‘I don’t need cash’ — but the Ryanair CEO wants Boeing to pay for 737 Max delivery delays

Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary told CNBC on Monday he is confident that Boeing’s grounded 737 Maxes will resume flights this summer. For the airline, the addition of 737 Max jets had been projected to have added 1 million new passengers this summer alone. “We’re having a discussion with Boeing” about getting financial compensation for the delays, O’Leary said on “Squawk Box.” Boeing’s fleet of Maxes was grounded worldwide in March after the second crash in five months involving the model. The FAA’s


Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary told CNBC on Monday he is confident that Boeing’s grounded 737 Maxes will resume flights this summer. For the airline, the addition of 737 Max jets had been projected to have added 1 million new passengers this summer alone. “We’re having a discussion with Boeing” about getting financial compensation for the delays, O’Leary said on “Squawk Box.” Boeing’s fleet of Maxes was grounded worldwide in March after the second crash in five months involving the model. The FAA’s
‘I don’t need cash’ — but the Ryanair CEO wants Boeing to pay for 737 Max delivery delays Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, delivery, ceo, maxes, delays, ryanair, need, grounded, added, pay, dont, told, cash, crashes, 737, wants, airline, max, oleary


'I don't need cash' — but the Ryanair CEO wants Boeing to pay for 737 Max delivery delays

Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary told CNBC on Monday he is confident that Boeing’s grounded 737 Maxes will resume flights this summer. But he said the grounding after two deadly crashes has hurt business.

Europe’s largest discount airline, which ordered 135 Max 200 models with the option for 75 more, had been expecting to receive its first five between April and June but now expects them to be flying by November.

For the airline, the addition of 737 Max jets had been projected to have added 1 million new passengers this summer alone.

“We’re having a discussion with Boeing” about getting financial compensation for the delays, O’Leary said on “Squawk Box.” “I don’t need cash,” he added, saying he wants movement on pricing. CFO Neil Sorahan told Reuters they plan to discuss “modest compensation.”

Boeing’s fleet of Maxes was grounded worldwide in March after the second crash in five months involving the model. The crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed a combined 346 people. Anti-stall software is suspected in the crashes.

The Federal Aviation Administration has come under fire as people questioned the agency’s oversight. The FAA’s internal probe of the 737 Max approval process reportedly found senior agency officials failed to review crucial assessments of the flight-control system.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-20  Authors: jessica bursztynsky
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, summer, delivery, ceo, maxes, delays, ryanair, need, grounded, added, pay, dont, told, cash, crashes, 737, wants, airline, max, oleary


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Self-made millionaire: Don’t make these 5 mistakes when negotiating your salary

Don’t tell them your current salaryThe primary reason employers always ask for your current salary is simply so they can offer you just a little bit more than what you’re currently making. If you’re asked this question, say, “I’m sure we can find a number that’s fair for both of us.” (Also, in New York, asking for your current salary is actually against the law.) Don’t tell them if you have an offer from a ‘mediocre’ companyIf you’ve got another offer from a company that’s generally regarded to


Don’t tell them your current salaryThe primary reason employers always ask for your current salary is simply so they can offer you just a little bit more than what you’re currently making. If you’re asked this question, say, “I’m sure we can find a number that’s fair for both of us.” (Also, in New York, asking for your current salary is actually against the law.) Don’t tell them if you have an offer from a ‘mediocre’ companyIf you’ve got another offer from a company that’s generally regarded to
Self-made millionaire: Don’t make these 5 mistakes when negotiating your salary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: ramit sethi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, current, mistakes, offer, ask, selfmade, negotiating, say, thats, salary, number, millionaire, dont, mediocre, company


Self-made millionaire: Don't make these 5 mistakes when negotiating your salary

1. Don’t tell them your current salary

The primary reason employers always ask for your current salary is simply so they can offer you just a little bit more than what you’re currently making. If you’re asked this question, say, “I’m sure we can find a number that’s fair for both of us.” If they press you, push back: “I’m not comfortable revealing my salary, so let’s move on. What else can I answer for you?” Keep in mind that it’s typically the first-line recruiters who ask this question first. If they won’t budge, ask to speak to the hiring manager. No recruiter wants to be responsible for losing a great candidate.

If the gatekeeper insists on knowing, consider playing hardball, because you can always jump back to negotiating later. (Also, in New York, asking for your current salary is actually against the law.)

2. Don’t make the first offer

Making the first offer is their job. It’s that simple. If they ask you to suggest a number, just smile and say, “Now come on, that’s your job. What’s a fair number that we can both work from?”

3. Don’t tell them if you have an offer from a ‘mediocre’ company

If you’ve got another offer from a company that’s generally regarded to be “mediocre,” don’t reveal the company’s name. You can still answer with something vague (but true), such as, “It’s another tech company that focuses on online consumer applications.”

…with just one conversation, you can boost your income for life. Ramit Sethi author, “I Will Teach You to Be Rich”

If you say the name of the mediocre company, the negotiator essentially has you in a corner, and instead of focusing on negotiating, they’ll just keep telling you why it’ll you’ll be happier at their company. So be smart and withhold this information.

4. Don’t ask ‘yes’ or ‘no’ questions

Avoid saying things like, “You offered me $50,000 dollars. Can you do $55,000?” Instead, say, “Your $50,000 offer is an excellent start. We’re in the same ballpark, but how can we get to $55,000?”

5. Don’t lie


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: ramit sethi
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, current, mistakes, offer, ask, selfmade, negotiating, say, thats, salary, number, millionaire, dont, mediocre, company


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Networking is pointless — unless you follow this important rule, relationship expert says

Networking. In fact, according to relationship strategist Zvi Band, those initial networking events are a pointless exercise if you don’t see them as part of a longer, more strategic relationship building process. “People going to networking events are seeking the same outcome as you — to meet people,” Band told CNBC Make It. However, as technology disrupts the workplace, those human relationship will become more important than ever, said Band. Sites like LinkedIn and Twitter can be useful tools


Networking. In fact, according to relationship strategist Zvi Band, those initial networking events are a pointless exercise if you don’t see them as part of a longer, more strategic relationship building process. “People going to networking events are seeking the same outcome as you — to meet people,” Band told CNBC Make It. However, as technology disrupts the workplace, those human relationship will become more important than ever, said Band. Sites like LinkedIn and Twitter can be useful tools
Networking is pointless — unless you follow this important rule, relationship expert says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, building, pointless, band, contacts, process, relationships, dont, networking, important, rule, follow, unless, network, expert, relationship


Networking is pointless — unless you follow this important rule, relationship expert says

Networking. For some it’s a pleasure, for others it’s a chore, but for the vast majority it’s a total waste of time. That’s because far too many of us ignore the most important part — the follow-up. In fact, according to relationship strategist Zvi Band, those initial networking events are a pointless exercise if you don’t see them as part of a longer, more strategic relationship building process. “People going to networking events are seeking the same outcome as you — to meet people,” Band told CNBC Make It. “But remember, the hard work is not in the initial meeting or LinkedIn connection. It’s recording your notes, following through on any action items, and keeping that relationship warm.”

Klaus Vedfelt | Taxi | Getty Images

Relationships are our most important asset, including in achieving our career goals, Band argues in his new book “Success Is in Your Sphere: Leverage the Power of Relationships to Achieve Your Business Goals.” But too few of us pay the necessary attention to building and maintaining those relationships in our professional lives, he said. Band is far from the first person to highlight the value of strong relationships in business success. Ever since Dale Carnegie published his seminal self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People” in 1936, business legends like Warren Buffett have espoused the role of relationships and reputation in their careers. However, as technology disrupts the workplace, those human relationship will become more important than ever, said Band. That’s especially true for young professionals, who may not know where their careers are going and would benefit from a network of contacts, he said.

The overwhelming majority of professionals … attribute their relationships to be their best asset Zvi Band CEO, Contactually

It’s therefore important to follow a strategy for building and maintaining professional relationships long after the first meeting. Band said that can be broken down into a seven-step process that views relationships as “capital.” “The overwhelming majority of professionals who have reached the zenith of their potential often attribute their relationships to be their best asset,” said Band, who is CEO and founder of relationship building software platform Contactually. “Just like the dollars in your bank account, the more you pay attention to retain and grow that asset early on, the more you will be able to reap the rewards later on in your career.” Here are the seven steps to building relationship capital:

Consistent execution

The first step in building meaningful professional relationships is to make it a consistent part of your work routine, said Band. That could be as a simple as blocking out an hour each day or week to touch base with contacts, send them an email or comment on their post. As with any other process, it may take time to stick, Band noted. But there are plenty of hacks to cement the habit, such as setting an alarm, associating the task with something else you do — like checking your emails in the morning — and rewarding yourself once the task is done.

Aggregate

Compiling all your contacts into one, clean database will help speed up that process, said Band. Networking sites like LinkedIn are useful for connecting with people initially, but something as basic as an Excel spreadsheet may be the right tool for keeping everything in one place. Ensure that the database is relevant by updating it every month or so, said Band. However, don’t be tempted to write contacts off, he warned — you never know when they may become relevant again. Instead, archive those you have a high confidence you won’t work with again.

Prioritize

Some of the contacts in your database will be more important than others. Based on your overall career goals, group them into buckets that reflect those aims and prioritize them according to their urgency. Don’t overshoot though, said Band. The average person can manage a network of 15 close friends and family, followed by 50 casual friends and a further 150 acquaintances. Your list should mirror that — highlighting, for instance, 10 high priority contacts and 20 secondary level ones — and set out reasonable time frames to follow up with each.

Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury | Caiaimage | Getty Images

Investigate

Building relationships is all about knowing — and caring — about the other person, noted Band. Take the time to take notes about your contacts, such as where you met, their skills and their interests, and add these to your database to help jog your memory next time you interact. Sites like LinkedIn and Twitter can be useful tools for building that knowledge bank and keeping up with your contacts’ important milestones, he said.

Timely engagement

There are no set rules for how frequently you should engage with your network. Rather, you should think about the time you have available and the relative return on investment of each interaction, said Band. However, being thoughtful about how and when you engage with others — and showing consideration for both their time and your own — will pay dividends, he added.

Adding value

When you do follow-up with your contacts, make sure you add value by sharing information, contacts and ideas that may be useful to them, said Band. Few things will irritate your network more quickly than a stream of empty “hello” messages — or, worse still, continuous requests.

Leverage

Finally, use technology, templates and other easily replicable methods wherever you can to ease your workload and make interacting with your network as pain free, and even enjoyable, as possible, said Band. Don’t miss: The jobs market is changing — and so should your resume Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-17  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, building, pointless, band, contacts, process, relationships, dont, networking, important, rule, follow, unless, network, expert, relationship


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SoFi CEO reveals what he learned about millennial stock investing habits

Early investors tend to buy stocks that are less than $10, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto said Thursday. “They want to put a small amount of money sort of buying things that don’t cost a lot of dollars.” The millennial generation, made up of people born roughly between the early 1980s and late 1990s, includes many of the early investors. “That enabled us to launch these new products, like SoFi Money and give a great interest rate at 2.25% and help people get their money right,” he said. SoFi is a financi


Early investors tend to buy stocks that are less than $10, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto said Thursday. “They want to put a small amount of money sort of buying things that don’t cost a lot of dollars.” The millennial generation, made up of people born roughly between the early 1980s and late 1990s, includes many of the early investors. “That enabled us to launch these new products, like SoFi Money and give a great interest rate at 2.25% and help people get their money right,” he said. SoFi is a financi
SoFi CEO reveals what he learned about millennial stock investing habits Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveals, things, money, theyre, early, sofi, investing, great, habits, stock, learned, noto, ceo, dont, millennial, financial


SoFi CEO reveals what he learned about millennial stock investing habits

Early investors tend to buy stocks that are less than $10, SoFi CEO Anthony Noto said Thursday.

They’re buying up recognizable names such as Ford Motor and General Electric, two centenarian corporations that are trading on the market for just above $10 per share.

“It’s a representation that they don’t want to put a lot of money at risk,” Noto said in an interview with “Mad Money’s” Jim Cramer. “They want to put a small amount of money sort of buying things that don’t cost a lot of dollars.”

The millennial generation, made up of people born roughly between the early 1980s and late 1990s, includes many of the early investors. They’re also likely to pick up on some of the hottest IPOs that they’re using, such as Uber and Lyft, he added.

“They’re focused on investing in things that they’re contributing to and things that they know, like these gig economy companies, but they’re also investing in things that they basically don’t use but are at a price point that allows them to get into the market and learn,” Noto said. “So we launched two ETFs that give them broad-based diversification.”

SoFi in recent months rolled out a suite of their own exchange-traded funds, which is a basket of underlying assets that trade throughout a session. Those include the SoFi Gig Economy ETF, tracking stocks of gig-oriented companies, on the Nasdaq Composite and the SoFi 50 ETF, tracking 50 of the top 1,000 high-growth U.S. companies, on the New York Stock Exchange.

Prior to those launches, SoFi also released an investing platform free of fees and commissions. SoFi Invest also carries all four of the financial technology firm’s ETFs. The mobile application uses artificial intelligence and machine learning, and also offers users financial education.

“You can get that diversification at a low allocation of money. It was an interesting learning,” Noto said. “It’s an imperative you invest in your twenties. If you miss those 10 years, that decade, you really have to catch up later on.”

To have a diversified portfolio, Cramer advises not to have more than 20% of your holdings in any one sector.

SoFi, the online lender that ranks No. 26 on this year’s CNBC Disruptor 50 list, launched in 2011 to refinance student loans.

More from CNBC Disruptor 50:

A big breakthrough in feeding the world may be spotted from outer space

Inside Impossible Foods’ mission to create the burger of the future

Why the next Uber may come from trucking

Since then the company has added more services that a traditional bank would have, including checking accounts, mortgages and renter’s insurance. As the ride-sharing apps did to ride-hailing services, it’s a technology that’s changing how customers engage in banking.

In the last 15 months, SoFi has made “great progress” and recorded its first “trifecta” in its last quarter, Noto said. The company grew revenue, loan volume and profitability, he said.

“That enabled us to launch these new products, like SoFi Money and give a great interest rate at 2.25% and help people get their money right,” he said. “We’ve meaningfully changed the core business of the company.”

As for when the company may enter public markets itself, “we’re focused on building great products first and someday that may come,” Noto said.

SoFi is a financial institution based in San Francisco with $1.9 billion in funding and a $4.4 billion valuation, according to PitchBook.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: tyler clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, reveals, things, money, theyre, early, sofi, investing, great, habits, stock, learned, noto, ceo, dont, millennial, financial


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Cramer: ‘I don’t trust this market at all’ because it’s so dependent on Trump tweets

“I don’t trust this market at all,” Cramer warned on “Squawk on the Street” as stock futures pointed to a higher Wall Street open, which in fact came to pass through the morning. Cramer said he was troubled by Trump’s barrage of tweets Tuesday, calling them “a little erratic,” including the one about the Federal Reserve. Trump is “really disturbing the zeitgeist of the stock market,” Cramer said. However, in light of the uncertainty around Trump’s new tweets, Cramer on Tuesday advised investors


“I don’t trust this market at all,” Cramer warned on “Squawk on the Street” as stock futures pointed to a higher Wall Street open, which in fact came to pass through the morning. Cramer said he was troubled by Trump’s barrage of tweets Tuesday, calling them “a little erratic,” including the one about the Federal Reserve. Trump is “really disturbing the zeitgeist of the stock market,” Cramer said. However, in light of the uncertainty around Trump’s new tweets, Cramer on Tuesday advised investors
Cramer: ‘I don’t trust this market at all’ because it’s so dependent on Trump tweets Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, stock, worth, sp, trump, trust, dependent, wall, tweets, cramer, street, dont, market, 500


Cramer: 'I don't trust this market at all' because it's so dependent on Trump tweets

CNBC’s Jim Cramer voiced concern about the staying power of the stock market’s bounce Tuesday following President Donald Trump’s latest tweetstorm on China trade and Monday’s sharp decline.

“I don’t trust this market at all,” Cramer warned on “Squawk on the Street” as stock futures pointed to a higher Wall Street open, which in fact came to pass through the morning. “[Trump] has made it so we got to wait to be able to buy.”

Cramer said he was troubled by Trump’s barrage of tweets Tuesday, calling them “a little erratic,” including the one about the Federal Reserve.

Trump is “really disturbing the zeitgeist of the stock market,” Cramer said. “He should knock the tweets off if he wants the Dow to start going up, at least today.”

On “Mad Money” on Monday evening — after the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 each lost about 2.4% on China’s tariff response to last week’s U.S. hike — Cramer said Wall Street is nearly oversold and investors should get ready to load up on names that can withstand higher tariffs.

However, in light of the uncertainty around Trump’s new tweets, Cramer on Tuesday advised investors to let things shake out, saying there may be a buying opportunity in stocks later in the session.

In late morning trading, the S&P 500 was making up about half of Monday’s losses, which had sent the index down for a total of nearly 5% from its May 1 intraday all-time high. So far in 2019, the S&P 500 has gained about 13% — and since the crushing Christmas Eve 2018 low, the index has soared more than 20%.

On Monday, China said it will raise tariffs, some to as high as 25%, on $60 billion in U.S. goods, in retaliation for the Trump administration’s decision last week to increase duties on $200 billion worth of Chinese products from 10% to 25%.

Meanwhile, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative is taking steps to prepare to slap tariffs on the remaining billions and billions of dollars worth of Chinese goods coming into the U.S.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: matthew j belvedere
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trumps, stock, worth, sp, trump, trust, dependent, wall, tweets, cramer, street, dont, market, 500


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Deepak Chopra: How to stay calm and avoid impulsive actions in a volatile market

The twists and the turns of the stock market may have you itching to make a move, but health and wellness expert Deepak Chopra has some advice: stay calm, don’t panic. “Any investor will tell you that if you get caught up in the melodrama of the fluctuations of the stock market, you’re going to be a loser,” the best-selling author and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, recently told CNBC. “If you want to be a winner, stay in for the long haul, and don’t take unnecessary, impulsive ri


The twists and the turns of the stock market may have you itching to make a move, but health and wellness expert Deepak Chopra has some advice: stay calm, don’t panic. “Any investor will tell you that if you get caught up in the melodrama of the fluctuations of the stock market, you’re going to be a loser,” the best-selling author and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, recently told CNBC. “If you want to be a winner, stay in for the long haul, and don’t take unnecessary, impulsive ri
Deepak Chopra: How to stay calm and avoid impulsive actions in a volatile market Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: michelle fox louise connelly, michelle fox, louise connelly
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youthese, stock, actions, avoid, impulsive, volatile, calm, worst, youre, winner, zen, chopra, stay, deepak, dont, market


Deepak Chopra: How to stay calm and avoid impulsive actions in a volatile market

The twists and the turns of the stock market may have you itching to make a move, but health and wellness expert Deepak Chopra has some advice: stay calm, don’t panic.

“Any investor will tell you that if you get caught up in the melodrama of the fluctuations of the stock market, you’re going to be a loser,” the best-selling author and co-founder of The Chopra Center for Wellbeing, recently told CNBC.

“If you want to be a winner, stay in for the long haul, and don’t take unnecessary, impulsive risks and actions.”

More from Invest in You:

These 30-somethings did a simple thing to get rich. Here’s what they learned

Bobby Flay’s secret to opening a successful restaurant

From a new home to medical care, here are some important savings goals

Market volatility has been rearing its head of late, with jittery traders selling on concerns about an escalating trade war with China. On Monday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down more than 600 points, its worst day since January.

Finding your zen amid the turbulence may be easier said than done.

Chopra, whose books include “Creating Affluence” and “The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success,” is the master of mindfulness and meditation. He has a number of tips for not losing your cool.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: michelle fox louise connelly, michelle fox, louise connelly
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, youthese, stock, actions, avoid, impulsive, volatile, calm, worst, youre, winner, zen, chopra, stay, deepak, dont, market


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Don’t make these 7 costly mistakes when shopping at Costco

You don’t take advantage of non-member perksYou don’t have to be a Costco member to take advantage of some of the warehouse club’s incredible bargains. If your local Costco has an optical department, you can book a cost-effective eye exam with an on-site optometrist without a membership. You buy more than you can consumeIf you have a membership, Costco can be a great place to find deals on the foods you eat every day. For example, most Costco products end in a 9, such as $15.99. You don’t price


You don’t take advantage of non-member perksYou don’t have to be a Costco member to take advantage of some of the warehouse club’s incredible bargains. If your local Costco has an optical department, you can book a cost-effective eye exam with an on-site optometrist without a membership. You buy more than you can consumeIf you have a membership, Costco can be a great place to find deals on the foods you eat every day. For example, most Costco products end in a 9, such as $15.99. You don’t price
Don’t make these 7 costly mistakes when shopping at Costco Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-13  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, costco, products, price, costly, stores, shopping, membership, mistakes, pay, prices, dont, local, offers


Don't make these 7 costly mistakes when shopping at Costco

Costco is one of America’s favorite places to shop: The chain recently earned second place among national grocery stores in the annual Retailer Preference Index from consumer data firm Dunnhumby. That’s pretty impressive, considering you typically need to purchase a membership to shop at Costco, a basic version of which costs $60 a year. More than 94 million members pay so they can buy in bulk and access the chain’s best products. Still, depending on your circumstances, not everything sold there is going to be a great deal for you. Here are seven mistakes to avoid next time you’re shopping at Costco to maximize your savings.

1. You don’t take advantage of non-member perks

You don’t have to be a Costco member to take advantage of some of the warehouse club’s incredible bargains. Perhaps the biggest is its pharmacy. Because of state and local laws, you can buy prescriptions at many Costco locations without a membership, according to the Krazy Coupon Lady. While exact prices can vary, drugs at Costco can save you up to 80% off what you’d pay for the same medications at other pharmacies, even without insurance, the Krazy Coupon Lady site reports. Costco was also the cheapest walk-in pharmacy when it came to non-member prices on five common prescription drugs, Consumer Reports found. Those savings also apply to immunizations such as flu shots: Costco is among the cheapest places to get those done if you don’t have insurance. If your local Costco has an optical department, you can book a cost-effective eye exam with an on-site optometrist without a membership. And if you’re hungry afterwards, you can swing by Costco’s in-store food court. Anyone paying cash can chow down on the retailer’s $1.50 hot dog combo. Alcohol purchases also don’t typically require a membership. That includes Costco’s Kirkland Signature vodka, which is a cult favorite and has even beaten Grey Goose in blind taste tests.

2. You don’t know whether a membership is right for you

Possibly the biggest question facing shoppers who are interested in Costco is whether they should invest in a paid annual membership, which starts at $60 a year. Costco also offers a Gold Star Executive Membership that costs $120 a year and offers a 2% cash-back reward up to $1,000. Generally, if you spend at least $600 a year there, it’s worth getting a basic Costo membership, Joanie Demer, co-founder of the Krazy Coupon Lady, tells CNBC Make It. Other experts suggest that it could make sense if you have kids, pets and/or a car. If you spend over $250 a month, or $3,000 a year, then an executive membership will pay for itself, she adds. If you’re only an occasional shopper, your best bet may be to ask someone with a membership to pick you up a Costco Cash Card next time they’re shopping. It’s the store’s version of a gift card and it will get you in the door whether you have a membership or not, Demer says.

3. You buy more than you can consume

If you have a membership, Costco can be a great place to find deals on the foods you eat every day. But because Costco generally sells products in bulk, you need to make sure you can consume the larger quantities before it goes bad. Otherwise, you may end up throwing a good portion of the food away or struggle to find room for it in your home. For example, if you live by yourself, springing for Costco’s one-pound container of fresh spinach may not make sense, even though it is a steal at around $5. Fresh spinach, even if it’s stored properly, will usually only last five to seven days in the refrigerator, according to shelf-life guide site StillTasty.com. That’s primarily why Charlene Haugsven, founder of MyFrugalAdventures.com, says you’ve got to consider the overall value of a product. “Just because Costco has it, doesn’t mean it’s a bargain,” she tells CNBC Make It.

4. You don’t pay attention to the price tags

If you buy food at Costco, you generally save because the chain doesn’t mark up products as much as typical grocery stores, Demer says. “Costco prices average 10% less than the local big-box retailer,” she adds. But that doesn’t mean everything is a good value. It pays to know the system embedded in Costco’s price tags, Demer says. For example, most Costco products end in a 9, such as $15.99. But if an item has a price that ends in a 7 or a 0, it’s been marked down. Also, if there’s an asterisk on the price tag, generally in the corner, it means that item will not be restocked. So if it’s a favorite, stock up while you can. Keep in mind, however, that the asterisk doesn’t always mean that an item is discounted, just that it won’t be around once supplies are gone.

5. You don’t price check

Even at Costco, you still have to compare the store’s price to what you’d generally pay for an item elsewhere. And because Costco sells most of its products in bulk, it may make sense to do a little math and find out the the price per unit. CNBC Make It recently crunched the numbers on 26 grocery items, including fresh produce, baking ingredients, meat, and household items such as trash bags and laundry detergent. When we compared the price per unit to BJ’s Wholesale Club, BJ’s came out ahead in 18 categories where both retailers sold a similar product. Costco, like most brick-and-mortar retailers, also tends to charge higher prices on books, CDS and DVDs compared to Amazon, according to the Krazy Coupon Lady site. Keep in mind that Costco has many exclusive book gift sets, so the prices may not be an apples-to-apples comparison. But to be on the safe side, you should check your Amazon app before adding any books to your cart at Costco.

6. You pay more for health services elsewhere

Costco offers a lot of discounted health services to its members. So before you go to your doctor’s office or local clinic, check to see if your local Costco offers the same service at a better price. For example, a number of Costco locations provide free diabetes, osteoporosis and heart health screenings. Members also can save even more on prescription medication and over-the-counter drugs by enrolling in the Costco Member Prescription Program (CMPP). This program, which is free for members to join, is not insurance, but does provide additional discounts on top of Costco’s already low prices. Many Costco locations also have hearing aid services, which can be a great value. The chain offers free hearing tests, according to Consumer Reports, and if you find you do need hearing aids, Costco has competitive prices starting at roughly $1,000 for a set, depending on the brand and specific store. Costco also provides free hearing aid cleanings and checkups, as well as loss and damage coverage, according to the store’s website. Plus, Costco gives a 180-day money-back guarantee, so if you’re having trouble with your hearing aids, you can return them.

7. You exclusively shop at Costco


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-13  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, costco, products, price, costly, stores, shopping, membership, mistakes, pay, prices, dont, local, offers


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Do this once a year to ratchet up your financial security

One Wall Street winner—Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase — emerged from the financial crisis whole. Some of the bank’s investors more than tripled their money in the wake of the financial crisis. Do your own financial stress test by creating a financial plan — that’s the foundation of your review. A financial plan doesn’t have to be complicated. Then, like the banks do, test different parts of your financial life to see how they’d perform in bad weather.


One Wall Street winner—Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase — emerged from the financial crisis whole. Some of the bank’s investors more than tripled their money in the wake of the financial crisis. Do your own financial stress test by creating a financial plan — that’s the foundation of your review. A financial plan doesn’t have to be complicated. Then, like the banks do, test different parts of your financial life to see how they’d perform in bad weather.
Do this once a year to ratchet up your financial security Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-13  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stress, test, theyd, thats, security, ratchet, insurance, financial, review, things, plan, dont


Do this once a year to ratchet up your financial security

On the face of it, comparing yourself to a large financial institution seems crazy. What could you possibly have in common?

You both have assets.

The only real difference is that many more people depend on a big bank than on you.

One Wall Street winner—Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase — emerged from the financial crisis whole. Some of the bank’s investors more than tripled their money in the wake of the financial crisis. Dimon’s strategy: preparing for the worst, not simply hoping things will turn out OK. The bank performs dozens of regular stress tests on a range of scenarios, including wars and recessions.

When you think about it, you already do that. What if you got sick? That’s why you have health insurance. What if something happened to your car? That’s why you have theft and liability insurance for your car.

Do your own financial stress test by creating a financial plan — that’s the foundation of your review. So if you don’t have one, put that on your to-do list. Don’t be intimidated. A financial plan doesn’t have to be complicated.

Then, like the banks do, test different parts of your financial life to see how they’d perform in bad weather.

Annually check these four key things recommended by Andrew Crowell, vice chairman of D.A. Davidson & Co. Wealth Management.

You want to review regularly to identify any vulnerable points. Crowell recommends testing your portfolio and general finances, and how they’d react if interest rates rise, the stock market drops or you needed to meet a sudden expense. He uses the acronym “MAID” to remember them easily: markets, accidents, income disruption and death.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-13  Authors: jill cornfield
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stress, test, theyd, thats, security, ratchet, insurance, financial, review, things, plan, dont


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Don’t compare Harry’s to Unilever’s Dollar Shave Club deal: Edgewell CEO

Dollar Shave Club’s subscriptions slowed after it sold to Unilever, the company has said. “[The deal] is not a good comparison,” Edgewell CEO Rod Little told CNBC, highlighting Harry’s product diversity, technology and scale. Edgewell shares fell nearly 15% on news of the deal, giving the company a market capitalization of $1.84 billion. As part of the deal, Edgewell will give Harry’s shareholders an 11% stake in the combined company and pay the remaining deal value in cash. Unlike Dollar Shave


Dollar Shave Club’s subscriptions slowed after it sold to Unilever, the company has said. “[The deal] is not a good comparison,” Edgewell CEO Rod Little told CNBC, highlighting Harry’s product diversity, technology and scale. Edgewell shares fell nearly 15% on news of the deal, giving the company a market capitalization of $1.84 billion. As part of the deal, Edgewell will give Harry’s shareholders an 11% stake in the combined company and pay the remaining deal value in cash. Unlike Dollar Shave
Don’t compare Harry’s to Unilever’s Dollar Shave Club deal: Edgewell CEO Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: lauren hirsch, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, unilevers, club, startup, little, ceo, company, deal, dollar, consumer, compare, billion, unilever, roughly, shave, harrys, edgewell


Don't compare Harry's to Unilever's Dollar Shave Club deal: Edgewell CEO

Unilever may have been one of first consumer giants to pay big dollars for an online brand, but Edgewell, owner of the Schick and Wilkinson razor brand, doesn’t want you to compare its $1.37 billion acquisition of Harry’s to the $1 billion deal that started a string of copycats.

Dollar Shave Club’s subscriptions slowed after it sold to Unilever, the company has said. It has since focused on expanding beyond razors to new products like body wash and deodorant.

“[The deal] is not a good comparison,” Edgewell CEO Rod Little told CNBC, highlighting Harry’s product diversity, technology and scale. Little said he was “super confident” in co-founders Andy Katz-Mayfield and Jeff Raider, who are taking a “huge leadership role.”

Edgewell shares fell nearly 15% on news of the deal, giving the company a market capitalization of $1.84 billion. At one point Thursday, the stock hit a 52-week low.

Mayfield and Raider will continue to run Harry’s U.S. business. As part of the deal, Edgewell will give Harry’s shareholders an 11% stake in the combined company and pay the remaining deal value in cash.

“You don’t often see a challenger company combine with an incumbent in what is effectively a merger of equals,” said Katz-Mayfield. “Edgewell is not a massive consumer packaged goods company, it is a midsize company. [And] Harry’s is not an average start-up, it’s totally integrated and omnichannel”

In 2018, Harry’s had a 2.6% of share of the U.S. razor market, according to Euromonitor. Last year, it expanded its business by launching Flamingo, a line of women’s razors and shaving cream.

Unlike Dollar Shave Club, which primarily did business online when it sold to Unilever, Harry’s does roughly half of its sales in stores like Target and Walmart. It also owns nine factories, including a manufacturing facility in Germany, which it contends gives its razor blades an edge.

Edgewell’s deal is the latest in a string of acquisitions that larger consumer and retail companies have made to spur growth and take advantage of the data that digitally launched brands have gathered on consumers. PetSmart acquired online pet food company Chewy in 2017 for roughly $3 billion, and Procter & Gamble acquired Walker & Co., owner of Bevel, a line of shaving care products for men with coarse or curly hair, last year.

But as consumer companies dole out lofty technology valuations for these upstart brands, many of which are not profitable, investors have escalated their scrutiny. There are concerns that the entrepreneurial spirit of a start-up can get lost in the arms of a large consumer giant. It has not yet been proven that acquiring a growing start-up will translate into growth for a multibillion company.

Edgewell executives told investors Thursday morning that Harry’s expects to to be “generally” breakeven in 2019.

“There’s a big opportunity for growth” in combining the two, said Edgewell CEO Little, highlighting the opportunity for Harry’s to take advantage of Edgewell’s infrastructure and move into new product lines.

Meantime, Little said he does not worry about Harry’s products cannibalizing Edgewell’s own, because they appeal to different customers, he said.

The companies said Thursday that they expect to generate roughly $20 million in earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization in annual cost savings by 2023.

The deal is expected to close in the first quarter of 2020.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-09  Authors: lauren hirsch, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, unilevers, club, startup, little, ceo, company, deal, dollar, consumer, compare, billion, unilever, roughly, shave, harrys, edgewell


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I raised 2 successful CEOs and a doctor—here’s one of the biggest mistakes I see parents making

Why do you think that here in the U.S. we have an epidemic of opioid addiction, depression and suicide? We don’t seem to have the right information about how to live well, how to take care of ourselves and others. But if there’s one thing I know, it’s this: You’re happiest — as well as most beneficial to society — when you’re doing things to help others. What if you were told to focus on personal success and don’t know where to start? Her most recent book is “How to Raise Successful People: Simp


Why do you think that here in the U.S. we have an epidemic of opioid addiction, depression and suicide? We don’t seem to have the right information about how to live well, how to take care of ourselves and others. But if there’s one thing I know, it’s this: You’re happiest — as well as most beneficial to society — when you’re doing things to help others. What if you were told to focus on personal success and don’t know where to start? Her most recent book is “How to Raise Successful People: Simp
I raised 2 successful CEOs and a doctor—here’s one of the biggest mistakes I see parents making Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: esther wojcicki, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceos, doctorheres, right, mistakes, wojcicki, simple, thing, theres, making, dont, world, raised, youre, know, biggest, successful, parents


I raised 2 successful CEOs and a doctor—here's one of the biggest mistakes I see parents making

Why do you think that here in the U.S. we have an epidemic of opioid addiction, depression and suicide? We don’t seem to have the right information about how to live well, how to take care of ourselves and others.

We’re chasing money and possessions. Not service, not purpose. If we have a purpose at all, it’s to make ourselves happy. But if there’s one thing I know, it’s this: You’re happiest — as well as most beneficial to society — when you’re doing things to help others.

Your family may have similar stories and a natural impulse to serve. You might know exactly how I felt as a college student convinced I could change the world. But what if you don’t? What if you were told to focus on personal success and don’t know where to start?

Well, I have good news: It’s not that hard. The main thing you need is the right attitude — toward yourself and your children. You can start small. Volunteer for one hour in your community. Go to a city council meeting. Research an issue that affects your neighborhood. At the very least, you can vote.

Everywhere there’s a problem to be solved, someone or some group to support and champion. It really is a way of being in the world, and when it comes to our kids, it pays to shape this perspective as early as possible.

This is an adapted excerpt from “How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results,” by Esther Wojcicki to be published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on May 6, 2019. Copyright © 2019. Used by permission.

Esther Wojcicki is the founder of the Media Arts programs at Palo Alto High School and serves as vice chair of Creative Commons and was instrumental in the launch of the Google Teacher Academy. Her most recent book is “How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-08  Authors: esther wojcicki, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ceos, doctorheres, right, mistakes, wojcicki, simple, thing, theres, making, dont, world, raised, youre, know, biggest, successful, parents


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