Trump issues executive order increasing transparency in hospital prices, doctor fees

President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Monday issued an executive order designed to pressure insurers, doctors and other health-care providers to disclose more information about their prices. “We are fundamentally changing the nature of the health care marketplace,” Trump said before signing the order. Trump said the lack of price transparency has benefited industry giants “gr


President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump on Monday issued an executive order designed to pressure insurers, doctors and other health-care providers to disclose more information about their prices. “We are fundamentally changing the nature of the health care marketplace,” Trump said before signing the order. Trump said the lack of price transparency has benefited industry giants “gr
Trump issues executive order increasing transparency in hospital prices, doctor fees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr ashley turner, berkeley lovelace jr, ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doctor, hospital, care, fees, patients, order, president, transparency, trump, increasing, health, promise, issues, insurers, prices, executive, services


Trump issues executive order increasing transparency in hospital prices, doctor fees

President Donald Trump speaks to the media prior to departing on Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC.

President Donald Trump on Monday issued an executive order designed to pressure insurers, doctors and other health-care providers to disclose more information about their prices.

The executive order will direct the Department of Health and Human Services to require hospitals and insurers to disclose negotiated rates for services, as well as provide patients with out-of-pocket costs before their procedures.

“We are fundamentally changing the nature of the health care marketplace,” Trump said before signing the order.

Trump said the lack of price transparency has benefited industry giants “greatly” and has cost Americans millions of dollars in health care costs.

Price transparency can “empower” patient choice, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said in a call Monday with reporters.

“The president has a clear vision for American health care,” Azar said. “That’s the promise he’s made to American patients, and today represents a historic step for delivering on that promise.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-24  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr ashley turner, berkeley lovelace jr, ashley turner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doctor, hospital, care, fees, patients, order, president, transparency, trump, increasing, health, promise, issues, insurers, prices, executive, services


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Uber teams with start-up Grand Rounds to give big-company employees free rides to the doctor

Dara Khosrowshahi, CEO of Uber Technologies, speaks during an Economic Club of Washington event in Washington, DC, June 11, 2019. The ride-hailing company announced Wednesday it is working with Grand Rounds, a venture-backed health-tech start-up that works with employers to provide guidance on employees’ medical needs. For Uber, working with Grand Rounds is an opportunity to move into a new and potentially lucrative market: large companies that are self-insured. Providing free rides could prove


Dara Khosrowshahi, CEO of Uber Technologies, speaks during an Economic Club of Washington event in Washington, DC, June 11, 2019. The ride-hailing company announced Wednesday it is working with Grand Rounds, a venture-backed health-tech start-up that works with employers to provide guidance on employees’ medical needs. For Uber, working with Grand Rounds is an opportunity to move into a new and potentially lucrative market: large companies that are self-insured. Providing free rides could prove
Uber teams with start-up Grand Rounds to give big-company employees free rides to the doctor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transportation, employees, uber, free, doctor, opportunity, washington, teams, bigcompany, health, medical, grand, market, working, rounds, startup, rides, employers


Uber teams with start-up Grand Rounds to give big-company employees free rides to the doctor

Dara Khosrowshahi, CEO of Uber Technologies, speaks during an Economic Club of Washington event in Washington, DC, June 11, 2019.

Uber is moving more deeply into the health sector, and that means striking deals so employers and health plans will cover the cost of a trip to a doctor’s office.

The ride-hailing company announced Wednesday it is working with Grand Rounds, a venture-backed health-tech start-up that works with employers to provide guidance on employees’ medical needs. That includes things like finding the right doctor or getting a second opinion for a complex diagnosis.

Uber’s health-care efforts to date have primarily involved nonemergency medical transportation, which is a $3 billion market, and fit into the larger medical transport market, which some researchers say will be worth $42 billion by 2024.

Uber and rival Lyft see an opportunity here because some 3.6 million Americans miss their health-care appointments each year due to a lack of reliable transportation. Uber and Lyft have focused on selling to Medicare and Medicaid, as well as other insurers, to help those who can’t afford a ride or can no longer drive.

For Uber, working with Grand Rounds is an opportunity to move into a new and potentially lucrative market: large companies that are self-insured.

Increasingly, companies are willing to pay for their workers to seek medical care, especially if it means they can avoid costlier health expenses down the line. As part of this many, employers are starting to experiment with ways to steer their employees to higher-quality and lower-cost physicians. Providing free rides could prove to be incentive enough for a worker to make the shift.

Grand Rounds’ largest customers include Comcast (which owns CNBC’s parent company NBCUniversal), Walmart and News Corp, all of which are self-insured.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transportation, employees, uber, free, doctor, opportunity, washington, teams, bigcompany, health, medical, grand, market, working, rounds, startup, rides, employers


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Anti-vaxxers are burdening the economy, NIH doctor says as measles outbreak spreads

There’s no official data yet on how this year’s measles outbreak — now the worst in the U.S. since the disease was declared eradicated in 2000 — may impact the economy in the near term. Additionally, a University of North Carolina study showed vaccine-preventable diseases among adults cost the economy nearly $9 billion in 2015, with unvaccinated individuals responsible for 80% of those costs. The disease, before vaccines were available, killed an average of 2 million to 3 million people a year g


There’s no official data yet on how this year’s measles outbreak — now the worst in the U.S. since the disease was declared eradicated in 2000 — may impact the economy in the near term. Additionally, a University of North Carolina study showed vaccine-preventable diseases among adults cost the economy nearly $9 billion in 2015, with unvaccinated individuals responsible for 80% of those costs. The disease, before vaccines were available, killed an average of 2 million to 3 million people a year g
Anti-vaxxers are burdening the economy, NIH doctor says as measles outbreak spreads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diseases, economy, million, vaccinepreventable, burdening, vaccines, spreads, antivaxxers, disease, nih, work, worst, doctor, outbreak, measles


Anti-vaxxers are burdening the economy, NIH doctor says as measles outbreak spreads

The agenda of anti-vaccination activists may be causing a drag on the U.S. economy as the measles outbreak forces people to stay out of work and seek medical care, the director for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said Monday.

“If you wind up getting more infections and diseases that were vaccine-preventable, those are entirely avoidable burdens on the economy,” Dr. Anthony Fauci told CNBC. “When people get sick, they lose work, they lose their finances from work, [and] they have hospital costs.”

There’s no official data yet on how this year’s measles outbreak — now the worst in the U.S. since the disease was declared eradicated in 2000 — may impact the economy in the near term.

However, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2013 showed a person hospitalized with measles can run up a hospital bill ranging from $4,032 to $46,060. Additionally, a University of North Carolina study showed vaccine-preventable diseases among adults cost the economy nearly $9 billion in 2015, with unvaccinated individuals responsible for 80% of those costs. The study was funded by Merck, a leading producer of vaccines.

On Friday, President Donald Trump, who had questioned the safety of vaccines in the past, urged people to get measles shots. Health officials in New York, where the current outbreak is the worst, have declared public health emergencies, and they’re scrambling to vaccinate people. The Food and Drug Administration is also reiterating to the public that vaccines are safe and effective.

The latest numbers from the CDC, released Wednesday, show 695 measles cases in 22 states.

The calls for action from federal and local officials come amid growing misinformation efforts by anti-vaccination activists, a vocal fringe who oppose inoculations. They believe, contrary to scientific evidence, that ingredients in vaccine can cause harm to the body.

Fauci, who helped develop a vaccine against AIDS, warned that measles itself is dangerous and can kill. The disease, before vaccines were available, killed an average of 2 million to 3 million people a year globally, he said. “In the United States, there were about 2 million cases [of measles] and about 500 deaths per year.”

“The misinformation that measles is not a serious disease is just not true,” Fauci added in the interview on “Squawk Box. “


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-29  Authors: berkeley lovelace jr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, diseases, economy, million, vaccinepreventable, burdening, vaccines, spreads, antivaxxers, disease, nih, work, worst, doctor, outbreak, measles


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Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai


If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help. As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors. “It’s tricky,” sai
Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


Amazon Alexa is luring health developers, but it will be a while before we use it to call a doctor

If you want to schedule a doctor’s appointment or check on the status of a medication without picking up the phone, Amazon Alexa can help.

As of this week, the voice assistant is HIPAA compliant, which means Amazon can work with hospitals and other health providers that manage protective health data to share personal information on an Echo.

But what users can’t do yet is connect with a doctor or a therapist through the device, and it might be a few years before they can. Currently, Amazon is working with applications on an invite-only basis, and none of the initial six developers link patients with doctors.

Developers focused on digital health have concerns about using home speakers like the Echo and Google Home for medical consults because privacy issues continue to emerge and there’s too much risk in sensitive health information falling into the wrong hands. Earlier this week, Bloomberg reported that thousands of employees listen in to snippets of conversations on Alexa to supposedly improve the product experience.

“It’s tricky,” said Robbie Cape, CEO of 98point6, a Seattle-based company that provides virtual medical consults via smartphones and the web. “To uphold user trust, I can imagine that Amazon Alexa would need to confirm they’re talking to the right person, but also that there’s no one else in the room listening to the conversation.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: christina farr, luke macgregor, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, theres, health, wrong, amazon, developers, information, consults, working, luring, alexa, medical, doctor, week


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‘Alexa, find me a doctor’: Amazon Alexa adds new medical skills

Amazon’s voice assistant can now manage people’s sensitive health information, which represents an important step for the company into the $3.5 trillion health care sector. As of Thursday, consumers will be able to use about half a dozen new Alexa health skills to ask questions such as “Alexa, pull up my blood glucose readings” or “Alexa, find me a doctor,” and receive a prompt response from the voice assistant. Amazon is able to add these skills because Amazon can now sign business associate ag


Amazon’s voice assistant can now manage people’s sensitive health information, which represents an important step for the company into the $3.5 trillion health care sector. As of Thursday, consumers will be able to use about half a dozen new Alexa health skills to ask questions such as “Alexa, pull up my blood glucose readings” or “Alexa, find me a doctor,” and receive a prompt response from the voice assistant. Amazon is able to add these skills because Amazon can now sign business associate ag
‘Alexa, find me a doctor’: Amazon Alexa adds new medical skills Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-03  Authors: christina farr, todd haselton, daniel berman, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voice, amazon, alexa, skills, medical, jiang, care, adds, health, information, hipaa, team, manage, doctor


'Alexa, find me a doctor': Amazon Alexa adds new medical skills

Amazon’s voice assistant can now manage people’s sensitive health information, which represents an important step for the company into the $3.5 trillion health care sector.

As of Thursday, consumers will be able to use about half a dozen new Alexa health skills to ask questions such as “Alexa, pull up my blood glucose readings” or “Alexa, find me a doctor,” and receive a prompt response from the voice assistant.

Amazon is able to add these skills because Amazon can now sign business associate agreements with health providers under HIPAA, which means third-party health developers who follow certain guidelines can meet the rules and requirements that govern how sensitive health information is transmitted and received. HIPAA, or the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is designed to protect patients in cases where their personal health information is shared with a health care organization, like a hospital.

Voice technology has been heralded as a major breakthrough for the health field, particularly for seniors, kids and those with mobility problems. As a result, Amazon, and its rival Alphabet, have been increasingly focused on the needs of these populations, who view voice assistant devices as an important way to manage their medications, communicate with loved ones, and alert emergency services.

Amazon Alexa’s health and wellness team has been working for months on HIPAA compliance, and its team includes Missy Krasner, who previously ran Box’s health care efforts, and Rachel Jiang, who previously worked at Microsoft and Facebook. Jiang announced via the Alexa developer blog that six health partners have been selected for the invitation-only program, and it expects to grow that number in the coming months.

“These new skills are designed to help customers manage a variety of healthcare needs at home simply using voice – whether it’s booking a medical appointment, accessing hospital post-discharge instructions, checking on the status of a prescription delivery, and more,” Jiang wrote in the post.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-03  Authors: christina farr, todd haselton, daniel berman, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, voice, amazon, alexa, skills, medical, jiang, care, adds, health, information, hipaa, team, manage, doctor


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Time is running out to switch or ditch your Medicare Advantage Plan

For starters, because you only get one shot at this, make sure you know what you’re signing up for if you choose another plan. “When you call your doctor, ask specifically if they are in network for your particular plan,” she said. This often was included in your Advantage Plan, and life-long penalties can be applied if you go more than 63 days without coverage. Additionally, if you’re planning to get a supplemental Medicare plan — called Medigap — to pair with original Medicare, be aware of add


For starters, because you only get one shot at this, make sure you know what you’re signing up for if you choose another plan. “When you call your doctor, ask specifically if they are in network for your particular plan,” she said. This often was included in your Advantage Plan, and life-long penalties can be applied if you go more than 63 days without coverage. Additionally, if you’re planning to get a supplemental Medicare plan — called Medigap — to pair with original Medicare, be aware of add
Time is running out to switch or ditch your Medicare Advantage Plan Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: sarah obrien, photo hero images via getty images, cnbc, jaden urbi, -danielle roberts, co-founder of boomer benefits
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coverage, original, medicare, medigap, doctor, ditch, planning, switch, advantage, running, youre, plan, insurance


Time is running out to switch or ditch your Medicare Advantage Plan

For starters, because you only get one shot at this, make sure you know what you’re signing up for if you choose another plan. That includes ensuring that your medications are covered and that your favorite doctors or other providers are in-network.

Roberts said that even if you see your doctor listed on a plan’s online directory, you should confirm that status directly with their office because those listings can be outdated or contain errors.

“When you call your doctor, ask specifically if they are in network for your particular plan,” she said. “Don’t just say the name of the insurance company.”

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If you’re planning to drop your Advantage Plan in favor of original Medicare — which consists of Part A hospital coverage and Part B outpatient coverage — you also likely need to get a standalone Part D prescription drug plan. This often was included in your Advantage Plan, and life-long penalties can be applied if you go more than 63 days without coverage.

Additionally, if you’re planning to get a supplemental Medicare plan — called Medigap — to pair with original Medicare, be aware of additional rules for applying. These policies help cover costs such as deductibles, co-pays and co-insurance.

When you first enroll in Medicare (typically at age 65), you get six months when you’re guaranteed Medigap coverage. That is, you can get a policy without the insurance company nosing through your health history and deciding whether to insure you.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-14  Authors: sarah obrien, photo hero images via getty images, cnbc, jaden urbi, -danielle roberts, co-founder of boomer benefits
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, coverage, original, medicare, medigap, doctor, ditch, planning, switch, advantage, running, youre, plan, insurance


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Advisors take extra steps to protect elder clients from fraud or abuse

Matt Cooney, a 79-year-old retired television sportscaster, was informed that his financial decision-making capacity was in jeopardy. Dobe Cooney admitted that her husband had lost track of their bills a few times lately. McClanahan, a certified financial planner and a medical doctor, is the founder of Life Planning Partners in Jacksonville, Florida. At her recommendation, Matt went to his own physician with the findings. “Advisors tend to be very close to their [clients],” said Jim Wrona, vice


Matt Cooney, a 79-year-old retired television sportscaster, was informed that his financial decision-making capacity was in jeopardy. Dobe Cooney admitted that her husband had lost track of their bills a few times lately. McClanahan, a certified financial planner and a medical doctor, is the founder of Life Planning Partners in Jacksonville, Florida. At her recommendation, Matt went to his own physician with the findings. “Advisors tend to be very close to their [clients],” said Jim Wrona, vice
Advisors take extra steps to protect elder clients from fraud or abuse Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-24  Authors: annie nova, source, carolyn mcclanahan, chris heye, gary vawter, -dobe cooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doctor, dobe, yearsmatt, protect, abuse, elder, steps, matt, cooney, wrona, went, extra, financial, industry, advisors, clients, fraud


Advisors take extra steps to protect elder clients from fraud or abuse

The Cooneys walked into the office to hear their test results.

Matt Cooney, a 79-year-old retired television sportscaster, was informed that his financial decision-making capacity was in jeopardy. Dobe Cooney admitted that her husband had lost track of their bills a few times lately.

“We don’t leave the teeth in the refrigerator or anything like that,” said the 75-year-old former nurse. “But as we get older, we seem to forget a lot.”

The exam had not been administered by their doctor but by their financial advisor, Carolyn McClanahan.

McClanahan, a certified financial planner and a medical doctor, is the founder of Life Planning Partners in Jacksonville, Florida. At her recommendation, Matt went to his own physician with the findings.

As it turned out, Matt indeed, had had a few silent strokes over the years.

Matt and Dobe Cooney

Such discoveries are coming to the surface in the offices of financial advisors across the country, as it becomes increasingly common for financial professionals to probe clients for signs that they are at risk of making poor decisions or turning into victims of fraud or abuse.

“Advisors tend to be very close to their [clients],” said Jim Wrona, vice president and associate general counsel at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, a self-funded regulator of the brokerage industry. “They’re in a fairly good position to know when something is out of the ordinary.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-24  Authors: annie nova, source, carolyn mcclanahan, chris heye, gary vawter, -dobe cooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, doctor, dobe, yearsmatt, protect, abuse, elder, steps, matt, cooney, wrona, went, extra, financial, industry, advisors, clients, fraud


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By 2025, a lot more people will be tracking their blood sugar, predicts doctor — here’s why

Let’s start with a prediction: By 2025, everyone with diabetes will be tracking their blood sugar with devices called continuous glucose monitors, and it will be common for many people without diabetes to dabble in tracking, too. People with diabetes now have alternatives to pricking their fingers with a sharp needle to measure their blood glucose level multiple times per day. Anybody who has ever done a fingerstick blood glucose knows that it hurts. Accordingly, continuous glucose monitoring (C


Let’s start with a prediction: By 2025, everyone with diabetes will be tracking their blood sugar with devices called continuous glucose monitors, and it will be common for many people without diabetes to dabble in tracking, too. People with diabetes now have alternatives to pricking their fingers with a sharp needle to measure their blood glucose level multiple times per day. Anybody who has ever done a fingerstick blood glucose knows that it hurts. Accordingly, continuous glucose monitoring (C
By 2025, a lot more people will be tracking their blood sugar, predicts doctor — here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31  Authors: aaron neinstein, bsip, uig, getty images, cnbc, adam isaak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, million, doctor, cgm, device, tracking, glucose, lot, devices, continuous, 2025, sugar, diabetes, type, fingerstick, blood, predicts


By 2025, a lot more people will be tracking their blood sugar, predicts doctor — here's why

Aaron Neinstein, MD, is Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and Director of Clinical Informatics at the UCSF Center for Digital Health Innovation. He’s also a practicing endocrinologist.

Let’s start with a prediction: By 2025, everyone with diabetes will be tracking their blood sugar with devices called continuous glucose monitors, and it will be common for many people without diabetes to dabble in tracking, too.

This may sound like a bold statement coming from an endocrinologist (we’re the specialists who manage diabetes), but hear me out. In my practice, I primarily treat people with diabetes, and over the years, technology to help manage the disease has made remarkable strides.

People with diabetes now have alternatives to pricking their fingers with a sharp needle to measure their blood glucose level multiple times per day. Early continuous glucose monitoring systems — the first was released in 1999 by the medical device maker Medtronic — while helpful in some cases, were not widely used because they were painful to insert, bulky, inaccurate, very expensive and still required many calibrations every day with fingersticks.

The technology has improved dramatically. Two of the newest devices, the Dexcom G6 and Abbott Freestyle Libre , no longer require fingerstick calibrations, are FDA-approved for people to make insulin-dosing decisions, and are much easier to insert.

Anybody who has ever done a fingerstick blood glucose knows that it hurts. Inserting a device instead is much less painful than a fingerstick, and the needlestick happens much less frequently. Both devices transmit glucose levels to a smartphone, either wirelessly and continuously, or with a wave of a smartphone over the sensor. Accordingly, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) use has increased in Americans with type 1 diabetes, from 6 percent in 2011 to 38 percent in 2018. I expect these technologies to continue to get even better — they will get smaller, more accurate, and even smarter as better algorithms are developed and collaborations from between the device companies and tech companies like Alphabet or Apple.

This is a positive trend. For the approximately 1.5 million Americans with type 1 diabetes, CGM has moved far beyond novelty and should represent standard of care.

But, I believe CGM has much larger potential. That includes people with type 2 diabetes (approximately 30 million American adults), the even larger group with pre-diabetes (approximately 81 million American adults), and potentially almost anybody.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-31  Authors: aaron neinstein, bsip, uig, getty images, cnbc, adam isaak
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, heres, million, doctor, cgm, device, tracking, glucose, lot, devices, continuous, 2025, sugar, diabetes, type, fingerstick, blood, predicts


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Dr. David Chao is the NFL’s armchair injury doctor

Enter Dr. David Chao, aka @ProFootballDoc, a former team doctor for the San Diego Chargers. Just the past weekend, when Kansas City quarterback Patrick Mahomes appeared to suffer a knee injury, Dr. Chao tweeted he wasn’t concerned about the knee within minutes. Dr. Chao said his accuracy is over 90 percent. This is not a substitute for a hands-on exam or imaging studies,” Dr. Chao. As legalized sports gambling grows across the country state by state, look for more doctors like Dr. Chao to pop up


Enter Dr. David Chao, aka @ProFootballDoc, a former team doctor for the San Diego Chargers. Just the past weekend, when Kansas City quarterback Patrick Mahomes appeared to suffer a knee injury, Dr. Chao tweeted he wasn’t concerned about the knee within minutes. Dr. Chao said his accuracy is over 90 percent. This is not a substitute for a hands-on exam or imaging studies,” Dr. Chao. As legalized sports gambling grows across the country state by state, look for more doctors like Dr. Chao to pop up
Dr. David Chao is the NFL’s armchair injury doctor Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-15  Authors: jessica golden, eric chemi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, david, injury, gamblers, knee, doctor, chao, state, think, medical, edge, video, nfls, armchair, dr


Dr. David Chao is the NFL's armchair injury doctor

Sports bettors have always looked for any edge they can find. As sports gambling gains legalization across the country, the next frontier for finding that edge is real-time medical information.

Enter Dr. David Chao, aka @ProFootballDoc, a former team doctor for the San Diego Chargers. Dr. Chao is now a force on Twitter, podcasts, newspapers and radio shows, quickly using game video to let audiences know his opinion of an injury’s severity.

“If you think about it, it makes sense,” said Chao about what he does. He compares himself to former referees who are now part of live game broadcasts. “You have all the Mike Pereiras of the world, the former officials deciphering what is or isn’t a touchdown or a what is a holding call. I am just doing a similar thing in the medical venue. I call it the medical Mike Pereira.”

Just the past weekend, when Kansas City quarterback Patrick Mahomes appeared to suffer a knee injury, Dr. Chao tweeted he wasn’t concerned about the knee within minutes.

The knee turned out to be fine and the Chiefs went on to beat the Colts without much of a challenge. Dr. Chao said his accuracy is over 90 percent. He’s also careful to note that what he does is very different from real medical analysis.

“This is not diagnosis. This is not a substitute for a hands-on exam or imaging studies,” Dr. Chao. “This is video impressions. This is no different than Tony Romo or any experienced QB in the NFL saying it’s going to go to the tight end based on the coverage. It’s just insider knowledge, not insider information.”

These insights are hard currency for gamblers who know how dramatically a game’s path can change based on one injury. There’s money to be made, even though it’s not life changing. “My main monetization is my practice still as an orthopedic surgeon,” Chao said. “This is a fun hobby that thankfully is becoming monetized. It was never the original goal to do this to make a living. There is monetization coming and I think it may grow with the legalization of gambling.”

The NFL league office did not respond to a CNBC inquiry for its opinion on this trend.

As legalized sports gambling grows across the country state by state, look for more doctors like Dr. Chao to pop up and offer their own instant injury opinions. Many top notch professional gamblers however will want to pay those doctors keep those opinions off the internet, so that the gamblers can maintain that extra edge.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-15  Authors: jessica golden, eric chemi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, david, injury, gamblers, knee, doctor, chao, state, think, medical, edge, video, nfls, armchair, dr


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New year, new you: Fitness trends for 2019

New Year, New You: Fitness trends for 2019 3:32 PM ET Wed, 2 Jan 2019 | 26:23Wellness, fitness, nutrition – all of it is getting a makeover in this age of mobile tech. Now you can book doctor appointments on an app, get your blood drawn and the results back in 20 minutes. You can give your doctor access to your genetic code and get truly personalized service. To kick off the year, Jon Fortt sits down with CNBC reporters Chrissy Farr and Diana Olick. It’s the artist formerly known as Weight Watch


New Year, New You: Fitness trends for 2019 3:32 PM ET Wed, 2 Jan 2019 | 26:23Wellness, fitness, nutrition – all of it is getting a makeover in this age of mobile tech. Now you can book doctor appointments on an app, get your blood drawn and the results back in 20 minutes. You can give your doctor access to your genetic code and get truly personalized service. To kick off the year, Jon Fortt sits down with CNBC reporters Chrissy Farr and Diana Olick. It’s the artist formerly known as Weight Watch
New year, new you: Fitness trends for 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-07  Authors: jonathan kim, jon fortt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trends, 2019, watchers, ww, doctor, truly, fitness, whats, weight, youbut


New year, new you: Fitness trends for 2019

New Year, New You: Fitness trends for 2019 3:32 PM ET Wed, 2 Jan 2019 | 26:23

Wellness, fitness, nutrition – all of it is getting a makeover in this age of mobile tech.

Now you can book doctor appointments on an app, get your blood drawn and the results back in 20 minutes. You can give your doctor access to your genetic code and get truly personalized service.

Your stationary bike can connect to the Internet to motivate you.

But how much is too much? And what are the best services to check out?

To kick off the year, Jon Fortt sits down with CNBC reporters Chrissy Farr and Diana Olick. He is also joined by WW CEO Mindy Grossman. What’s WW? It’s the artist formerly known as Weight Watchers.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-07  Authors: jonathan kim, jon fortt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trends, 2019, watchers, ww, doctor, truly, fitness, whats, weight, youbut


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