on GDP from the quantity of trade with the EU in comparison with the U.S., it is “hard to see how leaving the EU could be offset with a trade deal with the U.S.” “You could add a further layer in the fact that the U.K.’s trade agreement with the EU is free in all senses of the word, on investment, on immigration, on goods and in most services, including finance, whereas the U.K. would presumably be striking with the U.S. a trade deal that covers goods and only partial agreements in services, with very little on immigration,” Pickering said. “So the major things that the U.K. benefits from — attracting lots of FDI (foreign direct investment) from Europe, a high inflow of EU workers boosting the labor force — would not be offset by a trade deal with the U.S,” he added.

The EU has around 40 trade deals covering over 70 countries, meaning the U.K. currently has access to those markets, such as Canada, without having to pay import tariffs on most goods. In the event of a no-deal Brexit, the U.K. would lose this tariff-free access and would have to trade under World Trade Organization (WTO) rules. In order to avoid this, the U.K. government is trying to replicate many of the EU’s existing trade deals with other territories. If Brexit does happen on October 31, the U.K. will be free to sign trade deals with countries which do not have existing agreements with the EU, such as the U.S. Britain has rolled over 13 trade deals so far, most recently with South Korea. Others have included partners with whom trade is historically negligible, such as Central America, Norway and Iceland, Israel and the Pacific Islands. It will, however, also need to renegotiate a trade deal with the EU in order to ensure continued tariff-free access to the world’s largest free-trading bloc. While acknowledging that a trade deal with the U.S. would be advantageous in general terms, Pickering argued that the benefit of an immediate U.S. trade deal upon leaving the EU, in the case of a hard exit, “provides only a limited offset, and that’s being generous.”

Other analysts were similarly skeptical about the practical aspects of a potential deal. Steen Jakobsen, chief economist at Saxo Bank, dismissed the suggestions as “political noise” when speaking to CNBC’s “Squawk Box Europe” on Tuesday, citing the seven-year negotiation to establish the landmark EU-Canada deal as an example of the complexity of the process. Altaf Kassam, EMEA head of investment strategy and research at State Street Global Advisors, pointed to the White House’s recent handling of trade negotiations as an ominous sign for any prospective trade deal. “Boris Johnson and Donald Trump have some kind of rapport, and that’s a good thing, but if you see the way the U.S.-China trade negotiations have gone, it’s never going to be a slam dunk for the U.K. This is going to drag on,” he told CNBC earlier this week. Political wall The politics of the deal have emerged front and center of late. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Monday vowed to oppose any post-Brexit trade deal with the U.K. that would risk Northern Ireland’s peaceful status quo by reinstalling a hard southern border with the Republic of Ireland, which will remain part of the EU. U.K. leader Johnson has made eradicating the Irish “backstop” the key non-negotiable in his attempt to return to the table with European leaders. The “backstop” is seen as a way to keep the porous border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (which is a part of the U.K.) open in the event that the U.K. and EU fail to agree a future trade deal at the end of a 21-month transition period. Its unpopularity with pro-Brexit lawmakers stems from its requirement that the U.K. remains in a single customs territory with the EU for an indefinite amount of time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-23  Authors: elliot smith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, damage, uk, deal, deals, help, say, brexit, economists, britain, eu, quick, trade, imports, pickering, political, wont, offset, told


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Americans spend almost $700 on back-to-school shopping—here are 5 ways to save

Families are expected to spend an average of $697 on back-to-school shopping for their children in elementary through high school, according to the National Retail Federation. Yet traditional school supplies, such as notebooks, pencils and backpacks will account for only about 20% of the total spending, roughly $117 per family. But before you spend a bundle, experts say there are a lot of ways savvy parents can cut costs. Shopping site Fabulessly Frugal has a handy pricing guide on over 60 of th


Families are expected to spend an average of $697 on back-to-school shopping for their children in elementary through high school, according to the National Retail Federation. Yet traditional school supplies, such as notebooks, pencils and backpacks will account for only about 20% of the total spending, roughly $117 per family. But before you spend a bundle, experts say there are a lot of ways savvy parents can cut costs. Shopping site Fabulessly Frugal has a handy pricing guide on over 60 of th
Americans spend almost $700 on back-to-school shopping—here are 5 ways to save Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, notebooks, school, shoppinghere, backpacks, save, spend, deals, americans, youre, supplies, backtoschool, ways, 700, according, cents


Americans spend almost $700 on back-to-school shopping—here are 5 ways to save

If you haven’t started picking up the requisite pencils, backpacks, lunchboxes and notebooks your kids will need as they head back to school, you’re in luck — some of the best deals can pop up last-minute. “If you’re starting to shop for back-to-school essentials now, don’t worry, there are still deals to be had,” says Sara Skirboll, shopping and trends expert for RetailMeNot. Families are expected to spend an average of $697 on back-to-school shopping for their children in elementary through high school, according to the National Retail Federation. Yet traditional school supplies, such as notebooks, pencils and backpacks will account for only about 20% of the total spending, roughly $117 per family. The organization expects the top spending categories to be clothing and accessories, followed by electronics and shoes. And those with kids heading to college should prepare to spend big. The National Retail Federation predicts back-to-school spending for college students will average $977 per family. But before you spend a bundle, experts say there are a lot of ways savvy parents can cut costs. Here are five easy ways to give your wallet a break.

1. Shop clearance

Timing the back-to-school sales can be tricky. If you’re looking to score the deepest discounts, it may be worth buying a few essentials and then stocking up after the school year officially starts. Big box retailers such as Target and Walmart typically put school supplies on sale during the first week of September, with Target’s discounts ranging from 30-90% off, the Krazy Coupon Lady website reports.

Not sure what constitutes a good price? Shopping site Fabulessly Frugal has a handy pricing guide on over 60 of the most common school supplies and what you should expect to pay.

2. Divide and conquer

Time may be running short, but it’s worth the effort and extra stops to hit up multiple stores. Staples has a range of school supplies — composition notebooks, notebook paper, Elmer’s glue, 24-pack of Crayola crayons — for 50 cents each, according to the weekly ad for a Northern New Jersey location. Even better, 70-sheet single subject notebooks are 25 cents and a 12-pack of basic #2 pencils are on sale for 75 cents, about 6 cents a pencil. Meanwhile, Walmart has folders for 15 cents a piece and 1-inch binders for less than $1, according to its weekly ad. Walmart also has some of the best deals on Texas Instruments TI-84 Plus graphing calculators for $88, down from over $100. If you’re not as worried about the brand, Target is selling Casio graphing calculators for just $43. Take advantage of cash back savings that your credit card may offer, as well as rotating offers for different stores. Chase is offering cardmembers 10% back at Dick’s Sporting Goods and Rite Aid. And Target’s REDcard gives cardmembers 5% off their purchase. “It’s a great way to save even if there isn’t a sale,” Skirboll says.

3. Use your student ID

If you’re in the market for a laptop, you can use your college email to access Apple’s education discount, which typically gives students about a 10% discount on laptops, iPads, computers, and accessories, as well as 20% off AppleCare+ coverage. Best Buy also offers a variety of student deals, and you can sign up to get alerts when new promotions start.

4. Find a backpack that goes the distance

Skip the cheap, trendy backpacks that you know will fall apart within a few months. Many of the big brands such as Jansport, Herschel and Lands’ End have lifetime warranties. And they don’t have to cost a fortune. Target has JanSport backpacks on sale starting at $28, according to the weekly ad. The Krazy Coupon Lady’s website has a fairly comprehensive list of all the manufacturer warranties offered by popular backpack producers.

5. Try before you buy


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-16  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sale, notebooks, school, shoppinghere, backpacks, save, spend, deals, americans, youre, supplies, backtoschool, ways, 700, according, cents


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Sen. Elizabeth Warren wants to dramatically rewrite the rules on negotiating trade deals

Elizabeth Warren, seeking to extend her momentum among liberal voters before the second Democratic presidential debate, on Monday proposed sweeping changes in how America negotiates international trade agreements. Higher labor, human rights and environmental standards for the countries the U.S. negotiates with as a condition of reaching a trade agreement. A new “border carbon adjustment” tax on imported goods made by corporations that shift production to countries with weaker greenhouse gas emis


Elizabeth Warren, seeking to extend her momentum among liberal voters before the second Democratic presidential debate, on Monday proposed sweeping changes in how America negotiates international trade agreements. Higher labor, human rights and environmental standards for the countries the U.S. negotiates with as a condition of reaching a trade agreement. A new “border carbon adjustment” tax on imported goods made by corporations that shift production to countries with weaker greenhouse gas emis
Sen. Elizabeth Warren wants to dramatically rewrite the rules on negotiating trade deals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, elizabeth, negotiating, sen, standards, negotiates, senator, representing, wants, rules, tax, warren, deals, dramatically, countries, trade, rewrite, corporations


Sen. Elizabeth Warren wants to dramatically rewrite the rules on negotiating trade deals

Democratic U.S. Presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren answers a questions during the Presidential candidate forum at the annual convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in Detroit, Michigan, July 24, 2019.

Elizabeth Warren, seeking to extend her momentum among liberal voters before the second Democratic presidential debate, on Monday proposed sweeping changes in how America negotiates international trade agreements.

Complaining that existing procedures enrich multinational corporations at the expense of average workers, the Massachusetts senator argued that revised negotiating standards, increased public disclosure and expanded participation would produce fairer outcomes. Warren called for the changes as part of her “economic patriotism” agenda, which also includes large tax increases on the wealthy, the breakup of major high-tech firms and a regulatory crackdown on Wall Street.

Major elements of Warren’s trade proposal include:

Public disclosure of draft agreement texts throughout the negotiation process, not merely after a deal is reached and sent to Congress for a vote.

An expanded roster of advisory groups to U.S. negotiators beyond corporate and trade representatives to include a panel representing consumers, one representing rural areas and one for each region of the country.

Use of “fast-track” consideration by Congress, which requires an up-or-down vote without amendments, only when advisory groups unanimously endorse a trade deal as beneficial.

Higher labor, human rights and environmental standards for the countries the U.S. negotiates with as a condition of reaching a trade agreement.

A new “border carbon adjustment” tax on imported goods made by corporations that shift production to countries with weaker greenhouse gas emissions standards.

An end to “investor-state dispute settlement” arbitration that allows corporations to challenge laws enacted by countries on grounds that they violate trade deals the countries have signed.

“As president, I won’t hand America’s leverage to big corporations to use for their narrow purposes,” Warren wrote in a Medium post outlining her plan. “I’ll use it to create and defend good American jobs, raise wages and farm income, combat climate change, lower drug prices and raising living standards worldwide. We will engage in international trade – but on our terms and only when it benefits American families.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-29  Authors: john harwood
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, elizabeth, negotiating, sen, standards, negotiates, senator, representing, wants, rules, tax, warren, deals, dramatically, countries, trade, rewrite, corporations


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Here’s how to earn up to $55 in free Amazon credits for Prime Day

What’s better than Amazon Prime Day discounts? Free Amazon credits you can use toward those deals. To take advantage of the Prime Day deals, you need to Prime member. In total, first-time app users who are Prime members can earn up to $25 in free Amazon credits through July 31, 2019. Beyond the free credits, downloading the Amazon app also gives Prime members an edge.


What’s better than Amazon Prime Day discounts? Free Amazon credits you can use toward those deals. To take advantage of the Prime Day deals, you need to Prime member. In total, first-time app users who are Prime members can earn up to $25 in free Amazon credits through July 31, 2019. Beyond the free credits, downloading the Amazon app also gives Prime members an edge.
Here’s how to earn up to $55 in free Amazon credits for Prime Day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, free, day, app, browser, deals, 55, heres, youre, credit, credits, amazon, earn


Here's how to earn up to $55 in free Amazon credits for Prime Day

What’s better than Amazon Prime Day discounts? Free Amazon credits you can use toward those deals. To celebrate Amazon Prime Day, which starts on July 15 and runs two days this year, the company has several deals that offer customers $10 credits for using several of its services, including the online retailer’s app and browser extension. To take advantage of the Prime Day deals, you need to Prime member. If you’re not already a Prime member, you can sign up for a free 30-day trial. After the trial expires, a membership costs $119 a year. If you’re a student, Amazon offers a six-month trial period and half off a membership ($59 a year). Once your membership is sorted, take a moment to see if you qualify for any of these credits to use toward your Prime Day purchases.

Download the Amazon app

If you don’t have the Amazon shopping app yet, Amazon is offering Prime members a $10 credit when they download it and sign in for the first time. You can earn another $10 credit after you purchase an Amazon product through the app and another $5 when you use the camera and Alexa features for the first time. In total, first-time app users who are Prime members can earn up to $25 in free Amazon credits through July 31, 2019. Credits expire on August 2, 2019. However, if you’re on a free trial, you’re not eligible. Beyond the free credits, downloading the Amazon app also gives Prime members an edge. App users will be able to preview deals and can turn on “personalized notifications” in the app settings to get notified when deals are live.

Install the Amazon Assistant browser extension

Those looking to use a desktop or laptop to shop for Prime deals can install the Amazon Assistant browser extension and get $10 off their first order of $50 or more. A browser extension is a small software package that you can download, typically for free, and will work with websites. The Amazon Assistant browser extension shows you the top trending deals and offers, as well as notifies you when deals you are watching go live. Plus, this credit lasts beyond Prime Day. Users have until August 2, 2019 to use their credit on any order over $50 on Amazon.com.

Shop at Whole Foods

To score this credit, you’ll need to spend a little money. Prime members who spend at least $10 at a Whole Foods store or through Prime Now (which partners with the grocery retailer) through July 16 will receive a $10 credit to use on Amazon Prime Day purchases. The grocery store will also be adding exclusive deals on “peak-of-season produce and high-quality grocery favorites” during the week of Prime Day, including on strawberries, peaches, blueberries, salmon fillets, nut butters, trail mixes and ice creams, Whole Foods CEO John Mackey said in a statement.

Reload an Amazon gift card


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-15  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, prime, free, day, app, browser, deals, 55, heres, youre, credit, credits, amazon, earn


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Here’s what experts predict will be the best deals during Amazon Prime Day

If Amazon Prime Day has you feeling overwhelmed, you’re not alone. Almost eight out of 10 Prime members in the U.S. are planning to shop on Prime Day this year, up from 63% last year, according to a new study from Profitero. “Last year’s Prime Day deal for this device was $64.99,” Regina Conway, consumer expert for deal site Slickdeals, tells CNBC Make It. “This is something we would predict will likely continue to have price drops around Prime Day.” While electronics across the board will see b


If Amazon Prime Day has you feeling overwhelmed, you’re not alone. Almost eight out of 10 Prime members in the U.S. are planning to shop on Prime Day this year, up from 63% last year, according to a new study from Profitero. “Last year’s Prime Day deal for this device was $64.99,” Regina Conway, consumer expert for deal site Slickdeals, tells CNBC Make It. “This is something we would predict will likely continue to have price drops around Prime Day.” While electronics across the board will see b
Here’s what experts predict will be the best deals during Amazon Prime Day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, experts, heres, tv, big, prime, best, day, deals, predict, amazon, discounts, members, lehmann, products


Here's what experts predict will be the best deals during Amazon Prime Day

If Amazon Prime Day has you feeling overwhelmed, you’re not alone. But planning ahead could help: Shopping experts say you can start to narrow down your shopping list now so you don’t miss a great deal or, worse, end up with a ton of returns. Prime Day, which starts on July 15 and runs two days this year, offers members (and members only) huge discounts on a wide variety of products. Almost eight out of 10 Prime members in the U.S. are planning to shop on Prime Day this year, up from 63% last year, according to a new study from Profitero. But some deals are better than others, especially if you’re looking to snap up a big-ticket item. To help you narrow down your shopping list and snag the best deals, here are the five types of products that experts believe will rack up the deepest discounts during Prime Day.

Amazon Services

Amazon’s own products get a major push on Prime Day, so if you’ve been tempted to subscribe to some of its services, including Amazon Music and Kindle Unlimited, now is the time to do it. Amazon is already offering a 66% discount off the cost of audiobook service Audible. Prime members can get their first three months for $4.95 a month. For groceries, Amazon is offering $10 off Prime Pantry orders of $40 or more. And if Prime members spend at least $10 at a Whole Foods store or through Prime Now (which partners with the grocery retailer) from now through July 16, they’ll receive a $10 credit to use on Amazon for Prime Day purchases. “Amazon has a lot of control over the pricing of their own brands, and is very well known to be willing to take a short-term loss to gain market share,” Rebecca Lehmann of Brad’s Deals tells CNBC Make It. “In the past we’ve seen Amazon use Prime Day to drive awareness and gain exposure for these brands, and I think we are going to see even more of that this year.”

Amazon Electronics

If you’ve been eyeing an Alexa-enabled device, such as the Echo, hold out for Prime Day on Monday. “Last year’s Prime Day deal for this device was $64.99,” Regina Conway, consumer expert for deal site Slickdeals, tells CNBC Make It. “This is something we would predict will likely continue to have price drops around Prime Day.” Typically it retails for $100. Ring video doorbells are already on sale for $169, and if you buy one, Amazon will throw in an Echo Dot for free. The bundle is usually $299, so you’re saving $130. Beyond its Echo line of home products, experts also predict other Amazon electronics will see deep discounts, including the Fire TV stick and the Kindle Paperwhite. Amazon also collaborates with TV manufacturers, so expect these TVs to be on sale. “I think we’re going to see some big Prime Day discounts with a focus on the 55 ” Fire Smart TV model, ” Lehmann says. Last year, the Prime Day deal around the Toshiba 50″ 4K Amazon Fire Smart TV, which dropped from $399 to $290, proved popular. “It was one of the lowest prices we’d seen for a 50″ Smart TV and this particular TV had never been discounted before,” Lehmann says. In late June, Amazon launched an update to the Fire Smart TV line with the 55 ” Toshiba including Dolby Vision for dynamic HDR. Lehmann says the timing is “no accident.”

Name-brand electronics and other accessories

“While Amazon has focused some of their biggest discounts on their own electronic devices, there are plenty of deals to be had,” Sara Skirboll, shopping and trends expert at RetailMeNot, tells CNBC Make It. Headphones will again be big, Tiara Rea-Palmer, head of retail at CouponFollow, tells CNBC Make It. That includes noise-cancelling, earbuds and even expensive brands like Beats, which have had discounts as high as 55% off in past years. Be on the lookout for Apple products as well, since Amazon is now an authorized Apple retailer. The Apple Watch 4 is already on sale for $399, down from $429. And Apple AirPods with Wireless Charging Case are $180, $20 off the retail price. Lehmann says she expects to see iPad discounts during Prime Day as well. While electronics across the board will see big discounts during Prime Day, Skirboll says that consumers need to carefully check prices. “Some of the biggest deals of the year from the retail industry on things like consumer electronics are still concentrated on Black Friday,” she says. Unless you see a really great price on an item you need now, you might save more by holding out until November for things like TVs, laptops and cameras.

Gaming

Video game bundles will be another area where shoppers can save big, Rea-Palmer says. “Although you probably won’t find a sale on a Nintendo Switch, you can likely save with a Switch bundle on Prime Day,” she says. Consumers should watch for bundle gaming deals for Nintendo, Xbox and PS4. But before you buy, make sure you’re going to use all the components of the bundle, which typically include games, controllers or cases. Otherwise, it may not be a good value for you. Gaming accessories will also be big, Conway says. For example, she expects the price on the ViewSonic Elite XG350R-C 35 ” UltraWide Curved Gaming Monitor to drop by $140 during Prime Day, from $699.99 to $559.99.

Small appliances


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, experts, heres, tv, big, prime, best, day, deals, predict, amazon, discounts, members, lehmann, products


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Don’t make these 6 common mistakes and do Amazon Prime Day right

To get the most out of the sales event, here are some common mistakes to avoid when shopping on Prime Day. “If there’s something you’ve been planning to buy, by all means wait for Prime Day to see if it goes on sale. Assuming Prime Day has the best pricesOf course, you might not have to wait to get that specific big-ticket item on sale. “Amazon is offering limited deals now so waiting for Prime Day could mean missing out on big savings,” says Woroch. Missing out on additional dealsAhead of Prime


To get the most out of the sales event, here are some common mistakes to avoid when shopping on Prime Day. “If there’s something you’ve been planning to buy, by all means wait for Prime Day to see if it goes on sale. Assuming Prime Day has the best pricesOf course, you might not have to wait to get that specific big-ticket item on sale. “Amazon is offering limited deals now so waiting for Prime Day could mean missing out on big savings,” says Woroch. Missing out on additional dealsAhead of Prime
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: tom huddleston jr
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Don't make these 6 common mistakes and do Amazon Prime Day right

Amazon’s Prime Day kicks off at midnight on Monday, July 15. In recent years, Amazon’s Prime Day has become one of the most anticipated sales events of the year for online shoppers looking for deals — and, maybe, an excuse to splurge. And, for Amazon, the annual event has become successful enough that the e-commerce giant decided to double-down this year. Last year’s Prime Day was the “biggest in history” for Amazon, the company said at the time, with Prime members buying over 100 million products and sales on the site increasing by more than 400% over a typical day. This year, Amazon will look to improve on those numbers with a Prime Day event that will stretch over two full days for the first time, on July 15 and 16. That means 48 hours of “more than one million deals” on products ranging from smart TVs to household items like paper towels, according to Amazon. To get the most out of the sales event, here are some common mistakes to avoid when shopping on Prime Day.

1. Paying $119 for Prime to participate

Yes, only Amazon subscribers can participate in all of the Prime Day deals, but even if you’re not already a subscriber, you don’t have to pay the $119 yearly fee to take advantage. First of all, new subscribers can sign up for a 30-day free trial and get access to the deals. But, if you’ve already used up your free trial in the past 12 months — which would block you from getting another free trial — consumer savings expert Andrea Woroch notes that you can also consider signing up for just a one-month membership for $12.99 (or, just $6.49 if you’re still a student). But, Woroch tells CNBC Make It, only do that if you’re absolutely sure there are a few great deals available to make up for that month-long subscription. “Only do this if there’s an amazing deal on something you were planning to buy in which the savings are greater than this fee,” Woroch says. “Otherwise, perhaps you can ask a friend [with a Prime subscription] to buy it for you!” And, always remember to read the fine print when you sign up for either the free trial or a month-long Prime membership. Once your trial ends, Amazon will automatically enroll you in the paid membership plan unless you manually turn off the automatic renewal option before your trial or month-long subscription ends.

2. Forgetting to check your Amazon account beforehand

Double-check to ensure your credit card info, account and shipping info are up to date. You don’t want to find out you need to update an expired credit card mid-purchase if you only have a limited amount of time to secure one of Amazon Prime Day’s limited-time “lightning deals.”

3. Not planning ahead — and then falling down the Prime Day rabbit hole

One of the biggest challenges for online shoppers during Prime Day is that so many products will be discounted — over a million, in fact, according to Amazon — so, it’s important to have an idea of what you want to buy beforehand, says Rick Broida, CNET’s online deal expert and author of the blog The Cheapskate. Broida notes that just because Prime Day lasts for two days this year, that shouldn’t change how shoppers prepare for the event. “The most important advice I can give is to plan ahead,” Broida tells CNBC Make It. “If there’s something you’ve been planning to buy, by all means wait for Prime Day to see if it goes on sale. If it does, grab it, because many items will sell out quickly.” Another good way to sort through all the deals on offer is to download the Amazon app and enable alerts, Broida says. Amazon posts new deals every few minutes, and many are limited-time offers, so you’ll want to know exactly when an item you were already thinking about buying goes on sale.

4. Assuming Prime Day has the best prices

Of course, you might not have to wait to get that specific big-ticket item on sale. Broida and Woroch both point out that Amazon has already been trickling out limited deals in the weeks ahead of the two-day Prime Day event. “Amazon is offering limited deals now so waiting for Prime Day could mean missing out on big savings,” says Woroch. For instance, Amazon is already selling a bundled deal of an Echo Dot smart speaker and a Ring Video Doorbell Pro for $169 (the list price would be nearly $299), and the site is also offering 30% off many back to school and college products. And, by all means, remember to shop around. Amazon is not the only retailer offering deals. Woroch points out that Amazon rival Walmart’s “Google Week ” runs from July 8 to July 16, and it includes limited-time deals on Google products. Like Walmart, other retailers — like Target, Macy’s and eBay — have taken note of Amazon’s Prime Day success and are offering their own mid-July deals in an effort to lure online shoppers.

5. Missing out on additional deals

Ahead of Prime Day, Amazon is offering multiple ways to save money during the event, including a $10 credit to use on Prime Day sales that you can land the first time you download and shop on the Amazon app. You can also score a $10 credit (off any purchase worth $50) by signing up for the free Amazon Assistant service, a web browser plugin that helps you find order updates, deals and product comparisons on Amazon. And, you can also get $10 to spend during Prime Day if you spend at least $10 at Whole Foods (which Amazon bought in 2017) or on Prime Now before July 16.

6. Making impulse purchases


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, event, amazon, offering, prime, products, mistakes, common, right, trial, free, woroch, day, deals


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Tech and media moguls arrive in Sun Valley, Idaho, where many of the biggest deals in history have gone down

Private jets are parked at the Friedman Memorial Airport during the annual Allen and Co. Sun Valley media conference in Sun Valley, IdahoThe invite-only Allen & Co. Sun Valley conference, also known as “summer camp for billionaires,” kicks off in Sun Valley, Idaho this week. It’s where some of the biggest names in tech and media flock, and where seeds have been planted for tech and media acquisitions, including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, Verizon’s acquisition of


Private jets are parked at the Friedman Memorial Airport during the annual Allen and Co. Sun Valley media conference in Sun Valley, IdahoThe invite-only Allen & Co. Sun Valley conference, also known as “summer camp for billionaires,” kicks off in Sun Valley, Idaho this week. It’s where some of the biggest names in tech and media flock, and where seeds have been planted for tech and media acquisitions, including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, Verizon’s acquisition of
Tech and media moguls arrive in Sun Valley, Idaho, where many of the biggest deals in history have gone down Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton alex sherman, todd haselton, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idaho, sale, tech, deals, biggest, billion, allen, media, disney, history, including, arrive, gone, original, moguls, tv, valley


Tech and media moguls arrive in Sun Valley, Idaho, where many of the biggest deals in history have gone down

Private jets are parked at the Friedman Memorial Airport during the annual Allen and Co. Sun Valley media conference in Sun Valley, Idaho

The invite-only Allen & Co. Sun Valley conference, also known as “summer camp for billionaires,” kicks off in Sun Valley, Idaho this week.

It’s where some of the biggest names in tech and media flock, and where seeds have been planted for tech and media acquisitions, including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, Verizon’s acquisition of Yahoo and, in 1995, Disney’s merger with ABC. It’s also great marketing for investment bank boutique Allen & Co., which has advised on some of the biggest tech, media and telecom mergers, including Time Warner’s $108 billion sale to AT&T and LinkedIn’s $26 billion sale to Microsoft.

A lot has changed in the media landscape since last year. Fox sold its entertainment assets to Disney for $71 billion. Netflix, once the king of streaming, will soon compete for viewers with new services from Disney, AT&T and Comcast’s NBC, all of which are competing to create the best collection of original and existing TV and movie content. Apple is also throwing its hat in the game, with a new service called Apple TV+ that will launch this fall with original movies.

Here’s who’s showing up:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton alex sherman, todd haselton, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idaho, sale, tech, deals, biggest, billion, allen, media, disney, history, including, arrive, gone, original, moguls, tv, valley


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McDonald’s and Burger King are facing calls to scrap plastic toys in kids’ meal deals

The plastic toys given away with children’s fast food meals are under fire. McDonald’s and Burger King are the target of a petition started by two British school children who criticize the companies for giving away the toys that they say are put in the trash after only being used briefly. McDonald’s Happy Meal and Burger King’s Kids’ Meal include a main meal, side, drink and a toy, which is often linked to movie releases. The children, aged 9 and 7, wrote that they learnt about pollution at scho


The plastic toys given away with children’s fast food meals are under fire. McDonald’s and Burger King are the target of a petition started by two British school children who criticize the companies for giving away the toys that they say are put in the trash after only being used briefly. McDonald’s Happy Meal and Burger King’s Kids’ Meal include a main meal, side, drink and a toy, which is often linked to movie releases. The children, aged 9 and 7, wrote that they learnt about pollution at scho
McDonald’s and Burger King are facing calls to scrap plastic toys in kids’ meal deals Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, wrote, children, burger, away, started, deals, calls, mcdonalds, kids, toys, meal, facing, petition, plastic, king, scrap


McDonald's and Burger King are facing calls to scrap plastic toys in kids' meal deals

The plastic toys given away with children’s fast food meals are under fire.

McDonald’s and Burger King are the target of a petition started by two British school children who criticize the companies for giving away the toys that they say are put in the trash after only being used briefly.

McDonald’s Happy Meal and Burger King’s Kids’ Meal include a main meal, side, drink and a toy, which is often linked to movie releases.

“We like to go to eat at Burger King and McDonald’s, but children only play with the plastic toys they give us for a few minutes before they get thrown away and harm animals and pollute the sea,” wrote Ella and Caitlin Wood on a Change.org petition page, which has more than 335,000 signatures.

The children, aged 9 and 7, wrote that they learnt about pollution at school and recycle at home. “But we want to do more, which is why we started this petition. It’s not enough to make recyclable plastic toys — big, rich companies shouldn’t be making toys out of plastic at all,” they wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, school, wrote, children, burger, away, started, deals, calls, mcdonalds, kids, toys, meal, facing, petition, plastic, king, scrap


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Iran breaches 2015 nuclear deal’s stockpile limit: Sources

This handout image supplied by the IIPA (Iran International Photo Agency) shows a view of the reactor building at the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear power plant as the first fuel is loaded, on August 21, 2010 in Bushehr, southern Iran. Zarif confirmed that Iran had exceeded the relevant limit of 300 kg of uranium hexafluoride (UF6), but Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said Iran’s steps to decrease its commitments to the nuclear deal were “reversible.” The International Atomic Energy agen


This handout image supplied by the IIPA (Iran International Photo Agency) shows a view of the reactor building at the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear power plant as the first fuel is loaded, on August 21, 2010 in Bushehr, southern Iran. Zarif confirmed that Iran had exceeded the relevant limit of 300 kg of uranium hexafluoride (UF6), but Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said Iran’s steps to decrease its commitments to the nuclear deal were “reversible.” The International Atomic Energy agen
Iran breaches 2015 nuclear deal’s stockpile limit: Sources Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, agency, nuclear, uranium, kg, international, verified, limit, work, sources, deal, breaches, deals, stockpile, 2015, iran


Iran breaches 2015 nuclear deal's stockpile limit: Sources

This handout image supplied by the IIPA (Iran International Photo Agency) shows a view of the reactor building at the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear power plant as the first fuel is loaded, on August 21, 2010 in Bushehr, southern Iran.

Iran has breached the limit of its enriched uranium stockpile set in a 2015 deal with major powers, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said on Monday, according to the ISNA news agency, defying a warning by European co-signatories to stick to the deal despite U.S. sanctions.

Zarif confirmed that Iran had exceeded the relevant limit of 300 kg of uranium hexafluoride (UF6), but Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said Iran’s steps to decrease its commitments to the nuclear deal were “reversible.”

The International Atomic Energy agency (IAEA) said that its inspectors were verifying whether Iran had accumulated more enriched uranium than allowed.

“Our inspectors are on the ground and they will report to headquarters as soon as the LEU (low-enriched uranium) stockpile has been verified, a spokesman for the U.N. agency said.

Enriching uranium to a low level of 3.6% fissile material is the first step in a process that could eventually allow Iran to amass enough highly-enriched uranium to build a nuclear warhead.

Last Wednesday, the IAEA verified that Iran had roughly 200 kg of low-enriched uranium, just below the deals 202.8 kg limit, three diplomats who follow the agencys work told Reuters. A quantity of 300 kg of UF6 (uranium hexafluoride) corresponds to 202.8 kg of LEU.

After talks on Friday in Vienna, Iran said European countries had offered too little in the way of trade assistance to persuade it to back off from its plan to breach the limit, a riposte to U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision last year to quit the deal and reimpose economic sanctions.

Mousavi urged them on Monday to step up their efforts. “Time is running out for them to save the deal,” state TV quoted him Mousavi as saying.

The deal between Iran and six world powers lifted most international sanctions against Iran in return for restrictions on its nuclear work aimed at extending the time Iran would need to produce a nuclear bomb, if it chose to, from roughly 2-3 months to a year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-01  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, agency, nuclear, uranium, kg, international, verified, limit, work, sources, deal, breaches, deals, stockpile, 2015, iran


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How to snag a last-minute summer vacation deal

© Marco Bottigelli | Moment | Getty ImagesHaven’t booked that summer vacation yet? According to a recent survey by BankRate, 22% of Americans still haven’t decided whether they are going to take a trip this summer. “You can also sometimes save money by flying into a major gateway and then booking a separate flight to your ending destination,” she said. Where to goIf you are like the majority of U.S. residents traveling this summer, you are staying within the country’s borders. She suggests also


© Marco Bottigelli | Moment | Getty ImagesHaven’t booked that summer vacation yet? According to a recent survey by BankRate, 22% of Americans still haven’t decided whether they are going to take a trip this summer. “You can also sometimes save money by flying into a major gateway and then booking a separate flight to your ending destination,” she said. Where to goIf you are like the majority of U.S. residents traveling this summer, you are staying within the country’s borders. She suggests also
How to snag a last-minute summer vacation deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flying, book, money, travel, americans, deals, destination, lastminute, vacation, summer, snag, deal, save


How to snag a last-minute summer vacation deal

© Marco Bottigelli | Moment | Getty Images

Haven’t booked that summer vacation yet? You aren’t alone. According to a recent survey by BankRate, 22% of Americans still haven’t decided whether they are going to take a trip this summer. However, it’s not too late. While the season is one of the busiest, there are still deals to be found. “There are so many different ways to save that travelers are not aware of,” said Steven Sintra, North America commercial director at travel website Kayak. The first thing you need to do before you dive in is figure out your budget. That will help determine just where you can go and for how long. Then, knowing when to book is really important, said Alexis Tiacoh, spokesperson at travel site Expedia. “If you are going to book flights, book them on the weekend, preferably on a Sunday, as average ticket prices tend to be lower when booked on a weekend,” she advised. Hotels are best booked on a Friday night. There is also an upside to waiting until the very last minute: Booking a week out could save you more than 15% on hotel costs and about 25% on hotel and airfare packages, said Tiacoh.

Check travel websites and apps

Head to any travel website or app, such as Expedia, Travelocity, Orbitz or Kayak, and you’ll find a deals section. The same goes for websites for airlines and hotels. That’s when flexibility on your destination and your dates can really help you get a bargain. “There have been great deals that I’ve seen that are two months out; some that are less than a week out,” Expedia’s Tiacoh said. “Being flexible and being open to a new destination can really work to a traveler’s advantage, especially if you are looking to save.” If you have a specific destination in mind, you can keep an eye on the price through alerts from travel sites, which will inform you of any changes.

Think outside the box

If you can, hold off on that vacation until later in August or even in September, when prices come down, said Kayak’s Sintra. Or, if you have your heart set on going away for the July 4 holiday or Labor Day weekend, flying on the actual holiday can often save you some money. More from Personal Finance:

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This is four-time NBA champ John Salley’s No. 1 money rule It can also sometimes be cheaper to book two one-way tickets instead of one round-trip fare, he said. Another way to save is choosing an alternative airport for either your departure city or your destination, according to Sarah Schlichter, senior editor of the online travel magazine, SmarterTravel.com. “You can also sometimes save money by flying into a major gateway and then booking a separate flight to your ending destination,” she said. For example, when flying to Eastern European cities, purchasing a transatlantic flight to London and then a separate onward ticket on a budget airline can be cheaper than flying nonstop from the U.S. When it comes to lodging, you could find bed and breakfasts, vacation rentals or even hostels with private rooms are a more affordable option than hotels, Schlichter said.

Where to go

If you are like the majority of U.S. residents traveling this summer, you are staying within the country’s borders. According to a recent poll by Expedia, 3 out of 4 Americans don’t plan to leave the U.S. Of those who plan to take a summer vacation, 51% were taking to the road, 27% were flying and 15% were doing a combination of both, the survey of 1,000 Americans found.

Phillip Suddick | DigitalVision | Getty Images

If you are one of those who want to fly to your destination, there are some locations that may be more budget-friendly than others. “Consider destinations where summer isn’t high season — such as warm-weather cities (Phoenix, Las Vegas), tropical places where summer is rainy season (Costa Rica), or the Southern Hemisphere, where it’s wintertime,” said Sarah Schilichter of SmarterTravel.com. She suggests also considering destinations where the U.S. dollar is strong, which will save you money once you are there. That includes places such as Argentina, Mexico and the Dominican Republic.

European destinations

“Europe is super-hot right now, and the prices are also very cheap,” said Kayak’s Sintra. The best bargains can be found by traveling to Spain, Ireland and Portugal, he said. Airfare to these locations can be found for under $800. And despite the collapse of Icelandic discount carrier Wow Air, Reykjavik is the most affordable European city to fly to this summer, according to Kayak. Median airfare is around $550.

Other deals


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-03  Authors: michelle fox
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, flying, book, money, travel, americans, deals, destination, lastminute, vacation, summer, snag, deal, save


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