Microsoft is pushing forward with JEDI recruiting despite Amazon’s legal fight

Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft Corp., departs the “Tech For Good” meeting at Elysee Palace in Paris, France, on Wednesday, May 23, 2018. A group of industry executives met with France’s President Emmanuel Macron to discuss how to use technology to improve people’s lives. Microsoft has a history with government contracts and has spent years going through the process of clearing employees for defense work, said two of the people. Microsoft’s website lists more than 100 opening


Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft Corp., departs the “Tech For Good” meeting at Elysee Palace in Paris, France, on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
A group of industry executives met with France’s President Emmanuel Macron to discuss how to use technology to improve people’s lives.
Microsoft has a history with government contracts and has spent years going through the process of clearing employees for defense work, said two of the people.
Microsoft’s website lists more than 100 opening
Microsoft is pushing forward with JEDI recruiting despite Amazon’s legal fight Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: jordan novet william feuer, jordan novet, william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pushing, microsoft, president, fight, work, despite, process, jedi, recruiting, principal, defense, legal, pentagons, officer, amazons, employees, openings, forward


Microsoft is pushing forward with JEDI recruiting despite Amazon's legal fight

Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft Corp., departs the “Tech For Good” meeting at Elysee Palace in Paris, France, on Wednesday, May 23, 2018. A group of industry executives met with France’s President Emmanuel Macron to discuss how to use technology to improve people’s lives.

Microsoft is staffing up in preparation for its work with the Defense Department, even as Amazon is in court protesting the Pentagon’s decision, according to people familiar with the matter.

In the more than six weeks since winning the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, or JEDI, deal, which is worth up to $10 billion, Microsoft has been trying to lure talent from defense contractors and other companies and get employees the necessary authorization to work on the project, said the people, who asked not to be named because they’re not authorized to speak on behalf of the company.

Amazon has contested the Pentagon’s decision to award the contract to its smaller cloud rival, citing in a lawsuit a bias on the part of President Donald Trump and repeated attacks against Amazon and CEO Jeff Bezos as evidence of an unfair process.

But Microsoft isn’t slowing down. Brad Smith, Microsoft’s president and chief legal officer, told CNBC on Saturday that “we have if anything been moving even faster since that contract was awarded.”

Microsoft has a history with government contracts and has spent years going through the process of clearing employees for defense work, said two of the people. The company has hundreds of cleared engineers, one of the people said. But there are so many people in the pipeline that Microsoft faces an 18-month bottleneck getting current employees through the process, a different person said.

Microsoft’s website lists more than 100 openings for people with security clearances, though none mention JEDI by name. Openings are for positions including principal software engineering managers and principal program managers. In January, Microsoft plans to hold two recruiting events in Reston, Virginia, near the headquarters of the Central Intelligence Agency in Langley.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-12  Authors: jordan novet william feuer, jordan novet, william feuer
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pushing, microsoft, president, fight, work, despite, process, jedi, recruiting, principal, defense, legal, pentagons, officer, amazons, employees, openings, forward


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

US slaps sanctions on Iran’s biggest airline and shipping group

Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s president, pauses whilst speaking during a news conference in Tehran, Iran, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019. Bloomberg | Getty ImagesWASHINGTON — The U.S. will impose a fresh round of sanctions on Iran’s largest shipping company and biggest airline, the nation’s top diplomat announced Wednesday. The sanctions on Mahan Air, however, will take immediate effect. Earlier this year, Germany and France announced a ban on Mahan Air, in part, alleging the firm transports Iranian weapons


Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s president, pauses whilst speaking during a news conference in Tehran, Iran, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019.
Bloomberg | Getty ImagesWASHINGTON — The U.S. will impose a fresh round of sanctions on Iran’s largest shipping company and biggest airline, the nation’s top diplomat announced Wednesday.
The sanctions on Mahan Air, however, will take immediate effect.
Earlier this year, Germany and France announced a ban on Mahan Air, in part, alleging the firm transports Iranian weapons
US slaps sanctions on Iran’s biggest airline and shipping group Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, secretary, group, sanctions, mahan, shipping, mattis, air, rouhani, weapons, airline, biggest, irans, slaps, iranian


US slaps sanctions on Iran's biggest airline and shipping group

Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s president, pauses whilst speaking during a news conference in Tehran, Iran, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019. Bloomberg | Getty Images

WASHINGTON — The U.S. will impose a fresh round of sanctions on Iran’s largest shipping company and biggest airline, the nation’s top diplomat announced Wednesday. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo targeted the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines, its China-based subsidiary, E-Sail Shipping, and Mahan Air, saying the companies are aiding the Iranian regime’s alleged proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. “As long as its malign behaviors continue, so will our campaign of maximum pressure,” Pompeo said Wednesday, adding that the transportation firms helped to “augment the regime’s campaign of terror and intimidation at home and throughout the world.” The sanctions on IRISL and E-Sail will take effect in 180 days in order to give customers who ship humanitarian goods time to adjust their contracts. The sanctions on Mahan Air, however, will take immediate effect. Earlier this year, Germany and France announced a ban on Mahan Air, in part, alleging the firm transports Iranian weapons and personnel to Syria.

An airplane of Mahan Air sits at the tarmac after landing at Sanaa International Airport in the Yemeni capital on March 1, 2015. Mohammad Huwais | AFP | Getty Images

“The Iranian regime uses its aviation and shipping industries to supply its regional terrorist and militant groups with weapons, directly contributing to the devastating humanitarian crises in Syria and Yemen,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement. “Aviation and shipping industries should be vigilant and not allow their industries to be exploited by terrorists.” Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said Wednesday that Tehran will overcome U.S. sanctions. “The government is determined to defeat (the enemy) by bypassing America’s sanctions … or through various means including talks,” the semi-official Iranian news agency ISNA quoted Rouhani as saying. Former Defense secretaries Leon Panetta and James Mattis weighed in on the Trump administration’s tumultuous relationship with Rouhani at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum. “Bottom line is, they are dangerous; we need to try and get them to the negotiating table. I don’t think what we are doing now is working very effectively to get that done,” Panetta said. Mattis, a four-star Marine Corps general, reiterated the importance of working with allies, an issue that prompted his shock resignation as Trump’s secretary of Defense. “We can’t even deal with the nuclear threat alone and think we are going to somehow neuter this problem. It’s going to take allies and partners, as almost every problem we face in the world takes allies and partners,” he said. “Unilateral [doesn’t] work, we’ve got to do this in concert with others,” Mattis said, adding that the U.S. should take more creative approaches in dealing with Iran.

US President Donald Trump speaks as Defense Secretary James Mattis (L) looks on during a meeting with senior military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House on October 5, 2017. Mandel Nganr | AFP | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, defense, secretary, group, sanctions, mahan, shipping, mattis, air, rouhani, weapons, airline, biggest, irans, slaps, iranian


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

US slaps sanctions on Iran’s biggest airline and shipping group

Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s president, pauses whilst speaking during a news conference in Tehran, Iran, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019. Bloomberg | Getty ImagesWASHINGTON — The U.S. will impose a fresh round of sanctions on Iran’s largest shipping company and biggest airline, the nation’s top diplomat announced Wednesday. The sanctions on Mahan Air, however, will take immediate effect. Earlier this year, Germany and France announced a ban on Mahan Air, in part, alleging the firm transports Iranian weapons


Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s president, pauses whilst speaking during a news conference in Tehran, Iran, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019.
Bloomberg | Getty ImagesWASHINGTON — The U.S. will impose a fresh round of sanctions on Iran’s largest shipping company and biggest airline, the nation’s top diplomat announced Wednesday.
The sanctions on Mahan Air, however, will take immediate effect.
Earlier this year, Germany and France announced a ban on Mahan Air, in part, alleging the firm transports Iranian weapons
US slaps sanctions on Iran’s biggest airline and shipping group Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airline, rouhani, air, mahan, weapons, shipping, group, sanctions, secretary, slaps, defense, iranian, biggest, irans, mattis


US slaps sanctions on Iran's biggest airline and shipping group

Hassan Rouhani, Iran’s president, pauses whilst speaking during a news conference in Tehran, Iran, on Monday, Oct. 14, 2019. Bloomberg | Getty Images

WASHINGTON — The U.S. will impose a fresh round of sanctions on Iran’s largest shipping company and biggest airline, the nation’s top diplomat announced Wednesday. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo targeted the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines, its China-based subsidiary, E-Sail Shipping, and Mahan Air, saying the companies are aiding the Iranian regime’s alleged proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. “As long as its malign behaviors continue, so will our campaign of maximum pressure,” Pompeo said Wednesday, adding that the transportation firms helped to “augment the regime’s campaign of terror and intimidation at home and throughout the world.” The sanctions on IRISL and E-Sail will take effect in 180 days in order to give customers who ship humanitarian goods time to adjust their contracts. The sanctions on Mahan Air, however, will take immediate effect. Earlier this year, Germany and France announced a ban on Mahan Air, in part, alleging the firm transports Iranian weapons and personnel to Syria.

An airplane of Mahan Air sits at the tarmac after landing at Sanaa International Airport in the Yemeni capital on March 1, 2015. Mohammad Huwais | AFP | Getty Images

“The Iranian regime uses its aviation and shipping industries to supply its regional terrorist and militant groups with weapons, directly contributing to the devastating humanitarian crises in Syria and Yemen,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement. “Aviation and shipping industries should be vigilant and not allow their industries to be exploited by terrorists.” Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said Wednesday that Tehran will overcome U.S. sanctions. “The government is determined to defeat (the enemy) by bypassing America’s sanctions … or through various means including talks,” the semi-official Iranian news agency ISNA quoted Rouhani as saying. Former Defense secretaries Leon Panetta and James Mattis weighed in on the Trump administration’s tumultuous relationship with Rouhani at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum. “Bottom line is, they are dangerous; we need to try and get them to the negotiating table. I don’t think what we are doing now is working very effectively to get that done,” Panetta said. Mattis, a four-star Marine Corps general, reiterated the importance of working with allies, an issue that prompted his shock resignation as Trump’s secretary of Defense. “We can’t even deal with the nuclear threat alone and think we are going to somehow neuter this problem. It’s going to take allies and partners, as almost every problem we face in the world takes allies and partners,” he said. “Unilateral [doesn’t] work, we’ve got to do this in concert with others,” Mattis said, adding that the U.S. should take more creative approaches in dealing with Iran.

US President Donald Trump speaks as Defense Secretary James Mattis (L) looks on during a meeting with senior military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House on October 5, 2017. Mandel Nganr | AFP | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-11  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, airline, rouhani, air, mahan, weapons, shipping, group, sanctions, secretary, slaps, defense, iranian, biggest, irans, mattis


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

US firms dominate arms sales list as 2018 global spend rises to $420 billion

U.S. firms dominate a newly published list of arms and military services spend in 2018, accounting for well over half of global sales. SIPRI said Lockheed Martin’s arms sales exceeded $47 billion, boosted by a ramping up of deliveries of the F-35 fighter jet. Combined, these U.S. firms accounted for more than a third of global military spend in 2018 — at an estimated value of $148 billion. Revenue for all the 43 U.S. firms in the list adds up to $246 billion, around 59% of all arms sales by the


U.S. firms dominate a newly published list of arms and military services spend in 2018, accounting for well over half of global sales.
SIPRI said Lockheed Martin’s arms sales exceeded $47 billion, boosted by a ramping up of deliveries of the F-35 fighter jet.
Combined, these U.S. firms accounted for more than a third of global military spend in 2018 — at an estimated value of $148 billion.
Revenue for all the 43 U.S. firms in the list adds up to $246 billion, around 59% of all arms sales by the
US firms dominate arms sales list as 2018 global spend rises to $420 billion Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sales, billion, arms, 420, global, defense, 100, rises, spend, 2018, military, dominate, list, firms


US firms dominate arms sales list as 2018 global spend rises to $420 billion

U.S. firms dominate a newly published list of arms and military services spend in 2018, accounting for well over half of global sales.

The findings, published by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) on Monday, also calculated that the combined global sales from the world’s 100 biggest defense firms totaled $420 billion during 2018.

The figure, a 4.6% rise on SIPRI’s 2017 estimate, does not include sales from Chinese firms due to what the institute describes as a lack of reliable data.

For the first time since 2002, U.S. companies occupied all five top spots. Lockheed Martin kept its title as the world’s largest arms seller, accounting for 11% of global sales.

SIPRI said Lockheed Martin’s arms sales exceeded $47 billion, boosted by a ramping up of deliveries of the F-35 fighter jet.

Boeing, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon and General Dynamics rounded out the top five spots. Combined, these U.S. firms accounted for more than a third of global military spend in 2018 — at an estimated value of $148 billion.

Revenue for all the 43 U.S. firms in the list adds up to $246 billion, around 59% of all arms sales by the top 100 firms.

Looking elsewhere, the 10 Russian defense companies on the list managed to almost maintain their 2017 figure — selling $36.2 billion worth of military equipment and services.

Almaz-Antey was the only Russian firm to make the top 10 list with the state-owned company having a particular focus on anti-aircraft defense systems.

Combined arms sales of 27 European firms in the top 100 increased slightly in 2018 to $102 billion. U.K. firms accounted for $35.1 billion in 2018, the highest of the European nations.

U.K.-based BAE Systems came sixth in the top 100 list of sales, making it the largest arms seller outside of the United States in 2018.

Eighty of the 100 top arms producers in 2018 were based in the U.S., Europe and Russia. Of the remaining 20, SIPRI said six were based in Japan, three each for Israel, India and South Korea, two in Turkey and one each for Australia, Canada and Singapore.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sales, billion, arms, 420, global, defense, 100, rises, spend, 2018, military, dominate, list, firms


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Why Lockheed Martin gets billions in taxpayer money each year

Lockheed Martin is the top-grossing defense firm in the world and the U.S. government supports that business to the tune of more than $37.7 billion. In 2018 alone, that business from government contracts represented 70% of Lockheed Martin’s $53.7 billion revenue for the year, as it beat out its contemporaries Boeing and Raytheon. These funds are granted by Congress to provide equipment that enables the U.S. military to protect the country at home and abroad. To ensure that, politicians work with


Lockheed Martin is the top-grossing defense firm in the world and the U.S. government supports that business to the tune of more than $37.7 billion.
In 2018 alone, that business from government contracts represented 70% of Lockheed Martin’s $53.7 billion revenue for the year, as it beat out its contemporaries Boeing and Raytheon.
These funds are granted by Congress to provide equipment that enables the U.S. military to protect the country at home and abroad.
To ensure that, politicians work with
Why Lockheed Martin gets billions in taxpayer money each year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, military, equipment, provide, work, gets, world, taxpayer, business, lockheed, money, billions, martin, contracts, defense


Why Lockheed Martin gets billions in taxpayer money each year

Lockheed Martin is the top-grossing defense firm in the world and the U.S. government supports that business to the tune of more than $37.7 billion.

In 2018 alone, that business from government contracts represented 70% of Lockheed Martin’s $53.7 billion revenue for the year, as it beat out its contemporaries Boeing and Raytheon.

These funds are granted by Congress to provide equipment that enables the U.S. military to protect the country at home and abroad. To ensure that, politicians work with defense contractors to provide equipment to the military. This partnership creates a unique opportunity for private corporations to execute the will of the government and requires a delicate balance.

Watch the video above for more on why Lockheed Martin is awarded billions in government contracts each year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-09
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, military, equipment, provide, work, gets, world, taxpayer, business, lockheed, money, billions, martin, contracts, defense


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Former defense secretaries shed light on why Trump talks with North Korea failed

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Former defense secretaries Leon Panetta and James Mattis linked the failed summits between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump to a lack of preparation and not working with allies. North Korea, the only nation to have tested nuclear weapons this century, spent most of Trump’s first year in office perfecting its nuclear arsenal. Panetta, former director of the CIA and Secretary of Defense in the Obama Administration, echoed Mattis’ emphasis on working


SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Former defense secretaries Leon Panetta and James Mattis linked the failed summits between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump to a lack of preparation and not working with allies.
North Korea, the only nation to have tested nuclear weapons this century, spent most of Trump’s first year in office perfecting its nuclear arsenal.
Panetta, former director of the CIA and Secretary of Defense in the Obama Administration, echoed Mattis’ emphasis on working
Former defense secretaries shed light on why Trump talks with North Korea failed Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, defense, secretaries, light, trumps, president, korea, talks, working, north, jong, shed, panetta, united, kim, failed, mattis


Former defense secretaries shed light on why Trump talks with North Korea failed

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Former defense secretaries Leon Panetta and James Mattis linked the failed summits between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump to a lack of preparation and not working with allies.

“If the president of the United States is going to sit down with another leader, you better damn well be prepared in terms of what are the issues involved and what do we have to agree on so that you get something accomplished,” Panetta said when asked about Trump’s meetings with Kim.

“Yes, we made some progress in trying to restrain what happens in North Korea but I think North Korea today represents every bit as great a threat as it did before, if not more,” he added.

North Korea, the only nation to have tested nuclear weapons this century, spent most of Trump’s first year in office perfecting its nuclear arsenal. Since 2011, Kim has fired more than 90 missiles and had four nuclear weapons tests, which is more than what his father, Kim Jong Il, and grandfather, Kim Il Sung, launched over a period of 27 years.

“We did not perhaps have the alignment of the department and we did not engage with our allies at a time where they had to read something in a newspaper about what was going on,” Mattis said alongside Panetta at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum.

The four-star Marine Corps general reiterated the importance of working with allies — an issue that prompted his shock resignation as Trump’s Secretary of Defense.

“Going alone in this world doesn’t work,” the four-star Marine Corps general began. “And right now, what we are doing, in some cases, is we are working without or against allies,” he added.

Panetta, former director of the CIA and Secretary of Defense in the Obama Administration, echoed Mattis’ emphasis on working with allies.

“Jim [Mattis] is absolutely right, the strength of the United States of America lies in our alliances and our ability to work with others,” he began. “I understand the president is concerned about making sure people pay for this but he ought to at the same time express concern about the importance of the mission,” Panetta said, adding that the U.S. maintains 25,000 troops in the region to counter the North Korean threat.

On Saturday, North Korean state media said that a “very important” test was carried out at a rocket testing ground. Trump responded to the report by tweeting that Kim Jong Un risks losing “everything” if he does not take steps to denuclearize.

“Kim Jong Un is too smart and has far too much to lose, everything actually, if he acts in a hostile way. He signed a strong Denuclearization Agreement with me in Singapore,” Trump wrote on Twitter, referring to his first summit with Kim in 2018.

North Korea’s ambassador to the United Nations said denuclearization was off the negotiating table with the U.S. and lengthy talks with Washington were no longer needed.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-08  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, defense, secretaries, light, trumps, president, korea, talks, working, north, jong, shed, panetta, united, kim, failed, mattis


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Bezos says ‘the country is in trouble’ if big tech turns its back on the Pentagon: ‘We are the good guys’

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos gave a dismal outlook for the nation if U.S. tech companies decide to not support the Pentagon’s war business. “If big tech is going to turn their backs on the Department of Defense, this country is in trouble, that just can’t happen,” Bezos said at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California. As Silicon Valley courts a closer relationship with the Pentagon, tech firms have faced backlash for pursuing lucrative Defen


SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos gave a dismal outlook for the nation if U.S. tech companies decide to not support the Pentagon’s war business.
“If big tech is going to turn their backs on the Department of Defense, this country is in trouble, that just can’t happen,” Bezos said at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California.
As Silicon Valley courts a closer relationship with the Pentagon, tech firms have faced backlash for pursuing lucrative Defen
Bezos says ‘the country is in trouble’ if big tech turns its back on the Pentagon: ‘We are the good guys’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, contract, bezos, going, valley, support, defense, good, tech, department, turns, big, trouble, amazon, pentagon, washington, guys


Bezos says 'the country is in trouble' if big tech turns its back on the Pentagon: 'We are the good guys'

Jeff Bezos, founder and chief executive officer of Amazon.com Inc., listens during an Economic Club of Washington discussion in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018.

SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos gave a dismal outlook for the nation if U.S. tech companies decide to not support the Pentagon’s war business.

“If big tech is going to turn their backs on the Department of Defense, this country is in trouble, that just can’t happen,” Bezos said at the annual Reagan National Defense Forum in Simi Valley, California.

“Look I understand these are emotional issues, that’s okay, we don’t have to agree on everything, but this is how we are going to do it, we are going to support the Department of Defense. This country is important,” he added.

As Silicon Valley courts a closer relationship with the Pentagon, tech firms have faced backlash for pursuing lucrative Defense Department contracts.

Last year, Google announced that it was working with the U.S. military to analyze drone videos by using artificial intelligence.

The controversial contract, dubbed Project Maven, caused thousands of employees to protest the initiative.

In the wake of the firestorm, Google decided to not renew the contract upon its expiry in March 2019.

Loosely referencing the sequence of events in the wake of Google’s Project Maven, Bezos said that tech firms should support the U.S. military’s efforts.

“I know it’s complicated but you know, do you want a strong national defense or don’t you? I think you do. So we have to support that,” he said.

“We are the good guys, I really do believe that,” Bezos said.

Bezos’ comments come on the heels of Amazon’s decision to contest the Pentagon’s cloud-computing contract awarded to Microsoft.

Read more: Amazon cites ‘unmistakable bias’ in Microsoft’s military cloud contract win

The Pentagon said Oct. 25 that Microsoft had won the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure Cloud contract, which could span 10 years and be worth up to $10 billion.

“Numerous aspects of the JEDI evaluation process contained clear deficiencies, errors, and unmistakable bias — and it’s important that these matters be examined and rectified,” Amazon told CNBC in an email.

Trump often criticizes Amazon and Bezos, who also owns The Washington Post.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-07  Authors: amanda macias
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, country, contract, bezos, going, valley, support, defense, good, tech, department, turns, big, trouble, amazon, pentagon, washington, guys


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense Forum

Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense ForumCNBC’s Morgan Brennan reports from the Reagan National Defense Forum, where leaders in technology and defense are expected to attend the invite-only event to present what’s next in defense.


Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense ForumCNBC’s Morgan Brennan reports from the Reagan National Defense Forum, where leaders in technology and defense are expected to attend the invite-only event to present what’s next in defense.
Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense Forum Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leaders, defense, present, expect, reports, heres, inviteonly, reagan, national, forum, morgan, whats, technology


Here's what to expect from the Reagan National Defense Forum

Here’s what to expect from the Reagan National Defense Forum

CNBC’s Morgan Brennan reports from the Reagan National Defense Forum, where leaders in technology and defense are expected to attend the invite-only event to present what’s next in defense.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, leaders, defense, present, expect, reports, heres, inviteonly, reagan, national, forum, morgan, whats, technology


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

Putin fears the US and NATO are militarizing space and Russia is right to worry, experts say

He said the idea of a Space Force had started as a joke but he had then decided it was a “great idea.” “We have the Air Force, we’ll have the Space Force.” At the start of 2019, the U.S. unveiled an overhaul of its missile defense program in its “Missile Defense Review” in which it stated the need for a “comprehensive approach to missile defense against rogue state and regional missile threats.” The review also recognized “space is a new war-fighting domain, with the Space Force leading the way”


He said the idea of a Space Force had started as a joke but he had then decided it was a “great idea.”
“We have the Air Force, we’ll have the Space Force.”
At the start of 2019, the U.S. unveiled an overhaul of its missile defense program in its “Missile Defense Review” in which it stated the need for a “comprehensive approach to missile defense against rogue state and regional missile threats.”
The review also recognized “space is a new war-fighting domain, with the Space Force leading the way”
Putin fears the US and NATO are militarizing space and Russia is right to worry, experts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, space, nato, program, worry, experts, say, force, right, putin, russia, fears, missile, defense, satellites, military, militarizing


Putin fears the US and NATO are militarizing space and Russia is right to worry, experts say

Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) First Deputy Head Alexander Ivanov, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, and Federal Agency for Special Construction head Alexander Volosov watch a rocket booster carrying satellites blast off from a launch pad at the Vostochny Cosmodrome. Mikhail Metzel | TASS | Getty Images

NATO, the U.S. and Russia have a new domain to compete and conflict over: space. Russian President Vladimir Putin warned Wednesday that the U.S. saw space as as “theater of military operations” and that the development of the U.S. Space Force posed a threat to Russia. “The U.S. military-political leadership openly considers space as a military theater and plans to conduct operations there,” Putin said at a meeting with defense officials in Sochi, according to Russian news agency TASS. “For preserving strategic supremacy in this field the United States is accelerating creation of its space forces, which are already in the process of operative preparations,” Putin said, adding that the world’s leading countries are fast-tracking the development of modern military space systems and dual purpose satellites and that Russia needed to do the same. “The situation requires us to pay increased attention to strengthening the orbital group, as well as the rocket and space industry as a whole.” Russia opposed the militarization of space, Putin insisted, but said “at the same time the march of events requires greater attention to strengthening the orbital group and the space rocket and missile industry in general.”

NATO too

Putin’s comments Wednesday reiterated those he made in late November to his security council, in which he said he was “seriously concerned” about NATO’s “attempts to militarize outer space.” That comment came after NATO had declared space a fifth “operational domain” for the military alliance, alongside air, land, sea and cyber. “Space is part of our daily life here on Earth. It can be used for peaceful purposes. But it can also be used aggressively,” NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said at a meeting of foreign ministers on November 20. “Satellites can be jammed, hacked or weaponized. Anti-satellite weapons could cripple communications and other services our societies rely on, such as air travel, weather forecast or banking,” he said. “Space is also essential to the alliance’s deterrence and defense,” Stoltenberg added, referencing the organization’s ability to navigate, to gather intelligence, and to detect missile launches. “Making space an operational domain will help us ensure all aspects are taken into account to ensure the success of our missions,” he said. “For instance, this can allow NATO planners to make a request for allies to provide capabilities and services, such as satellite communications and data imagery.”

He said that around 2,000 satellites currently orbit the Earth with around half of them owned by NATO countries. Stoltenberg insisted that “NATO has no intention to put weapons in space. We are a defensive alliance.” He added the alliance’s approach to space will remain fully in line with international law. The 1967 Outer Space Treaty is a global agreement considered a foundation stone of international space law. The treaty was first signed by the U.K., U.S. and then-Soviet Union at the height of the Cold War to promote the peaceful exploration of space. It banned the placing of nuclear weapons in space and limited the use of the Moon and all other celestial bodies to peaceful purposes only. It also established that space shall be free for exploration and use by all nations, but that no nation may claim sovereignty on any part of it.

Star Wars

There are other space treaties covering, for example, the rescue of astronauts, the moon, the International Space Station (ISS) and liability for damage caused by space objects. Still, the use of space for defensive activities is likely to be litigious and provocative territory. It’s not the first time that space has been seen as a potential realm for defense though, especially during the Cold War. The “Strategic Defense Initiative” was a program first initiated in 1983 under President Ronald Reagan. The aim of the program was to develop an anti-ballistic missile system that was designed to shoot down nuclear missiles in space, with potential missile attacks from the Soviet Union specifically in mind.

Artist’s concept of interceptor under development for the U.S. Army’s HEDI (High Endoatmospheric Def. Interceptor), a key element of its 1983 Strategic Defense. Initiative (aka Star Wars) Time Life Pictures | The LIFE Picture Collection | Getty Images

It was dubbed “Star Wars” because it envisaged that technologies like space-based x-ray lasers could be used as part of the defensive system. Funding shortages as well as the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 meant that the SDI was never built. The idea of space dominance and defense has gained more traction in recent years, however, and in 2018, President Donald Trump floated the idea of developing another military branch, the “Space Force.” He said the idea of a Space Force had started as a joke but he had then decided it was a “great idea.” “Space is a war-fighting domain, just like the land, air, and sea,” Trump said. “We have the Air Force, we’ll have the Space Force.” In June 2018, he ordered the Pentagon to begin the creation of the new branch. At the start of 2019, the U.S. unveiled an overhaul of its missile defense program in its “Missile Defense Review” in which it stated the need for a “comprehensive approach to missile defense against rogue state and regional missile threats.” The review also recognized “space is a new war-fighting domain, with the Space Force leading the way” and said it would ensure “American dominance in space.” In a speech presenting more detail on the Missile Defense Review, Trump said the U.S. would “invest in a space-based missile defense layer. It’s new technology. It’s ultimately going to be a very, very big part of our defense and, obviously, of our offense,” he said.

U.S. Air Force Space Command Gen. John “Jay” Raymond stands next to the flag of the newly established U.S. Space Command, the sixth national armed service, in the Rose Garden at the White House August 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. Citing potential threats from China and Russia and the nation’s reliance on satellites for defense operations, Trump said the U.S. needs to launch a ‘space force.’ Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images News | Getty Images

“The system will be monitored, and we will terminate any missile launches from hostile powers, or even from powers that make a mistake. It won’t happen. Regardless of the missile type or the geographic origins of the attack, we will ensure that enemy missiles find no sanctuary on Earth or in the skies above.”

Arms race in space?

Russia responded angrily to the comments, saying it was tantamount to the U.S. relaunching the Cold War-era “Star Wars” program. According to a statement from Russia’s foreign ministry, reported by Reuters, Russia condemned the strategy as an act of confrontation and it urged Washington to reconsider its plans. “The strategy, de facto, gives the green light to the prospect of basing missile strike capabilities in space,” the statement said. “The implementation of these ideas will inevitably lead to the start of an arms race in space, which will have the most negative consequences for international security and stability,” it said. “We would like to call on the U.S. administration to think again and walk away from this irresponsible attempt to re-launch, on a new and more high-tech basis, the still-remembered Reagan-era ‘Star Wars’ program,” it said, Reuters reported. Experts say Russia is wary of the U.S., and NATO, opening up a new operational frontier in space as Russia would be easily out-competed by the combined NATO countries’ technological expertise, advances and weaponry in space.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: holly ellyatt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, space, nato, program, worry, experts, say, force, right, putin, russia, fears, missile, defense, satellites, military, militarizing


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post

During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending

Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England. Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford. In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture o


Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England.
Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford.
In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture o
During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, nato, focus, public, trillion, goods, services, net, spending, european, summit, trade, needs, defense, union


During the NATO summit, the US needs the EU to focus on trade, not just defense spending

Jens Stoltenberg, Secretary General of NATO speaks with U.S. President Donald Trump ahead of the NATO Leaders meeting at the NATO HQ on December 3, 2019 in Watford, England.

Underwriting Europe’s security and offering large and open markets to European goods and services are excessively costly legacy issues the U.S. can no longer afford.

Here is what we have now.

By the end of this year, the U.S. is expected to run a quasi-unstoppable gross public debt of $23.2 trillion, with its public sector budget deficits remaining at about 7% of the country’s economy.

On external accounts, the U.S. is showing a trade deficit on goods and services currently running at an annual rate of $529 billion, and a net foreign debt of $10.6 trillion at the end of last June.

In a sharp contrast, the European Union, the world’s largest free trading area (a single market and a customs union) of 513.5 million people, offers a picture of wealth and macroeconomic stability.

At the end of this year’s second quarter, the EU’s gross public debt stood at $14 trillion, with a budget deficit of only 0.9% of the group’s GDP.

Apart from that, the EU is a large net beneficiary on international trade accounts. Its surplus on goods and services trade in the first half of this year ran at an annual rate of $194.3 billion, in large part as a result of its strong net exports to the United States.

So, there it is: A deeply indebted U.S. continues to carry most of the financial burden of a defense alliance – NATO, The North Atlantic Treaty Organization – that guarantees the security of a rich and prosperous European Union.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: dr michael ivanovitch
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, large, nato, focus, public, trillion, goods, services, net, spending, european, summit, trade, needs, defense, union


Home Forums

    • Forum
    • Topics
    • Posts
    • Last Post