Judge rules against Trump in lawsuit to block Democrats’ subpoena for financial records

A federal judge ruled against President Donald Trump on Monday in a lawsuit to block a subpoena from House Democrats for information about his finances. Trump, speaking outside the White House shortly after the ruling came down, called the decision “crazy” and vowed to appeal it. “As far as the financials are concerned,” Trump said, “It’s totally the wrong decision [by an] Obama-appointed judge.” Trump’s lawyers sued in Washington, D.C., federal court to block that subpoena, writing that Democra


A federal judge ruled against President Donald Trump on Monday in a lawsuit to block a subpoena from House Democrats for information about his finances. Trump, speaking outside the White House shortly after the ruling came down, called the decision “crazy” and vowed to appeal it. “As far as the financials are concerned,” Trump said, “It’s totally the wrong decision [by an] Obama-appointed judge.” Trump’s lawyers sued in Washington, D.C., federal court to block that subpoena, writing that Democra
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Judge rules against Trump in lawsuit to block Democrats' subpoena for financial records

A federal judge ruled against President Donald Trump on Monday in a lawsuit to block a subpoena from House Democrats for information about his finances. U.S. District Court Judge Amit Mehta strongly endorsed Congress’ broad authority to investigate the president, striking a blow to arguments made by Trump’s legal team. Trump, speaking outside the White House shortly after the ruling came down, called the decision “crazy” and vowed to appeal it. “As far as the financials are concerned,” Trump said, “It’s totally the wrong decision [by an] Obama-appointed judge.” Mehta wrote in a 41-page memorandum opinion that while “there are limits on Congress’s investigative authority … those limits do not substantially constrain Congress.” The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee subpoenaed accounting firm Mazars in April, requesting financial documents and related materials from Trump, his trust and a handful of his businesses. Trump’s lawyers sued in Washington, D.C., federal court to block that subpoena, writing that Democrats had “declared all-out political war” against Trump.

While Trump’s lawyers had argued that the committee’s subpoena did not have a legitimate legislative purpose — and was therefore invalid — Mehta took a more liberal view. “So long as Congress investigates on a subject matter on which ‘legislation could be had,'” then Congress is acting within the bounds of the U.S. Constitution, the judge wrote. “President Trump cannot block the subpoena to Mazars.” The Democrat-led committee argued that the requested financial documents will help it strengthen ethics and disclosure laws and their penalties, as well as assisting in making sure that the president does not violate the emoluments clause of the Constitution. “These are facially valid legislative purposes, and it is not for the court to question whether the Committee’s actions are truly motivated by political considerations,” Mehta wrote. In a hearing in May, the president’s lawyers argued that the Democrats’ actions fell far afield of Congress’ legitimate oversight functions as a legislative body. But Mehta questioned that argument, suggesting in the hearing that many historic congressional investigations — including the Watergate probe — might be considered invalid by the standard Trump’s lawyers were asserting. House Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., praised the decision as a “resounding victory for the rule of law” in a statement Monday evening. “The court recognized the basic, but crucial fact that Congress has authority to conduct investigations as part of our core function under the Constitution,” Cummings said. “The court rejected President Trump’s repeated claim that congressional investigations serve no ‘legislative function’ — a baseless argument made in response to multiple investigations by the House of Representatives.” Democrats in Congress have issued requests to Trump and dozens of other figures in his orbit for records on a variety of subjects, including the president’s finances, his 2016 campaign and his inauguration committee. Some of their areas of inquiry also stem from the findings made public in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian election meddling, possible obstruction of justice and possible conspiracy between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin. Some of those requests have led to subpoenas — all of which Trump has vowed to fight.


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We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said

China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help


China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help
We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here’s what they said Cached Page below :
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We asked the Democrats running for president how they would negotiate with China on trade. Here's what they said

China’s President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump attend a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on November 9, 2017. Nicolas Asfouri | AFP | Getty Images

With trade negotiations between the U.S. and China stalled and an escalating trade war threatening global markets, President Donald Trump has said that the Chinese are “DREAMING” that he will be defeated by a Democrat in 2020. But Democrats have not said much about their own plans for negotiating with the Chinese. To learn more, CNBC asked the 21 top Democrats running for president about their views. We asked them what they believe is working under Trump — and what they would change. We also asked whether human rights issues in China, where the U.S. has said more than a million Muslims are held in concentration camps, should be part of any trade deal. Lastly, we asked about what they would do about China’s efforts to tighten its military grip on the South China Sea, where more than $3 trillion of trade passes annually. Below, unedited, are our questions and the answers we received from the seven Democrats who responded. Those Democrats are Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, former Maryland Rep. John Delaney, Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., Miramar, Florida, Mayor Wayne Messam and spiritual coach Marianne Williamson. Two other Democrats provided partial responses. A spokesperson for Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., provided an excerpt from the senator’s platform that is included as a response to the first question. An aide to Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke wrote in a statement: “Holding China accountable should not come at the expense of American workers. That is why we must not settle for any deal that does not respect intellectual property, level the playing field in the Chinese market, nor end unfair trade practices. We must advance progress based on shared interests and core democratic values.” Joe Biden, the Democratic front runner, did not respond to CNBC’s survey as of publication time but has dismissed China’s economic competitiveness while on the campaign trail, earning some criticism from his fellow contenders. “China is going to eat our lunch? Come on, man,” Biden told a crowd in Iowa earlier this month. He described himself as a “fair trader” and said he has been “arguing for a long time that we should treat other countries the way in which they treat us, which is, particularly as it relates to China: If they want to trade here, they’re going to be under the same rules.” CNBC provided the questions to each campaign on May 6. What do you think is the best approach to addressing China’s practices with regard to intellectual property theft, technology transfer, industrial subsidies and other matters in which the two countries are at odds. Is it through multinational organizations like the World Trade Organization and the United Nations? Will you take any action unilaterally? If so, what action? Sanders: It is in the interests of the United States to work to strengthen institutions like the WTO and the UN rather than trying to go it alone. American concerns about China’s technology practices are shared in Europe and across the Asia-Pacific. We can place far more pressure on China to change its policies if we work together with the broader international community and the other developed economies. International institutions also offer China a template for reforming its own internal intellectual property and industrial practices. Swalwell: I’m a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, as well as of the Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet, so I’ve seen first-hand the economic espionage that China commits and the adverse impact it has on American businesses. China has not been forthright in even admitting that intellectual property theft and technology transfer occurs. Nor is China transparent on its industrial subsidies. Curbing China’s dishonest practices must be a part of any negotiation; as president, I would hold China accountable. On the intellectual property theft, we know that much of the IP theft is state-backed. In order to combat this we must take a multi-pronged approach — both defensive and offensive. We must have a strong enforcement mechanism with which to hold China accountable for their actions and continue to impose penalties when theft occurs. China has made promises to institute reforms of their policies governing IP rights, technology transfers and cyber-theft of trade secrets in the past but we know these are not being imposed. Read more: Eric Swalwell of California joins 2020 presidential race The legal and diplomatic approaches have not been completely effective, it is critical that we implement other actions such as developing early warning systems, particularly when it comes to the stealing of defense technology. This can be done through private-public partnerships. We must also be ready to take counter action when a theft is detected. It is vital that we continue to have a multinational approach to addressing these issues. We can’t go it alone; we must involve allies — and other victims of China’s practices — such as Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand.

While the U.S. does not have to go through the World Trade Organization and can invoke Section 301 if they are to impose tariffs against China (even though it still has to file a simultaneous complaint with the WTO), the WTO can still be a useful partner. In fact, the WTO has an obligation to enforce the rules they have set up, otherwise it is left to the United States to impose punishment. We should hold the WTO to its obligation. It is also important that U.S. companies acknowledge when theft is occurring by China. In the past, companies have not wanted to impinge on their business with China so they’ve turned a blind eye. I would ensure that reporting this theft it is a win-win for American companies through fair trade practices. Lastly, government departments must coordinate with each other and with U.S. companies. The departments of Commerce and the Treasury, the U.S. Trade Representative and the U.S. State Department must all be aligned to tackle the problem of IP property theft in coordination with the private sector. I would continue to make sure the Justice Department brings criminal cases against the companies that violate trade agreements and steal our trade secrets and intellectual property. I would boost our Trade Representative’s investigation of China’s activities by adding more staff and funding. Ryan: When it comes to China stealing intellectual property from the United States, there is no doubt that multinational organizations need to play a part in holding them accountable. These actions are a serious national security and economic risk for the United States. At the same time, I think our government must take further action when it comes to creating safeguards against China’s actions. That is why I have cosponsored legislation the Fair Trade with China Enforcement Act, which would hold China accountable and create necessary regulations when it comes to trade with China, including prohibiting the sale of national security sensitive technology and intellectual property to China. Read more: Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan — who once tried to take down Nancy Pelosi — is running for president Delaney: China has acted like pirates, stealing intellectual property, building illegal islands, and not playing by the rules. I will build a broad coalition of U.S. allies and have a unified front against China (this will involve working with multinational organizations but also doing a lot more), I will unify our business community against these practices by preventing them from depositing intellectual property funded by taxpayers into joint ventures with China, and I will re-enter the TPP to compete with China. We can hold China accountable and have a productive relationship with them. Read more: What being a successful businessman taught Rep. John Delaney about politics Moulton: These options aren’t mutually exclusive. We should address cybersecurity and intellectual property theft issues directly with China and use the WTO to negotiate trade disputes and establish clear enforcement mechanisms. Protecting our international property is a national security issue, and we need to build a cyberwall to protect against Chinese and Russian attacks. We should start by strengthening the Cyber Threat Intelligence Integration Center created under President Obama and improve the information-sharing between the private sector and government on cyber threats. As we press China on trade and intellectual property theft, we need to demonstrate our resolve in ways that actually help American workers. Donald Trump has shown he knows nothing about trade. An initial analysis of the net effect of the tariffs is that they are costing the United States economy $1.4 billion a month, and the cost of the tariffs is being passed on to U.S. farmers, companies, and consumers. Read more: Seth Moulton is the latest Democrat running for president. Here are his biggest policy priorities, from green jobs to a public option The United States led the 15 years of negotiations that enabled China to join the WTO and we should reap the benefits of that successful diplomatic effort. Our negotiators secured unprecedented changes to China’s economic and trade policies as conditions for membership, including requiring a dramatic opening of China’s telecom, banking, and insurance sectors, along with the lowering of tariffs on key agricultural products to almost zero. The point is: WTO leverage works. China’s membership in the WTO has been a huge boon to the United States, with U.S. exports to China increasing by 500 percent and agricultural exports increasing by 1000 percent since China joined the organization. Going forward, the WTO should absolutely be involved in establishing trust in trade negotiations and in providing the mechanisms for the enforcement of trade agreements. Bennet: Instead of slapping tariffs on our allies and perpetrating a trade war, Michael believes we need to do the hard work of building coalitions to counter Chinese predatory economic practices, like intellectual property theft and economic espionage, that harm American workers, businesses, farmers, and ranchers. In order to compete with and counter an increasingly authoritarian China, Michael believes we must reinvest in our alliances, champion democratic values like the rule of law and human rights, and sharpen our efforts to combat technology threats that undermine U.S. economic and national security.

Messam: The strained trade relations between the U.S. and China is a complex issue that should be confronted with a measured and sober disposition. The combined approach of multinational organizations and unilateral action should be leveraged to protect intellectual property, technology assets, and trade secrets. Before engaging trade wars that could have detrimental impacts to American businesses and our economy, we must seek to solve our trade differences diplomatically. Where multinational organization negotiations don’t work, I would seek specific and direct trade remedies not limited to: • tariffs • blockade on imports of stolen intellectual property Read more: Little-known Florida mayor becomes the latest Democrat vying to take on Trump in 2020 Williamson: The United States Intellectual Property is some of the most valued in the world. According to the USTR, by stealing our intellectual property, China costs American businesses between $225 billion and $600 billion annually. We must use all tools at our disposal to ensure China respects intellectual property law. This will include working with and leveraging the power of the international community to make certain that China engages in fair trade. The U.S. government must also enlist the help and cooperation from American businesses to help solve this problem. Increased internal controls, more robust screening and standardized best practices will make it more difficult for Chinese agents to operate. Many opportunities are a matter of simple theft. More diligence will help curb crimes of opportunity. Lastly, a firm no nonsense stance against China on every front will be necessary to send a clear message that these practices won’t be tolerated. Should a trade deal with China address human rights issues? If not, will your administration address human rights in China and, if so, how? Sanders: Yes. Labor protections are very weak in China, and the rights of workers are an essential component of human rights. The Trump administration has proven itself indifferent to labor rights, and apparently would prefer that American workers are reduced to the position of Chinese workers, rather than that labor everywhere enjoy basic protections and strong standard of living. The Trump administration has also done nothing to pressure China over its abhorrent treatment of the Uighur and Tibetan peoples. Future trade negotiations should, for example, target American corporations that contribute surveillance technologies that enable China’s authoritarian practices. Swalwell: Yes, a trade deal must have a component to address human rights activity. We must be a model for the world and call out countries such as China that violate human rights. Ryan: Yes. As the United States negotiates any future trade deal with China, we must address the human rights violations. The actions we have seen from the Chinese government when it comes to the inhumane treatment of the ethnic minorities is inexcusable. And no future trade agreement can ignore these violations. Delaney: Human rights are a priority to the Delaney Administration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: tucker higgins
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Montana Gov. Steve Bullock is the latest Democrat to launch a 2020 presidential campaign

Steve Bullock, Governor of Montana, speaks at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., on Monday, May 1, 2017. Steve Bullock, who has cast himself as a bipartisan leader, announced Tuesday he is entering the crowded field of Democrats for the 2020 presidential race, vowing to “take our democracy back.” Bullock joins a field of more than 20 Democrats vying for the right to face Trump in next year’s election. The Montana Democrat is chairman of the National Govern


Steve Bullock, Governor of Montana, speaks at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., on Monday, May 1, 2017. Steve Bullock, who has cast himself as a bipartisan leader, announced Tuesday he is entering the crowded field of Democrats for the 2020 presidential race, vowing to “take our democracy back.” Bullock joins a field of more than 20 Democrats vying for the right to face Trump in next year’s election. The Montana Democrat is chairman of the National Govern
Montana Gov. Steve Bullock is the latest Democrat to launch a 2020 presidential campaign Cached Page below :
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Montana Gov. Steve Bullock is the latest Democrat to launch a 2020 presidential campaign

Steve Bullock, Governor of Montana, speaks at the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., on Monday, May 1, 2017.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, who has cast himself as a bipartisan leader, announced Tuesday he is entering the crowded field of Democrats for the 2020 presidential race, vowing to “take our democracy back.”

“I believe in an America where every child has a fair shot to do better than their parents. But we all know that kind of opportunity no longer exists for most people; for far too many, it never has,” Bullock said in his announcement. “We need to defeat Donald Trump in 2020 and defeat the corrupt system that lets campaign money drown out the people’s voice, so we can finally make good on the promise of a fair shot for everyone.”

Bullock joins a field of more than 20 Democrats vying for the right to face Trump in next year’s election. Former Vice President Joe Biden has opened large leads in a variety of polls of Democratic voters, while Sens. Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris make up the next tier.

While looking to run as a centrist, the two-term governor has worked on several progressive issues, including expanded health care and early childhood education to wage equality and campaign finance reform. He also has courted rural Americans and discussed the unique challenges they face and could broaden Democrats appeal in red states.

Bullock, 53, has already been to Iowa several times since last summer, and his Big Sky Values PAC has been adding staff in the key state. He’s also traveled to New Hampshire in the past year.

The Montana Democrat is chairman of the National Governors Association, a bipartisan group. Other governors have already entered the field of Democrats seeking the 2020 nomination, including Washington’s Jay Inslee and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: jeff daniels
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Mike Pence accuses centrist Joe Biden of ‘advocating a socialist agenda’ like other 2020 Democrats

Vice President Mike Pence told CNBC on Friday that Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden is “advocating a socialist agenda,” just like others vying to take on President Donald Trump. In an interview with CNBC’s Eamon Javers, Pence took multiple shots at his vice presidential predecessor, the frontrunner among more than 20 Democratic candidates, while contrasting their goals with Trump’s legislative agenda. The vice president touted Trump as an advocate for policies including lower taxes and


Vice President Mike Pence told CNBC on Friday that Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden is “advocating a socialist agenda,” just like others vying to take on President Donald Trump. In an interview with CNBC’s Eamon Javers, Pence took multiple shots at his vice presidential predecessor, the frontrunner among more than 20 Democratic candidates, while contrasting their goals with Trump’s legislative agenda. The vice president touted Trump as an advocate for policies including lower taxes and
Mike Pence accuses centrist Joe Biden of ‘advocating a socialist agenda’ like other 2020 Democrats Cached Page below :
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Mike Pence accuses centrist Joe Biden of 'advocating a socialist agenda' like other 2020 Democrats

Vice President Mike Pence told CNBC on Friday that Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden is “advocating a socialist agenda,” just like others vying to take on President Donald Trump.

In an interview with CNBC’s Eamon Javers, Pence took multiple shots at his vice presidential predecessor, the frontrunner among more than 20 Democratic candidates, while contrasting their goals with Trump’s legislative agenda.

“I think the choice that we face in this country today is a choice between freedom and socialism,” Pence said in the interview in his office. The vice president touted Trump as an advocate for policies including lower taxes and regulations and “better fair trade deals.”

He said Biden, along with Elizabeth Warren and self-described democratic socialist Bernie Sanders, are “advocating a socialist agenda of more government, higher taxes and the same tired policies that created the malaise of the last administration where we saw less than 2% economic growth.” The U.S. economy in fact saw annual growth near 3% at the peak of Obama’s presidency — or above 3% depending on the metric used.

Lumping Biden with some of the most progressive voices in the race under the umbrella of socialism may be intended to harden moderate Republicans against the former vice president, as well as stoke additional infighting within the Democratic field, where the candidates are jockeying to lock down different voter bases.

Biden’s campaign did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment. A spokeswoman for Pence had no additional comment beyond the vice president’s on-air remarks.

Pence’s remarks cut directly against Biden’s campaign rhetoric, in which he frames himself as a unifier and a more moderate choice among the pack of 2020 candidates. Despite Biden’s frequent attacks on Trump’s character and policies, he is poised to deliver a speech in Philadelphia in mid-May addressing how to bring the politically polarized country together.

Pence also criticized Biden for his recent comments downplaying China’s economic threat to the U.S. “China is going to eat our lunch? Come on, man,” Biden said at a campaign stop in Iowa on Wednesday.

“While we hear one of the latest candidates for president … say that China doesn’t represent a competition of the United States, you know they’re half of our international trade deficit,” Pence told CNBC. “And forced technology transfers and intellectual property theft are a reality.”

The Trump administration has been locked in what it suggests are the final stages of negotiations with China on reshaping the trade relationship between the world’s two economies. When asked about recent reports that a deal may be coming as early as next week, Pence said the “negotiations are ongoing.”

“I think President Trump remains very hopeful,” Pence added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: kevin breuninger
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‘The center of the political universe’ — Iowa is even more important than usual in the 2020 election

The president won Iowa by about 10 percentage points in 2016 after President Barack Obama carried the state twice. Iowa Soybean Association President Lindsay Greiner Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean AssociationLindsay Greiner, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, said “there’s really bean a lack of any good news.” The majority House Democrats are in no hurry to bring the deal to a vote in the chamber. With the issues facing Iowa, Democrats have looked for ways to gain an edge in 2020. “We d


The president won Iowa by about 10 percentage points in 2016 after President Barack Obama carried the state twice. Iowa Soybean Association President Lindsay Greiner Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean AssociationLindsay Greiner, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, said “there’s really bean a lack of any good news.” The majority House Democrats are in no hurry to bring the deal to a vote in the chamber. With the issues facing Iowa, Democrats have looked for ways to gain an edge in 2020. “We d
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'The center of the political universe' — Iowa is even more important than usual in the 2020 election

Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during a rally at the Fairfield Arts and Convention Center on April 06, 2019 in Fairfield, Iowa. Scott Olson | Getty Images

Democratic presidential candidates swarm. A nine-term U.S. House incumbent faces a primary challenge. Farmers watch to see whether President Donald Trump can end his trade conflicts — and ease their financial pain. That’s only the start of the intrigue in Iowa ahead of the 2020 elections. Even for a presidential campaign staging ground and White House swing state, the Hawkeye State will play a massive role next year. “Iowa is always important, but it really will be the center of the political universe for much of 2020,” said Alex Conant, a Republican strategist who worked on first-term Sen. Joni Ernst’s 2014 campaign victory. All four of the state’s House districts have a chance to change hands as Democrats try to hold a majority they won last year in part through a strong showing in Iowa. Meanwhile, Republicans may need Ernst to hold her seat to keep their Senate majority. Trump looms above it all. The president won Iowa by about 10 percentage points in 2016 after President Barack Obama carried the state twice. But frustrations have started to boil in a state heavily reliant on exports to Canada and Mexico. The president’s tariff policy and struggle to ratify updates to the North American Free Trade Agreement have created uncertainty for farms and other businesses. Of course, most of the focus on Iowa relates to its February caucuses, the first nominating contest in the Democratic presidential primary. The more than 20 candidates in the primary field have descended on the state in recent months, standing on counters, eating ice cream and serving beer as they court the state’s voters. A strong showing there can help Democrats establish an early foothold in the race to challenge Trump for the White House.

There’s more than a presidential race in Iowa

But much more will happen in Iowa to shape the battle for control of the White House and Congress in 2020. Along with states such as Pennsylvania and Michigan, Iowa voted for Trump after backing Obama twice. All of those states swung toward Democrats in last year’s midterms: in Iowa, Reps. Abby Finkenauer and Cindy Axne flipped GOP-held seats, while Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds won reelection by only about 2.5 percentage points. Iowa will play a major role in House elections again next year. Republicans have their eyes on taking back both Finkenauer’s 1st District and Axne’s 3rd District. The GOP will also target the state’s 2nd District, which despite its blue tilt has entered the 2020 battlefield due to Democratic Rep. Dave Loebsack’s retirement. Meanwhile, Republican Rep. Steve King in Iowa’s 4th District will have to fight off primary and general election challenges next year after surviving a close call in 2018. King, who has served for more than 15 years, lost party support and was stripped of committee assignments because of racist comments. His leading GOP rival for the seat is state Sen. Randy Feenstra, who easily raised more money than King in the first quarter. King’s district is “so heavily Republican that it really hasn’t been competitive for quite a while,” said Tim Hagle, an associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa. He said it has a better chance of flipping to Democratic control if King wins the nomination over one of his Republican challengers. Combined with Loebsack’s retirement and the freshman Democrats’ defense of their seats, the state has more congressional ballot intrigue than it has in years. At the statewide level, Ernst has an early advantage in the race to keep her seat. She won by nearly 10 percentage points in 2014. Democrats have struggled to find a top-tier challenger to take her on — both former Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack and Axne declined to run for Senate. Still, the factors that could make Trump’s reelection close in Iowa will also affect Ernst. Iowa sits at the center of two national issues that will test voters’ patience not only for the president but also other incumbents. Farmers damaged by lower prices caused in part by Trump’s trade war with China want to see the conflict end and hope Congress will approve the new United States Mexico Canada Agreement.

Iowa Soybean Association President Lindsay Greiner Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean Association

Lindsay Greiner, president of the Iowa Soybean Association, said “there’s really bean a lack of any good news.” The organization advocates for soybean farmers in Iowa, the largest U.S. producer of the crop. Prices have plunged since the U.S. started a tit-for-tat tariff battle with China. The Trump administration has pushed Beijing to purchase more soybeans as part of any agreement. “Politicians are dragging their feet on approving USMCA. Progress has been made on a deal with China but it’s been slow,” Greiner said, referring to the updated NAFTA, which Trump has dubbed the United States Mexico Canada Agreement. He added that politicians appear “more concerned about whether Russia meddled in an election when there’s real economic hardship going on in farm country.” Greiner grows about 800 acres of corn and 700 acres of soybeans near Keota, Iowa. He said he has looked for ways to cut costs as the revenue for his farm has dropped by about $80,000 in the last year. The prospects look grim for USMCA approval soon. The majority House Democrats are in no hurry to bring the deal to a vote in the chamber. Republicans, led by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley-R-Iowa, and Ernst, have pushed Trump to drop tariffs and steel and aluminum imports from Canada and Mexico before moving forward with the agreement. Iowa relies on America’s northern and southern neighbors. It sent $4.2 billion in goods, or about 30 percent of its exports, to Canada in 2018, according to the U.S. Trade Representative. It exported $2.3 billion in goods to Mexico. With about 18 months until the election and a Democratic nominee to be determined, it will take a while before we know whether the trade conflicts hurt Trump’s reelection. Greiner has voted for candidates from both major parties and supported both Trump and Loebsack in 2016. He said it is “too soon to tell” whether he will vote for a second term for the president. Trade has implications for Iowa’s House races, too. All four of Iowa’s congressional districts are among the 36 that have soybean plantings of more than half a million acres. Both Finkenauer and Axne criticized Trump’s tariffs on China on the way to winning their seats. While King acknowledged the damage the trade war caused to Iowa farmers, he, along with Trump, has stressed patience.

The disaster relief problem

Ryan Lincoln maneuvers his boat through flood water at the intersection of Pershing Ave and E 2nd St. Thursday, May 2, 2019. Kevin E. Schmidt | Quad City Times via AP

Farmers in western Iowa already ravaged by trade conflict took another devastating blow earlier this year. The worst flooding in years hit the state, along with Nebraska and Missouri. It put a focus not only on climate change but also the integrity of U.S. infrastructure. With the issues facing Iowa, Democrats have looked for ways to gain an edge in 2020. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., proposed appointing “trustbusters” to review and reverse “anti-competitive mergers” in the agriculture industry. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat used to campaigning in farm country, has put an emphasis on overhauling infrastructure and connecting rural Americans to the internet. Multiple Democratic candidates have toured the flooded areas of Iowa. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee — who has run primarily on a pledge to combat climate change — used the moment to accuse Trump of making natural disasters worse by failing to address a warming planet. In only the last few days, the eastern part of Iowa took a hit. Flood waters swept into Davenport, Iowa, on Tuesday temporary structures holding back a swollen Mississippi River gave way. Warren cited Davenport on Thursday in saying “climate change is here, and it’s up to us to act.” But Iowa carries its pitfalls for Democrats. The Senate has failed to pass a bill to send natural disaster relief funds to states such as Iowa, Florida, Texas and California. Democrats have pushed for a package to include more aid for hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico — spending Trump does not support. All six senators running for president as Democrats either voted not to advance, or missed the vote on, a GOP-backed bill that they said lacked enough relief money for the island commonwealth. When the vote took place last month, Grassley warned his colleagues about political backlash in Iowa. “To my colleagues across the aisle who have been spending a lot of time in Iowa lately as presidential candidates, if you vote against moving forward with the [relief money for Midwestern states], how are you going to look Iowans in the eye and justify a vote against moving this disaster relief bill ahead?” he asked at the time. Trade poses another issue for parts of the Democratic field in Iowa. Leading candidates whose trade views overlap with Trump’s — such as Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Warren — will have to defend their opposition to trade deals such as NAFTA that have shaped the Iowa economy.

“We do want to have an end in sight”

Soybean harvesting in Iowa Joseph L. Murphy | Iowa Soybean Association


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, house, democratic, democrats, state, trade, iowa, vote, important, universe, trump, usual, political, 2020, election, president, center, states


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Disney Studios Chairman Alan Horn hosting fundraiser for Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during the introduction of the Climate Action Now Act on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., March 27, 2019. Walt Disney Studios Chairman Alan Horn is hosting a fundraiser at his Los Angeles mansion for House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, CNBC has learned. In an email to CNBC, Horn confirmed details of the event that he and his wife, Cindy, are holding for Pelosi. Horn has been a longtime backer of


Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during the introduction of the Climate Action Now Act on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., March 27, 2019. Walt Disney Studios Chairman Alan Horn is hosting a fundraiser at his Los Angeles mansion for House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, CNBC has learned. In an email to CNBC, Horn confirmed details of the event that he and his wife, Cindy, are holding for Pelosi. Horn has been a longtime backer of
Disney Studios Chairman Alan Horn hosting fundraiser for Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congressional, rep, event, horn, president, studios, nancy, hosting, fundraiser, house, pelosi, democrats, dccc, committee, seats, chairman, dca, disney


Disney Studios Chairman Alan Horn hosting fundraiser for Nancy Pelosi and House Democrats

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during the introduction of the Climate Action Now Act on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., March 27, 2019.

Walt Disney Studios Chairman Alan Horn is hosting a fundraiser at his Los Angeles mansion for House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, CNBC has learned.

In an email to CNBC, Horn confirmed details of the event that he and his wife, Cindy, are holding for Pelosi.

“We are in fact hosting an event for Nancy and the DCCC at our home on May 30,” he said on Tuesday.

There are at least 12 other House Democrats attending the event, including House Intel Committee chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-CA, DCCC Chairwoman Rep. Cheri Bustos, D-IL, Rep. Gil Cisneros, D-CA, Rep. Abby Finkenauer, D-IA, Rep. Katie Hill, D-CA, Rep. Nita Lowey, D-NY, Rep.Richard Neal, D-MA, Rep. Harley Rouda, D-CA, and Rep. Lauren Underwood, D-IL, according to a senior Democratic congressional aide with direct knowledge of the matter.

Horn has been a longtime backer of the DCCC, the official campaign arm for Democrats running for seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. He donated just over $95,000 to the committee during the 2018 congressional midterm elections, according to Federal Election Commission records. During former President Barack Obama’s second term in office, Horn hosted at least one DCCC fundraising event with the then-commander in chief as the featured guest.

He was also a supporter of Hillary Clinton when she ran for the White House in 2016, helping her raise at least $100,000 and contributing $50,000 directly to her joint fundraising committee, the Hillary Victory Fund, according to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics.

Horn referred questions about how much each ticket will cost and names of other attendees to his political consultant who declined to respond to follow up requests for comment. Tickets for a prior fundraiser with Obama as the marquee guest ranged from $15,000 to $66,800 per couple.

A spokesman for the DCCC said that the event was closed to the press while a representative for Pelosi’s office did not return an email seeking comment.

A strong year of fundraising before the next congressional election in 2020 will likely prove crucial for House Democrats if they want to successfully defend their majority.

In 2018, the party flipped at least 40 seats and pulled off enough victories to retake control of the House.

The nonpartisan Cook Political Report, however, shows that in 2020, 31 Democrats are up for re-election are in districts carried by President Donald Trump when he first ran for president three years ago. It marks 17 Democrat-held seats as toss-ups, which includes districts in New York, Iowa, Virginia and South Carolina.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, congressional, rep, event, horn, president, studios, nancy, hosting, fundraiser, house, pelosi, democrats, dccc, committee, seats, chairman, dca, disney


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Trump and Democrats agreed $2 trillion is needed for infrastructure, Chuck Schumer says

President Donald Trump and leading Democratic lawmakers agreed that a plan to overhaul U.S. infrastructure would need $2 trillion, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Tuesday. At a previous meeting between Schumer, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Trump in December, the leaders openly clashed on camera over the president’s proposed border wall. The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment on Schumer’s remarks. Pelosi told reporters that Trump agreed on t


President Donald Trump and leading Democratic lawmakers agreed that a plan to overhaul U.S. infrastructure would need $2 trillion, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Tuesday. At a previous meeting between Schumer, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Trump in December, the leaders openly clashed on camera over the president’s proposed border wall. The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment on Schumer’s remarks. Pelosi told reporters that Trump agreed on t
Trump and Democrats agreed $2 trillion is needed for infrastructure, Chuck Schumer says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schumer, plan, senate, white, needed, house, trump, chuck, meeting, democrats, agreed, pelosi, trillion, infrastructure


Trump and Democrats agreed $2 trillion is needed for infrastructure, Chuck Schumer says

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (L) and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) lead fellow Congressional Democrats out of the White House following a meeting with President Donald Trump at the White House April 30, 2019 in Washington, DC.

Rebuilding the country’s aging infrastructure is one of the few bipartisan issues in American politics. Democrats and Republicans alike have stressed the importance of repairing and modernizing U.S. transportation, broadband, and water and power projects, and both parties have submitted separate funding proposals to achieve those goals.

“We agreed on a number, which was very, very good,” Schumer said.

President Donald Trump and leading Democratic lawmakers agreed that a plan to overhaul U.S. infrastructure would need $2 trillion, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Tuesday.

Yet the issue has languished on Capitol Hill — and the Trump administration’s repeated attempts to refocus lawmakers through the label of “infrastructure week” have become a running joke in Congress.

Schumer said “there was good will in this meeting” between the White House and Democrats — a tone that was “different than some of the other meetings we’ve had,” he added.

At a previous meeting between Schumer, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Trump in December, the leaders openly clashed on camera over the president’s proposed border wall. Trump said at that meeting that he would be “proud” to shut down the government in pursuit of funding to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. The government partially shut down less than two weeks later, and stayed that way for 35 days — the longest such closure in U.S. history.

Schumer told reporters after the meeting Tuesday morning that there was no inherent conflict in working with Trump to pass an infrastructure plan while, at the same time, Democrats in the House and Senate push forward in multiple investigations centered around Trump, his finances and his associates. “The two are not mutually exclusive and we were glad we didn’t make it that way,” Schumer said.

The meeting was held off camera. The White House did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment on Schumer’s remarks.

Speaking outside the White House just after the meeting, the Democratic leaders also said that the two sides found common ground on some of the priorities that an infrastructure plan should address. Pelosi told reporters that Trump agreed on the importance of broadband infrastructure, a signal that a broader, more modern definition of infrastructure will be the basis for further discussions.

Schumer said that another meeting will take place in three weeks.

Ahead of the meeting, a coalition of multiple groups of Democrats in the House unveiled an infrastructure road map stating that the majority of funding for any bill should come from the federal government.

Trump’s latest plan prior to Tuesday’s meeting, however, aimed to use $200 billion in federal funds to spur a total of $1 trillion in spending from state and local governments, as well as private partners.

Despite their differences, Pelosi, Schumer and a raft of Democratic lawmakers met with Trump and members of his team at the White House Tuesday morning to discuss infrastructure.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, schumer, plan, senate, white, needed, house, trump, chuck, meeting, democrats, agreed, pelosi, trillion, infrastructure


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Koch network slams $2 trillion infrastructure cost agreement between Trump and top Democrats

The libertarian political network funded by billionaire Charles Koch on Tuesday is not happy with the $2 trillion infrastructure price tag agreed upon by President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer, the top Democrat in the Senate. In a statement first given to CNBC, Americans for Prosperity, one of the key groups in the influential Koch network, ripped the idea of spending that much on infrastructure and instead urged leaders to focus on cutting regulations. “If Congress


The libertarian political network funded by billionaire Charles Koch on Tuesday is not happy with the $2 trillion infrastructure price tag agreed upon by President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer, the top Democrat in the Senate. In a statement first given to CNBC, Americans for Prosperity, one of the key groups in the influential Koch network, ripped the idea of spending that much on infrastructure and instead urged leaders to focus on cutting regulations. “If Congress
Koch network slams $2 trillion infrastructure cost agreement between Trump and top Democrats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, washington, wants, slams, trump, wasting, instead, cost, agreement, urged, democrats, infrastructure, network, trillion, koch


Koch network slams $2 trillion infrastructure cost agreement between Trump and top Democrats

The libertarian political network funded by billionaire Charles Koch on Tuesday is not happy with the $2 trillion infrastructure price tag agreed upon by President Donald Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer, the top Democrat in the Senate.

In a statement first given to CNBC, Americans for Prosperity, one of the key groups in the influential Koch network, ripped the idea of spending that much on infrastructure and instead urged leaders to focus on cutting regulations.

“If Congress wants to find money to modernize our roads and bridges, we encourage them to look to their own pockets – Americans have been filling them up for years,” Americans for Prosperity’s head of government affairs Brent Gardner said. “Instead of proposing a $2 trillion catch-all ‘infrastructure’ bill and asking hard-working Americans to fund it by paying more at the pump, Washington lawmakers should cut the red tape and stop wasting the tax dollars we give them.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: brian schwartz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, americans, washington, wants, slams, trump, wasting, instead, cost, agreement, urged, democrats, infrastructure, network, trillion, koch


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Democrats aim to roll back Mulvaney’s ‘anti-consumer’ measures at nation’s watchdog agency

The letter from Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Maryland, said the measure is one of many that the House may vote on next month. Kathy Kraninger, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) nominee for U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks during a Senate Banking Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., July 19, 2018. “I think it’s just an opportunity for Democrats to vent about their unhappiness over Mulvaney having been acting director.” After the bureau’s formation, Re


The letter from Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Maryland, said the measure is one of many that the House may vote on next month. Kathy Kraninger, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) nominee for U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks during a Senate Banking Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., July 19, 2018. “I think it’s just an opportunity for Democrats to vent about their unhappiness over Mulvaney having been acting director.” After the bureau’s formation, Re
Democrats aim to roll back Mulvaney’s ‘anti-consumer’ measures at nation’s watchdog agency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roll, measures, director, financial, bureau, mulvaney, cfpb, services, agency, house, aim, kaplinsky, democrats, trump, watchdog, nations, anticonsumer, mulvaneys, consumer


Democrats aim to roll back Mulvaney's 'anti-consumer' measures at nation's watchdog agency

A bill that would reverse some controversial moves made at the nation’s consumer watchdog could get a floor vote in the House in May, according to a letter that Democratic lawmakers received from their leadership late last week. The Consumers First Act, which was approved 34-26 by the House Financial Services Committee in late March, would require the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to “promptly reverse all anti-consumer actions” made under its previous acting director, Mick Mulvaney, who is now President Trump’s acting chief of staff. The letter from Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Maryland, said the measure is one of many that the House may vote on next month. Among other provisions, the legislation would require the bureau’s consumer complaint database to remain public, eliminate the director’s ability to limit the legal reach of its fair lending office and establish an Office of Students and Young Consumers to focus on financial education in that population.

Kathy Kraninger, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) nominee for U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks during a Senate Banking Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., July 19, 2018. Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images

While the bill — sponsored by Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, D-California — might get approved in the Democratic-controlled House, it would likely face an uphill battle in the Republican-dominated Senate. “I don’t see this going anywhere,” said Alan Kaplinsky, a partner at the national law firm Ballard Spahr and an expert on the CFPB. “I think it’s just an opportunity for Democrats to vent about their unhappiness over Mulvaney having been acting director.” Now under the direction of Trump appointee Kathy Kraninger, who replaced Mulvaney in December, the CFPB has been a point of political contention since its creation was legislated by the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010.

After the bureau’s formation, Republicans and the financial services industry decried what they considered overzealous regulatory overreach by its Obama-appointed director, Richard Cordray. Then Democratic lawmakers and consumer advocates cried foul when Mulvaney, who was named by Trump to replace Cordray in late 2017, pulled back enforcement and began reviewing existing policies and pending regulations. Kraninger recently indicated that the bureau is still exploring whether its public consumer complaint database should be private, along with reviewing how it measures whether a company is using discriminatory lending practices, according to published reports. Among other controversial moves, the agency also is still reviewing the so-called payday lending rule, which would require lenders to confirm the borrower’s ability to repay the debt. The CFPB did not respond to an inquiry from CNBC. Meanwhile, three cases in different federal circuit courts challenge the constitutionality of the bureau, at least partly on the grounds that its single-director structure puts too much power in the hands of the president. More from Personal Finance:

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Adult children eat into parents’ retirement savings: Study “One or more of the cases likely will end up in the Supreme Court, probably within the next year,” Kaplinsky said. If the bureau were ruled unconstitutional by the high court, the question would be how to fix that defect, Kaplinsky said. One solution that would help remove the politicization of the bureau would be to replace a solo director with a five-member commission, he said. It’s an idea that’s been bandied about but has yet to take hold with lawmakers. “The FCC [Federal Communications Commission] has a five-member commission,” Kaplinsky said. “Republicans have three of the spots and Democrats have two.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-30  Authors: sarah obrien
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, roll, measures, director, financial, bureau, mulvaney, cfpb, services, agency, house, aim, kaplinsky, democrats, trump, watchdog, nations, anticonsumer, mulvaneys, consumer


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Trump: ‘We’re fighting all the subpoenas’ from House Democrats

President Donald Trump vowed Wednesday to battle every subpoena lodged by House Democrats. “We’re fighting all the subpoenas,” Trump told reporters outside the White House, en route to an event in Georgia on the opioid crisis. In recent months, House Democratic leaders have issued dozens of requests for information or cooperation from Trump, his administration and his associates. The subpoena for McGahn, issued by House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is “ridiculous,” Trump said outsi


President Donald Trump vowed Wednesday to battle every subpoena lodged by House Democrats. “We’re fighting all the subpoenas,” Trump told reporters outside the White House, en route to an event in Georgia on the opioid crisis. In recent months, House Democratic leaders have issued dozens of requests for information or cooperation from Trump, his administration and his associates. The subpoena for McGahn, issued by House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is “ridiculous,” Trump said outsi
Trump: ‘We’re fighting all the subpoenas’ from House Democrats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: kevin breuninger, christina wilkie, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, trumps, white, house, fighting, subpoena, democrats, subpoenas, told, law, chairman, report, mcgahn


Trump: 'We're fighting all the subpoenas' from House Democrats

President Donald Trump vowed Wednesday to battle every subpoena lodged by House Democrats.

“We’re fighting all the subpoenas,” Trump told reporters outside the White House, en route to an event in Georgia on the opioid crisis.

In recent months, House Democratic leaders have issued dozens of requests for information or cooperation from Trump, his administration and his associates.

Democrats are demanding testimony from high-ranking current and former White House officials, as well as years of Trump’s financial records and the unredacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian meddling in the 2016 election..

Caught at the center of the crossfire is former White House counsel Don McGahn, who was cited by Mueller more than any other Trump official in the special counsel’s 448-page report that also investigated possible Trump-campaign coordination with the Kremlin and obstruction of justice by Trump himself.

On Tuesday, Trump told The Washington Post that he did not see any reason to “go any further” in allowing his aides to testify before congressional committees, “especially in Congress where it’s very partisan — obviously very partisan.”

Trump has already backed up his rhetoric with action: On Monday, the president sued House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., and the president’s former accounting firm Mazars to block a subpoena seeking years of financial information from Trump and his businesses.

Several legal scholars have since noted that the lawsuit against the accounting firm is a long shot and appears to be more of a delay tactic than anything else. In their justification for why the courts should block the release of the president’s taxes, Trump’s lawyers cite case law from an 1880 ruling as their precedent. In 1927, that precedent was replaced with a much broader reading of congressional powers, which has set the legal standard ever since, although Trump’s lawyers do not mention this.

“They’re seeking … to overturn the entire modern case law that the courts have put together to respect Congress’ investigative power,” University of Baltimore law professor Charles Tiefer told The Washington Post. “These suits look like an act of desperation by the Trump lawyers.”

The subpoena for McGahn, issued by House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is “ridiculous,” Trump said outside the White House on Wednesday.

The Russia report — released with redactions Thursday — found insufficient evidence to prove that Trump’s 2016 campaign coordinated with the Kremlin. Attorney General William Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein further determined that the report did not show that Trump committed an obstruction of justice offense.

Senior White House advisor Kellyanne Conway said earlier Wednesday that an option to assert executive privilege to keep McGahn from testifying “is on the table.”

Nadler has already rejected that move, however. “The moment for the White House to assert some privilege to prevent this testimony from being heard has long since passed,” the committee chairman said in a statement Tuesday evening.

Trump spoke to the press en route to Atlanta, where he and first lady Melania Trump are scheduled to headline an event on the opioid crisis Wednesday afternoon.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-24  Authors: kevin breuninger, christina wilkie, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, trumps, white, house, fighting, subpoena, democrats, subpoenas, told, law, chairman, report, mcgahn


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