US Treasury yields tick higher as investors consider smaller Fed rate cut

Disney bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009. It’s made $18.2… These box office numbers do not include the cost of production or marketing costs. They also don’t count the billions in merchandising that Disney has made over the last…Entertainmentread more


Disney bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009. It’s made $18.2… These box office numbers do not include the cost of production or marketing costs. They also don’t count the billions in merchandising that Disney has made over the last…Entertainmentread more
US Treasury yields tick higher as investors consider smaller Fed rate cut Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, higher, office, treasury, rate, consider, include, tick, merchandising, marvel, cut, fed, lastentertainmentread, smaller, marketing, investors, yields, production, numbers, disney, dont


US Treasury yields tick higher as investors consider smaller Fed rate cut

Disney bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009. It’s made $18.2…

These box office numbers do not include the cost of production or marketing costs. They also don’t count the billions in merchandising that Disney has made over the last…

Entertainment

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, higher, office, treasury, rate, consider, include, tick, merchandising, marvel, cut, fed, lastentertainmentread, smaller, marketing, investors, yields, production, numbers, disney, dont


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Cramer: Disney’s stock ‘is just an annuity stream’

Following a record breaking opening weekend for “The Lion King,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer said the Disney’s stock is an insurance play for investors. “Disney is just an annuity stream,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street” on Monday. Disney’s stock has been on a tear this year, climbing nearly 30%, on the back of announcing Disney’s new streaming service, Disney+, and releasing several recording-breaking films. Cramer said Disney’s stock can continue to rise as he wonders is the company’s chief Bob Ig


Following a record breaking opening weekend for “The Lion King,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer said the Disney’s stock is an insurance play for investors. “Disney is just an annuity stream,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street” on Monday. Disney’s stock has been on a tear this year, climbing nearly 30%, on the back of announcing Disney’s new streaming service, Disney+, and releasing several recording-breaking films. Cramer said Disney’s stock can continue to rise as he wonders is the company’s chief Bob Ig
Cramer: Disney’s stock ‘is just an annuity stream’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disney, annuity, stream, opening, weekend, cramer, lion, stock, street, disneys, king, tomatoes


Cramer: Disney's stock 'is just an annuity stream'

Following a record breaking opening weekend for “The Lion King,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer said the Disney’s stock is an insurance play for investors.

“Disney is just an annuity stream,” Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street” on Monday.

Disney’s stock has been on a tear this year, climbing nearly 30%, on the back of announcing Disney’s new streaming service, Disney+, and releasing several recording-breaking films. This past weekend, “The Lion King” earned an estimated $185 million in the U.S., the highest opening in July ever. The reimagining of the 1994 classic follows Disney’s release of “Avengers: Endgame,” which was crowned the highest-grossing film of all time.

“This movie machine is extraordinary,” said Cramer. “There was not, that I saw, a good review of Lion King and it just didn’t matter.”

“The Lion King” broke records despite garnering a Rotten Tomatoes score of 55% from 260 reviews heading into opening weekend. Critics had mixed feelings about the movie, with some calling the film’s musical numbers boring. The Rotten Tomatoes audience score was 89% on Sunday.

Cramer said Disney’s stock can continue to rise as he wonders is the company’s chief Bob Iger has “something up his sleeve” with the rollout of the company’s streaming service later this year. “If Disney+, if ESPN+, if any one of those shows good news, Disney’s stock can continue to go up,” said Cramer.

Disney is well-liked on Wall Street, with 68% of analysts giving the stock a “buy” rating. Disney also pays a 1.25% dividend yield. An annuity is a type of investment which pays a fixed sum of money over a set period of time.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22  Authors: maggie fitzgerald
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, disney, annuity, stream, opening, weekend, cramer, lion, stock, street, disneys, king, tomatoes


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Philips second-quarter results top estimates as growth picks up

Disney bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009. It’s made $18.2… These box office numbers do not include the cost of production or marketing costs. They also don’t count the billions in merchandising that Disney has made over the last…Entertainmentread more


Disney bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009. It’s made $18.2… These box office numbers do not include the cost of production or marketing costs. They also don’t count the billions in merchandising that Disney has made over the last…Entertainmentread more
Philips second-quarter results top estimates as growth picks up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secondquarter, picks, office, include, philips, marvel, growth, estimates, results, lastentertainmentread, marketing, merchandising, production, numbers, disney, dont


Philips second-quarter results top estimates as growth picks up

Disney bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009. It’s made $18.2…

These box office numbers do not include the cost of production or marketing costs. They also don’t count the billions in merchandising that Disney has made over the last…

Entertainment

read more


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-22
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, secondquarter, picks, office, include, philips, marvel, growth, estimates, results, lastentertainmentread, marketing, merchandising, production, numbers, disney, dont


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Disney bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009, a decade later it’s made more than $18 billion at the global box office

Chris Hemsworth and director Taika Waititi of Marvel Studios’ ‘Thor: Love and Thunder’ at the San Diego Comic-Con International 2019 Marvel Studios Panel in Hall H on July 20, 2019 in San Diego, California. In its opening weekend, “Iron Man” snared nearly $100 million at the box office, before going on to garner just under $600 million worldwide. Since releasing its first Disney produced Marvel movie in 2012, the company has earned more than $18.2 billion at the global box office. In total, all


Chris Hemsworth and director Taika Waititi of Marvel Studios’ ‘Thor: Love and Thunder’ at the San Diego Comic-Con International 2019 Marvel Studios Panel in Hall H on July 20, 2019 in San Diego, California. In its opening weekend, “Iron Man” snared nearly $100 million at the box office, before going on to garner just under $600 million worldwide. Since releasing its first Disney produced Marvel movie in 2012, the company has earned more than $18.2 billion at the global box office. In total, all
Disney bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009, a decade later it’s made more than $18 billion at the global box office Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-21  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, office, films, box, billion, global, later, bought, 2009, produced, marvel, iron, man, decade, diego, san, disney


Disney bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009, a decade later it's made more than $18 billion at the global box office

Chris Hemsworth and director Taika Waititi of Marvel Studios’ ‘Thor: Love and Thunder’ at the San Diego Comic-Con International 2019 Marvel Studios Panel in Hall H on July 20, 2019 in San Diego, California.

A decade ago, moviegoers were introduced to Tony Stark.

He was a fast-talking genius, playboy, billionaire, soon-to-be philanthropist played by the comeback kid himself Robert Downey Jr.

Marvel’s “Iron Man” arrived in theaters in 2008 just as rival DC’s gritty Dark Knight trilogy, directed by Christopher Nolan, was making its bow. It was a near polar opposite to the dark, gloomy story of billionaire Bruce Wayne, aka the masked vigilante Batman.

In its opening weekend, “Iron Man” snared nearly $100 million at the box office, before going on to garner just under $600 million worldwide. At the time, opening weekend ticket sales of “Iron Man” were just short of the first-weekend sales for “Spider-Man,” the 2002 blockbuster that held the record for the top non-sequel superhero movie opening.

A year later, Disney made its move. While Marvel had already contracted several films with Paramount and Universal as part of its Marvel Cinematic Universe, CEO Bob Iger closed on a deal to purchase the comic book company for around $4 billion.

“This is perfect from a strategic perspective,” Iger said at the time. “This treasure trove of over 5,000 characters offers Disney the ability to do what we do best.”

It seems he was right.

Since releasing its first Disney produced Marvel movie in 2012, the company has earned more than $18.2 billion at the global box office. And it’s already on its way to make billions more.

At San Diego Comic-Con on Saturday, Marvel announced its upcoming slate of films and TV shows that expand on the 23 movies already in the MCU.

Disney has produced 16 of those films. Paramount distributed “Iron Man,” “Captain America: The First Avenger,” “Thor” and “Iron Man 2”; and Universal distributed “The Incredible Hulk” as part of deals that predated Disney’s acquisition of Marvel.

More recently, Sony has produced two Spider-Man films — “Homecoming” and “Far From Home” — in partnership with Disney, allowing the character to appear in the MCU.

In total, all of the movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe have made more than $22 billion at the global box office.

To be sure, these box office numbers do not include the cost of production or marketing costs. They also don’t count the billions in merchandising that Disney has made over the last decade.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-21  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, office, films, box, billion, global, later, bought, 2009, produced, marvel, iron, man, decade, diego, san, disney


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These five stocks are the best performers since man landed on the moon

Fifty years ago, man landed on the moon and a handful of stocks took off into the stratosphere. At least one of those stocks still has more fuel in its jet, says Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray. “The second stock is Disney,” Johnson added. Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft have underperformed since making their market debut earlier this year. Disclosure: Tatro and Joule are long Disney, Lyft and Uber.


Fifty years ago, man landed on the moon and a handful of stocks took off into the stratosphere. At least one of those stocks still has more fuel in its jet, says Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray. “The second stock is Disney,” Johnson added. Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft have underperformed since making their market debut earlier this year. Disclosure: Tatro and Joule are long Disney, Lyft and Uber.
These five stocks are the best performers since man landed on the moon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, disney, lyft, stocks, moon, companies, tatro, market, johnson, uber, best, performers, price, perspective, landed, man


These five stocks are the best performers since man landed on the moon

Houston, we have liftoff.

Fifty years ago, man landed on the moon and a handful of stocks took off into the stratosphere. Since July 1969, McDonald’s has rocketed more than 82,000%, Lowe’s nearly 70,000%, Altria 49,000%, Hasbro 43,000% and Disney 40,000%.

At least one of those stocks still has more fuel in its jet, says Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray.

“If you look at McDonald’s, it’s been a slow and steady burn higher here in this stock and from our perspective, there’s been this really nice price channel that’s been unfolding over the past five years,” Johnson said Thursday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation. ”

“A move to the upper end of the price channel can put this stock up toward $265, so from our perspective that’s one that we would continue to focus on,” said Johnson.

A rally to $265 implies 23% upside from current levels. It would also mark a record for the stock, which hit an all-time high Thursday.

“The second stock is Disney,” Johnson added. “This stock has been forming a really nice consolidation over the last five years. It recently just broke out. We added it into our model portfolio and from our perspective based upon the size of the breakout, we could see this stock moving up toward $160. So clearly this is a stock that has more room to run.”

Disney could add another 13% before it hits $160, also a record high for the stock, which hit an all-time peak a week ago.

Quint Tatro, president of Joule Financial, says Disney is the best in show among the top winners over the last half century.

“This is a company that continues to reinvent themselves. We like them. We own them. We do believe in the next 50 years, we’ll still be talking about Disney,” said Tatro.

However, Tatro is more excited about the companies whose innovation will dominate the consumer space, and stock market, over the next 50 years.

“We do like what we believe are the future of great American franchise companies like an Uber or a Lyft and, I know not very popular, but our belief is that these industry-revolutionizing companies are going to be the ones that compound over the next several decades and the ones that provide the great opportunities going forward, ” said Tatro.

Ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft have underperformed since making their market debut earlier this year. Uber is trading 3% below its March IPO price, while Lyft has climbed 9% off its own.

Disclosure: Tatro and Joule are long Disney, Lyft and Uber.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stock, disney, lyft, stocks, moon, companies, tatro, market, johnson, uber, best, performers, price, perspective, landed, man


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Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era

But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. There’s no impetus for Disney to change th


But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. There’s no impetus for Disney to change th
Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fees, cable, content, era, pay, disney, paytv, espn, network, talking, tv, networks, charter, streaming, carriage, outcome, valuable


Disney and Charter are talking about carriage fees, and the outcome could affect how much you pay for cable in the streaming era

The Walt Disney Company CEO, Robert Iger arrives for the World premiere of Marvel Studios’ ‘Avengers: Endgame’ at the Los Angeles Convention Center on April 22, 2019 in Los Angeles. VALERIE MACON | AFP | Getty Images

Disney is set to renew its multiyear carriage agreement with Charter, the second-largest U.S. pay TV provider, at the beginning of August, according to people familiar with the matter. So far, there are no signs the two sides will have a testy public renegotiation. That is par for the course for Disney, which usually hammers out a deal without fanfare. After all, pay-TV providers have never had the stomach to black out ESPN, Disney’s most valuable cable channel and by far the most expensive network in the pay-TV bundle. But this particular Disney deal has widespread implications for how future TV carriage deals will be crafted. The outcome could lead to more contentious battles between TV providers and content creators, and perhaps stem the tide of rising cable TV bills. That’s because Disney is about to transition to a new era of direct-to-consumer streaming. AT&T’s WarnerMedia and Comcast’s NBC Universal, the next largest media companies, will follow in its footsteps in early 2020. In the past, carriage disagreements almost always stemmed over the same thing: the network that makes or licenses the content wants the pay-TV operator — your cable or satellite company — to pay more money for that programming. The fee negotiations sometimes result in networks being blacked out on a pay-TV service for a period of time. Viacom has had a few extended carriage conflicts in recent years. Univision recently settled one with Dish. Jeremy Lin’s insane three-week stretch of National Basketball Association games while on the New York Knicks helped convince Time Warner Cable to reach a deal with MSG Network a few years ago. The distributor and the content company usually reach an agreement, because the traditional pay-TV ecosystem has long been symbiotic — operators need material for customers to watch, and the programmers need people to see their programs. But the advent of direct-to-consumer streaming products could lead to blowout public fights over the declining value of linear TV networks. Content providers who have long pushed for higher carriage fees could face severe pushback from pay-TV providers who say that linear networks aren’t as valuable because so much content is available online — not only at Netflix and Amazon, but now within the content companies’ own streaming products. Moreover, if customers do flee the pay-TV bundle for streaming services, pay-TV providers may want to cut content spending even more to keep costs down.

Saving the bundle

In November, Disney will start selling Disney+, a family-friend entertainment product, for $6.99 a month. This will include Disney movies and TV shows from Disney, Pixar, Marvel Studios, Lucasfilm, National Geographic and 20th Century Fox. Disney is also planning on bundling Disney+ with Hulu and ESPN+, its direct-to-consumer streaming service focused on sports, to make the suite of products more appealing to consumers. no current season As Disney makes its content available outside of the pay-TV ecosystem, the value of its pay-TV channels should decrease. In other words, if the only way your child can watch “The Lion Guard” is on the Disney Channel, which requires a pay-TV subscription, the Disney Channel is a valuable asset to the pay-TV bundle. But if your child can now get that show on Disney+, which doesn’t require a pay-TV subscription, the value of the Disney Channel should decrease. The more stuff that’s available outside the network, the less that network is worth. Disney is trying to store some of the value of Disney Channel by prohibiting current seasons of all Disney Channel shows from being available on Disney+, according to a person familiar with the matter.

ESPN vs. ESPN+

The Disney-Charter negotiations probably won’t get too contentious because more than any other programmer, Disney wants to protect the pay-TV ecosystem. ESPN is the most important cable network in the cable bundle. It earns more than $9 for its suite of networks for every single customer that signs up for pay-TV, regardless of who is actually watching the networks. A lot of people watch “Monday Night Football” — it was the most-watched series on cable in 2018 for the second straight year. Pay TV customers would revolt if ESPN weren’t included in a standard cable package. So far, ESPN+ has only been an add-on product to ESPN. It hasn’t touched the network’s most valuable sports assets, which include “Monday Night Football,” NBA games, prime time college football, several tennis and golf grand slams and so on. There’s no impetus for Disney to change this arrangement because ESPN has successfully kept raising its carriage fee, unlike, say, Viacom’s cable networks. Still, Disney will almost certainly push for more flexibility in its renewal deal with Charter. Disney will want the option to make certain sports or games available for ESPN+ if consumers drastically change their viewing habits in the next few years, or if Wall Street starts valuing legacy media companies based on streaming customer growth, as they do with Netflix. Moreover, Disney wants pay-TV providers to integrate ESPN+ into their user interfaces, just as Comcast has done for Amazon and Netflix content, according to a person familiar with the matter. Then, a pay-TV operator could sell ESPN and ESPN+ together for an additional fee, and a consumer could watch all ESPN+ content as a network, just like ESPN. At this point, Disney isn’t asking to remove valuable assets from ESPN and shift them to ESPN+, two of the people said. That’s key. Charter isn’t going to want to lock in a rate increase for ESPN if the linear network could lose its exclusivity value in the coming years as Disney makes some events available to ESPN+. But Disney will likely want the ability to place particular games on ESPN+ and add other sweeteners to entice more consumers to sign up for the digital service. And those games probably would have lived on ESPN or one of its companion networks. Spokespeople for Disney and Charter declined to comment on specifics of the carriage talks between the companies. Terms in carriage fees are often applicable across pay-TV platforms thanks to so-called “most favored nation ” clauses. So the word will get out in the media ecosystem how Disney has structured its deal, and it will be held as a standard when WarnerMedia’s and NBC Universal’s big contracts come up for renewal. And while Disney may not want to rock the pay-TV bundle, WarnerMedia doesn’t have nearly the same incentive, because it doesn’t own particularly valuable linear networks (TBS, TNT and CNN are its strongest). Then again, AT&T owns DirecTV and WarnerMedia, and Comcast owns NBC Universal. So both media companies may decide to hedge their asks for the benefit of their parent companies, keeping the bundle alive and (relatively) well.

Does video even matter?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-12  Authors: alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fees, cable, content, era, pay, disney, paytv, espn, network, talking, tv, networks, charter, streaming, carriage, outcome, valuable


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Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to open Rise of Resistance ride later than expected

Disney has finally announced the opening date for Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride — and it’s a little later than expected. While the Orlando, Florida version of the ride is expected to be operational on Dec. 5, its California counterpart won’t open until Jan. 17. Disney had initially projected that both ride locations would be open by the end of 2019. Riders will be recruited to join Rey and General Leia Organa at a secret base, however, along the way they will be captured by the a First


Disney has finally announced the opening date for Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride — and it’s a little later than expected. While the Orlando, Florida version of the ride is expected to be operational on Dec. 5, its California counterpart won’t open until Jan. 17. Disney had initially projected that both ride locations would be open by the end of 2019. Riders will be recruited to join Rey and General Leia Organa at a secret base, however, along the way they will be captured by the a First
Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge to open Rise of Resistance ride later than expected Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, orlando, wars, later, star, rise, ride, order, disney, open, edge, wont, galaxys, resistance


Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge to open Rise of Resistance ride later than expected

Disney has finally announced the opening date for Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride — and it’s a little later than expected.

While the Orlando, Florida version of the ride is expected to be operational on Dec. 5, its California counterpart won’t open until Jan. 17. Disney had initially projected that both ride locations would be open by the end of 2019.

“As soon as work is completed at Walt Disney World, Imagineers will head back to California to complete their mission at Disneyland Resort where Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance will open on Friday, Jan. 17,” the company said Thursday.

CEO Bob Iger teased investors in March that the ride is “the most technologically advanced and immersive attraction” the park has ever seen.

The ride is meant to “blur the lines between fantasy and reality” as it puts guests right in the middle of a battle between the First Order and the Resistance. Riders will be recruited to join Rey and General Leia Organa at a secret base, however, along the way they will be captured by the a First Order Star Destroyer and must escape.

The Orlando Galaxy’s Edge land is due to open to the public on August 29 and, while it won’t have the Rise of Resistance ride just yet, it will have the Millennium Falcon: Smuggler’s Run ride ready for guests. Other experiences like Savi’s Workshop, where fans can make their own lighstabers, the Droid Depot, where parkgoers can craft their own droids, and Oga’s Cantina will also be open.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, expected, orlando, wars, later, star, rise, ride, order, disney, open, edge, wont, galaxys, resistance


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Tech and media moguls arrive in Sun Valley, Idaho, where many of the biggest deals in history have gone down

Private jets are parked at the Friedman Memorial Airport during the annual Allen and Co. Sun Valley media conference in Sun Valley, IdahoThe invite-only Allen & Co. Sun Valley conference, also known as “summer camp for billionaires,” kicks off in Sun Valley, Idaho this week. It’s where some of the biggest names in tech and media flock, and where seeds have been planted for tech and media acquisitions, including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, Verizon’s acquisition of


Private jets are parked at the Friedman Memorial Airport during the annual Allen and Co. Sun Valley media conference in Sun Valley, IdahoThe invite-only Allen & Co. Sun Valley conference, also known as “summer camp for billionaires,” kicks off in Sun Valley, Idaho this week. It’s where some of the biggest names in tech and media flock, and where seeds have been planted for tech and media acquisitions, including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, Verizon’s acquisition of
Tech and media moguls arrive in Sun Valley, Idaho, where many of the biggest deals in history have gone down Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton alex sherman, todd haselton, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idaho, sale, tech, deals, biggest, billion, allen, media, disney, history, including, arrive, gone, original, moguls, tv, valley


Tech and media moguls arrive in Sun Valley, Idaho, where many of the biggest deals in history have gone down

Private jets are parked at the Friedman Memorial Airport during the annual Allen and Co. Sun Valley media conference in Sun Valley, Idaho

The invite-only Allen & Co. Sun Valley conference, also known as “summer camp for billionaires,” kicks off in Sun Valley, Idaho this week.

It’s where some of the biggest names in tech and media flock, and where seeds have been planted for tech and media acquisitions, including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’s purchase of The Washington Post, Verizon’s acquisition of Yahoo and, in 1995, Disney’s merger with ABC. It’s also great marketing for investment bank boutique Allen & Co., which has advised on some of the biggest tech, media and telecom mergers, including Time Warner’s $108 billion sale to AT&T and LinkedIn’s $26 billion sale to Microsoft.

A lot has changed in the media landscape since last year. Fox sold its entertainment assets to Disney for $71 billion. Netflix, once the king of streaming, will soon compete for viewers with new services from Disney, AT&T and Comcast’s NBC, all of which are competing to create the best collection of original and existing TV and movie content. Apple is also throwing its hat in the game, with a new service called Apple TV+ that will launch this fall with original movies.

Here’s who’s showing up:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: todd haselton alex sherman, todd haselton, alex sherman
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, idaho, sale, tech, deals, biggest, billion, allen, media, disney, history, including, arrive, gone, original, moguls, tv, valley


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‘Avengers: Endgame’ is being rereleased with deleted scene, post-credit tribute in a bid to top ‘Avatar’

Disney is making one final push to make “Avengers: Endgame” the highest-grossing film of all time. “Not an extended cut, but there will be a version going into theaters with a bit of a marketing push with a few new things at the end of the movie,” Feige told Screen Rant. “If you stay and watch the movie, after the credits, there’ll be a deleted scene, a little tribute, and a few surprises.” “We are doing that,” Feige told Comicbook.com during a “Spider-Man: Far From Home” press junket in London.


Disney is making one final push to make “Avengers: Endgame” the highest-grossing film of all time. “Not an extended cut, but there will be a version going into theaters with a bit of a marketing push with a few new things at the end of the movie,” Feige told Screen Rant. “If you stay and watch the movie, after the credits, there’ll be a deleted scene, a little tribute, and a few surprises.” “We are doing that,” Feige told Comicbook.com during a “Spider-Man: Far From Home” press junket in London.
‘Avengers: Endgame’ is being rereleased with deleted scene, post-credit tribute in a bid to top ‘Avatar’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, endgame, deleted, tribute, avengers, scene, push, postcredit, theaters, rerelease, rereleased, told, screen, feige, rant, marvel, disney, avatar, bid, release


'Avengers: Endgame' is being rereleased with deleted scene, post-credit tribute in a bid to top 'Avatar'

Disney is making one final push to make “Avengers: Endgame” the highest-grossing film of all time.

According to reports by Screen Rant and Comicbook.com, both of which cite Marvel head Kevin Feige, the massive blockbuster will get a theatrical rerelease with extra footage that wasn’t included in its initial release.

“Not an extended cut, but there will be a version going into theaters with a bit of a marketing push with a few new things at the end of the movie,” Feige told Screen Rant. “If you stay and watch the movie, after the credits, there’ll be a deleted scene, a little tribute, and a few surprises.”

The rerelease will reportedly happen June 28. That weekend provides a good opportunity for the rerelease as there are no major competitors debuting, only smaller budget films “Yesterday” and “Annabelle Comes Home,” neither of which are categorized in the same genre as “Endgame.”

Representatives for Disney and Marvel did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

“We are doing that,” Feige told Comicbook.com during a “Spider-Man: Far From Home” press junket in London. “I don’t know if it’s been announced. And I don’t know how much… Yeah, we’re doing it next weekend.”

The rerelease would be a smart move by Disney. The additional content is an enticing lure for fans of Marvel who were already waiting for the DVD release to see scenes that didn’t make it into the film and other behind-the-scenes content.

Putting some of that footage into a rerelease will draw thousands back to theaters and likely push “Avengers: Endgame” above and beyond the record $2.78 billion “Avatar” has earned since its release in 2009.

“Endgame” has earned around $2.74 billion globally.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, endgame, deleted, tribute, avengers, scene, push, postcredit, theaters, rerelease, rereleased, told, screen, feige, rant, marvel, disney, avatar, bid, release


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Hulu CEO: Expect to see more original content now that Disney is in control

Now that Disney has full control of Hulu, audiences can expect more original programming to appear on the streaming service. “When you look at the capacity inside of the Walt Disney Company to create content, the IP that’s there, the access we’ll have with that is, you know, terrific. Freer, who took the helm at Hulu in 2017, told CNBC’s the company’s “investment in original programming will increase significantly.” Hulu already has a slate of original shows including the Emmy Award-winning “Han


Now that Disney has full control of Hulu, audiences can expect more original programming to appear on the streaming service. “When you look at the capacity inside of the Walt Disney Company to create content, the IP that’s there, the access we’ll have with that is, you know, terrific. Freer, who took the helm at Hulu in 2017, told CNBC’s the company’s “investment in original programming will increase significantly.” Hulu already has a slate of original shows including the Emmy Award-winning “Han
Hulu CEO: Expect to see more original content now that Disney is in control Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hulu, programming, told, original, control, service, expect, slate, content, shows, streaming, ceo, company, disney


Hulu CEO: Expect to see more original content now that Disney is in control

Now that Disney has full control of Hulu, audiences can expect more original programming to appear on the streaming service.

“When you look at the capacity inside of the Walt Disney Company to create content, the IP that’s there, the access we’ll have with that is, you know, terrific. We are going to be able to invest more and invest more upstream and find the best stories and the best creators to make shows for the company,” CEO Randy Freer told Julia Boorstin Tuesday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”

Freer, who took the helm at Hulu in 2017, told CNBC’s the company’s “investment in original programming will increase significantly.”

Representatives for Hulu clarified that investments would be less about spending money and more about refocusing the company’s resources. In the past, Hulu has concentrated on acquiring content, but with a powerhouse like Disney behind the streaming service, it can now put more effort towards creating its own.

A source close to the matter said Hulu’s programming budget will remain in line with the guidance Disney provided during its investor day in April.

Hulu already has a slate of original shows including the Emmy Award-winning “Handmaid’s Tale” as well as “Catch 22,” “Ramy,” “The Act,” “Pen 15,” and “Shrill.”

Ahead of Disney securing a controlling stake in the streaming service, Hulu had already green lit two live-action Marvel shows — “Ghost Rider” and “Helstrom” — as well as a slate of four animated series featuring Marvel superheroes, including Howard the Duck.

As entertainment giants like Warner Bros. and Comcast enter the streaming game, having a brand like Hulu is an asset for Disney. Not only does it have proprietary programming, but it also has a live-TV feature as well as the option for ad-supported viewing.

Disney has also discussed bundling its ESPN+ programming and its upcoming Disney+ streaming service with Hulu, but it has not disclosed how much this bundle would cost or when it would become available. Disney+ will launch on Nov. 12.

Disclosure: Comcast is the parent company of NBCUniversal and CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: sarah whitten
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hulu, programming, told, original, control, service, expect, slate, content, shows, streaming, ceo, company, disney


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