Ocasio-Cortez finds herself on same side as Trump regarding the Federal Reserve

National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow praised Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Thursday after the left-wing lawmaker urged Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell to keep monetary policy loose because inflation was not an issue, something that President Donald Trump and his administration have been pushing for. Why does that cause higher inflation and interest rates? By the way, that’s been my position. That’s been the president’s position. Strong growth does not cause higher in


National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow praised Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Thursday after the left-wing lawmaker urged Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell to keep monetary policy loose because inflation was not an issue, something that President Donald Trump and his administration have been pushing for. Why does that cause higher inflation and interest rates? By the way, that’s been my position. That’s been the president’s position. Strong growth does not cause higher in
Ocasio-Cortez finds herself on same side as Trump regarding the Federal Reserve Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, federal, higher, kudlow, ocasiocortez, reserve, trump, regarding, powell, chairman, thats, growth, does, position, finds, inflation


Ocasio-Cortez finds herself on same side as Trump regarding the Federal Reserve

National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow praised Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Thursday after the left-wing lawmaker urged Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell to keep monetary policy loose because inflation was not an issue, something that President Donald Trump and his administration have been pushing for.

“I know I’m a supply side conservative and so forth, but I want to note in the hearings yesterday with Fed Chairman Jay Powell, it was Ms. AOC who asked him about the Phillips curve,” Kudlow told Fox News on Thursday. “Why is rising growth and low unemployment bad? Why does that cause higher inflation and interest rates? Powell said ‘well, you’re right. That thing hasn’t worked in decades.'”

“I’ve got to give her high marks for that. She got that out of the chairman. By the way, that’s been my position. That’s been the president’s position. Strong growth does not cause higher inflation,” Kudlow said, adding he would like to discuss “supply-side economics” with Ocasio-Cortez in the future.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-11  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, federal, higher, kudlow, ocasiocortez, reserve, trump, regarding, powell, chairman, thats, growth, does, position, finds, inflation


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Cramer: Tech stocks are overvalued, but ‘it’s not like we’ve gone crazy’

“As far as I’m concerned, there’s too much exuberance in one particular subset of expensive tech stocks, but other than that, you’re boxing with phantoms.” Cramer counted Amazon, Microsoft, Netflix and Apple as some of the vulnerable tech stocks that could tumble, particularly if U.S.-China trade tensions ratchet back up. Looking at the software space, Cramer said the group of tech stocks he calls “Cloud Kings” are also vulnerable here. Facebook and Google-parent Alphabet, on the other hand, are


“As far as I’m concerned, there’s too much exuberance in one particular subset of expensive tech stocks, but other than that, you’re boxing with phantoms.” Cramer counted Amazon, Microsoft, Netflix and Apple as some of the vulnerable tech stocks that could tumble, particularly if U.S.-China trade tensions ratchet back up. Looking at the software space, Cramer said the group of tech stocks he calls “Cloud Kings” are also vulnerable here. Facebook and Google-parent Alphabet, on the other hand, are
Cramer: Tech stocks are overvalued, but ‘it’s not like we’ve gone crazy’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, overvalued, cramer, does, valuations, tech, gone, trade, weve, apple, technology, vulnerable, crazy


Cramer: Tech stocks are overvalued, but 'it's not like we've gone crazy'

CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Tuesday shot down the idea that there is too much bullish sentiment on Wall Street.

While the technology sector, which is fueling those concerns, has some sky-high valuations, the “Mad Money” host said the whole market does not fit the mold. The major averages each rallied more than 0.20% during the session, with the S&P 500 closed at a new all-time high of 2,973.

“After a big run, you always hear that there are just too many bulls, too much excitement, too much optimism, that we’ve been lulled into a false sense of security,” he said. “As far as I’m concerned, there’s too much exuberance in one particular subset of expensive tech stocks, but other than that, you’re boxing with phantoms.”

Cramer counted Amazon, Microsoft, Netflix and Apple as some of the vulnerable tech stocks that could tumble, particularly if U.S.-China trade tensions ratchet back up. Apple is one stock that he does not want to see get caught in the crossfire of the trade war.

“However, I think the deal [President Donald Trump] just made is a major win for these guys,” he said. “I wouldn’t sell Apple.”

Cramer also pointed to the biotech segment as another source of overvaluation, but found solace in the big pharmaceutical names buying up some of those companies.

He considered the financial technology world to be the most overvalued part of the market. That industry includes payments companies like Visa, PayPal, American Express and Mastercard. Still, these companies could continue to thrive because the fintech space has secular growth, the host noted.

“Every time they get hit, buyers come out of the woodwork,” Cramer said.

Looking at the software space, Cramer said the group of tech stocks he calls “Cloud Kings” are also vulnerable here. He listed Splunk, ServiceNow, Salesforce, Workday and Adobe among them.

Facebook and Google-parent Alphabet, on the other hand, are at “historically low valuations,” Cramer said. Furthermore, investors are still willing to buy other high-valued stocks like Trade Desk and Roku. Those equities bounced back after each caught downgrades from RBC Capital Markets Tuesday morning, he added.

“So where does the argument say that we’re too bullish? It comes from tech, where we do have some outrageous valuations,” Cramer said. “Still, it’s not like we’ve gone crazy.”

Disclosure: Cramer’s charitable trust owns shares of Facebook, Alphabet, Salesforce.com, Amazon, Microsoft and Apple.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-02  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, overvalued, cramer, does, valuations, tech, gone, trade, weve, apple, technology, vulnerable, crazy


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Huawei says it doesn’t cooperate with Chinese military — after report says its employees did

Huawei does not have any company-sanctioned projects cooperating with China’s military and does not customize products for use by the country’s armed forces, the tech giant’s legal chief told CNBC on Thursday. That comes after Bloomberg reported earlier in the day that, based on public documents, Huawei’s workers had cooperated with various parts of China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) on research including on artificial intelligence and radio communications. But the company exec denied there’


Huawei does not have any company-sanctioned projects cooperating with China’s military and does not customize products for use by the country’s armed forces, the tech giant’s legal chief told CNBC on Thursday. That comes after Bloomberg reported earlier in the day that, based on public documents, Huawei’s workers had cooperated with various parts of China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) on research including on artificial intelligence and radio communications. But the company exec denied there’
Huawei says it doesn’t cooperate with Chinese military — after report says its employees did Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, military, chinas, communications, huawei, projects, doesnt, employees, told, cooperate, chinese, legal, does, company, report


Huawei says it doesn't cooperate with Chinese military — after report says its employees did

Huawei does not have any company-sanctioned projects cooperating with China’s military and does not customize products for use by the country’s armed forces, the tech giant’s legal chief told CNBC on Thursday.

That comes after Bloomberg reported earlier in the day that, based on public documents, Huawei’s workers had cooperated with various parts of China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) on research including on artificial intelligence and radio communications.

But the company exec denied there’d been any official work with the PLA.

“As far as I know, we don’t have military cooperation projects because we are a company dedicated to provide communications systems and (information and communications technology) solutions for civil use,” Song Liuping, chief legal officer at Huawei, told CNBC in a Thursday interview conducted in Mandarin and translated by a company-provided translator.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-27  Authors: arjun kharpal
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, military, chinas, communications, huawei, projects, doesnt, employees, told, cooperate, chinese, legal, does, company, report


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Trump on demoting Fed Chair Jerome Powell, day before rate decision: ‘Let’s see what he does’

President Donald Trump, asked if he still wants to demote Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, told reporters Tuesday, “Let’s see what he does.” Trump’s remarks came a day before the Fed was set to announce its next decision on interest rates. Top White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow told reporters that the Trump administration was not currently considering such a move. The Fed will make a decision on interest rates on Wednesday at 2 p.m. “If you look at what’s going on with the euro, th


President Donald Trump, asked if he still wants to demote Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, told reporters Tuesday, “Let’s see what he does.” Trump’s remarks came a day before the Fed was set to announce its next decision on interest rates. Top White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow told reporters that the Trump administration was not currently considering such a move. The Fed will make a decision on interest rates on Wednesday at 2 p.m. “If you look at what’s going on with the euro, th
Trump on demoting Fed Chair Jerome Powell, day before rate decision: ‘Let’s see what he does’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: kevin breuninger fred imbert, kevin breuninger, fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, president, told, does, central, rates, demoting, lets, fed, decision, jerome, day, reporters, interest, powell, white, rate


Trump on demoting Fed Chair Jerome Powell, day before rate decision: 'Let's see what he does'

President Donald Trump, asked if he still wants to demote Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, told reporters Tuesday, “Let’s see what he does.”

Trump’s remarks came a day before the Fed was set to announce its next decision on interest rates.

The president added that he wants a “level playing field” from the central bank.

Bloomberg News reported Tuesday morning that the White House had looked into demoting Powell in February. Top White House economic advisor Larry Kudlow told reporters that the Trump administration was not currently considering such a move.

The Fed will make a decision on interest rates on Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET, concluding a two-day meeting. The central bank is not expected to make any policy changes, but investors are hoping for the central bank to signal a rate cut as soon as July. Powell will be holding a news conference Wednesday following the decision.

Stocks have rallied this month in part because investors expect the Fed to ease its monetary policy stance. The S&P 500, Dow Jones Industrial Average and Nasdaq Composite are all up more than 6% for June through Tuesday’s close. Traders are pricing in a more than 80% likelihood that the Fed will cut rates next month, according to the CME Group FedWatch tool.

Trump in recent days has pressured the Fed under Powell not to raise rates, claiming that comparatively lower interest rates for the euro give other countries an advantage over the U.S.

This line of attack is not new: Trump has claimed the seven Fed interest rate hikes in 2017 and 2018 — from the near-zero levels that followed the financial crisis — have held back U.S. economic growth.

On Tuesday morning, Trump lashed out at European Central Bank President Mario Draghi for his comments signaling openness to more monetary stimulus in Europe, which could lower the euro’s value compared to the dollar.

Draghi’s comments “immediately dropped the Euro against the Dollar, making it unfairly easier for them to compete against the USA. They have been getting away with this for years, along with China and others,” Trump tweeted.

“If you look at what’s going on with the euro, they have a much diff stance than our folks do,” Trump told reporters outside the White House on Tuesday afternoon. “As you know they did something today that was very dramatic, and frankly, it helped that part of the world.”

“I want to be given a level playing field. And so far I haven’t been,” the president added.

Trump spoke to reporters outside while en route to Orlando, Florida, where he will officially launch his 2020 reelection bid.

–CNBC’s Marc Rod and Jacob Pramuk contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-18  Authors: kevin breuninger fred imbert, kevin breuninger, fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, president, told, does, central, rates, demoting, lets, fed, decision, jerome, day, reporters, interest, powell, white, rate


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Cramer: Apple shares are more likely to get hurt by President Trump than by Chinese leader Xi

CNBC’s Jim Cramer says the biggest concern for Apple shareholders should be around what President Donald Trump does next in the U.S.-China trade war. “I actually think it’s more likely that President Trump hurts Apple more than” Chinese President Xi Jinping, Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street” on Wednesday. He said new tariffs on Chinese imports could really hit Apple. On Monday, Trump told to CNBC that if Xi does not attend the G-20 meeting later this month, he would pull the trigger on those


CNBC’s Jim Cramer says the biggest concern for Apple shareholders should be around what President Donald Trump does next in the U.S.-China trade war. “I actually think it’s more likely that President Trump hurts Apple more than” Chinese President Xi Jinping, Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street” on Wednesday. He said new tariffs on Chinese imports could really hit Apple. On Monday, Trump told to CNBC that if Xi does not attend the G-20 meeting later this month, he would pull the trigger on those
Cramer: Apple shares are more likely to get hurt by President Trump than by Chinese leader Xi Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, chinese, cramer, shares, president, trade, does, apple, tariffs, xi, leader, month, worth, hurt, trump


Cramer: Apple shares are more likely to get hurt by President Trump than by Chinese leader Xi

CNBC’s Jim Cramer says the biggest concern for Apple shareholders should be around what President Donald Trump does next in the U.S.-China trade war.

“I actually think it’s more likely that President Trump hurts Apple more than” Chinese President Xi Jinping, Cramer said on “Squawk on the Street” on Wednesday. He said new tariffs on Chinese imports could really hit Apple.

Trump has been threatening to place tariffs on another $300 billion worth of Chinese goods, effectively the rest of China’s imports in the United States, after increasing tariff rates last month on the $200 billion worth of Chinese goods already subject to punitive duties.

On Monday, Trump told to CNBC that if Xi does not attend the G-20 meeting later this month, he would pull the trigger on those additional tariffs.

Thus far, Apple feels that it has shielded itself from any immediate impact from the escalating U.S.-China trade and economic disputes.

“The Chinese have not targeted Apple at all, and, I don’t anticipate that happening, to be honest,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview with CBS News earlier this month. Though Cook admitted that more tariffs could eventually hurt sales, though he said he does not “anticipate it happening.”

Cramer on Wednesday encouraged investors not to sell their shares of Apple, but said he understands wanting to take profits with the stock up 10% this month and the specter of trade as an overhang.

“I do think you can own it. Don’t trade it,” the “Mad Money” host said. “But I totally understand why someone might say, ‘This has been a good run, I’m done.'”

While drifting down slightly in Wednesday afternoon trading, Apple shares on Tuesday logged a six-session winning streak.

In June, as of Tuesday’s close, the Nasdaq surged nearly 5%, while Apple stock advanced double that since the last trading day of May.

Apple, along with tech stocks broadly, were slammed in the May market rout, which saw the Nasdaq lose 8.4%, in its worst monthly performance since December.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, likely, chinese, cramer, shares, president, trade, does, apple, tariffs, xi, leader, month, worth, hurt, trump


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Glamour’s Samantha Barry says ‘networking’ doesn’t work—this is what she does instead

They’re told to go to job fairs, ask for coffee meetings, mingle at work-related cocktail events, and attend panels. Many people dislike networking and say it feels awkward, and for others it can be a source of anxiety. And according to Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry, a better approach is to stop networking entirely, and focus instead on forming relationships. Barry tells CNBC Make It that she tries never to even use the word “networks” and to focus instead on building relationships in a


They’re told to go to job fairs, ask for coffee meetings, mingle at work-related cocktail events, and attend panels. Many people dislike networking and say it feels awkward, and for others it can be a source of anxiety. And according to Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry, a better approach is to stop networking entirely, and focus instead on forming relationships. Barry tells CNBC Make It that she tries never to even use the word “networks” and to focus instead on building relationships in a
Glamour’s Samantha Barry says ‘networking’ doesn’t work—this is what she does instead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workthis, samantha, does, word, glamours, relationships, doesnt, approach, instead, professional, networking, welch, told, focus, feels, barry


Glamour's Samantha Barry says 'networking' doesn't work—this is what she does instead

Young professionals are constantly told about the importance of networking. They’re told to go to job fairs, ask for coffee meetings, mingle at work-related cocktail events, and attend panels.

What’s less clear is how and when (and if) these networking efforts really pay off. Many people dislike networking and say it feels awkward, and for others it can be a source of anxiety. And according to Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry, a better approach is to stop networking entirely, and focus instead on forming relationships.

Barry tells CNBC Make It that she tries never to even use the word “networks” and to focus instead on building relationships in a professional context.

“Networking can sometimes come across as a one-sided and negative word,” she says. “I prefer ‘relationships’ because that’s what I see them as — professional friendships. And they are beneficial and positive for all parties.”

Barry isn’t the only one who feels this way. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch says that the standard, transactional approach to networking, where you meet, talk and then exchange business cards, is usually not the most effective. Instead, Welch recommends taking a long-term approach and working to build a full, authentic relationship.

“Human beings help friends,” she says, “not ‘contacts.'”

Here’s how to shake up your approach to making professional connections:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workthis, samantha, does, word, glamours, relationships, doesnt, approach, instead, professional, networking, welch, told, focus, feels, barry


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Trump: If President Xi does not attend G-20, more China tariffs will go into effect immediately

Trump to CNBC: China will make a deal because ‘they’re going to…Trump’s remarks to CNBC came after the president sent a series of tweets touting the deal reached with Mexico that prevented the U.S. from imposing tariffs of 5% on all… Politicsread more


Trump to CNBC: China will make a deal because ‘they’re going to…Trump’s remarks to CNBC came after the president sent a series of tweets touting the deal reached with Mexico that prevented the U.S. from imposing tariffs of 5% on all… Politicsread more
Trump: If President Xi does not attend G-20, more China tariffs will go into effect immediately Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, tweets, immediately, does, effect, attend, g20, tariffs, xi, deal, trump, touting, totrumps, theyre, president, series, sent


Trump: If President Xi does not attend G-20, more China tariffs will go into effect immediately

Trump to CNBC: China will make a deal because ‘they’re going to…

Trump’s remarks to CNBC came after the president sent a series of tweets touting the deal reached with Mexico that prevented the U.S. from imposing tariffs of 5% on all…

Politics

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-10  Authors: michael sheetz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, tweets, immediately, does, effect, attend, g20, tariffs, xi, deal, trump, touting, totrumps, theyre, president, series, sent


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Fed officials and Trump’s latest trade threat could decide whether June starts with a market swoon

Federal Reserve officials speaking at a policy conference may get a lot more attention than usual in the week ahead after President Donald Trump’s latest tariff threat against Mexico ramped up expectations for interest rate cuts. Michael Gapen, Barclays chief U.S. economists, said investors hoping to hear Fed officials discuss their thinking on current policy could be disappointed. Gapen was one of several Wall Street economists Friday who changed his view on the Fed’s rate policy. The Fed has s


Federal Reserve officials speaking at a policy conference may get a lot more attention than usual in the week ahead after President Donald Trump’s latest tariff threat against Mexico ramped up expectations for interest rate cuts. Michael Gapen, Barclays chief U.S. economists, said investors hoping to hear Fed officials discuss their thinking on current policy could be disappointed. Gapen was one of several Wall Street economists Friday who changed his view on the Fed’s rate policy. The Fed has s
Fed officials and Trump’s latest trade threat could decide whether June starts with a market swoon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threat, does, mexico, fed, decide, conference, tariffs, officials, trade, latest, market, swoon, rate, cuts, trumps, policy, starts


Fed officials and Trump's latest trade threat could decide whether June starts with a market swoon

The coming week has a full calendar of economic data, with the highlight being Friday’s May employment report. There are also monthly auto sales and Institute for Supply Management manufacturing data due Monday, and international trade data expected Thursday.

Stocks lost ground in May on worries that the U.S. trade war with China would hurt the global economy and bite into earnings growth. They will begin trading in June with new worries that tariffs on Mexico could hurt the economy and threaten a new trade deal between the U.S., Mexico and Canada.

Markets will also start the month of June, which is often flat for markets, coming off a painful 6.6% monthly loss in the S&P 500.

Federal Reserve officials speaking at a policy conference may get a lot more attention than usual in the week ahead after President Donald Trump’s latest tariff threat against Mexico ramped up expectations for interest rate cuts.

But it is the Fed that should get the most attention, with central bank officials gathering at a much-anticipated conference hosted by the Chicago Fed Tuesday and Wednesday. Fed Chair Jerome Powell will make the opening remarks at the conference, which is about monetary policy strategy, tools and communications. For months, strategists have been hoping the conference will provide insight into how the Fed intends to address sluggish inflation.

Interest in the event is even higher after the market and Fed watchers are increasingly convinced the central bank will now cut rates this year, and maybe more than once. The futures market priced in increasing expectations for two rate cuts after Trump’s threat to put tariffs on all Mexican goods if the Mexican government does not stop immigration into the U.S.

After the last Fed meeting, Powell said low inflation appears to be transitory, suggesting the Fed would not have to cut rates, but markets still anticipate a rate cut, and inflation continues to run below the Fed’s 2% target.

Michael Gapen, Barclays chief U.S. economists, said investors hoping to hear Fed officials discuss their thinking on current policy could be disappointed. Gapen said the Fed is also about nine months away from its decision on how it will frame inflation, and the conference will be more about academic views on it.

Gapen was one of several Wall Street economists Friday who changed his view on the Fed’s rate policy. He said he now sees the Fed cutting the fed funds target rate by 75 basis points in two cuts this year, with the Fed starting at 50 basis points in September. The Fed has said does not foresee any rate cuts this year, nor hikes, and has stressed it is on hold.

Gapen does not expect to hear much from Fed officials at the conference on rates, though investors will be combing through every word looking for policy clues.

“I don’t think that’s the type of setting where anyone would make a monetary policy comment in advance of an FOMC meeting,” he said. The Fed next meets on June 18 and 19.

Gapen said he went from expecting no Fed move to two rate cuts because the trade war with China has become more extended than expected; manufacturing and business spending are weakening, and because of Trump’s threat to put tariffs on Mexico if it doesn’t control immigrants heading into the U.S. over the southern border.

“It does suggest the administration is willing to pursue multiple fronts. It lowers the bar for tariffs on Europe,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, threat, does, mexico, fed, decide, conference, tariffs, officials, trade, latest, market, swoon, rate, cuts, trumps, policy, starts


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Fed officials and Trump’s latest trade threat could decide whether June starts with a market swoon

Federal Reserve officials speaking at a policy conference may get a lot more attention than usual in the week ahead after President Donald Trump’s latest tariff threat against Mexico ramped up expectations for interest rate cuts. Michael Gapen, Barclays chief U.S. economists, said investors hoping to hear Fed officials discuss their thinking on current policy could be disappointed. Gapen was one of several Wall Street economists Friday who changed his view on the Fed’s rate policy. The Fed has s


Federal Reserve officials speaking at a policy conference may get a lot more attention than usual in the week ahead after President Donald Trump’s latest tariff threat against Mexico ramped up expectations for interest rate cuts. Michael Gapen, Barclays chief U.S. economists, said investors hoping to hear Fed officials discuss their thinking on current policy could be disappointed. Gapen was one of several Wall Street economists Friday who changed his view on the Fed’s rate policy. The Fed has s
Fed officials and Trump’s latest trade threat could decide whether June starts with a market swoon Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, starts, latest, conference, cuts, does, trumps, mexico, decide, swoon, tariffs, threat, fed, market, policy, officials, trade


Fed officials and Trump's latest trade threat could decide whether June starts with a market swoon

The coming week has a full calendar of economic data, with the highlight being Friday’s May employment report. There are also monthly auto sales and Institute for Supply Management manufacturing data due Monday, and international trade data expected Thursday.

Stocks lost ground in May on worries that the U.S. trade war with China would hurt the global economy and bite into earnings growth. They will begin trading in June with new worries that tariffs on Mexico could hurt the economy and threaten a new trade deal between the U.S., Mexico and Canada.

Markets will also start the month of June, which is often flat for markets, coming off a painful 6.6% monthly loss in the S&P 500.

Federal Reserve officials speaking at a policy conference may get a lot more attention than usual in the week ahead after President Donald Trump’s latest tariff threat against Mexico ramped up expectations for interest rate cuts.

But it is the Fed that should get the most attention, with central bank officials gathering at a much-anticipated conference hosted by the Chicago Fed Tuesday and Wednesday. Fed Chair Jerome Powell will make the opening remarks at the conference, which is about monetary policy strategy, tools and communications. For months, strategists have been hoping the conference will provide insight into how the Fed intends to address sluggish inflation.

Interest in the event is even higher after the market and Fed watchers are increasingly convinced the central bank will now cut rates this year, and maybe more than once. The futures market priced in increasing expectations for two rate cuts after Trump’s threat to put tariffs on all Mexican goods if the Mexican government does not stop immigration into the U.S.

After the last Fed meeting, Powell said low inflation appears to be transitory, suggesting the Fed would not have to cut rates, but markets still anticipate a rate cut, and inflation continues to run below the Fed’s 2% target.

Michael Gapen, Barclays chief U.S. economists, said investors hoping to hear Fed officials discuss their thinking on current policy could be disappointed. Gapen said the Fed is also about nine months away from its decision on how it will frame inflation, and the conference will be more about academic views on it.

Gapen was one of several Wall Street economists Friday who changed his view on the Fed’s rate policy. He said he now sees the Fed cutting the fed funds target rate by 75 basis points in two cuts this year, with the Fed starting at 50 basis points in September. The Fed has said does not foresee any rate cuts this year, nor hikes, and has stressed it is on hold.

Gapen does not expect to hear much from Fed officials at the conference on rates, though investors will be combing through every word looking for policy clues.

“I don’t think that’s the type of setting where anyone would make a monetary policy comment in advance of an FOMC meeting,” he said. The Fed next meets on June 18 and 19.

Gapen said he went from expecting no Fed move to two rate cuts because the trade war with China has become more extended than expected; manufacturing and business spending are weakening, and because of Trump’s threat to put tariffs on Mexico if it doesn’t control immigrants heading into the U.S. over the southern border.

“It does suggest the administration is willing to pursue multiple fronts. It lowers the bar for tariffs on Europe,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-31  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rate, starts, latest, conference, cuts, does, trumps, mexico, decide, swoon, tariffs, threat, fed, market, policy, officials, trade


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Ex-Navy SEAL and ‘John Wick 3’ trainer does this 5-minute workout to get ‘mentally pumped’ every morning

Second, it’s important to have a workout routine that gets you mentally and physically pumped for the day. It can be squats, squat jumps, pull-ups, box jumps — whatever you prefer, as long as it challenges your mind and body. Set your timer for five minutes and start with the lowest number of reps. We’ll use squat jumps as an example. If you’re a beginner, try starting with a rep of 10 squat jumps. Move on to a rep of 15 squat jumps.


Second, it’s important to have a workout routine that gets you mentally and physically pumped for the day. It can be squats, squat jumps, pull-ups, box jumps — whatever you prefer, as long as it challenges your mind and body. Set your timer for five minutes and start with the lowest number of reps. We’ll use squat jumps as an example. If you’re a beginner, try starting with a rep of 10 squat jumps. Move on to a rep of 15 squat jumps.
Ex-Navy SEAL and ‘John Wick 3’ trainer does this 5-minute workout to get ‘mentally pumped’ every morning Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-29  Authors: shawn ryan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, strength, jumps, record, mentally, reps, rep, john, timer, morning, seal, workout, trainer, way, wick, squat, pumped, starting, exnavy


Ex-Navy SEAL and 'John Wick 3' trainer does this 5-minute workout to get 'mentally pumped' every morning

Mornings aren’t for everyone. For some, it comes naturally. For others, it may take a lot more than just caffeine. First, it helps to have something to look forward to. I’ve gone from being a U.S. Navy SEAL to C.I.A. contractor to starting my own company, Vigilance Elite, where I get to train law enforcement, civilians and even actors on movie sets. (Most recently, I worked with Keanu Reeves to prepare for his role in “John Wick: Chapter 3.”) Each and every one of these jobs has allowed me to wake up feeling excited and motivated. Second, it’s important to have a workout routine that gets you mentally and physically pumped for the day. Every morning, I do at least five minutes of pyramid training to get an instant energy boost. It’s quick and doesn’t require a ton of space or any special equipment.

What is pyramid training?

Pyramid training is an incredibly simple workout structure where you follow consecutive repetitions of a specific exercise. The goal is to work your way up from each subsequent set and build strength over time.

Too many people try to chase after that one big win and fail to realize that it takes several small wins to get there. Shawn Ryan founder and CEO, Vigilance Elite

(Note: If you have any serious health conditions, consider checking with your health care professional first to see what’s right for you.)

Let’s begin

1. Pick an exercise of your choice. Stick with something that will work your core and major muscle groups (back, legs, chest). It can be squats, squat jumps, pull-ups, box jumps — whatever you prefer, as long as it challenges your mind and body. You can also designate certain days of the week to train specific muscle groups. There’s no “right way” to do this form of workout, so you can tailor it any way that works best for you. 2. Set your timer for five minutes and start with the lowest number of reps. We’ll use squat jumps as an example. Your starting number of reps will vary depending on your current level of physical strength. If you’re a beginner, try starting with a rep of 10 squat jumps. Remember, the goal isn’t to start at a super intense level. Go with what you feel most comfortable with and focus on building your strength over time. 3. Move on to a rep of 15 squat jumps. Gradually increase the number of reps you do in that five-minute time frame. After a rep of 15, you can move on to 20, then 25 and so on until the timer goes off. Of course, you can always take a rest if needed, but keep in mind that the timer doesn’t stop. 4. Record your results. It’s important to have a pen and paper handy so you can write down what you completed that day. You’ll want to beat your previous record each time, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you don’t. As you continue to do this workout over time, you’ll gain a true sense of your fitness level and know how to beat your last record. The feeling of accomplishment after each workout is priceless.

Build your mental toughness


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-29  Authors: shawn ryan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, does, strength, jumps, record, mentally, reps, rep, john, timer, morning, seal, workout, trainer, way, wick, squat, pumped, starting, exnavy


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