Pelosi doesn’t budge on impeachment after Trump’s ‘appalling’ claim he’d take 2020 campaign dirt from foreign powers

Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi speaks to the press on June 13, 2019, during her weekly press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. In an interview that aired in part Wednesday, Trump told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that he would accept information on his 2020 opponent if it was offered by foreign operatives and would not alert the FBI. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a major supporter of Trump’s, said his response to the question was “not the right answer … t


Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi speaks to the press on June 13, 2019, during her weekly press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. In an interview that aired in part Wednesday, Trump told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that he would accept information on his 2020 opponent if it was offered by foreign operatives and would not alert the FBI. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a major supporter of Trump’s, said his response to the question was “not the right answer … t
Pelosi doesn’t budge on impeachment after Trump’s ‘appalling’ claim he’d take 2020 campaign dirt from foreign powers Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, powers, foreign, president, hed, pelosi, campaign, trumps, press, told, claim, trump, right, dirt, speaker, doesnt, impeachment


Pelosi doesn't budge on impeachment after Trump's 'appalling' claim he'd take 2020 campaign dirt from foreign powers

Speaker of the US House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi speaks to the press on June 13, 2019, during her weekly press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., on Thursday repeatedly refused to say at what point she would support impeaching President Donald Trump, whose claim that he would possibly take foreign operatives’ dirt on a 2020 opponent was loudly condemned by her party a day earlier.

“Not any one issue is going to trigger, ‘Oh, now we’ll go do this,'” Pelosi told reporters when asked whether Trump’s remarks were enough to push the top House Democrat — who has strongly resisted an impeachment fight — over the edge.

In an interview that aired in part Wednesday, Trump told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that he would accept information on his 2020 opponent if it was offered by foreign operatives and would not alert the FBI.

“It’s not an interference. They have information. I think I’d take it,” Trump said.

The comments from a sitting president were immediately met with an outcry from Democrats and political organizations, as well as some Republicans.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a major supporter of Trump’s, said his response to the question was “not the right answer … the right answer is ‘no.'”

“Everybody in the country should be totally appalled by what the president said,” Pelosi said when asked if Trump inviting foreign help in an election was grounds for impeachment. “But he has a habit of making appalling statements,” she added.

Even if Trump was found to have accepted a foreign government’s help in the election, Pelosi avoided making any commitment to launching impeachment proceedings.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-13  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, powers, foreign, president, hed, pelosi, campaign, trumps, press, told, claim, trump, right, dirt, speaker, doesnt, impeachment


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Glamour’s Samantha Barry says ‘networking’ doesn’t work—this is what she does instead

They’re told to go to job fairs, ask for coffee meetings, mingle at work-related cocktail events, and attend panels. Many people dislike networking and say it feels awkward, and for others it can be a source of anxiety. And according to Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry, a better approach is to stop networking entirely, and focus instead on forming relationships. Barry tells CNBC Make It that she tries never to even use the word “networks” and to focus instead on building relationships in a


They’re told to go to job fairs, ask for coffee meetings, mingle at work-related cocktail events, and attend panels. Many people dislike networking and say it feels awkward, and for others it can be a source of anxiety. And according to Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry, a better approach is to stop networking entirely, and focus instead on forming relationships. Barry tells CNBC Make It that she tries never to even use the word “networks” and to focus instead on building relationships in a
Glamour’s Samantha Barry says ‘networking’ doesn’t work—this is what she does instead Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workthis, samantha, does, word, glamours, relationships, doesnt, approach, instead, professional, networking, welch, told, focus, feels, barry


Glamour's Samantha Barry says 'networking' doesn't work—this is what she does instead

Young professionals are constantly told about the importance of networking. They’re told to go to job fairs, ask for coffee meetings, mingle at work-related cocktail events, and attend panels.

What’s less clear is how and when (and if) these networking efforts really pay off. Many people dislike networking and say it feels awkward, and for others it can be a source of anxiety. And according to Glamour editor-in-chief Samantha Barry, a better approach is to stop networking entirely, and focus instead on forming relationships.

Barry tells CNBC Make It that she tries never to even use the word “networks” and to focus instead on building relationships in a professional context.

“Networking can sometimes come across as a one-sided and negative word,” she says. “I prefer ‘relationships’ because that’s what I see them as — professional friendships. And they are beneficial and positive for all parties.”

Barry isn’t the only one who feels this way. CNBC contributor Suzy Welch says that the standard, transactional approach to networking, where you meet, talk and then exchange business cards, is usually not the most effective. Instead, Welch recommends taking a long-term approach and working to build a full, authentic relationship.

“Human beings help friends,” she says, “not ‘contacts.'”

Here’s how to shake up your approach to making professional connections:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: anna hecht
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workthis, samantha, does, word, glamours, relationships, doesnt, approach, instead, professional, networking, welch, told, focus, feels, barry


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The best career and financial advice we got from our dads

With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, the staff at CNBC Make It took some time to reflect on life lessons from our dads. Kathleen Elkins”I remember distinctly the first time I heard my dad’s, ‘Is that a want or a need?’ speech: I was in kindergarten and tried to order a chocolate milk at a restaurant. Most of the talk went over my head, but the conclusion of his message stuck: There are ‘wants’ and ‘needs’ in life, and chocolate milk classifies as a ‘want.’ Of course, there’s always a time an


With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, the staff at CNBC Make It took some time to reflect on life lessons from our dads. Kathleen Elkins”I remember distinctly the first time I heard my dad’s, ‘Is that a want or a need?’ speech: I was in kindergarten and tried to order a chocolate milk at a restaurant. Most of the talk went over my head, but the conclusion of his message stuck: There are ‘wants’ and ‘needs’ in life, and chocolate milk classifies as a ‘want.’ Of course, there’s always a time an
The best career and financial advice we got from our dads Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, best, doesnt, money, life, career, dad, words, dads, say, financial, chocolate, advice, milk


The best career and financial advice we got from our dads

With Father’s Day coming up this Sunday, the staff at CNBC Make It took some time to reflect on life lessons from our dads. Here’s the best advice we ever got from them.

There’s a difference between a ‘want’ and a ‘need’

Every Christmas, my dad takes me shopping for a “go-to gift.” Kathleen Elkins

“I remember distinctly the first time I heard my dad’s, ‘Is that a want or a need?’ speech: I was in kindergarten and tried to order a chocolate milk at a restaurant. Most of the talk went over my head, but the conclusion of his message stuck: There are ‘wants’ and ‘needs’ in life, and chocolate milk classifies as a ‘want.’ I promptly changed my order to an ice water. As I got older, I learned how to separate larger potential purchases into those two categories and developed a frugal lifestyle, much like my dad’s, centered around needs, rather than wants. Of course, there’s always a time and place for a chocolate milk: The occasional splurge keeps you sane. I just make sure to weigh the pros and cons before splurging and ensure that I’m spending on things that truly matter to me. — Kathleen Elkins, senior money reporter

‘If you have a passion that doesn’t pay, it’s called a hobby’

Courtesy of Megan Leonhardt

“My dad has always been very practical about his approach to life, especially when it comes to finding and building a successful career. He always told me and my sister growing up that we should find careers that we found interesting because we were going to spend the rest of our lives doing it. But when it came to a job within that career, he always stressed that it was important to keep learning. You should constantly be learning new things or you become stagnant. If that happens, it’s time for a new job. “That said, he encouraged both his girls to choose college majors and careers in which we could earn enough to comfortably afford to eat and have a roof over our heads. If you have a passion that doesn’t pay, it’s called a hobby. He wanted us to be able to stand on our own, and thanks to his little lessons along the way, we’re both doing just that!” — Megan Leonhardt, senior money reporter

Talk less and listen more

“My dad isn’t a man of many words, but he did teach me every lyric to Alison Krauss’ ‘When You Say Nothing At All’ by the time I was three years old. I still keep the lyrics with me since it is a song that means so much to us. “One line says: ‘You say it best when you say nothing at all.’ Those words have always reminded me of the power of listening (rather than talking) and the impact one’s actions (rather than their words) can have on those around them.” — Anna Hecht, money reporter

Passion is important, but so is your paycheck

Courtesy of Lindsey Stanberry

“My dad always says, ‘The reason you get paid to work is because it’s work.’ He’s always been very passionate about his career, and I think I get a lot of my drive from him. But when work gets tough for whatever reason — a project doesn’t go as planned, office politics are complicated, you’re putting in a lot of overtime — I always remind myself, This is why I’m getting a paycheck. ” — Lindsey Stanberry, deputy managing editor Don’t miss: This is the No. 1 money lesson Shaquille O’Neal learned from his drill sergeant dad Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-12  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, work, best, doesnt, money, life, career, dad, words, dads, say, financial, chocolate, advice, milk


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Trump says ‘devalued’ currencies put US at a disadvantage and the Fed doesn’t have a ‘clue’

President Donald Trump, left, and Jerome Powell, the new chairman of the Federal Reserve on Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017. President Donald Trump said Tuesday that the U.S. dollar is at a disadvantage compared with other major currencies like the euro as central banks keep interest rates low while the Federal Reserve’s rates are higher by comparison. “The Euro and other currencies are devalued against the dollar, putting the U.S. at a big disadvantage,” Trump tweeted, adding the Fed doesn’t have “a clu


President Donald Trump, left, and Jerome Powell, the new chairman of the Federal Reserve on Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017. President Donald Trump said Tuesday that the U.S. dollar is at a disadvantage compared with other major currencies like the euro as central banks keep interest rates low while the Federal Reserve’s rates are higher by comparison. “The Euro and other currencies are devalued against the dollar, putting the U.S. at a big disadvantage,” Trump tweeted, adding the Fed doesn’t have “a clu
Trump says ‘devalued’ currencies put US at a disadvantage and the Fed doesn’t have a ‘clue’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, federal, rates, donald, clue, low, disadvantage, euro, dollar, doesnt, currencies, devalued, fed


Trump says 'devalued' currencies put US at a disadvantage and the Fed doesn't have a 'clue'

President Donald Trump, left, and Jerome Powell, the new chairman of the Federal Reserve on Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017.

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that the U.S. dollar is at a disadvantage compared with other major currencies like the euro as central banks keep interest rates low while the Federal Reserve’s rates are higher by comparison.

“The Euro and other currencies are devalued against the dollar, putting the U.S. at a big disadvantage,” Trump tweeted, adding the Fed doesn’t have “a clue.”

Trump also said in a separate tweet that the U.S. has low inflation, calling it “a beautiful thing.”

The dollar fell slightly against the euro following Trump’s tweets.

Trump has repeatedly gone after the Fed for what he considers tight monetary policy. The Fed hiked rates four times in 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-11  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, federal, rates, donald, clue, low, disadvantage, euro, dollar, doesnt, currencies, devalued, fed


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Trump is ‘perfectly happy’ to hit China with new tariffs if Xi meeting doesn’t go well, Mnuchin says

Kevin Lamarque | ReutersU.S. President Donald Trump will make a decision about whether to slap China with more tariffs after meeting with his Chinese counterpart later this month in Japan. “If China wants to move forward with the deal, we’re prepared to move forward on the terms we’ve done. If China doesn’t want to move forward, then President Trump is perfectly happy to move forward with tariffs to re-balance the relationship,” he said. At that time, Xi and Trump agreed to suspend planned incre


Kevin Lamarque | ReutersU.S. President Donald Trump will make a decision about whether to slap China with more tariffs after meeting with his Chinese counterpart later this month in Japan. “If China wants to move forward with the deal, we’re prepared to move forward on the terms we’ve done. If China doesn’t want to move forward, then President Trump is perfectly happy to move forward with tariffs to re-balance the relationship,” he said. At that time, Xi and Trump agreed to suspend planned incre
Trump is ‘perfectly happy’ to hit China with new tariffs if Xi meeting doesn’t go well, Mnuchin says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-09  Authors: everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, tariffs, doesnt, mnuchin, hit, xi, chinese, trade, perfectly, president, forward, trump, meeting, china, happy


Trump is 'perfectly happy' to hit China with new tariffs if Xi meeting doesn't go well, Mnuchin says

U.S. President Donald Trump walks with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in Washington, U.S., April 21, 2017. Kevin Lamarque | Reuters

U.S. President Donald Trump will make a decision about whether to slap China with more tariffs after meeting with his Chinese counterpart later this month in Japan. That’s according to U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told CNBC on Sunday that the American leader will be trying to determine if Chinese President Xi Jinping is willing to head “in the right direction” on a deal to reshape the trade and commercial relationships between the world’s top two economies. “We’re going to need to see action, and President Trump is going to need to make sure he’s clear that we’re moving in the right direction to a deal,” Mnuchin told CNBC’s Nancy Hungerford. “The president will make a decision after the meeting.” Trump has previously indicated he expects to plan his next trade war moves after that G-20 meeting. “If China wants to move forward with the deal, we’re prepared to move forward on the terms we’ve done. If China doesn’t want to move forward, then President Trump is perfectly happy to move forward with tariffs to re-balance the relationship,” he said. The two presidents last met in December 2018 in Buenos Aires — already several months into their escalating trade war. At that time, Xi and Trump agreed to suspend planned increases in tariffs while both sides redoubled negotiating efforts. The subsequent few months saw no further escalations amid repeated rounds of talks in both Washington and Beijing, but that pause ended in May when Trump unexpectedly said on Twitter that his administration would be levying new taxes on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods — and he threatened even more to come.

‘We’ve stopped negotiating’

American officials have repeatedly claimed that action was in response to China attempting to renegotiate parts of a deal it had previously agreed to — which Beijing has denied — and the prospect of additional tariffs on that $325 billion worth of Chinese products has hung over the bilateral relationship for the last month. “We made enormous progress, I think we had a deal that was almost 90% done. China wanted to go backwards on certain things,” Mnuchin said. “We’ve stopped negotiating.” Where the countries go from here, according to the Treasury secretary, is up to Trump to decide when he and Xi meet in Osaka, Japan at the end of June. “In the case of Buenos Aires, we came out of that, we had direction from the two presidents, (Trump) put the increases on hold. The president will make a decision after the meeting,” Mnuchin said. “I believe if China is willing to move forward on the terms that we were discussing, we’ll have an agreement. If they’re not, we will proceed with tariffs,” he added.

The thorny issues

Mnuchin weighed in on several of the thorniest subjects thought to be separating the American and Chinese sides from a deal. For one, he said that the issue of removing China’s so-called non-tariff barriers to foreign companies succeeding within its borders remains central to the U.S. position on the talks. “In negotiating our agreement, one of the big parts of the agreement has always been about non-tariff barriers, is about forced technology transfer. These are very important issues to us, and critical to any agreement,” Mnuchin said. “These are issues where we’ve made a lot of progress, and any agreement we have, we’ll need to be certain that that’s included.” American officials and businesses have long argued that China’s official and unofficial rules put non-Chinese firms at a disadvantage in the country. One of the most frequently cited examples is a “forced tech transfer” regime — in which companies are coerced into sharing their advanced technology and know-how with Chinese organizations in exchange for market access. Trump has also suggested that he may want his negotiating teams to pick up the issue of China’s currency, but Mnuchin on Sunday dismissed the notion that Beijing is actively keeping the yuan low in an effort to win a trade advantage over the likes of the U.S. Instead, he said, any weakness now seen in the Chinese currency is the result of downward economic pressures — in part due to Trump’s tariffs on the country. “I do think their currency has been under pressure,” the Treasury secretary said. “There’s no question that, as we put on tariffs, people will move their manufacturing outside of China, into other areas, and that’s going to have a very negative impact on their economy. And I think you see that reflected in the currency.” Another topic that has raised tensions between Beijing and Washington is Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei. The U.S. government has cracked down on the tech firm, effectively blacklisting it from doing business with American businesses, on the basis of claims it is a security risk. The rationale, according to the Trump administration is that the firm’s involvement in sensitive networking technology could potentially be leveraged by Beijing for spying or other malicious actions. Both China and the company have denied such a risk exists. Mnuchin emphasized that the Huawei blacklisting is solely a national security issue, and isn’t a non-tariff front of the trade war — even though Trump has suggested that the telecom company could get wrapped into a wider deal. “They’re separate from trade: Both we and China have acknowledged that in our discussions,” he said. “Now, of course, President Trump, when he has the meeting, to the extent he gets certain comfort on Huawei or other issues, obviously we can talk about national security issues, but these are separate issues, they’re not being linked to trade.” He emphasized the U.S. claim — central to recruiting allies in its effort to control the spread of Huawei tech — that Trump’s prior comments do not reveal an effort to gain trade leverage over Beijing: “I think what the president is saying is, if we move forward on trade, that perhaps he’ll be willing to do certain things on Huawei if he gets comfort from China on that, and certain guarantees.”

The next meeting


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-09  Authors: everett rosenfeld
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, deal, tariffs, doesnt, mnuchin, hit, xi, chinese, trade, perfectly, president, forward, trump, meeting, china, happy


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Apple didn’t just take the moral high ground on privacy, it twisted the knife into Google and Facebook

Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address during the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) at the San Jose Convention Center on June 03, 2019 in San Jose, California. Beyond the glitz of new iPhone features and a $6,000 new supercomputer, the underlying theme of Apple’s annual developers conference on Monday was privacy. The most significant announcement was “Sign in with Apple,” a new option developers can add to their apps so users can log in without having to create a separat


Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address during the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) at the San Jose Convention Center on June 03, 2019 in San Jose, California. Beyond the glitz of new iPhone features and a $6,000 new supercomputer, the underlying theme of Apple’s annual developers conference on Monday was privacy. The most significant announcement was “Sign in with Apple,” a new option developers can add to their apps so users can log in without having to create a separat
Apple didn’t just take the moral high ground on privacy, it twisted the knife into Google and Facebook Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, jose, google, doesnt, apples, san, moral, privacy, twisted, knife, high, ground, didnt, option, conference, log, facebook, apps, developers


Apple didn't just take the moral high ground on privacy, it twisted the knife into Google and Facebook

Apple CEO Tim Cook delivers the keynote address during the 2019 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) at the San Jose Convention Center on June 03, 2019 in San Jose, California.

Beyond the glitz of new iPhone features and a $6,000 new supercomputer, the underlying theme of Apple’s annual developers conference on Monday was privacy.

The Apple Watch’s new hearing protection feature doesn’t record ambient noise around you. Security cameras connected to Apple’s HomeKit system will encrypt your video feeds. And so on.

The most significant announcement was “Sign in with Apple,” a new option developers can add to their apps so users can log in without having to create a separate username and password. It’s similar to all those log in buttons you see across apps and websites from Facebook and Google, except Apple says its solution doesn’t gather any personal data from you. In fact, it gives you the option to scramble your email address so a third-party never gets to store it.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-04  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, apple, jose, google, doesnt, apples, san, moral, privacy, twisted, knife, high, ground, didnt, option, conference, log, facebook, apps, developers


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Actually, carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your credit score

He’s built a successful business in the Detroit suburbs and is on track to earn close to $300,000 this year. A 2018 survey from CreditCards.com found that of people who carry a credit card balance, 22% did so because they believed it would help their credit score. But carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your score, it just means you’ll pay more money over the long term as your interest payments build. “The best way to use a credit card is to make charges during the month and


He’s built a successful business in the Detroit suburbs and is on track to earn close to $300,000 this year. A 2018 survey from CreditCards.com found that of people who carry a credit card balance, 22% did so because they believed it would help their credit score. But carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your score, it just means you’ll pay more money over the long term as your interest payments build. “The best way to use a credit card is to make charges during the month and
Actually, carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your credit score Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, credit, money, interest, creditcardscom, survey, increase, pay, pardoe, carrying, score, balance, actually, card, doesnt


Actually, carrying a balance on your credit card doesn't increase your credit score

Alex Pardoe, a 25-year-old hairstylist in Detroit, is pretty good with his money. He’s built a successful business in the Detroit suburbs and is on track to earn close to $300,000 this year.

But he’s fallen victim to a pervasive money myth that could hurt his overall financial health: Pardoe keeps a balance on his credit card because he believes it will improve his credit score, even though he has more than enough in his checking account to pay the $2,000 debt off in full.

It’s a common misconception, Ted Rossman, industry analyst for CreditCards.com, tells CNBC Make It. A 2018 survey from CreditCards.com found that of people who carry a credit card balance, 22% did so because they believed it would help their credit score.

But carrying a balance on your credit card doesn’t increase your score, it just means you’ll pay more money over the long term as your interest payments build. With interest rates at record highs — currently 17.73% on average, according to CreditCards.com — it’s a costly myth.

“The best way to use a credit card is to make charges during the month and then pay it off in full before the statement is due,” says Rossman.

About four in 10 Americans don’t know how their credit score is determined, according to a recent survey from CompareCards by LendingTree. But it’s not that complicated.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-28  Authors: alicia adamczyk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, credit, money, interest, creditcardscom, survey, increase, pay, pardoe, carrying, score, balance, actually, card, doesnt


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Ron Insana: The market doesn’t realize this is more than a trade war — it’s a new Cold War

Chinese President Xi Jinping chats with President Donald Trump during a welcome ceremony in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017. The group wrote white papers and sent letters to then-President Bill Clinton urging him and his foreign policy team to support regime change in Iraq. In some ways, it is reminiscent of the claim that we take President Donald Trump seriously, but not literally. Those who viewed Bush 43’s Iraq comments seriously, but not literally, were somewhat taken aback when the U.S. moved on Ir


Chinese President Xi Jinping chats with President Donald Trump during a welcome ceremony in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017. The group wrote white papers and sent letters to then-President Bill Clinton urging him and his foreign policy team to support regime change in Iraq. In some ways, it is reminiscent of the claim that we take President Donald Trump seriously, but not literally. Those who viewed Bush 43’s Iraq comments seriously, but not literally, were somewhat taken aback when the U.S. moved on Ir
Ron Insana: The market doesn’t realize this is more than a trade war — it’s a new Cold War Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: ron insana
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, cold, ron, realize, threat, trump, policy, war, trade, market, doesnt, iraq, insana, seriously, china, group, bush, foreign


Ron Insana: The market doesn't realize this is more than a trade war — it's a new Cold War

Chinese President Xi Jinping chats with President Donald Trump during a welcome ceremony in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017. AP Photo | Andy Wong

Back in 1997, a group of neoconservatives founded “The Project for a New American Century.” Led by Bill Kristol and other so-called neocons, including former Vice President Dick Cheney, former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and current National Security Director John Bolton, the group called for a major revamp of American foreign policy initiatives, broadly with respect to the Middle East and, specifically, with regard to Iraq. The group wrote white papers and sent letters to then-President Bill Clinton urging him and his foreign policy team to support regime change in Iraq. While Clinton may have recognized Saddam Hussein as a serious threat, it would be George W. Bush who would populate his foreign policy team with these group members and ultimately follow their lead into Baghdad.

Regime change in Iraq was something that Bush campaigned on, although no one took him seriously at the time. No one should have been shocked when 9/11 served as a predicate for toppling Saddam in 2003. In some ways, it is reminiscent of the claim that we take President Donald Trump seriously, but not literally. Those who viewed Bush 43’s Iraq comments seriously, but not literally, were somewhat taken aback when the U.S. moved on Iraq. They should not have been. Similarly today, Trump’s closest advisors, including Robert Lighthizer and Peter Navarro, have identified China as the foremost threat to the United States in the years and decades ahead. They argue, even more than the president himself, that China represents an existential economic and military threat to the U.S. and often imply that nothing less than crippling China’s economy will prevent Beijing from becoming stronger than the U.S. in military terms, threatening U.S. interests in the Pacific and becoming the world’s leading economic power in the next 10-15 years. The president himself, like Bush 43 before him, is putting all his stock in these individuals who have more apocalyptic views of the world than advisors who have since departed the White House. He has also stated plainly that he intends to win the “trade war” with China after the U.S. suffered through decades of unfair Chinese actions on the trade front. While there is good reason to challenge China on a variety of fronts and force them to change behavior that hurt the U.S., and other major trading partners, it is not inevitable that China is as dangerous as members of this administration claim.

Financial WMDs?

China, although it has more than $3 trillion in foreign exchange reserves, is also awash in debt and excess capacity from its housing supply to its manufacturing industries. Its economy is already weakening while its demographic profile is becoming a drag on growth. That, however, is not stopping this group from pressing China as hard as possible operating, as others did with respect to Iraq, on the assumption that China could somehow destroy the U.S. economically and militarily someday in the near future. That may be a dubious claim, as was the one about Iraq having weapons of mass destruction. Like Bush, Trump appears to truly believe this is a war easily won with few adverse implications for the U.S. The financial markets are beginning to show signs of disagreement. Stocks, especially those exposed to China, are falling hard. So are interest rates, as U.S. 10-year note yields are at an 18-month low. Economically sensitive commodities like copper and oil are weakening as well, sending a market message that fears of slowing global growth are a direct result of the widening fight with China.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: ron insana
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, president, cold, ron, realize, threat, trump, policy, war, trade, market, doesnt, iraq, insana, seriously, china, group, bush, foreign


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Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues

Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues6 Hours AgoSheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, spoke with CNBC in an exclusive interview. “You could break us up, you could break other tech companies up, but you actually don’t address the underlying issues people are concerned about. People are concerned about election security, content, privacy and data portability,” Sandberg said.


Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues6 Hours AgoSheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, spoke with CNBC in an exclusive interview. “You could break us up, you could break other tech companies up, but you actually don’t address the underlying issues people are concerned about. People are concerned about election security, content, privacy and data portability,” Sandberg said.
Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: stephen desaulniers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, breaking, tech, big, underlying, sheryl, doesnt, break, security, sandberg, address, facebook, spoke, issues, privacy, concerned


Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn't address big underlying issues

Sheryl Sandberg says breaking up Facebook doesn’t address big underlying issues

6 Hours Ago

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, spoke with CNBC in an exclusive interview. “You could break us up, you could break other tech companies up, but you actually don’t address the underlying issues people are concerned about. People are concerned about election security, content, privacy and data portability,” Sandberg said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: stephen desaulniers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, breaking, tech, big, underlying, sheryl, doesnt, break, security, sandberg, address, facebook, spoke, issues, privacy, concerned


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Why bad news doesn’t affect Warren Buffett’s investing strategy

Why bad news doesn’t affect Warren Buffett’s investing strategy2 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Here’s why the “Oracle of Omaha” doesn’t let short-term bad news affect his long-term strategies when it comes to investing.


Why bad news doesn’t affect Warren Buffett’s investing strategy2 Hours AgoTo view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again. Here’s why the “Oracle of Omaha” doesn’t let short-term bad news affect his long-term strategies when it comes to investing.
Why bad news doesn’t affect Warren Buffett’s investing strategy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: rick wilking
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, enabled, buffetts, strategy, investing, affect, doesnt, bad, view, try, flash, warren, browser


Why bad news doesn't affect Warren Buffett's investing strategy

Why bad news doesn’t affect Warren Buffett’s investing strategy

2 Hours Ago

To view this site, you need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser, and either the Flash Plugin or an HTML5-Video enabled browser. Download the latest Flash player and try again.

Here’s why the “Oracle of Omaha” doesn’t let short-term bad news affect his long-term strategies when it comes to investing.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-06  Authors: rick wilking
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, enabled, buffetts, strategy, investing, affect, doesnt, bad, view, try, flash, warren, browser


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