Ex-Fox News anchor Heather Nauert withdraws from consideration as UN ambassador

U.S. President Donald Trump’s choice to be U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Heather Nauert, has withdrawn from consideration for the job for family reasons, according to a statement issued by the State Department on Saturday. Nauert was State Department spokeswoman when Trump chose her for the U.N. position after working as a host for the conservative Fox News Channel. Haley was a former South Carolina governor who also had little experience in world affairs before taking the ambassador po


U.S. President Donald Trump’s choice to be U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Heather Nauert, has withdrawn from consideration for the job for family reasons, according to a statement issued by the State Department on Saturday. Nauert was State Department spokeswoman when Trump chose her for the U.N. position after working as a host for the conservative Fox News Channel. Haley was a former South Carolina governor who also had little experience in world affairs before taking the ambassador po
Ex-Fox News anchor Heather Nauert withdraws from consideration as UN ambassador Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: yasin ozturk, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consideration, family, position, withdraws, state, united, york, ambassador, nations, exfox, department, anchor, nauert, heather


Ex-Fox News anchor Heather Nauert withdraws from consideration as UN ambassador

U.S. President Donald Trump’s choice to be U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Heather Nauert, has withdrawn from consideration for the job for family reasons, according to a statement issued by the State Department on Saturday.

Nauert was State Department spokeswoman when Trump chose her for the U.N. position after working as a host for the conservative Fox News Channel. She had been criticized by Democrats for her lack of diplomatic experience.

“The past two months have been grueling for my family and therefore it is in the best interest of my family that I withdraw my name from consideration,” Nauert said in the statement.

The statement did not specify the hardship on her family but the Washington Post said Nauert’s husband and children had remained in New York while she was working in Washington.

The New York Times, citing unnamed people familiar with the matter, said Nauert withdrew from consideration because she had a nanny who was in the United States legally but did not have the proper work visa.

The White House had no information on who might be the next in line for the U.N. job.

Trump had announced on Dec. 7 he would nominate Nauert for the U.N. position to replace Nikki Haley, who resigned at the end of 2018. Haley was a former South Carolina governor who also had little experience in world affairs before taking the ambassador position.

The White House had not yet formally submitted Nauert’s nomination to the Senate.

Nauert joined the State Department as spokeswoman in April 2017, three months into the Trump administration. She was named acting undersecretary for public diplomacy and public affairs in early 2018.

The role of U.S. ambassador to the United Nations is a highly visible international position. While Nauert had little diplomatic experience, other nations with veto power on the U.N. Security Council are represented by ambassadors with decades of foreign policy work.

“She’s clearly not qualified for this job but these days it seems that the most important qualification is that you show up on Donald Trump’s TV screen,” Democratic Senator Chris Murphy said of Nauert on CNN in December.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-16  Authors: yasin ozturk, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consideration, family, position, withdraws, state, united, york, ambassador, nations, exfox, department, anchor, nauert, heather


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Huawei’s fate in the US will be decided in the coming weeks

Canada’s Department of Justice is now reviewing an application by its U.S. counterpart on whether to extradite Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, daughter of founder Ren Zhengfei, on fraud charges. Prosecutors for the Eastern District of New York say Meng and Huawei committed fraud by seeking to hide payments made for equipment sold to Iran, a violation of sanctions against that country, from U.S. banks. If that is issued, an extradition hearing will be scheduled by the British Columbia Supreme Court, acc


Canada’s Department of Justice is now reviewing an application by its U.S. counterpart on whether to extradite Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, daughter of founder Ren Zhengfei, on fraud charges. Prosecutors for the Eastern District of New York say Meng and Huawei committed fraud by seeking to hide payments made for equipment sold to Iran, a violation of sanctions against that country, from U.S. banks. If that is issued, an extradition hearing will be scheduled by the British Columbia Supreme Court, acc
Huawei’s fate in the US will be decided in the coming weeks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: kate fazzini, fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fate, meng, fraud, extradition, hearing, coming, huawei, department, justice, huaweis, scheduled, weeks, spokesperson, decided, china


Huawei's fate in the US will be decided in the coming weeks

Canada’s Department of Justice is now reviewing an application by its U.S. counterpart on whether to extradite Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, daughter of founder Ren Zhengfei, on fraud charges.

Prosecutors for the Eastern District of New York say Meng and Huawei committed fraud by seeking to hide payments made for equipment sold to Iran, a violation of sanctions against that country, from U.S. banks.

Canada’s Department of Justice has a March 1 deadline to decide whether to issue an “Authority to Proceed,” a step which will provide the official go-ahead to begin hearing arguments for and against extradition.

If that is issued, an extradition hearing will be scheduled by the British Columbia Supreme Court, according to a spokesperson for the Canadian Ministry of Justice. Meng’s next court appearance has been scheduled for March 6, the spokesperson said.

The case has proven highly fraught for Canada, leading to several diplomatic spats with China and the possibly retaliatory arrests of several Canadian citizens living and working in China. Because of this, Canada may have additional incentive to protect its own trade interests with China, making the U.S.’ case for extradition even more tricky.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-11  Authors: kate fazzini, fabrice coffrini, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fate, meng, fraud, extradition, hearing, coming, huawei, department, justice, huaweis, scheduled, weeks, spokesperson, decided, china


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New York orders restaurants to stop serving weed-related CBD

New York City’s health department has ordered restaurants to stop adding CBD to food and drinks, threatening to thwart the budding trend. “The Health Department takes seriously its responsibility to protect New Yorkers’ health,” a spokeswoman said in an email to CNBC. “Until cannabidiol (CBD) is deemed safe as a food additive, the Department is ordering restaurants not to offer products containing CBD.” The New York City health department started embargoing CBD products in January. Cahan said he


New York City’s health department has ordered restaurants to stop adding CBD to food and drinks, threatening to thwart the budding trend. “The Health Department takes seriously its responsibility to protect New Yorkers’ health,” a spokeswoman said in an email to CNBC. “Until cannabidiol (CBD) is deemed safe as a food additive, the Department is ordering restaurants not to offer products containing CBD.” The New York City health department started embargoing CBD products in January. Cahan said he
New York orders restaurants to stop serving weed-related CBD Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: angelica lavito, geoffroy van der hasselt, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serving, city, york, products, food, weedrelated, restaurants, orders, drinks, department, adding, cbd, stop, health


New York orders restaurants to stop serving weed-related CBD

New York City’s health department has ordered restaurants to stop adding CBD to food and drinks, threatening to thwart the budding trend.

Bars, cafes and restaurants across the city have been increasingly adding CBD, short for cannabidiol, to cocktails, coffee and food. The compound, which comes from the cannabis plant, promises to deliver the calming benefits of marijuana without the high that comes from THC.

New York City’s health department started cracking down on restaurants in the city last month, saying CBD wasn’t approved as a safe product for consumers. It’s now prohibiting businesses from adding the supplement to food or drink.

“The Health Department takes seriously its responsibility to protect New Yorkers’ health,” a spokeswoman said in an email to CNBC. “Until cannabidiol (CBD) is deemed safe as a food additive, the Department is ordering restaurants not to offer products containing CBD.”

Most CBD was legalized in December when President Donald Trump signed the farm bill. Industry insiders and analysts expected this to fuel an already growing market. However, the Food and Drug Administration’s ban on adding CBD to foods and drinks was seen as a possible hurdle.

The FDA prohibits companies from adding active ingredients that are drug products in foods and drinks. CBD falls into this category because it’s the main ingredient in Epidiolex, a drug the FDA approved last year to treat severe childhood epilepsy.

When Trump signed the farm bill, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb released a statement saying the agency would continue enforcing a ban on adding CBD to food and drinks while it looked into creating a pathway for such products to legally enter the market.

The New York City health department started embargoing CBD products in January. An embargo means officials ask restaurants not to use the products, but they don’t remove them or ask restaurants to throw out or destroy CBD. So far, the city has ordered eight restaurants to stop using CBD.

Eric Cahan said he has already started pulling CBD-based food and drinks from his Manhattan cafe. Cahan co-owns Mamacha, which specializes in CBD matcha tea. He said the store has already pulled CBD cookies, chocolates and bottled tea and seltzer from shelves.

Cahan said he has also instructed his baristas to stop mixing CBD drinks. Customers normally can pay $4 to add 15 milligrams of CBD to their beverages. Now, Cahan said Mamacha is selling drinks and CBD oil separately. It’s offering a two-day dose kit for $12 that people can use to mix into their drinks.

“It’s weird, because it feels like the health department is against small businesses,” he said. “Don’t they want us to do well and continue? Why would they not want us to? It feels arbitrary and ridiculous.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-06  Authors: angelica lavito, geoffroy van der hasselt, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, serving, city, york, products, food, weedrelated, restaurants, orders, drinks, department, adding, cbd, stop, health


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State Department says US, South Korea agree ‘in principle’ on sharing troop cost

The United States and South Korea have reached an agreement “in principle” on sharing the cost of stationing U.S. troops in the Asian country, the State Department said Monday. “The United States and the Republic of Korea have reached an agreement in principle on a new Special Measures Agreement,” a spokeswoman said. CNN quoted an State Department official as saying that under the revised agreement, South Korea would boost its financial contribution to nearly $1 billion. The 2014 deal that expir


The United States and South Korea have reached an agreement “in principle” on sharing the cost of stationing U.S. troops in the Asian country, the State Department said Monday. “The United States and the Republic of Korea have reached an agreement in principle on a new Special Measures Agreement,” a spokeswoman said. CNN quoted an State Department official as saying that under the revised agreement, South Korea would boost its financial contribution to nearly $1 billion. The 2014 deal that expir
State Department says US, South Korea agree ‘in principle’ on sharing troop cost Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sharing, cost, troops, state, korea, states, agreement, reached, south, troop, principle, united, agree, department


State Department says US, South Korea agree 'in principle' on sharing troop cost

The United States and South Korea have reached an agreement “in principle” on sharing the cost of stationing U.S. troops in the Asian country, the State Department said Monday.

“The United States and the Republic of Korea have reached an agreement in principle on a new Special Measures Agreement,” a spokeswoman said. “Both sides are committed to working out remaining technical issues as quickly as possible.”

CNN quoted an State Department official as saying that under the revised agreement, South Korea would boost its financial contribution to nearly $1 billion.

The 2014 deal that expired last year required Seoul to pay about 960 billion won ($848 million) a year for keeping some 28,500 U.S. troops in the South Korea. The allies had appeared unable to strike an accord to renew the deal despite 10 rounds of talks since March.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-05  Authors: joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sharing, cost, troops, state, korea, states, agreement, reached, south, troop, principle, united, agree, department


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Payrolls surge by 304,000, smashing estimates despite government shutdown

Job growth in January shattered expectations, with nonfarm payrolls surging by 304,000 despite a partial government shutdown that was the longest in history, the Labor Department reported Friday. The unemployment rate ticked higher to 4 percent, a level where it had last been in June, a likely effect of the shutdown, according to the department. However, officials said federal workers generally were counted as employed during the period because they received pay during the survey week of Jan. 12


Job growth in January shattered expectations, with nonfarm payrolls surging by 304,000 despite a partial government shutdown that was the longest in history, the Labor Department reported Friday. The unemployment rate ticked higher to 4 percent, a level where it had last been in June, a likely effect of the shutdown, according to the department. However, officials said federal workers generally were counted as employed during the period because they received pay during the survey week of Jan. 12
Payrolls surge by 304,000, smashing estimates despite government shutdown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: jeff cox, luke sharrett, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, unemployment, payrolls, ticked, shutdown, surge, rate, department, estimates, week, federal, surveyed, 304000, despite, smashing


Payrolls surge by 304,000, smashing estimates despite government shutdown

Job growth in January shattered expectations, with nonfarm payrolls surging by 304,000 despite a partial government shutdown that was the longest in history, the Labor Department reported Friday.

The unemployment rate ticked higher to 4 percent, a level where it had last been in June, a likely effect of the shutdown, according to the department. However, officials said federal workers generally were counted as employed during the period because they received pay during the survey week of Jan. 12. On balance, federal government employment actually rose by 1,000.

Economists surveyed by Dow Jones had expected payrolls to rise by 170,000 and the unemployment rate to hold steady at 3.9 percent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-01  Authors: jeff cox, luke sharrett, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, unemployment, payrolls, ticked, shutdown, surge, rate, department, estimates, week, federal, surveyed, 304000, despite, smashing


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Asia markets mostly decline amid renewed US-China tensions

The U.S. Department of Justice filed filed criminal charges on Monday to officially request the extradition of Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei. The Justice Department also announced charges Monday against Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile. The latest development came ahead of a new round of high level trade negotiations between the two economic powerhouses locked in an ongoing trade war. That’s just not the way the U.S.


The U.S. Department of Justice filed filed criminal charges on Monday to officially request the extradition of Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei. The Justice Department also announced charges Monday against Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile. The latest development came ahead of a new round of high level trade negotiations between the two economic powerhouses locked in an ongoing trade war. That’s just not the way the U.S.
Asia markets mostly decline amid renewed US-China tensions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asia, chinese, trade, renewed, negotiations, amid, tensions, markets, uschina, department, think, law, decline, huawei, way, justice, filed


Asia markets mostly decline amid renewed US-China tensions

The U.S. Department of Justice filed filed criminal charges on Monday to officially request the extradition of Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei.

The Justice Department also announced charges Monday against Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile. The charges stem from a civil trade secrets lawsuit filed by T-Mobile in 2014 over a robot called “Tappy,” which was used in testing smartphones.

“Huawei and its senior executives repeatedly refused to respect U.S. law,” said FBI Director Christopher Wray. “Huawei … systematically sought to steal valuable trade secrets.”

Meng, who is also the daughter of Huawei’s founder and president Ren Zhengfei, was arrested on Dec. 1 in Vancouver. Her arrest sparked a series of tense exchanges between China and Canada over the possibility that she could be transferred to the U.S.

“The timing is certainly interesting given the upcoming discussions this week in D.C., but I think we have to take a step back and view this as part of a larger effort within the Justice Department, in particular, to focus on what it sees as misbehavior on the part of Chinese firms and individuals in the United States for a variety of reasons,” Robert Williams, executive director at the Paul Tsai China Center in Yale Law School, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” on Tuesday.

A spokesperson at China’s industry and information technology ministry said Tuesday that the U.S. government indictment against Huawei was “unfair” and “immoral,” Reuters reported. The foreign ministry of China also appealed to the U.S. to stop “unreasonable suppression” of Chinese companies, according to Reuters.

The latest development came ahead of a new round of high level trade negotiations between the two economic powerhouses locked in an ongoing trade war.

Chinese state-run Xinhua News Agency reported that Chinese Vice Premier Liu He arrived in Washington D.C. on Monday for economic and trade talks. Chinese central bank governor Yi Gang is also part of Liu’s delegation to the U.S., according to the report.

The Chinese delegation will be accompanied by a team from Washington led by U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, with negotiations set to take place on Wednesday and Thursday.

“I don’t think we can say that this is directly tied to the trade negotiations in that kind of transactional way. That’s just not the way the U.S. law enforcement system works, it’s not the way the Justice department works. These criminal investigations began long before the current trade negotiations. So I think we have to view it in that context,” Williams said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: eustance huang
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, asia, chinese, trade, renewed, negotiations, amid, tensions, markets, uschina, department, think, law, decline, huawei, way, justice, filed


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China says US indictment against Huawei is ‘unfair’ and ‘immoral’

A spokesman at China’s industry and information technology ministry said Tuesday that the U.S. government indictment against Huawei is “unfair” and “immoral,” Reuters reported. The U.S. Department of Justice filed criminal charges Monday against Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of China tech giant Huawei and the daughter of its founder and president Ren Zhengfei. Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker confirmed during a press conference that the Justice Department is seeking the extra


A spokesman at China’s industry and information technology ministry said Tuesday that the U.S. government indictment against Huawei is “unfair” and “immoral,” Reuters reported. The U.S. Department of Justice filed criminal charges Monday against Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of China tech giant Huawei and the daughter of its founder and president Ren Zhengfei. Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker confirmed during a press conference that the Justice Department is seeking the extra
China says US indictment against Huawei is ‘unfair’ and ‘immoral’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: everett rosenfeld, jason redmond, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plot, used, trade, charges, wanzhou, immoral, unfair, china, department, indictment, huawei, secrets, justice, tmobile


China says US indictment against Huawei is 'unfair' and 'immoral'

A spokesman at China’s industry and information technology ministry said Tuesday that the U.S. government indictment against Huawei is “unfair” and “immoral,” Reuters reported.

The U.S. Department of Justice filed criminal charges Monday against Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of China tech giant Huawei and the daughter of its founder and president Ren Zhengfei. Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker confirmed during a press conference that the Justice Department is seeking the extradition of Meng Wanzhou from Canada.

The Justice Department also announced charges Monday against Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile. The charges stem from a civil trade secrets lawsuit filed by T-Mobile in 2014 over a robot called “Tappy,” which was used in testing smartphones.

Meng’s lawyer, Reid Weingarten, said his client should not be used as a “pawn or a hostage” in the the U.S.-China relationship. She did not plot to break any U.S. laws, or violate American sanctions on Iran, he said in a statement to CNBC.

China’s foreign ministry, for its part, expressed its concerns about the charges and then characterized the actions as part of a U.S. plot to suppress the success of Chinese firms.

Alex Capri, visiting senior fellow at NUS Business School, told CNBC he found Beijing’s response notable.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: everett rosenfeld, jason redmond, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plot, used, trade, charges, wanzhou, immoral, unfair, china, department, indictment, huawei, secrets, justice, tmobile


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US files criminal charges in two Huawei cases, seeks extradition of CFO Meng Wanzhou

The U.S. Department of Justice filed criminal charges Monday against Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of China tech giant Huawei and the daughter of its founder and president Ren Zhengfei. The Justice Department also announced charges Monday against Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile. The charges stem from a civil trade secrets lawsuit filed by T-Mobile in 2014 over a robot called “Tappy,” which was used in testing smartphones. Acting Attorney General Matthew Whit


The U.S. Department of Justice filed criminal charges Monday against Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of China tech giant Huawei and the daughter of its founder and president Ren Zhengfei. The Justice Department also announced charges Monday against Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile. The charges stem from a civil trade secrets lawsuit filed by T-Mobile in 2014 over a robot called “Tappy,” which was used in testing smartphones. Acting Attorney General Matthew Whit
US files criminal charges in two Huawei cases, seeks extradition of CFO Meng Wanzhou Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meng, extradition, secrets, seeks, trade, charges, wanzhou, request, files, cfo, department, company, cases, huawei, criminal, justice


US files criminal charges in two Huawei cases, seeks extradition of CFO Meng Wanzhou

The U.S. Department of Justice filed criminal charges Monday against Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of China tech giant Huawei and the daughter of its founder and president Ren Zhengfei.

The Justice Department also announced charges Monday against Huawei for allegedly stealing trade secrets from T-Mobile. The charges stem from a civil trade secrets lawsuit filed by T-Mobile in 2014 over a robot called “Tappy,” which was used in testing smartphones.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker confirmed during a press conference that the Justice Department is seeking the extradition of Meng Wanzhou from Canada.

“We plan to file our formal extradition request and all the necessary documentation under the extradition treaty in the appropriate time frame,” Whitaker said. There is a Jan. 30 deadline for the request to be submitted.

Huawei said in a statement provided to CNBC that it was “disappointed to learn of the charges brought against the company today.” Here’s the rest of that statement:

After Ms. Meng’s arrest, the Company sought an opportunity to discuss the Eastern District of New York investigation with the Justice Department, but the request was rejected without explanation. The allegations in the Western District of Washington trade secret indictment were already the subject of a civil suit that was settled by the parties after a Seattle jury found neither damages nor willful and malicious conduct on the trade secret claim. The Company denies that it or its subsidiary or affiliate have committed any of the asserted violations of U.S. law set forth in each of the indictments, is not aware of any wrongdoing by Ms. Meng, and believes the U.S. courts will ultimately reach the same conclusion.

China, meanwhile, said through an industry ministry official that the indictment against the company is unfair and immoral, according to Reuters.

FBI, DHS and Commerce officials announced the two actions on Monday, saying the allegations go back more than a decade. “Huawei and its senior executives repeatedly refused to respect U.S. law,” said FBI Director Christopher Wray, in Monday’s press conference. “Huawei … systematically sought to steal valuable trade secrets.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-28  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, meng, extradition, secrets, seeks, trade, charges, wanzhou, request, files, cfo, department, company, cases, huawei, criminal, justice


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Palantir CEO rips Silicon Valley, accuses it of selling out America and failing to protect the country

Alex Karp, co-founder and CEO of secretive Silicon Valley data miner Palantir, is slamming the tech community for what he considers a breach of its social contract with America. “Now Silicon Valley is creating micro communities that break the consensus of larger society while simultaneously telling the average American, ‘I will not support your defense needs,’ and then selling their products that are adversarial to America.” Karp, whose Palo Alto, California-based company provides services to th


Alex Karp, co-founder and CEO of secretive Silicon Valley data miner Palantir, is slamming the tech community for what he considers a breach of its social contract with America. “Now Silicon Valley is creating micro communities that break the consensus of larger society while simultaneously telling the average American, ‘I will not support your defense needs,’ and then selling their products that are adversarial to America.” Karp, whose Palo Alto, California-based company provides services to th
Palantir CEO rips Silicon Valley, accuses it of selling out America and failing to protect the country Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, america, ceo, karp, protect, silicon, tech, defense, country, selling, rips, value, companies, valley, palantir, failing, department


Palantir CEO rips Silicon Valley, accuses it of selling out America and failing to protect the country

Alex Karp, co-founder and CEO of secretive Silicon Valley data miner Palantir, is slamming the tech community for what he considers a breach of its social contract with America.

Big Tech is no longer delivering on its value proposition, he said.

“The reason why people put up with crazy looking people that are doing their thing in a different way is because we have historically delivered either jobs or national security,” Karp told CNBC on Wednesday. “People understood the value of what we’re doing.”

However, Karp said that’s all changed. “Now Silicon Valley is creating micro communities that break the consensus of larger society while simultaneously telling the average American, ‘I will not support your defense needs,’ and then selling their products that are adversarial to America.”

Karp, whose Palo Alto, California-based company provides services to the Defense Department, CIA and FBI, blasted tech companies that refuse work with the federal government to keep the country safe.

“That is a loser position. It is not intelligible. It is not intelligible to the average person. It’s academically not sustainable. And I am very happy we’re not on that side of the debate,” Karp said in the interview with “Squawk Box” co-host Andrew Ross Sorkin from the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Last year, for example, Alphabet’s Google unit decided not to renew its contact for a Defense Department program known as Project Maven after an employee firestorm erupted with a petition urging CEO Sundar Pichai to keep Google out of the “business of war.”

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has defended such public-private contracts, saying last year his company will continue to do business with government agencies and warned that other tech companies about turning their backs. “If big tech companies are going to turn their back on the U.S. Department of Defense, this country is going to be in trouble,” Bezos said in October.

Karp also went off on the government shutdown, which entered Day 33 on Wednesday. “It’s damaging for the American brand to have something from the outside that doesn’t seem to make sense.”

Palantir, which has reportedly been considering an initial public offering as soon as this year, was founded in 2004 by Karp and other ex-Stanford students including PayPal co-founder and outspoken venture capitalist Peter Thiel.

The company provides software that customers use to import volumes of disparate data, such as spreadsheets and images, into a central database where it can be analyzed and interpreted with maps and charts.

WATCH: Here’s the full CNBC interview with Palantir CEO Alex Karp


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-23  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, america, ceo, karp, protect, silicon, tech, defense, country, selling, rips, value, companies, valley, palantir, failing, department


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Wilbur Ross to testify to Congress in March about census question

Lawmakers will grill Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in March about a “wide range” of topics, including Ross’ role in the Trump administration’s plans to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The Commerce Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment on Cummings’ letter. Ross, whose department oversees the census, had argued that the question was necessary in order to uphold certain provisions of the Voting Rights Act. Civil rights groups have argued that the propo


Lawmakers will grill Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in March about a “wide range” of topics, including Ross’ role in the Trump administration’s plans to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The Commerce Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment on Cummings’ letter. Ross, whose department oversees the census, had argued that the question was necessary in order to uphold certain provisions of the Voting Rights Act. Civil rights groups have argued that the propo
Wilbur Ross to testify to Congress in March about census question Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: kevin breuninger, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, department, question, ross, secretary, congress, administration, citizenship, wilbur, census, commerce, cummings, trump, testify


Wilbur Ross to testify to Congress in March about census question

Lawmakers will grill Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in March about a “wide range” of topics, including Ross’ role in the Trump administration’s plans to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

Ross agreed to testify “voluntarily and without a subpoena” after weeks of discussions, House Oversight Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., said in a statement Tuesday. A spokesman for Cummings confirmed to CNBC that the hearing will be public.

“Committee Members expect Secretary Ross to provide complete and truthful answers to a wide range of questions, including questions regarding the ongoing preparations for the census, the addition of a citizenship question, and other topics,” Cummings said in the statement.

He also noted that the majority-Democrat committee expects Ross, who has served in President Donald Trump’s Cabinet since the early days of his administration, to comply with multiple outstanding requests for documents that have been “withheld” by the Commerce Department.

The Commerce Department did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment on Cummings’ letter. But a spokesperson told NBC News that the department “is working with Chairman Cummings and Ranking Member Jordan to determine a mutually-agreeable date for the Secretary to appear before the Committee.”

The hearing, which Cummings’ statement says is set for Thursday, March 14, comes a week after a federal court in New York blocked the Trump administration’s plans to include a question in the 10-year national survey asking respondents about their citizenship. The Trump administration is appealing that ruling.

Ross, whose department oversees the census, had argued that the question was necessary in order to uphold certain provisions of the Voting Rights Act.

The Cabinet secretary “cherry-picked” evidence, “acted irrationally” and failed to justify the planned policy shift, U.S. District Court Judge Jesse Furman wrote in his conclusion. Furman added that the plaintiffs did not meet their burden of proof in claiming that Ross’ decision was “motivated by invidious discrimination.”

The results of the census are used to distribute congressional district seats, a process that is fiercely contested and scrutinized by watchdogs, advocacy groups and political parties. Civil rights groups have argued that the proposed citizenship question — “Is this person a citizen of the United States?” — could create a chilling effect that would result in a lower count of minority respondents, especially Latinos.

The question has appeared in various forms on past censuses. But it has not appeared on the “complete” survey since 1950, The Washington Post reported, though it has been included on other forms in subsequent years.

Some Democrats in Congress have also questioned Ross’ prior testimony before the Ways and Means Committee — in particular his assertion that the Justice Department “initiated” the citizenship question request.

Ross has also been accused by a campaign-finance watchdog of possibly violating criminal conflict-of-interest laws by holding stock in companies potentially affected by Trump administration actions in which he was involved.

The Campaign Legal Center flagged Ross’ role in a Trump administration investigation on whether to impose steel tariffs while Ross held stock in his former investment management firm, which has a “major interest” in Chinese steel. The center also questioned why Ross did not initially disclose his stake in another steel-based manufacturer, Greenbriar, and shipping company Navigator.

The watchdog asked the Commerce Department’s inspector general’s office to conduct an investigation.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: kevin breuninger, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, department, question, ross, secretary, congress, administration, citizenship, wilbur, census, commerce, cummings, trump, testify


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