HBO didn’t submit these 3 ‘Game of Thrones’ stars for an Emmy—so they did it themselves and got nominated

Sometimes, in order to get ahead, you need to be your own best advocate. Gwendoline Christie must know that classic piece of career advice, because when HBO did not submit the “Game of Thrones” star for Emmy consideration, she decided to take matters into her own hands — and now she’s an Emmy-nominated actress. According to The Hollywood Reporter, HBO, the network behind the massively popular fantasy series, confirmed on Wednesday that it did not submit Christie’s name to the Academy of Televisi


Sometimes, in order to get ahead, you need to be your own best advocate. Gwendoline Christie must know that classic piece of career advice, because when HBO did not submit the “Game of Thrones” star for Emmy consideration, she decided to take matters into her own hands — and now she’s an Emmy-nominated actress. According to The Hollywood Reporter, HBO, the network behind the massively popular fantasy series, confirmed on Wednesday that it did not submit Christie’s name to the Academy of Televisi
HBO didn’t submit these 3 ‘Game of Thrones’ stars for an Emmy—so they did it themselves and got nominated Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thrones, stars, paid, hollywood, didnt, emmyso, submit, emmy, entry, reporter, hbo, game, nominated, played


HBO didn't submit these 3 'Game of Thrones' stars for an Emmy—so they did it themselves and got nominated

Sometimes, in order to get ahead, you need to be your own best advocate.

Gwendoline Christie must know that classic piece of career advice, because when HBO did not submit the “Game of Thrones” star for Emmy consideration, she decided to take matters into her own hands — and now she’s an Emmy-nominated actress.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, HBO, the network behind the massively popular fantasy series, confirmed on Wednesday that it did not submit Christie’s name to the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences to be considered for a 2019 Emmy nomination for her work on the final season of “Game of Thrones,” ended its eight-season run in May.

Instead, Christie, along with her agents and managers paid her own $225 entry fee to enter herself into the running.

What’s more, actors Alfie Allen (who played Theon Greyjoy) and Carice van Houten (who played Melisandre) also paid their own entry fees to submit themselves for Emmy consideration, according to The Hollywood Reporter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thrones, stars, paid, hollywood, didnt, emmyso, submit, emmy, entry, reporter, hbo, game, nominated, played


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The Corvette, America’s sports car, almost didn’t survive the Great Recession

From the very start, GM didn’t quite know what to do with the Corvette. The first car, introduced in 1953 was a striking counterpart to the big sedans and station wagons that, at the time, dominated American highways. But the original Chevrolet Corvette featured a seriously underpowered six-cylinder engine, recalled Ken Gross, an author and automotive historian, and didn’t really click with buyers, only 700 being built for 1955. Things changed with the addition of a new, 283 cubic inch V-8 that,


From the very start, GM didn’t quite know what to do with the Corvette. The first car, introduced in 1953 was a striking counterpart to the big sedans and station wagons that, at the time, dominated American highways. But the original Chevrolet Corvette featured a seriously underpowered six-cylinder engine, recalled Ken Gross, an author and automotive historian, and didn’t really click with buyers, only 700 being built for 1955. Things changed with the addition of a new, 283 cubic inch V-8 that,
The Corvette, America’s sports car, almost didn’t survive the Great Recession Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: paul a eisenstein
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, took, inch, today, gm, didnt, great, popular, cubic, americas, original, recession, survive, corvette, really, car


The Corvette, America's sports car, almost didn't survive the Great Recession

Chevrolet’s official reveal of its eighth-generation Corvette in a splashy preview Thursday night near Los Angeles marks the culmination of a secret project that traces its roots back more than half a century.

But that’s no surprise. Over the years, much of the work on the “‘Vette” has been conducted out of sight — in some cases hidden even from the top brass at parent company General Motors which, at various points, have considered killing off what has come to be known as “America’s sports car.”

From the very start, GM didn’t quite know what to do with the Corvette. The original model was only intended to be a flashy concept vehicle, developed for the mobile Motorama car shows the automaker staged across the country, but the design proved so popular that GM rushed out plans to put it into production.

The first car, introduced in 1953 was a striking counterpart to the big sedans and station wagons that, at the time, dominated American highways. But the original Chevrolet Corvette featured a seriously underpowered six-cylinder engine, recalled Ken Gross, an author and automotive historian, and didn’t really click with buyers, only 700 being built for 1955.

Things changed with the addition of a new, 283 cubic inch V-8 that, Chevy advertised, offered “one hp per cubic inch.” Sales took off and the Corvette quickly found a place in popular culture, among other things serving as a star in its own rite in the popular TV series, “Route 66.”

But it was the second-generation Corvette that really took off. Today, the 1963 version, with its distinctive “split” rear window, has become one of the most popular American-made cars of the era with collectors, according to experts. Originally listed at $4,257, buyers can expect to pay as much as $100,000 or more for one in good condition today, according to the National Automobile Dealers Association.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-18  Authors: paul a eisenstein
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, took, inch, today, gm, didnt, great, popular, cubic, americas, original, recession, survive, corvette, really, car


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How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H


After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. H
How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


How a single mom of four switched careers to land a six-figure salary

After separating from her husband in June, single mom Shannon Lance found herself suddenly needing to earn enough to support four children. “I have a teaching degree but (teaching) won’t pay the bills for a family of five – it’s just not an option,” she told CNBC. “I thought about nursing, but the biggest drawback was that it required going back to school for two years to get another degree – I didn’t have two years, I have kids and bills to pay.” Despite being a self-confessed technophobe, Lance decided to learn computer coding after a suggestion from her brother-in-law, taking the plunge into an entirely new career path. Lance began her job search after completing an intensive 14-week program with Washington-based Coding Dojo. Just six days after beginning her job hunt, Lance secured a six-figure offer from travel expenses firm SAP Concur. In an interview with CNBC, she shared her tips on achieving success in a new career.

Value your ‘soft skills’

Although a career change can set you back in terms of direct industry experience, Lance urged others not to underestimate the value of basic core capabilities that appeal to employers — like strong communication or leadership skills. “I was (previously) a teacher and had a bunch of professional experience that gave me soft skills which helped land the job,” she said. “(That was) combined with having just coming out of a great program which gave me all the right tech skills.”

Be willing to learn

As well as considering how your skillset could be transferred to a new industry, Lance told CNBC that having the right attitude was a real asset when it came to landing a job with no direct experience. She said she was upfront about what she could and couldn’t do, taking the approach: “I don’t know a lot about it, but I do know a little bit – and I’m willing to learn more.” According to Lance, embracing those knowledge gaps and showcasing a desire for self-improvement could be just as valuable as experience to some employers. “For the job I got, the company was starting a new team that would be using new technology, so we’d all be learning whether they hired somebody with experience or not,” she said. “They wanted people who were capable of learning quickly and who could work and learn under pressure. Going through Coding Dojo proved I had those capabilities and that desire to keep learning.”

Work your own way

Although Lance didn’t feel intellectually limited while learning to code, she said comparing her own pace of work to others’ sometimes led to unnecessary frustration and could impact her confidence. “One challenge was the amount of time it took to get through everything. I don’t think I had trouble with the actual program, but I didn’t have any tech background, so every assignment would take me one and a half times as long as everyone else,” she told CNBC. “Some of the people in my group had played on computers since they were 12 — so the assignments only took 20 to 30 minutes for them to complete.” She said it was important to find your own way to get work done, rather than sticking to the chronological or seemingly “correct” method. Her coding program was organized into three sections, and when she initially attempted to do each assignment in order, Lance found herself falling behind. “I’d have to skip forward and go back again – that’s not a good strategy,” she said. Instead, she got through all of the reading and learning materials for each topic before attempting to complete an assignment. “Make sure you do the reading and homework way before you start struggling with (graded assignments and technical work),” she said. “And make sure you allow yourself enough time outside of class to get stuff done.” Lance also advised those considering a career change not to overestimate their own academic ability. “I was pretty good in school and didn’t have to study a lot,” she said. “I went into Coding Dojo thinking I could get it done quicker, underestimating how much time it would consume. (You have to let it) take as long as it takes.”

Seek support to switch career


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: chloe taylor
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, learning, switched, experience, program, single, work, salary, mom, coding, land, careers, job, didnt, career, lance, sixfigure


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Many high school students don’t understand how the college financial aid process works

Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.” That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans. More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accr


Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.” That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans. More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accr
Many high school students don’t understand how the college financial aid process works Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, loans, college, study, financial, process, didnt, center, high, aid, economic, dont, know, students, understand, school, works


Many high school students don't understand how the college financial aid process works

Students’ knowledge of the financial aid process is “shockingly low.”

That’s the takeaway from a new study by ACT, which in April 2018 surveyed about 1,200 high school students who were registered to take the standardized test.

Regardless of economic background, most families pointed to price as a very important consideration in choosing a college. Yet most students don’t understand the basic workings of financial aid, which includes grants, scholarships, work study and loans.

More than 70% of students didn’t know that loans from the government for undergraduate students are subsidized, meaning interest doesn’t accrue on them while the student is enrolled in college.

Most students also didn’t know that student loans can be repaid on an “income-driven ” plan, in which their monthly payments are capped at a percentage of their income.

Another recent study by the National Center for Education Statistics found that just 11% of ninth graders can correctly estimate the tuition and fees for one year at a public four-year college in their state. Around 57% overestimated the costs, and 32% underestimated them.

“The findings highlight an urgent need for more financial literacy-specific interventions, especially in light of the economic stakes at hand,” said Jim Larimore, chief officer for ACT’s Center for Equity in Learning.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-05  Authors: annie nova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, student, loans, college, study, financial, process, didnt, center, high, aid, economic, dont, know, students, understand, school, works


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Antitrust threats didn’t stop investors from plowing money into Big Tech in the first half of 2019

So far, 2019 has been a year of growth for the nation’s largest tech companies while U.S. lawmakers and regulators question how big is too big. Microsoft, currently the largest public tech company in the U.S. with a market cap topping $1 trillion, has also grown its shares more than 31% since the beginning of 2019. Netflix shares jumped more than 37% while Apple and Amazon both saw their stock prices rise more than 25%. Snap, which is much smaller than the other tech giants at a $19.2 billion ma


So far, 2019 has been a year of growth for the nation’s largest tech companies while U.S. lawmakers and regulators question how big is too big. Microsoft, currently the largest public tech company in the U.S. with a market cap topping $1 trillion, has also grown its shares more than 31% since the beginning of 2019. Netflix shares jumped more than 37% while Apple and Amazon both saw their stock prices rise more than 25%. Snap, which is much smaller than the other tech giants at a $19.2 billion ma
Antitrust threats didn’t stop investors from plowing money into Big Tech in the first half of 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grown, plowing, money, market, tech, stop, saw, shares, billion, investors, month, antitrust, big, cap, stock, didnt, regulators, half, threats


Antitrust threats didn't stop investors from plowing money into Big Tech in the first half of 2019

So far, 2019 has been a year of growth for the nation’s largest tech companies while U.S. lawmakers and regulators question how big is too big.

Four of the five FAANG stocks — Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Netflix— have grown their market value at least 25% over the past six months. Microsoft, currently the largest public tech company in the U.S. with a market cap topping $1 trillion, has also grown its shares more than 31% since the beginning of 2019.

Only Google parent company Alphabet saw more modest growth of 3.6% since the beginning of the year.

Of the group, Facebook saw the biggest rally in its stock price, jumping more than 47% since the beginning of the year to reach a market cap of $550.9 billion. Netflix shares jumped more than 37% while Apple and Amazon both saw their stock prices rise more than 25%.

During that time, lawmakers and regulators in the U.S. and abroad have lobbed criticism at Big Tech. Skeptics, which include presidential contenders like Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, say the tech firms have grown too large and abuse what they call dominant market positions.

While the refrain “break up Big Tech” had been floated around even before Warren’s policy proposal, investors seemed to see it as a more concrete possibility earlier this month. Shares of Facebook, Alphabet, Amazon and Apple tumbled following reports that top U.S. antitrust regulators were divvying up oversight responsibility over the companies.

But even over the past month, all of those companies except Alphabet have grown their stock price, showing investors are still largely confident in the tech industry’s staying power. Facebook’s stock actually went up after hours in April when it said it expected a one time charge of up to $5 billion in connection with the Federal Trade Commission’s investigation into whether it violated a 2011 consent decree.

Other major tech stocks are also having a great start to the year.

Snap, which is much smaller than the other tech giants at a $19.2 billion market cap, has seen explosive growth this year. The stock is up nearly 160% in 2019. Earlier this month, BTIG analysts wrote that the company’s comeback has been flying under investors’ radar as it has introduced new products and monetization opportunities.

Tesla, on the other hand, has had a more turbulent start to the year as it has entered cost-cutting mode. The company, which has a market cap of $39.5 billion, has seen its shares fall more than 32% in 2019.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

WATCH: Why Facebook’s business model is only now coming under fire


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-28  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grown, plowing, money, market, tech, stop, saw, shares, billion, investors, month, antitrust, big, cap, stock, didnt, regulators, half, threats


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Slack CEO explains why the company didn’t go public with a traditional IPO

The CEO of messaging firm Slack said that the company didn’t want to go public with a traditional IPO so that it could bypass the closed-door process of raising capital from private investors and hasten its access to the broader public capital market. In a direct listing, at least they have an opportunity,” Stewart Butterfield said in an interview with CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin on Thursday. In traditional IPO, new shares are created, underwritten and sold to the public, diluting existing stakeho


The CEO of messaging firm Slack said that the company didn’t want to go public with a traditional IPO so that it could bypass the closed-door process of raising capital from private investors and hasten its access to the broader public capital market. In a direct listing, at least they have an opportunity,” Stewart Butterfield said in an interview with CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin on Thursday. In traditional IPO, new shares are created, underwritten and sold to the public, diluting existing stakeho
Slack CEO explains why the company didn’t go public with a traditional IPO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, ipo, investors, company, traditional, listing, direct, theres, explains, wanted, slack, public, didnt


Slack CEO explains why the company didn't go public with a traditional IPO

The CEO of messaging firm Slack said that the company didn’t want to go public with a traditional IPO so that it could bypass the closed-door process of raising capital from private investors and hasten its access to the broader public capital market.

“I think there’s a lot of investors who are used to a model where they get a small allocation, they wanted a big one. In a direct listing, at least they have an opportunity,” Stewart Butterfield said in an interview with CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin on Thursday.

“And I think you saw that with Spotify: Some early institutional investors taking huge positions on day one,” he added. “The savings [from direct listing] aren’t that great, to be honest. And that’s certainly not the motivator.”

Wall Street’s latest high-profile addition, Slack is a workplace-oriented app designed to ease communication through chat channels, akin to large group messaging. The company hopes to appeal to a variety of companies and usurp email’s longstanding reign as the primary method of intra-office chatter.

Unlike other newsy debuts this year that followed the usual IPO playbook like Beyond Meat and Uber, Slack chose to launch through a process known as direct listing. In traditional IPO, new shares are created, underwritten and sold to the public, diluting existing stakeholders. In a direct listing, no new shares are created and are sold on the public market without underwriting and without a lockup period.

Spotify went public on April 3 using a direct listing, at the time representing one of the most prominent companies to do so. Corporate law firm Latham & Watkins, which represented the music streaming platform in its direct listing, wrote that Spotify wanted to list with as much transparency, access and price discovery as possible, a sentiment echoed by Slack’s chief.

“One of the hopes for a company like us is that there’s not too much volatility. And we are hoping that this model, where there’s many sellers and many buyers – supply and demand – we reach a market-clearing price a lot earlier,” Butterfield said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-20  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceo, ipo, investors, company, traditional, listing, direct, theres, explains, wanted, slack, public, didnt


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Apple didn’t just take the moral high ground on privacy, it twisted the knife into Google and Facebook

Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address during the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) at the San Jose Convention Center on June 03, 2019 in San Jose, California. Beyond the glitz of new iPhone features and a $6,000 new supercomputer, the underlying theme of Apple’s annual developers conference on Monday was privacy. The most significant announcement was “Sign in with Apple,” a new option developers can add to their apps so users can log in without having to create a separat


Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address during the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) at the San Jose Convention Center on June 03, 2019 in San Jose, California. Beyond the glitz of new iPhone features and a $6,000 new supercomputer, the underlying theme of Apple’s annual developers conference on Monday was privacy. The most significant announcement was “Sign in with Apple,” a new option developers can add to their apps so users can log in without having to create a separat
Apple didn’t just take the moral high ground on privacy, it twisted the knife into Google and Facebook Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, jose, google, doesnt, apples, san, moral, privacy, twisted, knife, high, ground, didnt, option, conference, log, facebook, apps, developers


Apple didn't just take the moral high ground on privacy, it twisted the knife into Google and Facebook

Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address during the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) at the San Jose Convention Center on June 03, 2019 in San Jose, California.

Beyond the glitz of new iPhone features and a $6,000 new supercomputer, the underlying theme of Apple’s annual developers conference on Monday was privacy.

The Apple Watch’s new hearing protection feature doesn’t record ambient noise around you. Security cameras connected to Apple’s HomeKit system will encrypt your video feeds. And so on.

The most significant announcement was “Sign in with Apple,” a new option developers can add to their apps so users can log in without having to create a separate username and password. It’s similar to all those log in buttons you see across apps and websites from Facebook and Google, except Apple says its solution doesn’t gather any personal data from you. In fact, it gives you the option to scramble your email address so a third-party never gets to store it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, jose, google, doesnt, apples, san, moral, privacy, twisted, knife, high, ground, didnt, option, conference, log, facebook, apps, developers


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61-year-old self-made millionaire: 4 things I regret wasting money and time on in my 20s

Here are the top four things I regret spending my time and money on:1. I should have been spending that money on things that would help me develop new skills, gain knowledge and make powerful connections. I was also spending money I didn’t have on airfare, hotels and food. Let everyone else in their 20s sleep like they’re rich. Let everyone else in their 20s sleep like they’re rich.


Here are the top four things I regret spending my time and money on:1. I should have been spending that money on things that would help me develop new skills, gain knowledge and make powerful connections. I was also spending money I didn’t have on airfare, hotels and food. Let everyone else in their 20s sleep like they’re rich. Let everyone else in their 20s sleep like they’re rich.
61-year-old self-made millionaire: 4 things I regret wasting money and time on in my 20s Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: grant cardone
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sleep, school, dont, 61yearold, regret, rich, things, travel, money, selfmade, didnt, spending, 20s, millionaire, wasting


61-year-old self-made millionaire: 4 things I regret wasting money and time on in my 20s

It’s been more than 40 years since I graduated high school — and a lot has changed since then. I’m older, wiser, wealthier and much more successful. I’ve built a multimillion-dollar business and am the CEO of seven privately held companies. But there’s always room for improvement — even at age 61. In order to do that, it’s important to acknowledge past failures and learn from them. Looking back at my 20s, there was so much I didn’t know about money. With what little I earned, I wasted on useless things that didn’t benefit me at all. Here are the top four things I regret spending my time and money on:

1. Drugs and alcohol

If I could go back in time, I’d tell my younger self: “Your education doesn’t stop after college.” After graduating high school, I became obsessed with all the wrong things. I spent money on drugs and alcohol — and even developed an addiction problem. I should have been spending that money on things that would help me develop new skills, gain knowledge and make powerful connections. In the real world, your high school diploma is useless, and your college degree won’t get you very far if you don’t have the right skills to keep up with the marketplace. Investing in yourself will only make you more valuable and increase your earning potential. I didn’t realize any of this until much later. At 25, I spent my last $3,000 on an audio program that taught me about sales and how to close deals. I can honestly say that the investment and commitment to go “all in” are the reasons for my success today.

2. Traveling

Kevin O’Leary says that taking a gap year to travel is a bad idea — and I couldn’t agree more. I took so much time off early in my entrepreneurial career that it almost derailed me. I was also spending money I didn’t have on airfare, hotels and food. A lot of millennials today find themselves in a similar position. They have the urge to travel because they have no purpose at work. They believe time off will help them find that “something” that’s missing in their careers. When you don’t know what you should be doing, it’s easy to put life on hold, go backpacking, stay in hostels and eat ramen. I’m not saying you can’t ever take any time off. I can travel the world in my own plane today because I ultimately decided to put in the hard work. Get obsessed with your purpose, and you’ll find that your travel plans can wait. Comfort is the enemy of abundance. Don’t let an $800 ticket to Europe get in the way of your freedom.

3. Sleeping in

When you’re young, it’s easy to be lazy and not feel guilty about it. But guess what? The rich and successful get a good night’s rest, but they don’t sleep in.

Let everyone else in their 20s sleep like they’re rich. You should be up at the crack of dawn.

One of my biggest regrets was not taking advantage of all the hours in a day. I allowed myself to feel content when I should have been mapping out my goals and figuring out how to achieve them. Had I realized my full potential in my 20s, I would reached my first million a lot sooner. Let everyone else in their 20s sleep like they’re rich. You should be up at the crack of dawn. Speed is power, and when you’re young, patience is not a virtue. Today’s marketplace is changing at the speed of light, so you need to be nimble to get ahead.

4. Being too comfortable in my jobs


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-30  Authors: grant cardone
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sleep, school, dont, 61yearold, regret, rich, things, travel, money, selfmade, didnt, spending, 20s, millionaire, wasting


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‘Don’t say we didn’t warn you’: A phrase from China signals the trade war could get even worse

“We advise the U.S. side not to underestimate the Chinese side’s ability to safeguard its development rights and interests. Don’t say we didn’t warn you!” the People’s Daily said in a commentary titled “United States, don’t underestimate China’s ability to strike back.” The phrase “Don’t say we didn’t warn you” was only used two other times in history by the People’s Daily — in 1962 before China’s border war with India and ahead of the 1979 China-Vietnam War. “Will rare earths become a counter w


“We advise the U.S. side not to underestimate the Chinese side’s ability to safeguard its development rights and interests. Don’t say we didn’t warn you!” the People’s Daily said in a commentary titled “United States, don’t underestimate China’s ability to strike back.” The phrase “Don’t say we didn’t warn you” was only used two other times in history by the People’s Daily — in 1962 before China’s border war with India and ahead of the 1979 China-Vietnam War. “Will rare earths become a counter w
‘Don’t say we didn’t warn you’: A phrase from China signals the trade war could get even worse Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-29  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, underestimate, say, peoples, used, united, rare, signals, didnt, trade, war, phrase, publication, dont, china, states, worse, warn


'Don't say we didn't warn you': A phrase from China signals the trade war could get even worse

The biggest Chinese newspaper explicitly warned the U.S. on Wednesday that China would cut off rare earth minerals as a countermeasure in the escalated trade battle, using an expression the publication has only used twice in history, both of which involved full-on wars.

“We advise the U.S. side not to underestimate the Chinese side’s ability to safeguard its development rights and interests. Don’t say we didn’t warn you!” the People’s Daily said in a commentary titled “United States, don’t underestimate China’s ability to strike back.” The publication is the official newspaper of the Communist Party of China.

The phrase “Don’t say we didn’t warn you” was only used two other times in history by the People’s Daily — in 1962 before China’s border war with India and ahead of the 1979 China-Vietnam War.

“Will rare earths become a counter weapon for China to hit back against the pressure the United States has put on for no reason at all? The answer is no mystery,” the paper said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-29  Authors: yun li
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, underestimate, say, peoples, used, united, rare, signals, didnt, trade, war, phrase, publication, dont, china, states, worse, warn


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Cramer: US companies are getting hurt by tariffs because ‘they didn’t think Trump had the resolve’

Some American companies “let themselves get hurt” by tariffs because they assumed President Donald Trump wouldn’t follow through on his China trade threats, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Thursday. “They didn’t think Trump had the resolve,” Cramer said on “Squawk Box. Cramer praised Cisco Systems after the U.S.-based networking equipment maker said Wednesday that it had reduced its manufacturing in China in anticipation of increased tariffs by the Trump administration. Cramer has voiced support for Trum


Some American companies “let themselves get hurt” by tariffs because they assumed President Donald Trump wouldn’t follow through on his China trade threats, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Thursday. “They didn’t think Trump had the resolve,” Cramer said on “Squawk Box. Cramer praised Cisco Systems after the U.S.-based networking equipment maker said Wednesday that it had reduced its manufacturing in China in anticipation of increased tariffs by the Trump administration. Cramer has voiced support for Trum
Cramer: US companies are getting hurt by tariffs because ‘they didn’t think Trump had the resolve’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariff, companies, resolve, trade, higher, told, week, didnt, china, hurt, tariffs, getting, trump, cramer, think, cisco


Cramer: US companies are getting hurt by tariffs because 'they didn't think Trump had the resolve'

Some American companies “let themselves get hurt” by tariffs because they assumed President Donald Trump wouldn’t follow through on his China trade threats, CNBC’s Jim Cramer said Thursday.

“They didn’t think Trump had the resolve,” Cramer said on “Squawk Box. “That proved to be wrong,” he said but added that some negative impact from the U.S.-China trade war is unavoidable.

Cramer praised Cisco Systems after the U.S.-based networking equipment maker said Wednesday that it had reduced its manufacturing in China in anticipation of increased tariffs by the Trump administration.

Cisco Chairman and CEO Chuck Robbins told Cramer on “Mad Money ” Wednesday evening that the current tariff risk to the company is “relatively immaterial at this point and built in to our guidance.”

However, Cisco’s CFO, Kelly Kramer, sitting next to Robbins, said if the Trump administration were to impose tariffs on the rest of China’s imports, that would not only impact Cisco but “every industry out there.”

Those tariff reassurances and better-than-expected fiscal third-quarter earnings late Wednesday boosted Dow-stock Cisco more than 5% early Thursday. That, coupled with better-than-expected earnings from Walmart, another component in the average, and a similar stock move higher for the retailer early Thursday, helped boost the market at the open.

If the Dow Jones Industrial Average, the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq were to close higher Thursday, that would be a three-day winning streak and perhaps a break in the negative sentiment surrounding trade headlines earlier this week.

The Trump administration last week increased duties on $200 billion worth of Chinese products from 10% to 25%. On Monday, in retaliation, China announced plans to raise tariffs rates on $60 billion in U.S. goods. The president has also been threatening all along to put tariffs on the rest of China’s imports.

Cramer has voiced support for Trump’s tougher stance on China but has also advised investors to load up on names that can withstand higher tariffs.

He reported last week that people were saying that American companies that did not reduce their China exposure after months and months of watching Washington and Beijing clash on trade have only themselves to blame.

“I’m also told that they are like, ‘Are you kidding me, you had a full year to move out of China. If you didn’t move out of China now, it’s your own fault,'” Cramer said at the time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tariff, companies, resolve, trade, higher, told, week, didnt, china, hurt, tariffs, getting, trump, cramer, think, cisco


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