Amazon, Walmart in online grocery pilot in NY involving food stamps

Food stamp recipients will be able to use online delivery services such as Amazon and Walmart to buy groceries under a two-year pilot program that just launched in New York state. The pilot program could benefit recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program who may have trouble getting fresh food from brick-and-mortar stores. About 20% of SNAP participants are either elderly or disabled and face challenges getting healthy food from grocery stores, according to the U.S. Department o


Food stamp recipients will be able to use online delivery services such as Amazon and Walmart to buy groceries under a two-year pilot program that just launched in New York state. The pilot program could benefit recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program who may have trouble getting fresh food from brick-and-mortar stores. About 20% of SNAP participants are either elderly or disabled and face challenges getting healthy food from grocery stores, according to the U.S. Department o
Amazon, Walmart in online grocery pilot in NY involving food stamps Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: jeff daniels, andrew harrer, bloomberg, jerry cleveland, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, stamps, online, pilot, walmart, orders, pay, ny, delivery, involving, snap, stamp, recipients, grocery, program, amazon


Amazon, Walmart in online grocery pilot in NY involving food stamps

Food stamp recipients will be able to use online delivery services such as Amazon and Walmart to buy groceries under a two-year pilot program that just launched in New York state.

The program will be expanded to include a handful of other states. It could give Amazon a bigger shot at a lucrative $65 billion market now dominated by supermarkets and superstores such as Walmart.

The pilot program could benefit recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program who may have trouble getting fresh food from brick-and-mortar stores. About 20% of SNAP participants are either elderly or disabled and face challenges getting healthy food from grocery stores, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which administers the food stamp program.

“People who receive SNAP benefits should have the opportunity to shop for food the same way more and more Americans shop for food — by ordering and paying for groceries online,” said USDA Secretary Sonny Perdue. “As technology advances, it is important for SNAP to advance, too, so we can ensure the same shopping options are available for both non-SNAP and SNAP recipients.”

The government’s pilot program will focus initially on the Empire State, before expanding to Alabama, Iowa, Maryland, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oregon and Washington in coming years, according to USDA.

Overall, SNAP received more than $65 billion in government funding last year and helped some 40 million people. In New York state alone, nearly 3 million people participate in the program, or about 13% of the state’s total population, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Participants in the pilot program won’t be allowed to use their food stamp benefits to pay for service or delivery fees.

Amazon is allowing SNAP participants to obtain free delivery on AmazonFresh orders on purchases $50 or more or to place smaller orders and pay under $10 for shipping. Also, to get free delivery on Prime Pantry orders, the online giant requires purchases of $35 or more or the option of $5.99 shipping for smaller orders.

Regardless, food stamp recipients won’t need to pay for a Prime membership to use their benefits on Amazon as part of the pilot.

“As we expand participating areas throughout the life of the pilot, Amazon believes the program will dramatically increase access to food for more remote customers and help to mitigate the public health crisis of food deserts,” Kristina Herrmann, an Amazon director in charge of the company’s participation in the USDA pilot, wrote in a blog last week.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: jeff daniels, andrew harrer, bloomberg, jerry cleveland, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, stamps, online, pilot, walmart, orders, pay, ny, delivery, involving, snap, stamp, recipients, grocery, program, amazon


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Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions


But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice. In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions
Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


Amazon is trying to soften its image as regulatory scrutiny of Big Tech grows

Amazon’s relentless pursuit of growth in retail, cloud computing, advertising and consumer devices has put the company squarely in the sights of Washington lawmakers who are concerned about Big Tech’s growing influence over consumers. But rather than fiercely fighting every battle, Amazon looks like its ready to play nice.

In March, Amazon dropped a policy that prevented merchants from offering lower prices on other websites following an investigation request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). Last month, the company scaled back some of its most aggressive promotion tactics after Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) called out abusive business practices. And late last year Amazon raised its minimum wage to $15 following criticism of the company’s working conditions by Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT).

Amazon also confirmed to CNBC that it would soon start accepting cash at the Amazon Go cashierless stores as a growing number of cities and states push for laws that require all stores to serve the unbanked. It’s all part of a strategy to be more likable at a time when tech companies are drawing heat for behavior that looks increasingly anti-competitive.

“I believe Amazon has made the connection between likability and immunity from regulation,” said NYU business professor Scott Galloway, author of “The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google.”

This is a different company from the vigorously defensive, win-at-all-cost Amazon we’re used to seeing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eugene kim, brent lewis, denver post, getty images, david ryder
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, big, growing, tech, soften, sen, stores, scrutiny, amazon, trying, business, winatallcost, regulatory, image, following, working, looks, grows, company


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Trump loves coal, hates climate action but investors are fighting back

President Donald Trump loves climate-wrecking coal and hates the climate-saving Paris Agreement. Meanwhile, forward-looking impact investors hate the problems of burning coal and its financial downside – and love portfolios of companies and funds pursuing climate solutions, which can have stronger returns. This love-hate split has motivated investors – and eco-focused ESG investment funds — seeking to save the planet from Trump’s policies. That same month, the Etho Climate Leadership Index US la


President Donald Trump loves climate-wrecking coal and hates the climate-saving Paris Agreement. Meanwhile, forward-looking impact investors hate the problems of burning coal and its financial downside – and love portfolios of companies and funds pursuing climate solutions, which can have stronger returns. This love-hate split has motivated investors – and eco-focused ESG investment funds — seeking to save the planet from Trump’s policies. That same month, the Etho Climate Leadership Index US la
Trump loves coal, hates climate action but investors are fighting back Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-06  Authors: r paul herman, ceo, founder of hip investor, dominick reuter, afp, getty images, pauline askin, craig f walker, denver post, carsten koall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, investors, impact, coal, companies, action, etho, climate, funds, etf, loves, fighting, esg, investing, hates


Trump loves coal, hates climate action but investors are fighting back

President Donald Trump loves climate-wrecking coal and hates the climate-saving Paris Agreement.

Meanwhile, forward-looking impact investors hate the problems of burning coal and its financial downside – and love portfolios of companies and funds pursuing climate solutions, which can have stronger returns.

This love-hate split has motivated investors – and eco-focused ESG investment funds — seeking to save the planet from Trump’s policies. (Note: ESG stands for “environmental, social and governance.”)

In fact, $12 trillion — or $1 in every $4 of assets professionally managed in the U.S. — is invested in portfolios seeking to be sustainable, responsible and impactful. This is up 38 percent since 2016 and up 18 times since 1995, and it includes more than 180 mutual funds and dozens of exchange-traded funds, according to the US SIF Foundation, the socially responsible investing industry trade association.

More from Impact Investing:

From ESG to SRI, decoding impact investing lingo

Why investors like Bezos and Gates pour money into clean tech

What Warren Buffett thinks about climate change

While Trump seems to hate science, investors are loving physics genius Isaac Newton’s third law of motion: “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.”

Trump’s August 2018 “affordable clean energy” rule seeks to transfer pollution-control laws to the states, likely to result in more polluted air and rivers. But savvy fossil-fuel-free-focused investors are trumping this by avoiding the 18 percent drop in coal stocks (Van Eck KOL ETF) since then, compared to the S&P 500’s flat performance over the eight months from July 28, 2018, to March 27, 2019.

Trump announced in July 2017 the intent to withdraw from the Paris Agreement, which was signed by 195 countries in November 2015. That same month, the Etho Climate Leadership Index US launched its ETF, investing in a diversified mix of 400 equities with lower emissions and carbon footprints — and no fossil-fuel producers.

Since that Etho launch on Nov. 19, 2015, it has cumulatively returned 44 percent, while the S&P500 SPY ETF has returned 34 percent. Etho founder Ian Monroe said: “The most efficient and sustainable companies are simply making investors more money” by reducing energy, water, waste and emissions. Companies that don’t can be much riskier.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-06  Authors: r paul herman, ceo, founder of hip investor, dominick reuter, afp, getty images, pauline askin, craig f walker, denver post, carsten koall
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, investors, impact, coal, companies, action, etho, climate, funds, etf, loves, fighting, esg, investing, hates


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Amazon changed how it reports its retail footprint — and now it’s not as clear

But in not including stores under development, Amazon is removing some level of transparency into how quickly it’s building up new space for physical stores. Amazon also launched three new 4-star stores, which sell an assortment of products with at least a 4-star rating on Amazon. Amazon is expected to double down on physical store growth this year. Amazon’s physical store footprint isn’t the only number that dropped due to an accounting change last year. Adjusting for those changes, physical st


But in not including stores under development, Amazon is removing some level of transparency into how quickly it’s building up new space for physical stores. Amazon also launched three new 4-star stores, which sell an assortment of products with at least a 4-star rating on Amazon. Amazon is expected to double down on physical store growth this year. Amazon’s physical store footprint isn’t the only number that dropped due to an accounting change last year. Adjusting for those changes, physical st
Amazon changed how it reports its retail footprint — and now it’s not as clear Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: eugene kim, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images, john leyba, denver post
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, revenue, physical, number, clear, footprint, foods, reported, retail, changed, store, reports, company, stores


Amazon changed how it reports its retail footprint — and now it's not as clear

But in not including stores under development, Amazon is removing some level of transparency into how quickly it’s building up new space for physical stores. Whole Foods announced at least 25 new location openings last year, while the number of Go stores increased to 10 across Seattle, Chicago and San Francisco. Amazon also launched three new 4-star stores, which sell an assortment of products with at least a 4-star rating on Amazon.

Amazon is expected to double down on physical store growth this year. It’s planning an expansion for Whole Foods stores, primarily targeting suburbs and more rural areas like Idaho and Wyoming, the Wall Street Journal reported in December. And Bloomberg reported in September that the company is considering opening up to 3,000 Amazon Go stores by 2021.

Amazon’s physical store footprint isn’t the only number that dropped due to an accounting change last year.

The company said during its fourth-quarter earnings call that a 3 percent decline in physical store revenue was largely caused by a change in how it accounted for calendar days following the Whole Foods acquisition, and a shift in delivery and pick-up orders to the online sales component of revenue. Adjusting for those changes, physical store revenue would have grown 6 percent, Amazon said.

WATCH: Amazon is expanding Go footprint after one year in business


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: eugene kim, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images, john leyba, denver post
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, revenue, physical, number, clear, footprint, foods, reported, retail, changed, store, reports, company, stores


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Amazon changed how it reports its retail footprint — and now it’s not as clear

But in not including stores under development, Amazon is removing some level of transparency into how quickly it’s building up new space for physical stores. Amazon also launched three new 4-star stores, which sell an assortment of products with at least a 4-star rating on Amazon. Amazon is expected to double down on physical store growth this year. Amazon’s physical store footprint isn’t the only number that dropped due to an accounting change last year. Adjusting for those changes, physical st


But in not including stores under development, Amazon is removing some level of transparency into how quickly it’s building up new space for physical stores. Amazon also launched three new 4-star stores, which sell an assortment of products with at least a 4-star rating on Amazon. Amazon is expected to double down on physical store growth this year. Amazon’s physical store footprint isn’t the only number that dropped due to an accounting change last year. Adjusting for those changes, physical st
Amazon changed how it reports its retail footprint — and now it’s not as clear Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: eugene kim, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images, john leyba, denver post
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, revenue, physical, number, clear, footprint, foods, reported, retail, changed, store, reports, company, stores


Amazon changed how it reports its retail footprint — and now it's not as clear

But in not including stores under development, Amazon is removing some level of transparency into how quickly it’s building up new space for physical stores. Whole Foods announced at least 25 new location openings last year, while the number of Go stores increased to 10 across Seattle, Chicago and San Francisco. Amazon also launched three new 4-star stores, which sell an assortment of products with at least a 4-star rating on Amazon.

Amazon is expected to double down on physical store growth this year. It’s planning an expansion for Whole Foods stores, primarily targeting suburbs and more rural areas like Idaho and Wyoming, the Wall Street Journal reported in December. And Bloomberg reported in September that the company is considering opening up to 3,000 Amazon Go stores by 2021.

Amazon’s physical store footprint isn’t the only number that dropped due to an accounting change last year.

The company said during its fourth-quarter earnings call that a 3 percent decline in physical store revenue was largely caused by a change in how it accounted for calendar days following the Whole Foods acquisition, and a shift in delivery and pick-up orders to the online sales component of revenue. Adjusting for those changes, physical store revenue would have grown 6 percent, Amazon said.

WATCH: Amazon is expanding Go footprint after one year in business


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-19  Authors: eugene kim, david ryder, bloomberg, getty images, john leyba, denver post
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, revenue, physical, number, clear, footprint, foods, reported, retail, changed, store, reports, company, stores


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Instacart will stop skimming tips from delivery workers

On-demand delivery company Instacart announced on Wednesday that it plans to overhaul the way it pays its contracted workforce to ensure that tips do not subsidize its workers’ pay. Under the new payment structure announced on Wednesday, Instacart will separate tips from the company’s compensation to drivers and pay drivers for the tips Instacart absorbed dating back to October 2018, when the previous payment system was rolled out. The batch payment are generally higher if they have to carry fiv


On-demand delivery company Instacart announced on Wednesday that it plans to overhaul the way it pays its contracted workforce to ensure that tips do not subsidize its workers’ pay. Under the new payment structure announced on Wednesday, Instacart will separate tips from the company’s compensation to drivers and pay drivers for the tips Instacart absorbed dating back to October 2018, when the previous payment system was rolled out. The batch payment are generally higher if they have to carry fiv
Instacart will stop skimming tips from delivery workers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: olivia solon, cyrus mccrimmon, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skimming, batch, company, instacart, payment, workers, paid, pay, mehta, delivery, stop, tips, drivers


Instacart will stop skimming tips from delivery workers

On-demand delivery company Instacart announced on Wednesday that it plans to overhaul the way it pays its contracted workforce to ensure that tips do not subsidize its workers’ pay.

On Monday, NBC News reported that Instacart and other delivery companies including Doordash were using customer tips to subsidize the fees the company paid to drivers — a practice that consumer protection groups criticized as deceptive to consumers and unfair to workers.

Under the new payment structure announced on Wednesday, Instacart will separate tips from the company’s compensation to drivers and pay drivers for the tips Instacart absorbed dating back to October 2018, when the previous payment system was rolled out.

In a blog post addressed to the company’s contracted workforce on Wednesday, Instacart founder and CEO Apoorva Mehta described drivers, referred to by the company as “shoppers”, as “household heroes for millions of families across North America”.

“This past week, however, it’s become clear that we’ve fallen short in delivering our promise to you,” Mehta said.

For every job, Instacart calculates a “batch payment,” which varies according to the type and number of items the contracted worker had to pick from the shelves and deliver. The batch payment are generally higher if they have to carry five-gallon bottles of water versus a small bag of fresh produce, for example.

Under the old model, If the batch payment was under $10, Instacart would make up the difference to ensure that drivers were paid a minimum of $10 per delivery. So if the batch payment was $6, Instacart would add $4. However, if the customer tipped the driver, Instacart would reduce its contribution. For example if the customer tipped $3, Instacart would only pay $1 to reach the guaranteed payment.

“While our intention was to increase the guaranteed payment for small orders, we understand that the inclusion of tips as a part of this guarantee was misguided,” Mehta said. “We apologize for taking this approach.”

Under the new model, which will be rolled out “in the coming days,” Instacart will contact all drivers who lost out on tips on jobs below the $10 threshold. If a driver was paid $7 by Instacart, he or she will receive an additional $3 from the company in back pay. A source close to the company who was not authorized to speak publicly said the move would cost the company millions of dollars.

Instacart said it will also raise the minimum batch payment from $3 to $5 for smaller delivery-only jobs and between $7 and $10 for jobs where the driver also picks and packs the orders.

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Watch: Aldi expanding Instacart delivery to 35 states


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: olivia solon, cyrus mccrimmon, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, skimming, batch, company, instacart, payment, workers, paid, pay, mehta, delivery, stop, tips, drivers


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USDA: Food stamp benefits guaranteed through February despite shutdown

Millions of Americans who depend on food stamps will receive benefits to buy food through February despite the ongoing partial government shutdown, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Tuesday. Other nutrition assistance programs including school meals and the Women, Infants and Children program will continue through March, according to the release. “Our motto here at USDA has been to ‘Do Right and Feed Everyone,'” Perdue said in a release. The program has just $3 billion in a contingency fun


Millions of Americans who depend on food stamps will receive benefits to buy food through February despite the ongoing partial government shutdown, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Tuesday. Other nutrition assistance programs including school meals and the Women, Infants and Children program will continue through March, according to the release. “Our motto here at USDA has been to ‘Do Right and Feed Everyone,'” Perdue said in a release. The program has just $3 billion in a contingency fun
USDA: Food stamp benefits guaranteed through February despite shutdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-09  Authors: marilyn haigh, helen h richardson, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, usda, stamp, weve, funding, right, snap, despite, benefits, guaranteed, resolution, program, shutdown, assistance


USDA: Food stamp benefits guaranteed through February despite shutdown

Millions of Americans who depend on food stamps will receive benefits to buy food through February despite the ongoing partial government shutdown, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Tuesday.

Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue said the USDA will take advantage of temporary funding to cover the cost of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, for the month of February, estimated at $4.8 billion for the approximately 38 million recipients, according to a USDA news release.

The USDA is asking states to issue February’s benefits earlier than usual on Jan. 20 to take advantage of a 2018 continuing resolution that kept the government funded temporarily as Congress tried and failed to pass an appropriations bill for fiscal 2019. The CR expired Dec. 21, 2018 but allows the government to make payments for 30 days after it expires. SNAP is fully funded for January.

Other nutrition assistance programs including school meals and the Women, Infants and Children program will continue through March, according to the release.

“Our motto here at USDA has been to ‘Do Right and Feed Everyone,'” Perdue said in a release. “With this solution, we’ve got the ‘Feed Everyone’ part handled. And I believe that the plan we’ve constructed takes care of the ‘Do Right’ part as well.”

SNAP became a point of contention for lawmakers as Congress struggled to reach a funding agreement. The program has just $3 billion in a contingency fund, prompting fears that food assistance to the most vulnerable Americans would run out as a result of the shutdown.

SNAP funding for March is uncertain as the shutdown enters its 19th day with no resolution in sight.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-09  Authors: marilyn haigh, helen h richardson, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, food, usda, stamp, weve, funding, right, snap, despite, benefits, guaranteed, resolution, program, shutdown, assistance


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How to keep recycling from turning into ‘wishcycling’

Truth is we were sending them junky loads, we got very comfortable with sending them loads that were not pure recyclables,” Harrison said. Over the last four years, the Recycling Partnership says it has reached 47 million households in 961 communities to “increase access to recycling, increase capture of and quality of recyclables, decreasing contamination.” But since thin plastic bags can gum up processing machines, “that’s a challenge for MRFs (Materials Recycling Facilities),” Harrison told C


Truth is we were sending them junky loads, we got very comfortable with sending them loads that were not pure recyclables,” Harrison said. Over the last four years, the Recycling Partnership says it has reached 47 million households in 961 communities to “increase access to recycling, increase capture of and quality of recyclables, decreasing contamination.” But since thin plastic bags can gum up processing machines, “that’s a challenge for MRFs (Materials Recycling Facilities),” Harrison told C
How to keep recycling from turning into ‘wishcycling’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: trent gillies, aaron ontiveroz, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, know, help, money, harrison, china, local, recyclables, recycling, thats, turning, wishcycling


How to keep recycling from turning into 'wishcycling'

The Recycling Partnership has more than 40 funding partners, including some of the largest global companies such as Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Keurig Dr. Pepper, Target, Proctor & Gamble, ExxonMobil, Amazon, International Paper and Starbucks.

“Part of the reason why our organization was founded was to accept donations from companies to put to work in local government to build long standing solutions, because we know it’s a big challenge for them to handle on their own,” the CEO told CNBC.

In 2016, China was the destination for two-thirds of the world’s plastic waste. But last year the country stopped buying recycled materials, because so much that arrived was contaminated.

“It’s important to know why China stopped buying our stuff. Truth is we were sending them junky loads, we got very comfortable with sending them loads that were not pure recyclables,” Harrison said.

“And now that we’re shifting our markets to the domestic market, we are cleaning them up and that takes money,” she said.

Harrison added: “Municipalities have never made serious money off of recyclables. They might have gotten some money back to offset the cost of collection, but this has been a cost for communities for years and they do it as a public service just like they supply clean water, good roads. This is part of what makes a healthy town.”

U.S. trash haulers and cities can’t make money selling recyclables, suggesting the system might be broken. Harrison said it still works, but is in need of modernization.

“This is a shift of the entire industry, but it’s not an indicator that the system is broken,” she said. “It’s that it needs help to be healthy and robust for years to come.”

Over the last four years, the Recycling Partnership says it has reached 47 million households in 961 communities to “increase access to recycling, increase capture of and quality of recyclables, decreasing contamination.”

Harrison said one of the biggest things people can do to recycle better is “make sure that none of it is bagged. That’s one of the most common things we see from consumers. They want to keep it nice and clean and tidy so they put recyclables in a bag and drop the entire bag into the recycling bin.”

But since thin plastic bags can gum up processing machines, “that’s a challenge for MRFs (Materials Recycling Facilities),” Harrison told CNBC. And since China is no longer buying U.S. recycling, Harrison acknowledged the model needs to change.

“I think there will be a change, (and) haulers, MRFs, processors, all these companies need to be profitable. This is not a goodwill exercise for them.”

Harrison said the U.S. recycling model is “different than in other countries, it’s at the expense of the local government to make (it) happen.”

“20,000 local governments are each making their own decisions on how to handle recycling,” Harrison explained. “They don’t always know where to start, that’s why they look to us as a national nonprofit to bring them expertise, financial help and really tools that can help bridge this gap that we’re currently facing in recycling.”

On the Money airs on CNBC Saturday at 5:30 am ET, or check listings for air times in local markets.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-16  Authors: trent gillies, aaron ontiveroz, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, companies, know, help, money, harrison, china, local, recyclables, recycling, thats, turning, wishcycling


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Oil drilling stocks surge after Colorado voters reject restrictions on industry

Oil and gas companies with operations in Colorado are seeing their shares jump after voters rejected a ballot proposal that would have placed tough restrictions on drilling in the Centennial State. Colorado’s proposition 112 would have prohibited energy companies from drilling within about half a mile from homes, schools, businesses and water sources. Shares of PDC Energy, another Wattenberg player, were up nearly 8 percent shortly after the opening bell on Wednesday. While Colorado voters rejec


Oil and gas companies with operations in Colorado are seeing their shares jump after voters rejected a ballot proposal that would have placed tough restrictions on drilling in the Centennial State. Colorado’s proposition 112 would have prohibited energy companies from drilling within about half a mile from homes, schools, businesses and water sources. Shares of PDC Energy, another Wattenberg player, were up nearly 8 percent shortly after the opening bell on Wednesday. While Colorado voters rejec
Oil drilling stocks surge after Colorado voters reject restrictions on industry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: tom dichristopher, helen h richardson, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voters, energy, colorado, sources, gas, drilling, oil, surge, industry, reject, shares, polis, wattenberg, rejected, stocks, restrictions


Oil drilling stocks surge after Colorado voters reject restrictions on industry

Oil and gas companies with operations in Colorado are seeing their shares jump after voters rejected a ballot proposal that would have placed tough restrictions on drilling in the Centennial State.

Colorado’s proposition 112 would have prohibited energy companies from drilling within about half a mile from homes, schools, businesses and water sources. The measure would have cut the state’s projected oil and gas output roughly in half by 2023, according to an estimate by S&P Global Platts Analytics.

Shares of Bonanza Creek Energy and Extraction Oil and Gas, two drillers that produce solely from Colorado’s Wattenberg Field, surged about 9.5 percent and 13.5 percent, respectively. Shares of PDC Energy, another Wattenberg player, were up nearly 8 percent shortly after the opening bell on Wednesday.

Shares of more diversified drillers with a footprint in Colorado were also higher. Anadarko Petroleum’s shares rose 6.5 percent in premarket trading, while Noble Energy’s stock price jumped nearly 4 percent.

While Colorado voters rejected prop 112, they made Democratic Jared Polis their new governor. Polis campaigned on generating 100 percent of Colorado’s electric power from renewable energy sources by 2040.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-07  Authors: tom dichristopher, helen h richardson, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voters, energy, colorado, sources, gas, drilling, oil, surge, industry, reject, shares, polis, wattenberg, rejected, stocks, restrictions


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Papa John’s to report ‘terrible’ earnings. That could spell trouble for a sale

It’s not getting any easier for embattled pizza chain Papa John’s. Further clouding its future to survive on its own, Papa John’s lenders cut its credit lines and raised its borrowing rates last month. Earnings are expected to take an even harder hit, from 60 cents a share a year ago to 22 cents a share during the third quarter. Papa John’s ousted Schnatter as its chairman in July after a conference call leaked in which he used a racially charged slur. Since then, the company has been embroiled


It’s not getting any easier for embattled pizza chain Papa John’s. Further clouding its future to survive on its own, Papa John’s lenders cut its credit lines and raised its borrowing rates last month. Earnings are expected to take an even harder hit, from 60 cents a share a year ago to 22 cents a share during the third quarter. Papa John’s ousted Schnatter as its chairman in July after a conference call leaked in which he used a racially charged slur. Since then, the company has been embroiled
Papa John’s to report ‘terrible’ earnings. That could spell trouble for a sale Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: sarah whitten, lauren hirsch, hyoung chang, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, earnings, public, quarter, trouble, share, papa, sale, pizza, report, million, schnatter, expected, company, spell, johns, terrible


Papa John's to report 'terrible' earnings. That could spell trouble for a sale

It’s not getting any easier for embattled pizza chain Papa John’s.

The company is widely expected to deliver terrible earnings Tuesday night that show a continued slide in pizza sales, a steep drop in profit and trouble with its franchise owners during the third quarter — making finding a potential buyer all the more difficult. Further clouding its future to survive on its own, Papa John’s lenders cut its credit lines and raised its borrowing rates last month.

Analysts are projecting revenue to fall by about 9 percent, from $431.7 million during the same quarter last year to an estimated $393.7 million, according to estimates compiled by Refinitiv. Earnings are expected to take an even harder hit, from 60 cents a share a year ago to 22 cents a share during the third quarter.

Those results will further complicate its efforts to find a buyer without having solved the thorny question of what to do with its cantankerous founder, John Schnatter, people briefed on the process say. A public battle with the former chairman and CEO has pummeled the company’s shares, which have fallen 7 percent so far this year and about 40 percent from their all-time high of $90.49 in Dec. 2016.

Papa John’s ousted Schnatter as its chairman in July after a conference call leaked in which he used a racially charged slur. Since then, the company has been embroiled in a public relations nightmare that’s included a war of words and two lawsuits. That drama came as the company was already struggling to compete against more innovative competitors like Domino’s.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-06  Authors: sarah whitten, lauren hirsch, hyoung chang, denver post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, earnings, public, quarter, trouble, share, papa, sale, pizza, report, million, schnatter, expected, company, spell, johns, terrible


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