Facebook’s Zuckerberg mulled developer deals to decide value of data

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg once considered making deals with third-party developers just to help him find out how much users’ data is worth, according to an NBC News report. It said the social network’s boss once mulled 100 deals with app developers for potentially selling access to user data. In one message highlighted by the publication, Zuckerberg says the goal “wouldn’t be the deals themselves,” but learning “what developers would actually pay.” Zuckerberg reportedly said the deals would h


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg once considered making deals with third-party developers just to help him find out how much users’ data is worth, according to an NBC News report. It said the social network’s boss once mulled 100 deals with app developers for potentially selling access to user data. In one message highlighted by the publication, Zuckerberg says the goal “wouldn’t be the deals themselves,” but learning “what developers would actually pay.” Zuckerberg reportedly said the deals would h
Facebook’s Zuckerberg mulled developer deals to decide value of data Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: ryan browne, justin sullivan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, facebook, public, developers, developer, nbc, decide, deals, mulled, facebooks, zuckerberg, value, help, users, user


Facebook's Zuckerberg mulled developer deals to decide value of data

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg once considered making deals with third-party developers just to help him find out how much users’ data is worth, according to an NBC News report.

The report, which cites 4,000 leaked pages of internal documents, shines a light on the way senior company executives viewed attaching a dollar sign to sensitive user data, despite Facebook’s public commitment to protect such information.

It said the social network’s boss once mulled 100 deals with app developers for potentially selling access to user data. In one message highlighted by the publication, Zuckerberg says the goal “wouldn’t be the deals themselves,” but learning “what developers would actually pay.”

Zuckerberg reportedly said the deals would help Facebook decide the “real market value” of Facebook’s data on users, and help it set a “public rate” for developers. Facebook ultimately decided not to go forward with such a strategy, the company told NBC.

The CEO has said in the past that Facebook would “never” sell people’s information without their consent.

According to the documents obtained by NBC, Zuckerberg was described by one executive as being a “master of leverage.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: ryan browne, justin sullivan, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, facebook, public, developers, developer, nbc, decide, deals, mulled, facebooks, zuckerberg, value, help, users, user


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Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai


If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai
Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help.

As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo.

But what users can’t do yet is connect with a doctor or a therapist through the device, and it might be a few years before they can. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors.

Developers focused on digital health have concerns about using home speakers like the Echo and Google Home for medical consults because privacy issues continue to emerge and there’s too much risk in sensitive health information falling into the wrong hands. Earlier this week, Bloomberg reported that thousands of employees listen in to snippets of conversations on Alexa to supposedly improve the product experience.

“It’s tricky,” said Robbie Cape, CEO of 98point6, a Seattle-based company that provides virtual medical consults via smartphones and the web. “To uphold user trust, I can imagine that Amazon Alexa would need to confirm they’re talking to the right person, but also that there’s no one else in the room listening to the conversation.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


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Microsoft reveals an A.I. camera for developers

Microsoft announced the introduction of a new smart camera for business at the Mobile World Conference in Barcelona on Sunday. Yet other companies have their sights set on the AI camera market as well. Indeed, in late 2017, Amazon Web Services announced an AI camera targeted at developers. Google, another major cloud provider, doesn’t have an AI camera for developers, but it has announced Google Clips, which is aimed at consumers. Early users of the Microsoft Azure Kinect include AVA Retail, to


Microsoft announced the introduction of a new smart camera for business at the Mobile World Conference in Barcelona on Sunday. Yet other companies have their sights set on the AI camera market as well. Indeed, in late 2017, Amazon Web Services announced an AI camera targeted at developers. Google, another major cloud provider, doesn’t have an AI camera for developers, but it has announced Google Clips, which is aimed at consumers. Early users of the Microsoft Azure Kinect include AVA Retail, to
Microsoft reveals an A.I. camera for developers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-24  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, device, announced, cloud, azure, white, microsoft, camera, ai, reveals, developers, kinect


Microsoft reveals an A.I. camera for developers

Microsoft announced the introduction of a new smart camera for business at the Mobile World Conference in Barcelona on Sunday.

Microsoft is drawing on both its Kinect and Azure public cloud brands, as it sets off on the next phase in the company’s emphasis on artificial intelligence — an area Microsoft identified as a top priority in a recent annual report.

The Microsoft Azure Kinect is “new intelligent edge device that enables developers to create a wide range of AI-powered experiences,” Julia White, Microsoft’s corporate vice president for Azure marketing, said at the conference.

The system has a 1-megapixel depth camera, a 12-megapixel camera and a seven-microphone array on board. It will work with “a range of compute types,” White said.

The device will cost $399, and it’s now available for developers to pre-order, White said.

Yet other companies have their sights set on the AI camera market as well. Indeed, in late 2017, Amazon Web Services announced an AI camera targeted at developers. Google, another major cloud provider, doesn’t have an AI camera for developers, but it has announced Google Clips, which is aimed at consumers.

Microsoft first released the Kinect sensor hardware for use with Xbox game consoles in 2010, and in 2012 it introduced a version of the device for PCs running Windows. In 2017, Microsoft announced that it had stopped making Kinect systems, saying that it had sold 35 million of them.

Last year the company started talking about Kinect technology in the context of Azure. Now, the technology has a cleaned-up look. White said the new product is the result of a collaboration of Microsoft’s Azure cloud group and its devices team, which has previously created Surface Hub business devices, among other things.

Early users of the Microsoft Azure Kinect include AVA Retail, to enable self-checkout and “grab-and-go shopping,” as well as Ocuvera. The latter is working with Cleveland Clinic to predict when patients are about to fall, White said.

WATCH: Multi-cloud approaches are good for the industry, says Microsoft EVP


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-24  Authors: jordan novet
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, device, announced, cloud, azure, white, microsoft, camera, ai, reveals, developers, kinect


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Facebook receives personal health data from apps: WSJ

Facebook receives highly personal information from apps that track your health and help you find a new home, testing by The Wall Street Journal found. Facebook can receive this data from certain apps even if the user does not have a Facebook account, according to the Journal. The new report said Facebook is able to receive data from a variety of apps. Of more than 70 popular apps tested by the Journal, they found at least 11 apps that sent potentially sensitive information to Facebook. The apps


Facebook receives highly personal information from apps that track your health and help you find a new home, testing by The Wall Street Journal found. Facebook can receive this data from certain apps even if the user does not have a Facebook account, according to the Journal. The new report said Facebook is able to receive data from a variety of apps. Of more than 70 popular apps tested by the Journal, they found at least 11 apps that sent potentially sensitive information to Facebook. The apps
Facebook receives personal health data from apps: WSJ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images, aly song
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, developers, receives, app, facebook, personal, information, report, analytics, data, users, health, apps, sent, wsj


Facebook receives personal health data from apps: WSJ

Facebook receives highly personal information from apps that track your health and help you find a new home, testing by The Wall Street Journal found. Facebook can receive this data from certain apps even if the user does not have a Facebook account, according to the Journal.

Facebook has already been in hot water concerning issues of consent and user data.

Most recently, a TechCrunch report revealed in January that Facebook paid users as young as teenagers to install an app that would allow the company to collect all phone and web activity. Following the report, Apple revoked some developer privileges from Facebook, saying Facebook violated its terms by distributing the app through a program meant only for employees to test apps prior to release.

The new report said Facebook is able to receive data from a variety of apps. Of more than 70 popular apps tested by the Journal, they found at least 11 apps that sent potentially sensitive information to Facebook.

The apps included the period-tracking app Flo Period & Ovulation Tracker, which reportedly shared with Facebook when users were having their periods or when they indicated they were trying to get pregnant. Real estate app Realtor reportedly sent Facebook the listing information viewed by users, and the top heart-rate app on Apple’s iOS, Instant Heart Rate: HR Monitor, sent users’ heart rates to the company, the Journal’s testing found.

The apps reportedly send the data using Facebook’s software-development kit, or SDK, which help developers integrate certain features into their apps. Facebook’s SDK includes an analytics service that helps app developers understand its users’ trends. The Journal said developers who sent sensitive information to Facebook used “custom app events” to send data like ovulation times and homes that users had marked as favorites on some apps.

A Facebook spokesperson told CNBC, “Sharing information across apps on your iPhone or Android device is how mobile advertising works and is industry standard practice. The issue is how apps use information for online advertising. We require app developers to be clear with their users about the information they are sharing with us, and we prohibit app developers from sending us sensitive data. We also take steps to detect and remove data that should not be shared with us.”

A spokesperson for Flo, the period-tracking app, said in a statement it has already started an audit on data privacy that “will cover an exhaustive spectrum of all external analytical tools, not limited to Facebook Analytics.” The spokesperson emphasized, “Facebook Analytics’ insights are utilized for internal analytics purposes only,” but said until the audit is finished, it has limited its use of external analytics programs and released iOS and Android updates that won’t send custom app events to any external analytics systems, including Facebook Analytics.

The other two app developers did not immediately return CNBC’s requests for comment.

Following the report, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo directed the New York Department of State and Department of Financial Services to investigate Facebook for what he called an “invasion of consumer privacy” in a statement.

“New Yorkers deserve to know that their personal information is safe, and we must hold internet companies — no matter how big — responsible for upholding the law and protecting the information of smartphone users,” Cuomo said in the statement.

Facebook had also considered collecting health information in the past, when it asked major U.S. hospitals to share anonymized data about their patients, as CNBC reported in April, though Facebook said the project had not moved past the planning stage at the time.

Read the full report at The Wall Street Journal.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: Why this former insider thinks Facebook’s metrics may be misleading


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images, aly song
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, developers, receives, app, facebook, personal, information, report, analytics, data, users, health, apps, sent, wsj


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Facebook receives personal health data from apps: WSJ

Facebook receives highly personal information from apps that track your health and help you find a new home, testing by The Wall Street Journal found. Facebook can receive this data from certain apps even if the user does not have a Facebook account, according to the Journal. The new report said Facebook is able to receive data from a variety of apps. Of more than 70 popular apps tested by the Journal, they found at least 11 apps that sent potentially sensitive information to Facebook. The apps


Facebook receives highly personal information from apps that track your health and help you find a new home, testing by The Wall Street Journal found. Facebook can receive this data from certain apps even if the user does not have a Facebook account, according to the Journal. The new report said Facebook is able to receive data from a variety of apps. Of more than 70 popular apps tested by the Journal, they found at least 11 apps that sent potentially sensitive information to Facebook. The apps
Facebook receives personal health data from apps: WSJ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images, aly song
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, developers, receives, app, facebook, personal, information, report, analytics, data, users, health, apps, sent, wsj


Facebook receives personal health data from apps: WSJ

Facebook receives highly personal information from apps that track your health and help you find a new home, testing by The Wall Street Journal found. Facebook can receive this data from certain apps even if the user does not have a Facebook account, according to the Journal.

Facebook has already been in hot water concerning issues of consent and user data.

Most recently, a TechCrunch report revealed in January that Facebook paid users as young as teenagers to install an app that would allow the company to collect all phone and web activity. Following the report, Apple revoked some developer privileges from Facebook, saying Facebook violated its terms by distributing the app through a program meant only for employees to test apps prior to release.

The new report said Facebook is able to receive data from a variety of apps. Of more than 70 popular apps tested by the Journal, they found at least 11 apps that sent potentially sensitive information to Facebook.

The apps included the period-tracking app Flo Period & Ovulation Tracker, which reportedly shared with Facebook when users were having their periods or when they indicated they were trying to get pregnant. Real estate app Realtor reportedly sent Facebook the listing information viewed by users, and the top heart-rate app on Apple’s iOS, Instant Heart Rate: HR Monitor, sent users’ heart rates to the company, the Journal’s testing found.

The apps reportedly send the data using Facebook’s software-development kit, or SDK, which help developers integrate certain features into their apps. Facebook’s SDK includes an analytics service that helps app developers understand its users’ trends. The Journal said developers who sent sensitive information to Facebook used “custom app events” to send data like ovulation times and homes that users had marked as favorites on some apps.

A Facebook spokesperson told CNBC, “Sharing information across apps on your iPhone or Android device is how mobile advertising works and is industry standard practice. The issue is how apps use information for online advertising. We require app developers to be clear with their users about the information they are sharing with us, and we prohibit app developers from sending us sensitive data. We also take steps to detect and remove data that should not be shared with us.”

A spokesperson for Flo, the period-tracking app, said in a statement it has already started an audit on data privacy that “will cover an exhaustive spectrum of all external analytical tools, not limited to Facebook Analytics.” The spokesperson emphasized, “Facebook Analytics’ insights are utilized for internal analytics purposes only,” but said until the audit is finished, it has limited its use of external analytics programs and released iOS and Android updates that won’t send custom app events to any external analytics systems, including Facebook Analytics.

The other two app developers did not immediately return CNBC’s requests for comment.

Following the report, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo directed the New York Department of State and Department of Financial Services to investigate Facebook for what he called an “invasion of consumer privacy” in a statement.

“New Yorkers deserve to know that their personal information is safe, and we must hold internet companies — no matter how big — responsible for upholding the law and protecting the information of smartphone users,” Cuomo said in the statement.

Facebook had also considered collecting health information in the past, when it asked major U.S. hospitals to share anonymized data about their patients, as CNBC reported in April, though Facebook said the project had not moved past the planning stage at the time.

Read the full report at The Wall Street Journal.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: Why this former insider thinks Facebook’s metrics may be misleading


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-22  Authors: lauren feiner, saul loeb, afp, getty images, aly song
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, developers, receives, app, facebook, personal, information, report, analytics, data, users, health, apps, sent, wsj


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Facebook admits to bug that allowed third party developers to access user photos

01:41 | 6:45 AM ET Fri, 22 May 2015


01:41 | 6:45 AM ET Fri, 22 May 2015
Facebook admits to bug that allowed third party developers to access user photos Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, developers, facebook, 22, bug, 2015, 645, et, photos, user, access, allowed, admits, party, 0141


Facebook admits to bug that allowed third party developers to access user photos

01:41 | 6:45 AM ET Fri, 22 May 2015


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, developers, facebook, 22, bug, 2015, 645, et, photos, user, access, allowed, admits, party, 0141


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Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users

A Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users using third-party apps, the company disclosed Friday. The exposed photos include those that users never finished sharing to the site, Facebook said. Facebook said that photos that had yet to be shared could have been accessed by apps that users gave permission to access their Facebook photos. Facebook said the bug did not affect photos that were shared in Messenger conversations and that Facebook became aware of the bug and fixed it on S


A Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users using third-party apps, the company disclosed Friday. The exposed photos include those that users never finished sharing to the site, Facebook said. Facebook said that photos that had yet to be shared could have been accessed by apps that users gave permission to access their Facebook photos. Facebook said the bug did not affect photos that were shared in Messenger conversations and that Facebook became aware of the bug and fixed it on S
Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, developers, facebook, exposed, 68, bug, apps, breach, data, photos, gdpr, million, users


Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users

A Facebook bug exposed photos from up to 6.8 million users using third-party apps, the company disclosed Friday. The exposed photos include those that users never finished sharing to the site, Facebook said.

The disclosure is one of several privacy scandals the company has grappled with over the past year. In March, reports from the New York Times and the Guardian shed light on how Cambridge Analytica used data on Facebook users to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election. In September, it announced a security breach that affected up to 50 million users and sent its stock price plunging more than 2.5 percent.

Facebook said that photos that had yet to be shared could have been accessed by apps that users gave permission to access their Facebook photos. Facebook said that photos that hadn’t yet been shared on its platform could be accessed because the platform stores a copy of photos that users do not finish sharing on their profile after attempting to upload.

Facebook said the bug in its photo API affected a 12 day window between Sept. 13 and Sept. 25 and gave access to up to 1,500 apps built by 876 developers. Facebook said the bug did not affect photos that were shared in Messenger conversations and that Facebook became aware of the bug and fixed it on Sept. 25.

Under the European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), companies must notify appropriate authorities of any data breach within 72 hours of finding out about it. While Facebook said it took them some time to alert the public while it investigated the impact of the bug, the company said it complied with GDPR reporting standards by reporting the bug to the Irish Data Protection Commission on Nov. 22 once it was able to conclude it was “a reportable breach under GDPR.”

“We notified the IDPC as soon as we established it was considered a reportable breach under GDPR. We had to investigate in order to make that conclusion. And once we did, we let our regulator know within the 72 [hour] timeframe,” a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement.

The IDPC confirmed it began reviewing Facebook’s compliance with GDPR this week. In a statement, Graham Doyle, the head of communications at the IDPC said, “The Irish DPC has received a number of breach notifications from Facebook since the introduction of the GDPR on May 25, 2018. With reference to these data breaches, including the breach in question, we have this week commenced a statutory inquiry examining Facebook’s compliance with the relevant provisions of the GDPR.”

Facebook said it will alert users who may have been affected by the breach through a notice on the site that will show them how to see if apps they use were affected. The company also advises users log into apps they believe they granted access to Facebook photos to see which photos they have accessed.

“We’re sorry this happened,” Facebook said in the post on its developers blog written by Tomer Bar, an engineering director at the company. “Early next week we will be rolling out tools for app developers that will allow them to determine which people using their app might be impacted by this bug. We will be working with those developers to delete the photos from impacted users.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-14  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, developers, facebook, exposed, 68, bug, apps, breach, data, photos, gdpr, million, users


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Former FTC official says Facebook VP misled international leaders

A former Federal Trade Commission official claimed a Facebook official mislead and international committee of parliamentarians Tuesday in a hearing about the company’s privacy policies. The allegation centers around whether third-party developers had access to information on private Facebook profiles in the early days of the platform. Facebook was transitioning developers onto the newer platform with more limited information, Allan said. In version one it included some access to friends’ data wh


A former Federal Trade Commission official claimed a Facebook official mislead and international committee of parliamentarians Tuesday in a hearing about the company’s privacy policies. The allegation centers around whether third-party developers had access to information on private Facebook profiles in the early days of the platform. Facebook was transitioning developers onto the newer platform with more limited information, Allan said. In version one it included some access to friends’ data wh
Former FTC official says Facebook VP misled international leaders Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-27  Authors: lauren feiner, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vp, soltani, developers, technical, misled, facebook, international, platform, ftc, access, leaders, friends, information, version, committee, official


Former FTC official says Facebook VP misled international leaders

A former Federal Trade Commission official claimed a Facebook official mislead and international committee of parliamentarians Tuesday in a hearing about the company’s privacy policies.

The allegation centers around whether third-party developers had access to information on private Facebook profiles in the early days of the platform. In response to a question from Damian Collins, chair of the U.K. culture, media and sport select committee, about Facebook’s changes to its developer policies in 2014, Facebook Vice President of Policy Solutions Richard Allan said there were two distinct versions of the platform at the time. Facebook was transitioning developers onto the newer platform with more limited information, Allan said.

“What developers had under the first version was the ability to ask you to install their application, and if you agreed to it and agreed to certain permissions, then they could also access some of the information that your friends shared with you. Version two stopped that,” Allan said. “So in neither version was it full access to data. In version one it included some access to friends’ data where they’d given permission, in version two, that access was removed.”

“This is false,” former Obama-era FTC Chief Technologist Ashkan Soltani told the committee later in the day.

Soltani made an unexpected appearance at Tuesday’s hearing in the U.K. to debunk what he claimed were technical issues with testimony. Soltani said his visit was so last minute that he had to borrow a blazer from a friend before showing up in front of government officials.

In disputing Allan’s testimony, Soltani cited a 2011 settlement between Facebook and the FTC, where the commission alleged Facebook misled users by allowing their profile information to be accessible to app developers even when their profiles were set to private. He also said white listed apps he tested on Facebook as late as 2018 could still access personal information and information of friends even if they had turned off this setting.

This contradicts Allan’s statement that “version one” of the platform pre-2014 only “included some access to friends’ data where they’d given permission.”

Soltani said his motivation for coming to the committee was to provide them the technical expertise that would help it make an informed decision about Facebook. He said he has been working on this issue for the past decade and has tested the the app privacy settings himself. Soltani said he was a technical consultant for the Wall Street Journal’s “What They Know” series about information privacy.

“When companies make technically nuanced and perhaps … deceitful statements, it kind of gets under my skin,” Soltani said.

Facebook did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-27  Authors: lauren feiner, chip somodevilla, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, vp, soltani, developers, technical, misled, facebook, international, platform, ftc, access, leaders, friends, information, version, committee, official


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Apple to tell Supreme Court it can’t be sued in App Store dispute

In a statement, Apple said that its App Store has fueled competition. The company said the store is responsible for the creation of millions of jobs and more than $100 billion in payments to app developers. The precedent the court is revisiting was set in Illinois Brick Co. v. Illinois, a 1977 dispute in which the court ruled in favor of concrete brick manufacturers. Rather, Apple will say that it is acting as an agent for app developers, who ultimately are selling their wares to consumers. Whil


In a statement, Apple said that its App Store has fueled competition. The company said the store is responsible for the creation of millions of jobs and more than $100 billion in payments to app developers. The precedent the court is revisiting was set in Illinois Brick Co. v. Illinois, a 1977 dispute in which the court ruled in favor of concrete brick manufacturers. Rather, Apple will say that it is acting as an agent for app developers, who ultimately are selling their wares to consumers. Whil
Apple to tell Supreme Court it can’t be sued in App Store dispute Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: tucker higgins, steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, supreme, illinois, developers, sued, court, app, brick, case, cant, apps, tell, iphone, dispute, store


Apple to tell Supreme Court it can't be sued in App Store dispute

The court’s decision in the case, which is named Apple Inc. v. Pepper, No. 17-204, could have an impact beyond Apple. It could also open up other tech companies that operate electronic marketplaces, like Facebook, Ebay, Amazon and Alphabet’s Google, to similar challenges.

In a statement, Apple said that its App Store has fueled competition. The company said the store is responsible for the creation of millions of jobs and more than $100 billion in payments to app developers.

“We are hopeful the Supreme Court will recognize Apple’s critical role as a marketplace for apps, and uphold existing legal precedent by finding in favor of Apple and the millions of developers who sell their apps on our platform,” the company said.

Despite affecting the biggest tech companies in the world, Monday’s case hinges on how the Supreme Court’s justices will apply a decidedly low-tech ruling from the latter half of the 20th century.

The precedent the court is revisiting was set in Illinois Brick Co. v. Illinois, a 1977 dispute in which the court ruled in favor of concrete brick manufacturers. The state of Illinois sued the brickmakers for allegedly inflating their prices, causing an increase in the the cost of public building projects.

The court ruled that even though the increased brick costs might hurt Illinois indirectly, only the contractors who actually bought the bricks had standing to sue. That established the so-called “Illinois brick doctrine,” which says that only the direct purchaser of a good can collect damages from a monopoly holder.

Apple, which is supported by the Justice Department, will argue Monday that it is not directly selling apps to iPhone users. Rather, Apple will say that it is acting as an agent for app developers, who ultimately are selling their wares to consumers. In exchange for the commission Apple takes on app sales, the company provides access to its vast user base and performs other services, such as malware detection.

That view is supported by The App Association, an industry group that represents developers. The group has said that, in its view, “the customer is unequivocally buying from the app developer, not the platform the developer sold their app through,” and cautioned that a ruling against Apple could jeopardize the app economy.

But the iPhone owners bringing the suit take a different view. They argue that Apple directly sells the apps in its store, and has gone to “great lengths” to keep it that way, both by establishing technical barriers to other marketplaces and by penalizing those who jailbreak their devices.

While Apple does not price the goods in its App Store, the iPhone users argue that Apple still exercises control over pricing. Apple requires that that any app sold have a price that ends in 99 cents, such as $1.99.

Herbert Hovenkamp, one of the country’s top antitrust experts and a professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Law and The Wharton School, the university’s business school, joined a brief supporting the iPhone owners in the case.

In an interview, Hovenkamp said that the case is distinct from Illinois Brick.

In that case, he said, it was the brickmakers who were alleged to be conspiring to inflate prices. But in this case, the equivalent party — the app developers — are innocent, potentially even victims of the alleged monopoly.

“Illinois Brick assumes that you’ve got an antitrust violator, and that violator sells to some innocent retailer or distributor, or someone in the middle, and then that innocent retailer sells to someone who then sues,” Hovenkamp said. But, in this case, it’s different: Apple, the alleged violator, is the one in the middle, he said.

A ruling is expected to come by late June.

WATCH: Steve Jobs defends his commitment to Apple on CNBC in 1997


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-26  Authors: tucker higgins, steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, supreme, illinois, developers, sued, court, app, brick, case, cant, apps, tell, iphone, dispute, store


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Zendesk pushes into Salesforce’s turf with new sales tool

Cloud customer-support software company Zendesk on Tuesday announced a new tool for salespeople and a compatible system for developing custom applications. It bought another customer service company, Assistly, and in 2012 rebranded it to Desk.com, an oblique reference to Zendesk. Now Zendesk is countering by introducing technology for sales, which is the core of Salesforce’s business. The Zendesk Sell tool will cost $19 per user per month and could help Zendesk to draw more revenue from its exis


Cloud customer-support software company Zendesk on Tuesday announced a new tool for salespeople and a compatible system for developing custom applications. It bought another customer service company, Assistly, and in 2012 rebranded it to Desk.com, an oblique reference to Zendesk. Now Zendesk is countering by introducing technology for sales, which is the core of Salesforce’s business. The Zendesk Sell tool will cost $19 per user per month and could help Zendesk to draw more revenue from its exis
Zendesk pushes into Salesforce’s turf with new sales tool Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: jordan novet, eric piermont, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, svane, turf, customers, variety, sales, developers, salesforces, today, using, company, service, pushes, tool, zendesk


Zendesk pushes into Salesforce's turf with new sales tool

Cloud customer-support software company Zendesk on Tuesday announced a new tool for salespeople and a compatible system for developing custom applications.

The moves could help Zendesk compete for important deals against archrival Salesforce, as well as Microsoft.

Salesforce tried and failed to buy Zendesk around 2011, CNBC previously reported. It bought another customer service company, Assistly, and in 2012 rebranded it to Desk.com, an oblique reference to Zendesk.

Now Zendesk is countering by introducing technology for sales, which is the core of Salesforce’s business.

“We know from a lot of our customers that whatever they do in customer service, often a big part of that is actually related to their sales processes,” Zendesk CEO Mikkel Svane told CNBC in an interview.

The Zendesk Sell tool will cost $19 per user per month and could help Zendesk to draw more revenue from its existing customers. It’s based on a product called Base, which Zendesk gained in the acquisition of FutureSimple in September.

With the development platform, called Sunshine, developers can build programs that work with a variety of data. It becomes easier to track customer-service conversations, purchases and shipments to specific customers from one place, for example.

Sunshine will be available free of charge as part of Zendesk’s enterprise tier of service. It was built in-house, Svane said.

The new development platform runs atop Amazon’s public cloud. The company isn’t insisting that developers learn new languages for building applications with the Zendesk Sunshine system. “We are leveraging the best of breed — what most of the world’s developers today are using to build applications,” Svane said.

Base has more than 5,000 customers. Zendesk announced a partnership with the company last year.

“The majority of the Zendesk base is not using Salesforce.com today and instead are on a variety of disparate sales tools, suggesting ample cross-selling opportunities,” Piper Jaffray analysts Alex Zukin, Scott Wilson and Taylor Reiners wrote in a note distributed to clients immediately following the acquisition announcement in September.

Zendesk went public in 2014. Today it generates about $550 million in annual revenue. Its stock is up 58 percent since the beginning of 2018, making the company worth about $5.7 billion.

WATCH: Zendesk CEO: Companies have a lot more choice for enterprise software


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-13  Authors: jordan novet, eric piermont, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, svane, turf, customers, variety, sales, developers, salesforces, today, using, company, service, pushes, tool, zendesk


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