Investors don’t think Mueller report will get in the way of Trump reelection

Read more: The redacted Mueller report is expected Thursday. And the other thing is how does Trump react? But even so, the headlines coming from the Mueller report are not expected to rock the stock market unless they start to seriously weaken Trump. He also said at this point, he does not think investors are convinced Trump will win reelection. Earlier this week, Goldman Sachs economists issued a report saying Trump has a narrow advantage in the 2020 election at this point.


Read more: The redacted Mueller report is expected Thursday. And the other thing is how does Trump react? But even so, the headlines coming from the Mueller report are not expected to rock the stock market unless they start to seriously weaken Trump. He also said at this point, he does not think investors are convinced Trump will win reelection. Earlier this week, Goldman Sachs economists issued a report saying Trump has a narrow advantage in the 2020 election at this point.
Investors don’t think Mueller report will get in the way of Trump reelection Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: patti domm, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, president, trump, think, reelection, economy, impact, does, going, dont, way, investors, mueller


Investors don't think Mueller report will get in the way of Trump reelection

The release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report is unlikely to change the growing sense in markets that President Donald Trump can win reelection if the economy remains solid, analysts say.

A redacted version of Mueller’s report is expected to be released Thursday morning, and it should add context to the four-page summary released last month by Attorney General William Barr. The attorney general said Mueller did not establish conspiracy or coordination between the Trump campaign and the Russians.

The state of the economy next year will end up mattering more, analysts say. Instead of concerning themselves too much with the details that could emerge from the Mueller report, investors are paying more attention to its potential impact on whether the president can reach a trade agreement with China.

“A lot of this is priced in already, and the market is saying that Trump is going to be the candidate,” said Daniel Clifton, head of policy research at Strategas. “The risks of impeachment are very low even if there’s something in that report. I think the consensus view holds, and does it make it easier to get a China deal through? The answer is yes.”

Still, there are uncertainties about what the report could reveal. Analysts expect there to be much focus on details that can be used to argue either way whether there was any appearance of obstruction of justice by the president. Barr said there was insufficient evidence to charge Trump with obstruction, but he also said “while this report does not conclude that President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.”

Mueller’s two-year probe resulted in criminal charges against 35 people and three companies, including the president’s long time personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, his former campaign manager Paul Manafort and the former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Read more: The redacted Mueller report is expected Thursday. Here’s how we got here, and what’s next

“There are a couple of wild cards. How many embarrassing things will be revealed? And the other thing is how does Trump react? If he gets furious about these allegations, there will be a lot of eyebrows raised,” said Horizon Investment’s chief global strategist, Greg Valliere. “The other wildcard is eventually Mueller is going to have to testify. I think the Mueller testimony will be explosive and refocus attention. … When Trump says he’s totally exonerated, he has not been totally exonerated. That has yet to be addressed.”

But even so, the headlines coming from the Mueller report are not expected to rock the stock market unless they start to seriously weaken Trump.

“I don’t think it’s going to have a lot of impact,” said James Paulsen, chief investment strategist at Leuthold Group. “It’s possible that the way it has impact is not so much whether Trump gets impeached or not, but if it tends to alter the political polls either way, then it would have impact.”

Democrats are expected to seize on any questionable issue, and Paulsen said what matters is if it continues to look like Republicans can hold the Senate and White House. He also said at this point, he does not think investors are convinced Trump will win reelection.

“I think a loss of the Republican side would have Wall Street’s expectations dialed back, and there would be concerns around regulations and different tax policies. I think that would hurt outlooks. To the extent it would move the needle one way or other, it would have impact, but I don’t think it will,” he said. “I still think the bigger thing ultimately will be where the economy goes. If the economy does fade or accelerates again going into the election, that’s huge.”

Valliere also said the economy is what ultimately matters most.

“I think there’s a growing sentiment that the Democratic field is not particularly strong, and I think there’s a growing sentiment if the economy stays in decent shape, yes, he is the favorite,” said Valliere.

Earlier this week, Goldman Sachs economists issued a report saying Trump has a narrow advantage in the 2020 election at this point.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: patti domm, kevin lamarque
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, report, president, trump, think, reelection, economy, impact, does, going, dont, way, investors, mueller


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Publicis’ $4.4 billion acquisition leaves analysts skeptical

Analysts also questioned how well Epsilon will fit into Publicis’ strategy. Barclays analysts said in a note this deal gives Publicis first-party data on U.S. customers, but questioned how useful they would be. “At first sight, Epsilon does not seem to fit Publicis’ strategy that well.” Liberum analysts said the deal is an “overall positive” since it increases Publicis’ ownership of first-party data at a time where the importance of ownership is increasing. He said Publicis had been interested “


Analysts also questioned how well Epsilon will fit into Publicis’ strategy. Barclays analysts said in a note this deal gives Publicis first-party data on U.S. customers, but questioned how useful they would be. “At first sight, Epsilon does not seem to fit Publicis’ strategy that well.” Liberum analysts said the deal is an “overall positive” since it increases Publicis’ ownership of first-party data at a time where the importance of ownership is increasing. He said Publicis had been interested “
Publicis’ $4.4 billion acquisition leaves analysts skeptical Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: megan graham, eric piermont, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, epsilon, strategy, leaves, billion, youve, 44, data, analysts, publicis, acquisition, deal, asset, know, does, skeptical


Publicis' $4.4 billion acquisition leaves analysts skeptical

Analysts also questioned how well Epsilon will fit into Publicis’ strategy.

Morgan Stanley analysts said Epsilon should add to the data and analytics services Publicis can provide its clients, but said investors will likely focus on the ongoing attrition in traditional advertising, which would remain about 75% of Publicis’ revenues following the deal.

Barclays analysts said in a note this deal gives Publicis first-party data on U.S. customers, but questioned how useful they would be. “At first sight, Epsilon does not seem to fit Publicis’ strategy that well.”

Credit Suisse analysts said the deal echoed other agency acquisitions in recent years, such as Dentsu Aegis Network’s purchase of a majority stake in Merkle, or Interpublic Group of Cos.’s buy of Acxiom’s marketing solutions unit. But the analysts were cooler about this deal, noting that Epsilon “is a more varied asset with other agency-like revenue streams, it has a mixed historical track record and is a big departure from the organic strategy Publicis was following.”

Liberum analysts said the deal is an “overall positive” since it increases Publicis’ ownership of first-party data at a time where the importance of ownership is increasing.

But Liberum noted the price was also “much cheaper” than $5 billion suggested in press reports, “which suggests competition for the asset was maybe not as much as expected (and may raise questions as to how ‘must have’ the asset was).”

On a call with analysts Monday, Liberum analyst Ian Whittaker asked why there wasn’t more competition for the deal given how attractive it apparently was to Publicis.

“You’ve said the asset is very good, it fits into your strategy, you’ve … talked about potential longer-term growth, and yet the multiple you’ve paid for it doesn’t seem particularly demanding on that,” he said.

“We do know that in the beginning there were lots of players,” Sadoun countered, “and we do know in the end there were around three.”

Sadoun added, “We are talking about a business that not only does data, that not only does technology to actually enrich data, that not only has platforms, which are three distinct things, but that they were doing the three of them in a connected way, which makes them extremely unique in the market and difficult to compare with other assets that you know. That’s why we were so interested.”

He said Publicis had been interested “three times,” including before Epsilon was up for sale.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: megan graham, eric piermont, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, epsilon, strategy, leaves, billion, youve, 44, data, analysts, publicis, acquisition, deal, asset, know, does, skeptical


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Publicis’ $4.4 billion acquisition leaves analysts skeptical

Analysts also questioned how well Epsilon will fit into Publicis’ strategy. Barclays analysts said in a note this deal gives Publicis first-party data on U.S. customers, but questioned how useful they would be. “At first sight, Epsilon does not seem to fit Publicis’ strategy that well.” Liberum analysts said the deal is an “overall positive” since it increases Publicis’ ownership of first-party data at a time where the importance of ownership is increasing. He said Publicis had been interested “


Analysts also questioned how well Epsilon will fit into Publicis’ strategy. Barclays analysts said in a note this deal gives Publicis first-party data on U.S. customers, but questioned how useful they would be. “At first sight, Epsilon does not seem to fit Publicis’ strategy that well.” Liberum analysts said the deal is an “overall positive” since it increases Publicis’ ownership of first-party data at a time where the importance of ownership is increasing. He said Publicis had been interested “
Publicis’ $4.4 billion acquisition leaves analysts skeptical Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: megan graham, eric piermont, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, epsilon, strategy, leaves, billion, youve, 44, data, analysts, publicis, acquisition, deal, asset, know, does, skeptical


Publicis' $4.4 billion acquisition leaves analysts skeptical

Analysts also questioned how well Epsilon will fit into Publicis’ strategy.

Morgan Stanley analysts said Epsilon should add to the data and analytics services Publicis can provide its clients, but said investors will likely focus on the ongoing attrition in traditional advertising, which would remain about 75% of Publicis’ revenues following the deal.

Barclays analysts said in a note this deal gives Publicis first-party data on U.S. customers, but questioned how useful they would be. “At first sight, Epsilon does not seem to fit Publicis’ strategy that well.”

Credit Suisse analysts said the deal echoed other agency acquisitions in recent years, such as Dentsu Aegis Network’s purchase of a majority stake in Merkle, or Interpublic Group of Cos.’s buy of Acxiom’s marketing solutions unit. But the analysts were cooler about this deal, noting that Epsilon “is a more varied asset with other agency-like revenue streams, it has a mixed historical track record and is a big departure from the organic strategy Publicis was following.”

Liberum analysts said the deal is an “overall positive” since it increases Publicis’ ownership of first-party data at a time where the importance of ownership is increasing.

But Liberum noted the price was also “much cheaper” than $5 billion suggested in press reports, “which suggests competition for the asset was maybe not as much as expected (and may raise questions as to how ‘must have’ the asset was).”

On a call with analysts Monday, Liberum analyst Ian Whittaker asked why there wasn’t more competition for the deal given how attractive it apparently was to Publicis.

“You’ve said the asset is very good, it fits into your strategy, you’ve … talked about potential longer-term growth, and yet the multiple you’ve paid for it doesn’t seem particularly demanding on that,” he said.

“We do know that in the beginning there were lots of players,” Sadoun countered, “and we do know in the end there were around three.”

Sadoun added, “We are talking about a business that not only does data, that not only does technology to actually enrich data, that not only has platforms, which are three distinct things, but that they were doing the three of them in a connected way, which makes them extremely unique in the market and difficult to compare with other assets that you know. That’s why we were so interested.”

He said Publicis had been interested “three times,” including before Epsilon was up for sale.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: megan graham, eric piermont, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, epsilon, strategy, leaves, billion, youve, 44, data, analysts, publicis, acquisition, deal, asset, know, does, skeptical


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How does that index fund address social issues? SEC official seeks transparency

The Securities and Exchange Commission is contemplating a new rule that would represent a fundamental rethink of the way funds disclose key information to investors, and, as technology advances, how information is released to them, as well. One top SEC official, Commissioner Robert Jackson, believes this rethink should include discussion of how funds disclose their votes on key social issues. Investors can choose funds designed (and branded) as environmental, social and governance (ESG) investme


The Securities and Exchange Commission is contemplating a new rule that would represent a fundamental rethink of the way funds disclose key information to investors, and, as technology advances, how information is released to them, as well. One top SEC official, Commissioner Robert Jackson, believes this rethink should include discussion of how funds disclose their votes on key social issues. Investors can choose funds designed (and branded) as environmental, social and governance (ESG) investme
How does that index fund address social issues? SEC official seeks transparency Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eric rosenbaum, fort worth star-telegram, tribune news service, getty images, wolfgang kaehler, lightrocket, krisanapong detraphiphat, moment, dominick reuter, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transparency, issues, disclose, official, address, seeks, key, investors, index, does, votes, information, funds, social, voting, fund, sec


How does that index fund address social issues? SEC official seeks transparency

The era of low-cost index funds from asset management giants such as Vanguard Group and BlackRock has simplified the fund-buying process — and that has been a good thing — but there is more work to be done.

The Securities and Exchange Commission is contemplating a new rule that would represent a fundamental rethink of the way funds disclose key information to investors, and, as technology advances, how information is released to them, as well.

One top SEC official, Commissioner Robert Jackson, believes this rethink should include discussion of how funds disclose their votes on key social issues.

Mutual fund investors have learned that there are a few critical pieces of information to ask about before making an investment purchase: How much does the fund cost, and how has its performance compared with other funds and the index? But that leaves out a layer of information that is becoming increasingly important to a new generation of investors: Does your fund care about social conditions across the Earth today and the future of the planet itself?

Investors can choose funds designed (and branded) as environmental, social and governance (ESG) investments. But the vast majority of investors are still in funds designed to buy stocks first and deal with the social repercussions after as they cast votes at annual meetings — the most votes of any public company shareholders.

Those proxy voting records of big fund companies on issues — including climate change, human rights, gun control and CEO pay — are a key metric to measure their social responsibility. On issues such as climate change, they’ve proven to be more talk than action.

“We should be showing how votes are cast with Americans’ dollars at the point of sale,” Jackson said in a recent interview with CNBC. “When you sit down with a broker and they put you in a fund, that investor ought to know how the money voted.”

While mutual funds are required by the SEC to disclose their proxy voting record once a year in a public document called an N-PX, that information remains hidden from most investors — who wouldn’t be able to understand the disclosure even if they knew how to find it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: eric rosenbaum, fort worth star-telegram, tribune news service, getty images, wolfgang kaehler, lightrocket, krisanapong detraphiphat, moment, dominick reuter, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, transparency, issues, disclose, official, address, seeks, key, investors, index, does, votes, information, funds, social, voting, fund, sec


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How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin


Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin
How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, information, turn, say, ive, recordings, voice, assistant, commands, things, google, better, delete


How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home.

Google’s privacy page says it does this to “help you get better results using your voice,” and that it only does this after you say “OK Google” to learn the sound of your voice and how you speak certain words and phrases.

Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has when I asked the temperature back on Sept. 2, 2014, for example, and everything I’ve asked since then. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions.

Normally, this isn’t a big deal. I don’t mind if it saves a few commands for the sake of creating a better product. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordings.

Like me, you might not want Google to save this information, or you might want to review all of the commands you’ve ever spoken. Over the past year, Google has made it a lot easier to see the sorts of information it collects, and gives you better controls over stopping it from gathering some specific data.

You can turn it off completely, but just note that this might affect how well Google responds. You can always turn it back on if you run in to trouble.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, information, turn, say, ive, recordings, voice, assistant, commands, things, google, better, delete


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How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin


Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home. Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordin
How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, assistant, things, say, information, commands, google, does, recordings, voice, ive, delete, turn


How to delete your voice recordings from Google Assistant

Like Amazon, Google stores and collects the things you say to its assistant on your phone, computer or smart speaker, like the Google Home.

Google’s privacy page says it does this to “help you get better results using your voice,” and that it only does this after you say “OK Google” to learn the sound of your voice and how you speak certain words and phrases.

Google has a whole host of things I’ve said saved to its servers. It has when I asked the temperature back on Sept. 2, 2014, for example, and everything I’ve asked since then. It has a recording of my voice — or my wife’s — asking Google Assistant everything — such as playing music, turning off the bedroom lights, getting directions.

Normally, this isn’t a big deal. I don’t mind if it saves a few commands for the sake of creating a better product. But I know that Google can get a better picture of my entire life the more data it has, so I’m glad I can delete all of these recordings.

Like me, you might not want Google to save this information, or you might want to review all of the commands you’ve ever spoken. Over the past year, Google has made it a lot easier to see the sorts of information it collects, and gives you better controls over stopping it from gathering some specific data.

You can turn it off completely, but just note that this might affect how well Google responds. You can always turn it back on if you run in to trouble.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-13  Authors: todd haselton, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, better, assistant, things, say, information, commands, google, does, recordings, voice, ive, delete, turn


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NYU business school professor: People think they know what makes them happy–here’s what really does

NYU business school professor: People think they know what makes them happy–here’s what really does11:14 AM ET Thu, 11 April 2019To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. “Many people think that happiness comes from getting what you want,” says happiness expert and New York University business school professor Jonathan Haidt. Here’s what does.


NYU business school professor: People think they know what makes them happy–here’s what really does11:14 AM ET Thu, 11 April 2019To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. “Many people think that happiness comes from getting what you want,” says happiness expert and New York University business school professor Jonathan Haidt. Here’s what does.
NYU business school professor: People think they know what makes them happy–here’s what really does Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, happiness, browser, york, view, really, think, professor, business, flash, school, know, nyu, happyheres, does, enabled, makes


NYU business school professor: People think they know what makes them happy–here's what really does

NYU business school professor: People think they know what makes them happy–here’s what really does

11:14 AM ET Thu, 11 April 2019

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

“Many people think that happiness comes from getting what you want,” says happiness expert and New York University business school professor Jonathan Haidt. Here’s what does.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, happiness, browser, york, view, really, think, professor, business, flash, school, know, nyu, happyheres, does, enabled, makes


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Strong jobs number dashes recession fears and shows Fed it does not need to move on rates

Treasury yields slipped immediately after the March jobs report’s weaker wage gains, but then rebounded as traders focused on the growth aspects of the job gains. Ed Keon, chief market strategist at QMA, said the wage gains were “solid but a little bit off its peak.” Manufacturing lost 6,000 jobs while big gains were seen in health care, with 49,000 jobs, and professional and technical services, up 34,000. Swonk said she still sees a risk of a recession for next year, but the surprisingly soft F


Treasury yields slipped immediately after the March jobs report’s weaker wage gains, but then rebounded as traders focused on the growth aspects of the job gains. Ed Keon, chief market strategist at QMA, said the wage gains were “solid but a little bit off its peak.” Manufacturing lost 6,000 jobs while big gains were seen in health care, with 49,000 jobs, and professional and technical services, up 34,000. Swonk said she still sees a risk of a recession for next year, but the surprisingly soft F
Strong jobs number dashes recession fears and shows Fed it does not need to move on rates Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gains, rates, report, slowdown, number, growth, rate, economy, market, shows, fears, good, recession, does, need, fed, strong, wage, jobs


Strong jobs number dashes recession fears and shows Fed it does not need to move on rates

Six experts on what March’s strong job numbers mean for the US economy 1 Hour Ago | 05:11

March’s jobs growthpowered back to a more normal level of 196,000, after February’s weakness, suggesting some of the first-quarter slowdown is fading.

The better-than-expected March payrolls, combined with February’s revised but still shockingly low 33,000 jobs and January’s above trend 312,000, brings the three-month average to a healthy 180,000 jobs per month. That is lower than the 223,000 in 2018, but in line with a solid labor market in a growing economy.

Economists had been expecting 175,000 jobs for March. The unemployment rate remained at 3.8% as expected. One source of weakness in the report was the lower-than-expected wage gain of just 0.1%, following February’s stronger than expected gain of 0.4%.

Overall, however, the March employment report has become the latest in a series of better data this week, including stronger home sales and a pickup in ISM manufacturing activity. Recession fears have been fading as economists have been nudging up their expectations for GDP growth, with some seeing over 2% in the first quarter from earlier forecasts closer to 1% or lower.

“The demise of the U.S. economy has been greatly exaggerated,” said Ward McCarthy, chief financial economist at Jefferies. McCarthy said this year’s first quarter is following the pattern of typically weaker growth at the start of the year followed by a rebound.

Treasury yields slipped immediately after the March jobs report’s weaker wage gains, but then rebounded as traders focused on the growth aspects of the job gains. Stocks traded higher, and the dollar was flattish after fluctuating.

“I think this is a positive number for risk,” said Brian Daingerfield, head of G10 foreign exchange strategy at NatWest. “It’s a good combination of strong employment numbers and soft wage or inflation numbers. It allays concerns about a slowdown in U.S. growth. You have strong growth but not necessarily enough to force a market repricing toward a more hawkish Fed.”

Ed Keon, chief market strategist at QMA, said the wage gains were “solid but a little bit off its peak.”

“I do think that number is likely to rise but not enough to really ignite inflation fears or get the Fed back into hiking mode,” he said. “Overall, it’s a good solid report that should be good for stocks but not as much for bonds.”

Even though fears of a U.S. recession are fading, the growth pace is clearly slower than the more than 3% level in the middle of last year. First-quarter growth was tracking at about 2% and economists expect growth just above 2.5% in the second quarter.

“The pace of gains has slowed. We have seen a slowdown in the pace of job gains, which is to be expected with slower economic growth,” said Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton. She also said the shutdown of a GM plant in Ohio was a drag on manufacturing jobs, as she expected. Manufacturing lost 6,000 jobs while big gains were seen in health care, with 49,000 jobs, and professional and technical services, up 34,000.

Swonk said she still sees a risk of a recession for next year, but the surprisingly soft February jobs report was not signaling slowdown. “The bad number for February was a bad number for February. There was still a big weather effect on construction, lots of losses in construction. It was in reaction to the extremely good January. I just look at it as a moving average. The moving average is moving down,” she said.

But while it’s a slower trend, she said the March report was still good. “We’ve got low wage workers still gaining wages and more middle and upper management jobs. That’s good. That’s a better quality overall,” she said.

“We’re back to 2% [growth]. It’s not a recession. This is a healthy labor market, and it means more from the low levels of unemployment we’re at than earlier in cycle, as well,” she said.

In the fed funds futures market, traders continued to bet on a partial rate cut for 2019. Just over a week ago, the market was pricing in a quarter point, or 25 basis points of easing, but that level fell to just 15 basis points of easing, according to Jon Hill, rate strategist with BMO.

The jobs report basically left the market view of the Fed’s stance unchanged, Hill said. The Fed last month had eliminated its forecast for rate hikes this year, and now expects no change in rates for 2019. As market worries about a recession grew in recent weeks, traders looked for more of a rate cut but some of those concerns have been allayed by improving data and progress in U.S.-China trade talks.

“The Fed’s patient stance is cemented by the softer inflation reading but the growth side of this, the jobs gain was healthy,” said Daingerfield.

McCarthy said he was not concerned about the lower wage gain because of the better than expected 0.4% gain in February. He also pointed out that growth in wages for lower paid, nonsupervisory personnel was 0.3% higher in March.

While the economy has clearly slowed from last year’s pace, it is now less at risk of fall to a subtrend growth rate, barring an exogenous shock.

“The risk for the US economy is mostly from a slowdown in the world economy with Brexit, Europe and China worries paramount in the minds of Fed officials,” wrote Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist at MUFG Union Bank. “The US economy continues to remain an island of relative prosperity however, and with the Federal Reserve backing off its gradual pace of rate hikes, the outlook for growth this year is a positive one.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, gains, rates, report, slowdown, number, growth, rate, economy, market, shows, fears, good, recession, does, need, fed, strong, wage, jobs


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NFL linebacker Brandon Copeland saves 90% of his pay. Here’s how he does it

Since then, Copeland says he’s learned to live on less. “I’m not too flashy; I don’t need a lot.” “I need to be maximizing every single day I have in the NFL because I don’t know when this NFL platform will be swept right under my feet.” Start investing today”Ultimately, being able to cut your expenses will help you save money so that you can have a nice nest egg,” Copeland said. This offseason, he returned to his alma mater to teach a class on financial literacy, which he’s nicknamed “Life 101.


Since then, Copeland says he’s learned to live on less. “I’m not too flashy; I don’t need a lot.” “I need to be maximizing every single day I have in the NFL because I don’t know when this NFL platform will be swept right under my feet.” Start investing today”Ultimately, being able to cut your expenses will help you save money so that you can have a nice nest egg,” Copeland said. This offseason, he returned to his alma mater to teach a class on financial literacy, which he’s nicknamed “Life 101.
NFL linebacker Brandon Copeland saves 90% of his pay. Here’s how he does it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: sharon epperson, jessica dickler, scott w grau, icon sportswire, getty images, -brandon copeland, nfl linebacker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 90, league, heres, does, copeland, need, half, saves, dont, learned, money, financial, linebacker, brandon, pay, nfl, hes, save


NFL linebacker Brandon Copeland saves 90% of his pay. Here's how he does it

Since then, Copeland says he’s learned to live on less. In fact, he said, he spends only about 10% to 15% of his income.

“I’m not too flashy; I don’t need a lot.”

“I realized that I have it backwards,” he said of his early days in the league. “I need to be maximizing every single day I have in the NFL because I don’t know when this NFL platform will be swept right under my feet.”

For others — whether they’re professional athletes or not — he advises shooting to save at least half of your salary, far more than even most financial advisors suggest is feasible. (One popular guideline among experts is to spend half of your take home pay on necessities, put 20% toward savings and leave 30% for discretionary spending, otherwise known as the “50-30-20 rule.”)

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“Ultimately, being able to cut your expenses will help you save money so that you can have a nice nest egg,” Copeland said.

To achieve such a goal, he said, his competitive mindset helps. “If you just challenge yourself, you’ll be surprised at what you can accomplish.”

“The biggest money lesson I’ve learned is basically don’t try to keep up with the Joneses,” he said. “If that’s not something of value to you, then don’t chase it.”

That mentality is what sets him (far) apart from his peers. In fact, nearly 80% of retired players go broke in their first two years out of the league, according to Sports Illustrated.

Now he’s sharing his conservative approach with students, too. This offseason, he returned to his alma mater to teach a class on financial literacy, which he’s nicknamed “Life 101.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-05  Authors: sharon epperson, jessica dickler, scott w grau, icon sportswire, getty images, -brandon copeland, nfl linebacker
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, 90, league, heres, does, copeland, need, half, saves, dont, learned, money, financial, linebacker, brandon, pay, nfl, hes, save


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Buffett on the economy: ‘It looks like things have slowed down’

Billionaire Warren Buffett said Thursday that economic growth has lost some steam recently. “It does look like the pace of increase in the economy has slowed down,” the chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway told CNBC’s Becky Quick at The Gatehouse’s Hands Up for Success luncheon in Grapevine, Texas. Buffett noted that a slowdown in BNSF, the railroad company owned by Berkshire, is flashing a signal of slower growth, but added that some of the data may be distorted by seasonal factors, such as t


Billionaire Warren Buffett said Thursday that economic growth has lost some steam recently. “It does look like the pace of increase in the economy has slowed down,” the chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway told CNBC’s Becky Quick at The Gatehouse’s Hands Up for Success luncheon in Grapevine, Texas. Buffett noted that a slowdown in BNSF, the railroad company owned by Berkshire, is flashing a signal of slower growth, but added that some of the data may be distorted by seasonal factors, such as t
Buffett on the economy: ‘It looks like things have slowed down’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: fred imbert, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, signal, looks, buffett, pace, railroad, yield, look, things, economy, does, growth, slower, red, slowed


Buffett on the economy: 'It looks like things have slowed down'

Billionaire Warren Buffett said Thursday that economic growth has lost some steam recently.

“It does look like the pace of increase in the economy has slowed down,” the chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway told CNBC’s Becky Quick at The Gatehouse’s Hands Up for Success luncheon in Grapevine, Texas. “I’d call it somewhere close to noticeably, but I wouldn’t go beyond that.”

Buffett noted that a slowdown in BNSF, the railroad company owned by Berkshire, is flashing a signal of slower growth, but added that some of the data may be distorted by seasonal factors, such as the weather.

His comments came amid increasing concern that U.S. economic growth could be stalling. This has added to volatility in the stock market and has pushed Treasury yields lower.

The benchmark 10-year yield hit its lowest level since Dec. 5, 2017, overnight. Recently, the spread between the 10-year yield and its 3-month counterpart turned negative, causing a so-called yield-curve inversion. Inversions are seen by investors as a signal that a recession may be coming.

Still, Buffett said he is not concerned.

“But it does look like it’s slowing down. I don’t mean it’s reversing course, but it does seem from all of the businesses, especially the railroad statistics” that the economy may be growing at a slower pace, Buffett said. “That doesn’t change anything we do. If there was a flashing red light, if there was a blaring red light, we would keep investing the same way we do.”

He also repeated his mantra of the United States being the best place to invest money. “You really want to bet on America,” Buffett said. “God has blessed America.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-28  Authors: fred imbert, david a grogan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, signal, looks, buffett, pace, railroad, yield, look, things, economy, does, growth, slower, red, slowed


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