I quit my high-paying finance job to start a side hustle. Now it’s making millions—here’s how I did it

Exploring a new opportunity while still having financial security from my full-time job was enormously fulfilling. This gave me the confidence to finally leave my finance job and officially launch WellPath , which makes customized nutritional products, in 2014. Meanwhile, I was still grinding at my high-paying, full-time job in investment banking, which often required 80-hour workweeks. That can be time-consuming for those who also juggle a full-time job. In fact, 27% of the 2,550 adults surveye


Exploring a new opportunity while still having financial security from my full-time job was enormously fulfilling.
This gave me the confidence to finally leave my finance job and officially launch WellPath , which makes customized nutritional products, in 2014.
Meanwhile, I was still grinding at my high-paying, full-time job in investment banking, which often required 80-hour workweeks.
That can be time-consuming for those who also juggle a full-time job.
In fact, 27% of the 2,550 adults surveye
I quit my high-paying finance job to start a side hustle. Now it’s making millions—here’s how I did it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: collin darretta
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quit, making, start, millionsheres, job, hustle, hobby, finance, career, project, working, didnt, highpaying, wellpath, work, fulltime, business


I quit my high-paying finance job to start a side hustle. Now it's making millions—here's how I did it

In addition to not having to give up one for the other, I was able to dip my toes into the entrepreneurial waters. The skills I developed in finance also served me well in turning my hobby into a business .

Exploring a new opportunity while still having financial security from my full-time job was enormously fulfilling.

My passion project took on a number of iterations and forms. In 2011, it turned into a small-scale, at-home operation. This gave me the confidence to finally leave my finance job and officially launch WellPath , which makes customized nutritional products, in 2014.

I started my career as a banker at Goldman Sachs and, in 2008, moved on to Caxton-Iseman (now CI Capital Partners). I had always been interested in wellness and nutrition , but my desire to gain every competitive advantage for my job in finance — including getting better sleep, staying more focused and shaking off stress — was leading me down an entirely new career path.

Soon, friends who saw my lab of makeshift supplements would say, “Man, I wish someone could do that for me.” And so I did. Meanwhile, I was still grinding at my high-paying, full-time job in investment banking, which often required 80-hour workweeks.

I was sorting, mixing and matching pills and powders — refining my nutritional supplement regimen on a quest for self-optimization. I did plenty of research and took courses in health and nutrition, which helped me differentiate products that are worth their salt from ones that are just snake oil.

According to a 2019 report from Bankrate, Americans spend an average of 12 hours per week working on projects related to their side hustle, and earn an average of $1,122 per month.

That can be time-consuming for those who also juggle a full-time job. But it’s not a bad thing; working on things you enjoy can be good for your mental health. In fact, 27% of the 2,550 adults surveyed said they’re more passionate about their side gig than their full-time job.

Here’s how I was able to make money off my side hobby without having to immediately compromise my primary career in the process:

1. I didn’t let my passion project take over my life.

While I was testing the waters of entrepreneurship, I was first and foremost working my butt off in the world of finance.

The nutrition stuff was for fun, but letting my hobby impact the quality of the work I did during the day would have tanked my career. If you’re embarking on a side project, make sure that it doesn’t detract — in performance or in perception — from your current job.

Also, to ensure you’re not sabotaging your career, investigate your company’s policy on side projects: Some don’t allow them, while others actively encourage them.

2. I built in structure and accountability.

I didn’t monetize WellPath until after I left the world of finance.

Before taking that leap, I made sure there was enough opportunity to turn what was only a hobby into a profitable business. I iterated possible services until I hit on a real pain point that I would be able to subsequently develop and test solutions for.

If you decide that your hobby is worth exploring as a business venture, build a schedule and allocate your time. Hold yourself accountable by sharing your timetable with trusted confidants in your immediate inner circle. The social pressure of delivering on your word can be a powerful motivator.

3. I found the right market for my service.

As interested as I was in personalized nutritional supplements, I knew that not everyone felt the same. That’s why I did rigorous research and conducted several surveys to find the right market for my services.

Your milestones will be different depending on what your hobby is, but it’s important to identify and nail them down early; understand the biggest pain points of your target consumer base and explore how your idea can solve them.

Then, test those ideas on a small group of paying customers to discover the market’s likely reaction.

4. I tried…and failed.

To keep pushing forward, I had to get comfortable with failure. The faster you can plow through and learn from your mistakes, the sooner you can understand whether your side project might ultimately be the kernel of a thriving business.

Pursuing your interests outside of work isn’t always about building up a side hustle. You also build skills that positively impact your growth in your current career — often in ways that wouldn’t be possible in your primary job.

5. I didn’t quit.

Today, about 80% of my working hours are spent building WellPath, which has already generated millions in revenue. (The rest of my time is spent working on DojoMojo, a marketing platform company I co-founded in 2016.)

Last year, WellPath sold more than 100,000 individual products to consumers across the US. We’re currently on pace to quadruple that number — and our revenue — by the end of this year.

Getting WellPath up and running wasn’t easy. There were several times when I wanted to quit, but didn’t. I know that continuing to grow the success of my business won’t get any easier, but there’s nothing better than seeing all your hard work pay off.

Colin Darretta is the founder of WellPath and co-founder of DojoMojo. Formerly, he worked as an investment banker at Goldman Sachs and Caxton-Iseman (now CI Capital Partners).

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: collin darretta
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, quit, making, start, millionsheres, job, hustle, hobby, finance, career, project, working, didnt, highpaying, wellpath, work, fulltime, business


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Bill Gates: ‘I didn’t even want to meet Warren Buffett’ —but their first dinner conversation changed everything

There seems to be no shortage of people eager to meet Warren Buffett. And yet, fellow billionaire Bill Gates says he wasn’t even sure he wanted to meet Buffett at all before the two iconic businessmen finally crossed paths in the early 1990s. In an interview at The New York Times/DealBook conference on Wednesday, the Microsoft co-founder explained why he was initially reluctant to meet with Buffett. That was my view before I met him … he wasn’t going to tell me about inventing something,” Gates


There seems to be no shortage of people eager to meet Warren Buffett.
And yet, fellow billionaire Bill Gates says he wasn’t even sure he wanted to meet Buffett at all before the two iconic businessmen finally crossed paths in the early 1990s.
In an interview at The New York Times/DealBook conference on Wednesday, the Microsoft co-founder explained why he was initially reluctant to meet with Buffett.
That was my view before I met him … he wasn’t going to tell me about inventing something,” Gates
Bill Gates: ‘I didn’t even want to meet Warren Buffett’ —but their first dinner conversation changed everything Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conversation, bill, didnt, buffett, investors, microsoft, dinner, meeting, wasnt, gates, warren, meet, thats, value, changed


Bill Gates: 'I didn't even want to meet Warren Buffett' —but their first dinner conversation changed everything

There seems to be no shortage of people eager to meet Warren Buffett.

Every year, investors flock to the annual meeting of Berkshire Hathaway, the billionaire investor’s holding company, to catch a glimpse of Buffett and possibly ask him a question. And the annual charity auction for a lunch with Buffett now regularly fields multi-million dollar bids (this year’s winner paid nearly $4.6 million, even if he did postpone at the last minute).

And yet, fellow billionaire Bill Gates says he wasn’t even sure he wanted to meet Buffett at all before the two iconic businessmen finally crossed paths in the early 1990s. In an interview at The New York Times/DealBook conference on Wednesday, the Microsoft co-founder explained why he was initially reluctant to meet with Buffett.

“I didn’t even want to meet Warren because I thought, ‘Hey this guy buys and sells things, and so he found imperfections in terms of markets, that’s not value added to society, that’s a zero-sum game that is almost parasitic.’ That was my view before I met him … he wasn’t going to tell me about inventing something,” Gates said at the conference.

Gates simply felt that he and Buffett operated too differently in the world of business for there to be any value in them meeting and sharing insights — Buffett is an investor looking to create value for himself and his shareholders, while Gates, especially at that point in Microsoft’s history, was more focused on building software that would change the way people and businesses use computers in their daily lives. (His company released its first Microsoft Office suite and Windows 3.0 in 1990, a year before Gates and Buffett actually did meet).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-08  Authors: tom huddleston jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, conversation, bill, didnt, buffett, investors, microsoft, dinner, meeting, wasnt, gates, warren, meet, thats, value, changed


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How brands get your phone number and call after they see you on their website

It was StubHub, telling him he could get a 5% discount for the tickets if he bought them immediately over the phone. “It was surprising because I didn’t even realize they had my phone number,” Kerpen, an author and entrepreneur, told CNBC. She said the practice is to first reach out by email then follow up by phone. It’s not surprising that a big internet company — StubHub is owned by eBay — would track consumer activity on the web. Last week, comedy writer Ariel Dumas wrote on Twitter that she


It was StubHub, telling him he could get a 5% discount for the tickets if he bought them immediately over the phone.
“It was surprising because I didn’t even realize they had my phone number,” Kerpen, an author and entrepreneur, told CNBC.
She said the practice is to first reach out by email then follow up by phone.
It’s not surprising that a big internet company — StubHub is owned by eBay — would track consumer activity on the web.
Last week, comedy writer Ariel Dumas wrote on Twitter that she
How brands get your phone number and call after they see you on their website Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brands, stubhub, consumers, tickets, phone, right, company, website, didnt, comment, number, kerpen, wayfair


How brands get your phone number and call after they see you on their website

A Wayfair employee works at his desk at the Boston headquarters of Wayfair on July 31, 2018.

Dave Kerpen was hoping prices would drop on some expensive tickets for a late-September New York Mets game. He kept checking the prices to no avail.

At one point, he checked his StubHub app and added the tickets to his cart. He decided not to buy just then, and closed the app.

Almost right away, he got a phone call. It was StubHub, telling him he could get a 5% discount for the tickets if he bought them immediately over the phone.

“It was surprising because I didn’t even realize they had my phone number,” Kerpen, an author and entrepreneur, told CNBC. “If it startled me, it probably startled most people.”

Creepiness aside, Kerpens said he was disappointed in the meek 5% discount offer and didn’t buy the tickets, but added “it probably works part of the time or they wouldn’t be doing it.”

A StubHub spokeswoman said the company began doing this more than three years ago “for select events” to help consumers with factors like the best seat or the best day to attend an event. She said the practice is to first reach out by email then follow up by phone. Kerpen said he had not received an email.

“When consumers are considering a high cost purchase, there is a desire for a more personal touch, which can give them greater confidence,” StubHub wrote in an emailed statement.

It’s not surprising that a big internet company — StubHub is owned by eBay — would track consumer activity on the web. That’s how brands target users with such increasing precision and how data collection firms build comprehensive profiles that can help advertisers get the messages to the right people at the right time.

But after several years of high-profile scandals over how big internet companies like Facebook collect and use data from users, consumers are paying a lot more attention — especially if they’re not sure how a website got their number.

Last week, comedy writer Ariel Dumas wrote on Twitter that she received a phone call from furniture retailer Wayfair while browsing its website. She wasn’t happy about it.

A Wayfair spokeswoman told CNBC in an emailed statement that the company recently started testing outbound calls to less than 1% of customers “to assist them in the shopping process.”

“We do not make any outbound phone calls based on real-time site activity,” the representative said. “In all cases, customers receive an introductory email from the team prior to any phone outreach.”

Critics have also taken to Twitter to criticize T-Mobile, ePromos, Staples and Liberty Mutual for what they claim is similar behavior. ePromos and Staples didn’t respond to a request for comment. Liberty Mutual did not provide a comment as of press time. T-Mobile declined to comment on the record.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-07  Authors: megan graham
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brands, stubhub, consumers, tickets, phone, right, company, website, didnt, comment, number, kerpen, wayfair


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27-year-old tech CEO had to convince banks he wasn’t ‘just a kid’ — now his clients include Capital One

In 2016, less than a year into founding his financial services consulting company, Kishan Patel, then 24, was close to landing his first half-million-dollar contract. Even though Patel’s company, Kunai, had already passed through several phases of vetting, the potential client had one final request: a site visit. Kishan Patel CEO, KunaiHis first six months in business, Patel says he constantly thought about giving up. Rather than focusing on what would make money, bringing in clients, Patel says


In 2016, less than a year into founding his financial services consulting company, Kishan Patel, then 24, was close to landing his first half-million-dollar contract.
Even though Patel’s company, Kunai, had already passed through several phases of vetting, the potential client had one final request: a site visit.
Kishan Patel CEO, KunaiHis first six months in business, Patel says he constantly thought about giving up.
Rather than focusing on what would make money, bringing in clients, Patel says
27-year-old tech CEO had to convince banks he wasn’t ‘just a kid’ — now his clients include Capital One Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, youre, convince, kunai, companies, clients, ceo, capital, patel, wasnt, hard, include, work, didnt, kishan, 27yearold, kid, banks, tech


27-year-old tech CEO had to convince banks he wasn't 'just a kid' — now his clients include Capital One

In 2016, less than a year into founding his financial services consulting company, Kishan Patel, then 24, was close to landing his first half-million-dollar contract. Even though Patel’s company, Kunai, had already passed through several phases of vetting, the potential client had one final request: a site visit. At the time, Kunai had 10 employees, most of whom worked remotely — and the “office” was basically a school desk and school chairs. “It looked like a dump,” he recalls. The CEO had to improvise, and fast. He spruced up the office and called in a big favor from dozens of former coworkers: He asked them to work from his office for the day. “The client walked around and saw that we were a small, but bustling team,” Patel says. And his company landed the contract. Patel, now 27, has founded a total of three companies and learned a lot about how to be taken seriously as an entrepreneur even when you’re young. Here are some of his key takeaways.

Push past your fears

By the time Patel founded Kunai in 2015, he had two prior ventures under his belt. In high school, he launched a website to promote independent music. (“It failed miserably.”) And along with one of his professors at the University of Southern California, he started an e-greeting card company incorporating video clips. (“It didn’t work out, either.”) As Patel was winding down that second company in 2014, he met with Monsoon, an app-development agency focused on start-ups and other companies in the San Francisco Bay area. But six months after he joined the agency as a partner, Monsoon was acquired by Capital One. This meant that Patel was out of work — but not out of ideas. He saw an opportunity to fill a void. He realized that banks and other financial services companies have come to rely on technology to serve their customers. Because that’s not their specialty, they need help. “These large companies often struggle to be as nimble and fast-moving as their fintech counterparts,” Patel says. That’s where he envisioned Kunai, named for a weapon ninjas use, coming into play. While Patel had been building websites since he was 15 and felt comfortable navigating tough technical topics, he didn’t know what was needed to start the business he envisioned. He says he spent “inordinate amounts of time” doing research and Googling questions like, “How do you set up a tech consulting company?”

When you’re sitting alone in your bedroom trying to figure out what’s going to happen next with the company, doubt starts to creep in and pretty consistently. Kishan Patel CEO, Kunai

His first six months in business, Patel says he constantly thought about giving up. He was running the company with one other partner who he didn’t see very often. “When you’re sitting alone in your bedroom trying to figure out what’s going to happen next with the company, doubt starts to creep in and pretty consistently.” Rather than focusing on what would make money, bringing in clients, Patel says he worried about everything else. “You lose all sense of rational thinking because you’ve taken what feels like the biggest leap in your life and there’s no safety net beneath you,” he says. “But you need to push past it by realizing it’s just a part of the journey. Self-doubt and feeling lost are not phases, they’re constant.”

Hustle to get traction

Patel came to realize that Kunai’s success depended on his hustle. There was always another call to make, another meeting to secure, and he had to “completely exhaust those options” before throwing in the towel: “If you don’t land, it’s back to where you were before, working at a company you don’t love.” So Patel became “very scrappy” about getting meetings with potential clients. Selling some of the world’s largest banks on a two-person start-up based in Oakland, California, with developers in Ukraine? That was unconventional, Patel says: “We had to convince people.” And there was an extra hurdle. Most of his potential clients were headquartered in New York, so Patel had to travel across the country to try to get new deals. On several occasions Patel mentioned he’d be in New York, even though he didn’t actually have a trip booked. The bet often paid off; if the other person suggested they meet, Patel would go ahead and book a last-minute flight.

Courtesy Kishan Patel

His commitment came at a cost, however. “Financially, things [got] really difficult, especially when [I was] hustling to get traction,” he says. While the company made about $30,000 after taxes in 2015, Patel put his salary on hold to keep the business afloat. He also turned to other extreme measures he doesn’t necessarily recommend. “I found myself scrambling to figure out how I could use loopholes in my personal credit cards, Venmo, and a bunch of moving money around to keep my landlord, my utilities, and my internet going,” Patel recalls. He watched as his once near-perfect credit score tanked to subprime levels and one of his credit card issuers sent him to collections: “It was rough.” He was also trying, mostly unsuccessfully, to scrape together extra money: Buying cheap watches and reselling them on eBay, crowdfunding an inflatable couch with friends, and trying to start a meme Instagram account. “Most of it was nothing more than a distraction,” he says.

Craft your image

As Patel began meeting with more potential clients in New York, he faced a conundrum. He wanted to distinguish himself from the big consulting companies that employ 100,000-plus people, but he didn’t want his age to become an issue. “In those early days, I was wearing the most ridiculous clothing,” Patel recounts, including “terrible” shirts with fish on them or Members Only jackets in “obscene” colors. On the other side of the table? People in suits. Patel’s attire was intentional, though. “If you speak their language but dress differently, there’s an inconsistency that clicks in their mind,” he says. “They think, ‘He’s saying the things I want to hear and need to hear, and he’s using my terminology, but he knows some other world that I don’t.'”

It’s hard telling large publicly traded companies that your little company can help them build cool technology. It’s especially hard if they think you’re just a kid. Kishan Patel CEO, Kunai

Since many of these meetings were with senior level people who were two or even three times his age, though, Patel needed creative ways to avoid small talk about his personal life that might reveal just how young he was. He’d made up stories previously, a decision he regretted because he didn’t want to lie or have to deflect questions about a wife or kids with jokes. So he went shopping. “I ordered a cheap ring off Amazon in the hopes that clients would notice it and wouldn’t go there,” Patel recalls. “It’s hard telling large publicly traded companies that your little company can help them build cool technology. It’s especially hard if they think you’re just a kid.”

Learn from your mistakes

While many of his peers are still working their way up the corporate ladder, Patel has been grappling with the responsibility of being a CEO for years. Three months after starting Kunai, Patel had to lay off a team of 30 — people he’d brought on board from his prior job — because “it just wasn’t working out,” he recalls. “It sucked. I felt like I let them and the team down,” even though he offered the workers two months’ notice and helped them land new jobs. Thanks in part to landing that $500,000 deal with the new client in 2016, Patel started paying himself a salary that year, and his credit score began bouncing back. Family members who’d previously asked, mostly in jest, if he needed to go look for a job started taking his venture more seriously, especially as he began working with companies they recognized. Building the business nearly five years in isn’t necessarily easier, but it’s “decisively less hard,” Patel says. “Once you have a few notches on your belt, it’s a lot easier to talk about the good work you’ve done and to focus on the results you’ve created for your clients.” Growing the company also brings other pressure: “It’s constantly on my mind that we’re responsible for 65 people and their source of income.”

Once you have a few notches on your belt, it’s a lot easier to talk about the good work you’ve done. Kishan Patel CEO, Kunai

What’s next


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-06  Authors: anna-louise jackson
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, youre, convince, kunai, companies, clients, ceo, capital, patel, wasnt, hard, include, work, didnt, kishan, 27yearold, kid, banks, tech


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Chrissy Teigen didn’t have a bank account and ate McDonald’s to save money at the start of her career

Before Chrissy Teigen was a successful model, TV host and internet personality with 11.9 million Twitter followers, she struggled financially, she told Vanity Fair for its November issue. “I had no credit cards, I didn’t have a bank account,” Teigen told Vanity Fair about her first years working as a model. “I knew exactly how much it was with tax to get a McDouble and fries,” Teigen told the magazine. “I did from the pilot season to first, but then I got demoted because I couldn’t walk down the


Before Chrissy Teigen was a successful model, TV host and internet personality with 11.9 million Twitter followers, she struggled financially, she told Vanity Fair for its November issue.
“I had no credit cards, I didn’t have a bank account,” Teigen told Vanity Fair about her first years working as a model.
“I knew exactly how much it was with tax to get a McDouble and fries,” Teigen told the magazine.
“I did from the pilot season to first, but then I got demoted because I couldn’t walk down the
Chrissy Teigen didn’t have a bank account and ate McDonald’s to save money at the start of her career Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lived, teigens, teigen, legend, vanity, chrissy, start, save, didnt, modeling, lives, mcdonalds, bank, money, told, models, career, parents, ate


Chrissy Teigen didn't have a bank account and ate McDonald's to save money at the start of her career

Before Chrissy Teigen was a successful model, TV host and internet personality with 11.9 million Twitter followers, she struggled financially, she told Vanity Fair for its November issue.

“I had no credit cards, I didn’t have a bank account,” Teigen told Vanity Fair about her first years working as a model.

In 2018, Teigen’s net worth was $11.5 million, according to Forbes’ ranking of highest paid models last year.

The 33-year-old was ranked one of the highest-paid models in the world by Forbes in 2017 and 2018, and appeared on the cover of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition in 2014. Teigen has also written two cookbooks that made the New York Times bestseller’s list, and co-hosts multiple TV shows, including Paramount Network’s “Lip Sync Battle” and NBC’s “Bring the Funny.”

Teigen’s entertainment career started at 18, when she was discovered by a photographer while working at a surf shop in Huntington Beach, California. After modeling gigs started to interfere with her retail job, she quit and moved to Miami part-time to pursue modeling. There, she lived with six other models in the living room of an apartment, and lived paycheck to paycheck, according to Vanity Fair.

To cut costs, Teigen would eat at McDonald’s. “I knew exactly how much it was with tax to get a McDouble and fries,” Teigen told the magazine.

Teigen appeared on “Deal or No Deal,” which debuted on NBC in 2005, as a “briefcase girl.” “I did from the pilot season to first, but then I got demoted because I couldn’t walk down the stairs,” Teigen told Andy Cohen on Bravo’s “Watch What Happens Live.”

In 2007, Teigen appeared in a music video with singer John Legend for his song “Stereo.” The pair have been married since 2013 and have two children, Luna, 3, and Miles, 1. Legend, who is considered an “EGOT” for his Emmy, Grammy, Oscars and Tony’s awards. Before making music, Legend graduated from the University of Pennsylvania at 20 and worked as a consultant for Boston Consulting Group.

Fame has allowed Teigen to give back to her parents and see them be “comfortable for once in their lives,” she told MarketWatch in May 2019. Teigen’s mother is from Thailand, and moved to Utah to be with her father, where they lived in a trailer and worked in a tavern. Today, Teigen’s mother lives at home with her in Beverly Hills, while her father lives nearby in the same neighborhood.

Giving back to her parents has always been important to Teigen. “I remember all those times I was Western Unioning my parents when I was 20 living in Miami not making anything because all the checks you would make would go back into modeling and being sucked into your apartment that you’re being overcharged for,” she said.

These days, Teigen is known for being outspoken on the internet and in real life, which is a trait that she said allowed her to be successful. She told MarketWatch that she thinks it’s important to use your voice to “tell people what you want and what will make the job go better.”

“I understand people have tough bosses, but I think there are ways to say things to people where they can understand that this isn’t just about the job, this is about my personal well-being; my happiness; my mental health,” she said. “I don’t want to just work, I want to live and work and be happy.”

Disclosure: NBCUniversal is the parent company of NBC, Bravo and CNBC.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-28  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lived, teigens, teigen, legend, vanity, chrissy, start, save, didnt, modeling, lives, mcdonalds, bank, money, told, models, career, parents, ate


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Harvey Weinstein confronted by multiple people at New York City bar

A number of people reported confrontations with accused sexual predator Harvey Weinstein after the embattled filmmaker made an appearance at a New York City bar Wednesday night. “Harvey Weinstein was out with friends enjoying the music and trying to find some solace in his life that has been turned upside down,” a spokesman for Weinstein told NBC News. A person named Zoe Stuckless posted video of themselves confronting Weinstein at the bar. She later said on her Instagram that the host of the sh


A number of people reported confrontations with accused sexual predator Harvey Weinstein after the embattled filmmaker made an appearance at a New York City bar Wednesday night.
“Harvey Weinstein was out with friends enjoying the music and trying to find some solace in his life that has been turned upside down,” a spokesman for Weinstein told NBC News.
A person named Zoe Stuckless posted video of themselves confronting Weinstein at the bar.
She later said on her Instagram that the host of the sh
Harvey Weinstein confronted by multiple people at New York City bar Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: doha madani, ali gostanian, adam reiss
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, stuckless, hour, harvey, weinstein, confronted, bar, city, nbc, sexual, multiple, rape, didnt, actors, bachman


Harvey Weinstein confronted by multiple people at New York City bar

A number of people reported confrontations with accused sexual predator Harvey Weinstein after the embattled filmmaker made an appearance at a New York City bar Wednesday night.

Weinstein, who has made rare public appearances since 2017 articles in The New York Times and New Yorker chronicled numerous allegations of sexual misconduct against him, attended a private event at Downtime bar in the East Village.

His representatives confirmed to NBC News that Weinstein was in the audience at Actors’ Hour, a speakeasy-style show dedicated to artists, after numerous accounts popped up on social media Thursday.

“Harvey Weinstein was out with friends enjoying the music and trying to find some solace in his life that has been turned upside down,” a spokesman for Weinstein told NBC News. “This scene was uncalled for, downright rude and an example of how due process today is being squashed by the public, trying to take it away in the courtroom too.”

A person named Zoe Stuckless posted video of themselves confronting Weinstein at the bar. “Nobody’s going to say anything?” Stuckless is heard screaming while pointing at Weinstein. “I’m going to stand four feet from a f—— rapist and nobody is going to say anything?”

Stuckless, who identifies as nonbinary, wrote that Weinstein was sitting in a booth surrounded by young women.

“In some ways tonight was a horrible, painful reminder of the power a man like Weinstein holds even now,” Stuckless wrote. “It was a reminder that even in this time of relative awareness it is hypnotically easy to be pulled into a culture of silence.”

The 21-year-old actor told NBC News they didn’t recognize Weinstein at first and were in complete disbelief because they didn’t think he would ever show his face at an event like that. Stuckless said they thought of their own experience with rape and all of the women who spoke out against Weinstein.

“If no one says anything, then I owe it to myself, I owe it to the survivors and to all the women that Harvey has victimized to say something,” Stuckless explained.

Stuckless added that they were disappointed in others at the bar who didn’t speak out against Weinstein’s presence and reflective of the culture of fear that allowed Weinstein’s alleged behavior to persist for years.

“That kind of complacency cannot and should not be allowed to continue,” Stuckless said.

Comic Kelly Bachman shared video of herself onstage at the show where she said she had to address the elephant in the room during her set.

“Do we know what that is? Yeah it’s Freddy Krueger in the room, if you will,” Bachman said. “I didn’t know we had to bring our own Mace and rape whistle’s to Actors’ Hour.”

After some men in the audience booed her, Bachman responded that she was rape survivor who never got the chance to confront her attacker.

She later said on her Instagram that the host of the show told her that it wasn’t the first time Weinstein appeared at Actors’ Hour. Bachman did not immediately respond to a request for comment from NBC News.

Both Bachman and Stuckless said that a male comedian who came on stage next also spoke about Weinstein but praised him instead, including a compliment for his work on the film “Good Will Hunting.”

Another woman, comedian Amber Rollo, tweeted that she cursed at Weinstein and a “goon” that was with him called her a “c—.” Rollo did not immediately respond to a request for comment from NBC News.

Downtime made a statement in its Instagram stories Thursday that Actors’ Hour rented the bar for the event and had a private guest list.

“Shortly into the evening, one guest began heckling another, causing a disturbance to everyone in attendance,” the bar continued. “After several requests to stop were ignored, we kindly asked the heckler to leave.”

The bar said that its goal is to create an environment where everyone feels welcome and made a decision in line with maintaining that goal.

Actors’ Hour did not immediately respond to a request for comment from NBC News.

Weinstein is currently facing multiple court cases stemming from allegations of sexual assault and intimidation. He pleaded not guilty to two charges of predatory sexual assault in August connected to testimony from actress Annabella Sciorra, who claims Weinstein barged into her Manhattan apartment and raped her in 1993.

The disgraced movie mogul is also facing five felony charges in New York — two counts of predatory sexual assault, one count of criminal sexual act in the first degree and one count each of first-degree rape and third-degree rape.

Weinstein has pleaded not guilty to those charges as well. He has also repeatedly denied engaging in non-consensual sex.

Actress Rose McGowan, who has accused Weinstein of rape, filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday alleging that Weinstein and two of his former attorneys engaged in racketeering to silence her and derail her career. Weinstein’s attorney said McGowan is “a publicity seeker looking for money” and her suit is meritless.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-25  Authors: doha madani, ali gostanian, adam reiss
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, york, stuckless, hour, harvey, weinstein, confronted, bar, city, nbc, sexual, multiple, rape, didnt, actors, bachman


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Warren Buffett: This is the ‘most surprising’ lesson I didn’t learn in business school

‘The institutional imperative’The “most surprising discovery,” he wrote, is “the overwhelming importance in business of an unseen force that we might call ‘the institutional imperative.’ In business school, I was given no hint of the imperative’s existence, and I did not intuitively understand it when I entered the business world.” The billionaire continued: “I then thought that decent, intelligent and experienced managers would automatically make rational business decisions. Instead, rationalit


‘The institutional imperative’The “most surprising discovery,” he wrote, is “the overwhelming importance in business of an unseen force that we might call ‘the institutional imperative.’
In business school, I was given no hint of the imperative’s existence, and I did not intuitively understand it when I entered the business world.”
The billionaire continued: “I then thought that decent, intelligent and experienced managers would automatically make rational business decisions.
Instead, rationalit
Warren Buffett: This is the ‘most surprising’ lesson I didn’t learn in business school Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, surprising, matter, school, managers, lesson, learned, trend, business, companies, buffett, institutional, imperative, products, didnt, warren, learn


Warren Buffett: This is the 'most surprising' lesson I didn't learn in business school

Great leaders think differently. But take a cursory glance at the majority of consumer products around you, and you’ll see an interesting trend you might not have noticed before: in nearly every industry, from automobiles to computers to clothing, companies tend to produce products that are extremely similar to those of their competitors. Sure, sometimes it’s because there’s plenty of space in the market. But other times, it’s just a blatant attempt to cash in on a trend and boost short-term earnings. And it’s not just products, either — it’s branding, politicizing, team structuring. Companies copy each other in all kinds of ways. Warren Buffett addressed this occurrence in his 1989 letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, in which he reflected on the hard lessons he learned about investing and managing in the preceding 25 years.

‘The institutional imperative’

The “most surprising discovery,” he wrote, is “the overwhelming importance in business of an unseen force that we might call ‘the institutional imperative.’ In business school, I was given no hint of the imperative’s existence, and I did not intuitively understand it when I entered the business world.” The billionaire continued: “I then thought that decent, intelligent and experienced managers would automatically make rational business decisions. But I learned over time that isn’t so. Instead, rationality frequently wilts when the institutional imperative comes into play.” Buffett explained that the institutional imperative can manifest when, for example, “any business craving of the leader, however foolish, will be quickly supported by detailed rate-of-return and strategic studies prepared by his troops.” It can also occur when “executives mindlessly imitate the behavior of their peer companies — whether they are expanding, acquiring, setting executive compensation or whatever — no matter how foolish it may be to do so.”

Why it can be problematic

This force can drive leaders, even the ones with top credentials, to adopt misguided approaches purely because everyone else is doing it. Why does this happen? Buffett noted that much of it has to do with managers having poor capital management skills, along with the tendency to seize upon any evidence or data — no matter how inaccurate — that supports their resistance to change.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: tom popomaronis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, surprising, matter, school, managers, lesson, learned, trend, business, companies, buffett, institutional, imperative, products, didnt, warren, learn


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How one woman went from feeling ‘paralyzed’ by her student loans to paying off over $100,000 in 6 years

Dulaney finished school with about $105,000 in student loans, but with interest she paid back around $120,000 in total, she tells CNBC Make It. And despite graduating in 2010, it wasn’t until 2014 that Dulaney got serious about ridding herself of student debt. “I didn’t even want to do a joint checking account together until I paid off my student loans,” she says. How small changes can make a big differenceDulaney’s success in paying off her loans didn’t come without sacrifice. 1 piece of advice


Dulaney finished school with about $105,000 in student loans, but with interest she paid back around $120,000 in total, she tells CNBC Make It. And despite graduating in 2010, it wasn’t until 2014 that Dulaney got serious about ridding herself of student debt. “I didn’t even want to do a joint checking account together until I paid off my student loans,” she says. How small changes can make a big differenceDulaney’s success in paying off her loans didn’t come without sacrifice. 1 piece of advice
How one woman went from feeling ‘paralyzed’ by her student loans to paying off over $100,000 in 6 years Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, feeling, student, going, paralyzed, shes, owed, 100000, paying, didnt, woman, loans, really, debt, dulaney, went


How one woman went from feeling 'paralyzed' by her student loans to paying off over $100,000 in 6 years

In July 2019, Nichol Dulaney made the final payment on her student loans. It took her under six years to eliminate more than $100,000 in debt — a significantly shorter period than the 21-plus years it takes the average American to pay off their bachelor’s degree. Dulaney, 32, is a pharmaceutical research professional and lives in Centerville, Ohio, with her husband, William, 36. Just weeks ago, Dulaney gave birth to the couple’s first son, and they recently bought their dream home — an accomplishment Dulaney says they could have done “a lot sooner” if she hadn’t felt “paralyzed” by her debilitating debt for so long.

Dulaney’s “dream home” located in Centerville, Ohio.

Like a lot of students, when Dulaney graduated from Kettering College of Medical Arts in Ohio in 2010, she didn’t have a firm grasp on just how much debt she’d be paying off. Dulaney finished school with about $105,000 in student loans, but with interest she paid back around $120,000 in total, she tells CNBC Make It. And despite graduating in 2010, it wasn’t until 2014 that Dulaney got serious about ridding herself of student debt. With the help of her husband, who has a degree in finance, Dulaney finally found the motivation to stop ignoring her situation and face her loans head-on. “I think that having someone there to give another level of accountability was really helpful,” she says. While Dulaney’s husband provided her the support she needed, he didn’t contribute to her monthly payments, other than a small gift to finish off the last few thousand dollars she owed. “I didn’t even want to do a joint checking account together until I paid off my student loans,” she says. “He didn’t pay my loans for me, but he was really proud of me in the end.”

‘Writing it all down’ gave Dulaney a reality check

Dulaney’s first step toward tackling her debt was calling her student loan providers to confirm how much she owed. Then, she created an Excel spreadsheet so that she could write down everything in one place, including the name of each lender with each respective account number, amount of principle owed, monthly payment cost and interest rate. It was a wake-up call. “Tracking my debt down and listing it out was really helpful for me,” Dulaney says. “Once I found out exactly how much interest I was paying each month, I calculated how much [money] I’d need to cover the higher interest loans and started knocking those out first.” However, taking that first step wasn’t easy. “It’s hard to do, because when you see the numbers all together, it makes everything more overwhelming,” she says. “But the reality is, your debt isn’t going anywhere and it’s only going to get worse if not handled.”

I was working at a call center, and I knew that I owed all these people all of this money. And I thought, ‘I don’t have enough money. I have to get moving. This is not a drill.’ Nichol Dulaney Pharmaceutical research professional

Not only did creating a spreadsheet give Dulaney an aerial view of everything she owed and when, it also helped her to realize that her salary at the time wasn’t going to cut it. “I was working at a call center, and I knew that I owed all these people all of this money. And I thought, ‘I don’t have enough money. I have to get moving. This is not a drill,'” Dulaney says. “I started looking for job postings every morning before I got of bed and eventually I found my career.” Today, Dulaney makes close to six figures, a major jump from her days working at the Bath & Body Works call center, where she earned $13 an hour. From there, she took a job with a private pharmaceutical research organization, where she made close to $36,000 per year. “It wasn’t a huge leap pay-wise, but it started me on the path toward my next role,” which eventually led to the one she’s in now, she says.

How small changes can make a big difference

Dulaney’s success in paying off her loans didn’t come without sacrifice. In order to conserve her money, she started passing on small expenses she could do without, such as shopping for clothes or coloring her hair. “At first it was hard, but then I realized that I don’t need these things,” she says. “I was able to get more enjoyment and fulfillment out of seeing my loans going down.” Dulaney also kept the same car she had from college — a 2005 Toyota Corolla with windows that “won’t roll down” — rather than buying a new one. “I have a really decent salary and I have a great house, but I can’t go through the drive-thru,” Dulaney jokes. She’s finally at the point where she’s thinking about getting a new car, but is glad she didn’t rush to upgrade.

Dulaney’s 2005 Toyota Corolla she’s had since college.

Aside from buying the house, Dulaney says she hasn’t yet rewarded herself for becoming debt-free. She’s taking things one step at a time: Although she has her sights set on buying a designer bag to celebrate, right now she’s prioritizing taking care of her son. “I was going to get a really nice handbag, but I think I’d already found out that I was pregnant. So, things have kind of shifted, but I’m not counting it out. I’m hoping to have a splurge at some point for that,” she jokes.

Dulaney’s No. 1 piece of advice for paying off student loans


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, feeling, student, going, paralyzed, shes, owed, 100000, paying, didnt, woman, loans, really, debt, dulaney, went


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Students who don’t fill out FAFSA are missing out on their share of billions in financial aid

As of Oct. 1, college-bound students can apply for their share of $150 billion in federal student aid including grants, loans and work-study. To apply, they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. NerdWallet estimates that students who are Pell Grant-eligible missed out on $2.6 billion in free FAFSA college aid in 2018 simply because they did not submit the FAFSA. Most students complete the FAFSA online, but students who choose to complete the application on


As of Oct. 1, college-bound students can apply for their share of $150 billion in federal student aid including grants, loans and work-study. To apply, they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. NerdWallet estimates that students who are Pell Grant-eligible missed out on $2.6 billion in free FAFSA college aid in 2018 simply because they did not submit the FAFSA. Most students complete the FAFSA online, but students who choose to complete the application on
Students who don’t fill out FAFSA are missing out on their share of billions in financial aid Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, aid, students, dont, didnt, tax, federal, sallie, need, share, complete, fafsa, missing, financial


Students who don't fill out FAFSA are missing out on their share of billions in financial aid

As of Oct. 1, college-bound students can apply for their share of $150 billion in federal student aid including grants, loans and work-study. To apply, they need to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or the FAFSA. FAFSA funds are distributed on a first-come, first-served basis. Sallie Mae recently polled 2,000 undergraduate students and parents and asked if they submitted the FAFSA. According to Sallie Mae’s analysis, during the 2018 – 2019 school year, only 25% of undergraduate students completed the FAFSA the first month it was open, and just 77% of undergraduate students completed it at all. By not filling out FAFSA, American college students are missing out. Federal grants do not need to be repaid, federal student loans have low interest rates and work-study programs can be a convenient way to simultaneously fund an education and build a resume. Because FAFSA funds are distributed as applications come in, families who plan ahead can gain an upper hand. Sallie Mae reported that 80% of students from families that make between $35,000 and $100,000 filled out the FAFSA, but 75% of students from families making less did so. NerdWallet estimates that students who are Pell Grant-eligible missed out on $2.6 billion in free FAFSA college aid in 2018 simply because they did not submit the FAFSA. In Sallie Mae’s poll, the company asked the students and parents about their reasons for not submitting the FAFSA. Here’s what they said:

They thought they were too rich

Among the almost quarter of college students who did not apply, nearly 40% said their reason was because they didn’t think they would qualify. But there is no income cut-off to apply for federal student aid. Charlie Javice, founder & CEO of Frank, an online FAFSA platform, told CNBC Make It. “It’s really important as FAFSA season comes up that people don’t forget that there is no such thing as being too rich to file FAFSA.” Javice said families that make more than $250,000 do not typically qualify for grants or subsidized loans but pointed out that a vast majority of Americans make less than $250,000. Being too rich “only applies to less than 5% of the U.S. population. Everyone should be doing it.”

They missed the deadline

The second most common reason students gave for not completing the FAFSA was because they missed the deadline, with 15% of those who did not complete the form giving this excuse. Each year, there is a nine-month period during which students can submit applications for both the current year and the future year. To avoid confusion, students should be sure to apply for aid for their upcoming school year as soon as possible. Most students complete the FAFSA online, but students who choose to complete the application on paper should submit their documents so that a federal processor reviews them by June 30. According to Edvisors, if a FAFSA is received after the June 30 deadline, it will not be processed. For those looking to avoid this challenge, here are the deadlines: Students attending college from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020 can file the 2019 – 2020 FAFSA between Oct. 1, 2018, and June 30, 2020, using their 2017 tax information.

Students attending college from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021 can file the 2020 – 2021 FAFSA between Oct. 1, 2019, and June 30, 2021, using their 2018 tax information. Students should also make sure they are aware of the deadlines for applying for financial aid from their schools, states and local governments. The Department of Education and Edvisors provide resources for students to check their local deadlines.

jacoblund | Getty Images

It’s complicated

Of those who didn’t complete the FAFSA, 8% said it was because the application was too complicated, 9% said they didn’t have time and another 10% said they didn’t have the necessary information they needed to complete the form. In order to complete the FAFSA, students will need their tax returns, information about their family’s bank accounts and assets, and the names of the schools they are interested in attending. Over the past decade, the Department of Education has taken steps to make the form simpler and more intuitive, including redesigning the application website adding automatic error notifications if a field has been filled incorrectly. As of 2019, the FAFSA can even be completed on your phone. To test these improvements, I filled out the revamped FAFSA form myself. It took about five and a half minutes. The IRS data retrieval tool makes it easy for students to automatically transfer their tax return information, so I didn’t need to go searching for my returns. The banking information required was limited, so I didn’t need to go searching through bank statements. “I think [the Department of Education] has definitely made some strides,” Sallie Mae spokesperson Rick Castellano told CNBC Make It. “The IRS data retrieval tool is a game-changer, and the ability to use your prior year tax return is huge.” Castellano said that though it can take closer to 30 minutes for some students to complete the FAFSA, “it’s well worth it, given what you’re getting in line for.”

They didn’t know


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, billions, aid, students, dont, didnt, tax, federal, sallie, need, share, complete, fafsa, missing, financial


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I saved $300,000 by 26—and doing these 5 unusual things helped me save like crazy

The savings from my two jobs had grown to more than $8,000 by the time I left for college. By not staying in hotels (which cost, on average, $135 dollars per night), I’ve been able to save more than $10,000 for all my travels combined. The nice thing about that, however, is that splitting the costs has helped me save a lot of money. Switched jobs without all the ‘right’ qualificationsOne surefire way to save more money is to make more money. While some might be hesitant about switching careers w


The savings from my two jobs had grown to more than $8,000 by the time I left for college. By not staying in hotels (which cost, on average, $135 dollars per night), I’ve been able to save more than $10,000 for all my travels combined. The nice thing about that, however, is that splitting the costs has helped me save a lot of money. Switched jobs without all the ‘right’ qualificationsOne surefire way to save more money is to make more money. While some might be hesitant about switching careers w
I saved $300,000 by 26—and doing these 5 unusual things helped me save like crazy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jessica byrne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, partner, average, 26and, unusual, car, 300000, doing, apartment, ive, crazy, didnt, able, things, helped, save, saved, savings


I saved $300,000 by 26—and doing these 5 unusual things helped me save like crazy

When it comes to growing your savings, there are a handful of traditional ways to do it, such as investing in the stock market or in your 401(k). And then there are the more creative strategies, such as dumpster diving, couch surfing for a few months or buying and selling collectible coins. Dumpster diving isn’t really my thing. But I’ve gone to extreme lengths to avoid wasting money, and they ended up paying off significantly: I recently reached my goal of saving $300,000 — all at the age of 26. (The majority of that money has gone into my retirement savings.) This is how I did it.

An early start in my journey to $300,000

I started working as a babysitter when I was 12 until I left for college at 18. My rates climbed from $7 per hour to $12. At 14, I landed my first W-2 job earning minimum wage as a golf coach. The savings from my two jobs had grown to more than $8,000 by the time I left for college. I also worked hard to earn scholarships and chose to go to an in-state school for financial reasons. But that, in addition to the job I took on as a research assistant, didn’t make school that much cheaper. To cover the $21,000 per year tuition, I did have some help from my parents and was able to graduate debt-free, which I consider an enormous privilege. After college, I landed an internship at a biotech company that paid $32 an hour. Then, I moved on to a junior software engineering role that offered a $65,000 salary, along with a $10,000 signing bonus. I immediately started saving a large chunk of my salary, spending only $20,000 per year while living in Portland, Oregon. While investing the rest of my money into retirement funds and stocks was what really pushed me to the $300,000 finish line, I also did many things — that many might consider unconventional or weird — to save like crazy:

1. Stayed in hostels with up to 15 people per room

I love to travel, but it can be expensive. On top of flights, ground transportation and daily excursions, you still have to pay for a place to sleep. One way I was able to bring down the cost of accommodations was to stay in a hostel … which often meant sharing a room with a bunch of strangers. Even though there was always the option to book a private room, I saved hundreds of dollars per trip by sharing rooms with four — and sometimes up to 15 — people. Few are willing to do that, but for me, the most exciting part about traveling is what I’m going to explore during my trip, rather than where I sleep at night. I’ve stayed in hostels in a rainforest in Colombia with my partner and in Budapest while traveling solo. All of them had lockers to store belongings securely and kitchens to cook in (another frugal win!). I also met a lot of interesting travelers who gave great advice about what to do in the local areas. On average, I’d spend less than $30 per night for a bunk. By not staying in hotels (which cost, on average, $135 dollars per night), I’ve been able to save more than $10,000 for all my travels combined.

2. Bought a used car and sold it for profit

According to car-buying site Carfax, a new vehicle loses 20% of its value in the first year, and then another 30% over the next four years. And with the average price of a new car at about $37,000, most new car owners will lose more than $17,000 to depreciation over the first few years after purchasing! That’s why I decided to buy used car, with the intention of selling it later on. Rather than going through a dealership, I negotiated with a private seller I found through an online forum. The total price I paid up front was $12,150 (includes inspection, shipping, registration, title and license plate fees). Two years later, after keeping it in great condition, I listed the car on Craigslist for $13,200. I decided I didn’t really need it and could bike to work instead. A buyer purchased the car for my full asking price, and I earned a $1,050 profit.

3. Shared a 700-square-foot apartment with my partner

For two years, my partner and I had been living in a 1,000-square-foot apartment in Portland, where the average apartment for that size is $1,335 per month, according to Smart Asset. But we eventually realized that we didn’t need all that space (most of our time was spent cooking or lounging in the living room). So when we moved across the coast to Upstate New York, we agreed to downsize to a 700-square-foot, one-bedroom apartment. It isn’t easy to live in such a cramped space, especially with one other person, but we made it work. The nice thing about that, however, is that splitting the costs has helped me save a lot of money. (Even without a partner, I would have gotten a roommate). Overall, I’ve seen a dramatic spike in my savings rate since the move. My current rent is $507 per month (when split with my partner), as opposed to the $930 per month I was paying in Portland.

4. Switched jobs without all the ‘right’ qualifications

One surefire way to save more money is to make more money. I didn’t graduate with a degree in computer science, but I made the switch from mechanical engineering to software engineering. The two aren’t as similar as they might sound; I spent a lot of time teaching myself how to code through learning websites like Leetcode and Hackerrank. I also studied the book “Cracking the Coding Interview” by Gayle Laakmann McDowell. Then, I started a personal project and made a website to showcase my portfolio. It wasn’t easy, but the extra work was worth it. After working as a software engineer for two and a half years, I was able to double my salary from $65,000 to a little more than $130,000. While some might be hesitant about switching careers without the right qualifications, changing industries was critical to my savings growth.

5. Picked up a side hustle


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: jessica byrne
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, partner, average, 26and, unusual, car, 300000, doing, apartment, ive, crazy, didnt, able, things, helped, save, saved, savings


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