The best credit cards with annual fees under $100 of November 2019

If you’re looking for a first-in-class cash-back card, then this may be the card for you. The Alliant Cashback Visa® Signature Card offered by Chicago-based Alliant Credit Union really upped the ante when it comes to cash-back rewards. You also have to become a member of Alliant Credit Union and open an account. You don’t need to pay the charity directly — Alliant pays $5 on your behalf when you apply to join the credit union. If you don’t want to make that trade off, though, consider one of the


If you’re looking for a first-in-class cash-back card, then this may be the card for you.
The Alliant Cashback Visa® Signature Card offered by Chicago-based Alliant Credit Union really upped the ante when it comes to cash-back rewards.
You also have to become a member of Alliant Credit Union and open an account.
You don’t need to pay the charity directly — Alliant pays $5 on your behalf when you apply to join the credit union.
If you don’t want to make that trade off, though, consider one of the
The best credit cards with annual fees under $100 of November 2019 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protection, fees, best, union, dont, 100, cards, annual, card, cashback, cash, credit, alliant, 2019, spend


The best credit cards with annual fees under $100 of November 2019

Who’s this for? If you’re looking for a first-in-class cash-back card, then this may be the card for you. The Alliant Cashback Visa® Signature Card offered by Chicago-based Alliant Credit Union really upped the ante when it comes to cash-back rewards. Cardmembers get an eye-popping unlimited 3% cash back during the first year, and 2.5% after that. That’s the highest flat rate offered among the options surveyed by CNBC Select.

Another benefit of this card is the easy cash-back program. There’s no activation required, no limit on how many points you can earn and you can redeem cash-back for statement credit or deposit into your Alliant checking or savings account at any amount. (There’s a $5 minimum opening balance requirement for an Alliant savings account — which Alliant pays on your behalf — and no fee for its checking accounts.)

Alliant says on its website that this card is designed for big spenders, or those who spend $50,000 a year on credit cards, but CNBC Select found the benefits kick in at less than half this amount. If you spend around the same as the average American, roughly $21,852 a year, we calculated the card nets you about $656 during the first year with 3% cash back and $447 each year after. You do need a high credit score to qualify.

While it doesn’t offer any welcome bonuses or introductory offers, this card also stands out thanks to its relatively low APR. (Though we do recommend you pay off your card on time and in full each month.) There are also no fees charged on foreign transactions.

Additionally, the card offers a host of useful protection programs, including 90-day purchase protection coverage if a recent purchase suffers harm (like if you drop your new iPhone in water) and travel accident coverage up to $250,000 — protection if you’re injured or killed while on the road.

Cardmembers can take advantage of up to $5,000 in personal identity theft protection, free roadside assistance and rental car collision insurance, so you don’t have to spend extra money next time you rent a car.

The biggest downside to the Alliant Cashback Visa® Signature Credit Card is that it does have a $99 annual fee that kicks in after the first year, though you can easily make up for the cost thanks to the strong 3% cash back program.

You also have to become a member of Alliant Credit Union and open an account. The easiest way to become a member is by supporting Alliant’s partner charity, Foster Care to Success. You don’t need to pay the charity directly — Alliant pays $5 on your behalf when you apply to join the credit union. Membership is also open to family members of current members, employees of partner organizations or those who live or work in qualifying towns and communities near Chicago’s O’Hare International airport.

Overall, the numbers indicate that it’s worth it to overcome these relatively minor obstacles in order to get the card’s generous cash-back rate on all your purchases. If you don’t want to make that trade off, though, consider one of the other highly rated cards below.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: alexandria white
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, protection, fees, best, union, dont, 100, cards, annual, card, cashback, cash, credit, alliant, 2019, spend


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How Beddr and other tech start-ups hope to help millions of Americans get a good sleep

CEO Michael Kisch is among a growing group of entrepreneurs making tools to improve people’s sleep. His company, Beddr, is known for its stamp-size sensor called the Sleep Tuner, which fits on the forehead and measures things like heart rate and oxygen saturation levels. CEO Michael Kisch launched Beddr in 2016. Michael Kisch, BeddrAn estimated 22 million Americans have sleep apnea, but about 80% are unaware they have it. Researchers are also finding out about a potential consequence of sleep tr


CEO Michael Kisch is among a growing group of entrepreneurs making tools to improve people’s sleep.
His company, Beddr, is known for its stamp-size sensor called the Sleep Tuner, which fits on the forehead and measures things like heart rate and oxygen saturation levels.
CEO Michael Kisch launched Beddr in 2016.
Michael Kisch, BeddrAn estimated 22 million Americans have sleep apnea, but about 80% are unaware they have it.
Researchers are also finding out about a potential consequence of sleep tr
How Beddr and other tech start-ups hope to help millions of Americans get a good sleep Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, michael, kisch, millions, sleep, help, making, dont, treatment, tech, hope, americans, startups, beddr, company, known, good


How Beddr and other tech start-ups hope to help millions of Americans get a good sleep

Getty | Boy_Anupong

Nearly half of Americans say they are impacted by poor-quality sleep, and many are on the hunt for solutions to help them get to sleep more quickly and stay asleep longer. CEO Michael Kisch is among a growing group of entrepreneurs making tools to improve people’s sleep. His company, Beddr, is known for its stamp-size sensor called the Sleep Tuner, which fits on the forehead and measures things like heart rate and oxygen saturation levels. His team also built an app that offers access to coaches, who can help people making lifestyle changes to improve their sleep quality, and provides a network of medical experts for those who need follow-up care. Kisch launched his Mountain View, California-based company in 2016 after experiencing his own sleep struggles. “It was the primary contributor to some very dark days where I struggled with my mental well-being, relationships and physical health,” he said. Now the company — which made the 2019 CNBC Upstart 100 list, revealed on Tuesday — is making its most ambitious move yet: to get regulatory approval to detect sleep apnea, which would make Beddr a much easier alternative for detecting this common condition than the current method, which requires sleeping in a lab while hooked up to wires.

CEO Michael Kisch launched Beddr in 2016. Sleep Tuner, the company’s stamp-size sensor created to improve sleep, fits on the forehead and measures things like heart rate and oxygen saturation levels. Michael Kisch, Beddr

An estimated 22 million Americans have sleep apnea, but about 80% are unaware they have it. The condition is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes, and those who aren’t getting treatment often feel fatigued during the day despite getting a full night’s sleep. “Most people don’t realize there are doctors out there who are specialized around sleep and that there are treatment options available,” the serial health tech entrepreneur said. “We’re looking to change that with a focus on accessibility and convenience.” So far the company has raised $5.6 million from Stanford StartX, Three Leaf Ventures, Delta Dental, IT Farm and angel investors and family offices, Kisch said.

A boom in sleep wellness tools

Most people don’t realize there are doctors out there who are specialized around sleep and that there are treatment options available. Michael Kisch founder and CEO, Beddr

Kisch said there aren’t any peer-reviewed studies that show whether the Beddr approach is effective in helping people sleep, although research shows that the methodology underlying the coaching — known as CBT-I — can work well for many patients with insomnia. But sleep medicine experts warn that wearables and apps aren’t a quick fix for everyone, claiming that the products are of mixed quality and many of them don’t help their users sleep better. In fact, some are having the opposite effect. “People spent billions on weight loss and increasingly sleep tech, but they don’t listen to the free advice,” said Seema Khosla, a pulmonologist in Fargo, North Dakota, who runs the tech committee of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. “You don’t need a gadget to tell you to put your phone down and go to bed at the same time and wake up at the same time.” Researchers are also finding out about a potential consequence of sleep tracking, known as orthosomnia, which involves patients becoming obsessed with optimizing their sleep, which in turn impacts their sleep. In other words, if someone is anxious about their sleep, getting them to fixate on it is far from ideal.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: christina farr
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, michael, kisch, millions, sleep, help, making, dont, treatment, tech, hope, americans, startups, beddr, company, known, good


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More than half of Americans don’t have a will — this app wants to change that

Founded in March 2017, the company is hoping to make the process even easier by launching an iOS mobile app in Apple’s App Store on Tuesday. With the Fabric app, users can create a digital vault for all their financial account information that’s accessible to their spouse. Build a digital vaultThe Fabric app also offers to act as your digital repository for all financial account information and documents. To keep your information secure, the Fabric app uses bank-level security, as well as common


Founded in March 2017, the company is hoping to make the process even easier by launching an iOS mobile app in Apple’s App Store on Tuesday.
With the Fabric app, users can create a digital vault for all their financial account information that’s accessible to their spouse.
Build a digital vaultThe Fabric app also offers to act as your digital repository for all financial account information and documents.
To keep your information secure, the Fabric app uses bank-level security, as well as common
More than half of Americans don’t have a will — this app wants to change that Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, need, information, services, service, dont, users, change, half, americans, app, life, fabric, company, wants, erlebacher


More than half of Americans don't have a will — this app wants to change that

Most Americans do not have a will, according to a recent Care.com survey. The biggest reason? Inertia. The annual survey found only 43% of U.S. adults have a will or living trust, and that number is much lower among younger Americans. Only about 18% of those ages 18 to 34 have a will, while about a third of those ages 34 to 44 have one in place. Overall, the No. 1 reason for not having a will was that most Americans simply haven’t gotten around to it. Yet more than a few companies are looking to change that by making the process more streamlined. The latest effort comes from Fabric. Founded in March 2017, the company is hoping to make the process even easier by launching an iOS mobile app in Apple’s App Store on Tuesday. Through the new app, the company aims to be a “a one-stop shop for family protection,” according to co-founder and CEO Adam Erlebacher. Erlebacher, who previously worked as the chief operating officer for the digital bank Simple, says Fabric was formed out of his own frustrating experiences trying to set up a will and get life insurance. The app aims to make these complex processes “simpler and quicker,” he says.

Creating a will takes just minutes

On Fabric’s app, creating a will is free and can take less than 10 minutes, assuming you have some idea of who would be in charge of critical tasks, such as serving as a guardian for your children. Fabric’s team worked with leading estate planning law firms to create a template that’s legally binding. The company makes its money through its life insurance sales, Erlebacher says, so it’s able to offer this service for free. It’s worth nothing that Fabric’s privacy policy does allow the company to share aggregated, anonymized data with third parties. Many apps have started to sell users’ data, and Fabric’s privacy policy, as it stands now, does not rule this out. When using the app, you simply need to answer a few questions that give you the opportunity to name beneficiaries and an executor, as well as lay out any funeral and burial arrangements. Fabric then helps you coordinate with your witnesses as well, so all you’ll need to do is print it out and get together with the two other people you’ve designated, to sign off and notarize your will. You don’t need to have the actual will notarized, but most states require you to include a document called a “self-proving affidavit” as part of your will. That affidavit usually needs to be notarized, which means that you’ll need a notary public to be part of the process, when the will is being signed and witnessed. Usually the best place to do this is at a bank, real-estate office, or package-mailing service like the UPS Store, all of which generally have notaries on staff. Or there are even some online services, such as Notarize, which allow you to video chat with a notary. The Fabric apps guides users through a questionnaire to determine which services they may need. Once you have your will complete, Fabric also gives you the option of creating a “mirror will” with your spouse that parallels your choices for guardianship, beneficiaries and executor, saving you time creating a second one. While you can have a joint will, experts say that can be problematic for a surviving spouse and that having separate documents may be a better option. That’s because joint will usually include a provision stating they cannot be revoked, making it nearly impossible for the surviving spouse to change the terms of the will to reflect life changes, such as remarriage or additional children. This quick, simple will can stand alone as your will of record, or you can use it as a placeholder until you get in to see an attorney, Erlebacher says. “It’s dependent on your own situation and if you do have more complicated needs, you should absolutely go to an attorney and get some advice.” If you have a blended family or a previous marriage, for example, you may want to seek out some additional advice on how to distribute your assets. So this is best for couples in their first marriage, with a child or two who are under 18 and may need a guardian. Of course, Fabric is not the only service out there that can help you create a will. Well-known legal sites such as RocketLawyer and LegalZoom also offer comprehensive services. However, both charge fees: $40 a month for RocketLawyer’s services and a $89 flat fee for LegalZoom. Like Fabric, Do Your Own Will and FreeWill offer free, basic will templates by having users fill out a questionnaire, although neither company offers a mobile app. It’s also worth noting that while online wills are valid, they need to be correctly executed and abide by state laws, which can be convoluted. So while you could create a will completely on your own, it may be a good idea to run it by a lawyer to make sure that there are no mistakes or errors. With the Fabric app, users can create a digital vault for all their financial account information that’s accessible to their spouse.

Build a digital vault

The Fabric app also offers to act as your digital repository for all financial account information and documents. About 40% of couples say they would struggle to find and access family financial information, according to a poll Fabric conducted in conjunction with YouGov among couples 30 to 50 with kids under 18. Called Fabric Vault, this free tool allows you to keep a record of your family’s bank accounts, investment accounts, 401(k) plans, IRAs, credit card accounts, wills and life insurance documents. The service links to these accounts and provides access to spouses and partners so that in an emergency, you’re not searching for the information. To keep your information secure, the Fabric app uses bank-level security, as well as common safeguards such as two-factor authentication and signing out of the app if it’s inactive. The app also has adaptive security features that learn to spot unexpected activity on your account and alert you if there are suspected issues, which Erlebacher believes is an innovative feature that will help protect consumers’ data. The Fabric app manages the process of buying term life insurance.

Get insured


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-12  Authors: megan leonhardt
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, need, information, services, service, dont, users, change, half, americans, app, life, fabric, company, wants, erlebacher


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It could get worse for one of the worst-performing retailers, traders say

One of the worst-performing retail stocks this year just broke down even more. The stock is down more than 35% for the year, while the XRT retail ETF has climbed 8% over the same stretch. It could get worse for Gap, according to Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray. “Gap shares are just purely out of fashion at this point in time,” Johnson said on CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Friday. Erin Gibbs, chief investment officer at Gibbs Wealth Management, also sees Gap as a no-touch sto


One of the worst-performing retail stocks this year just broke down even more.
The stock is down more than 35% for the year, while the XRT retail ETF has climbed 8% over the same stretch.
It could get worse for Gap, according to Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray.
“Gap shares are just purely out of fashion at this point in time,” Johnson said on CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Friday.
Erin Gibbs, chief investment officer at Gibbs Wealth Management, also sees Gap as a no-touch sto
It could get worse for one of the worst-performing retailers, traders say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retailers, shares, point, worse, gibbs, dont, market, traders, worstperforming, stock, earnings, youre, retail, theres, say


It could get worse for one of the worst-performing retailers, traders say

One of the worst-performing retail stocks this year just broke down even more.

Gap shares tumbled more than 7% on Friday after CEO Art Peck stepped down and the company cut full-year earnings guidance below consensus. The stock is down more than 35% for the year, while the XRT retail ETF has climbed 8% over the same stretch.

It could get worse for Gap, according to Craig Johnson, chief market technician at Piper Jaffray.

“Gap shares are just purely out of fashion at this point in time,” Johnson said on CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Friday. “You’re back to levels you were at in 2016 and 2011, and it doesn’t look like there’s any indication that a bottom has been made.”

The retailer is also firmly in bear market territory, having fallen nearly 50% from a March high. Shares are considered in a bear market when off more than 20% from 52-week highs.

“On a relative basis, this stock has seriously lagged the overall market. If you go back to 2012, the S&P is up 143% and this stock is still at the same level it was in 2012. I’m not willing to go bottom-fishing here on this stock until there’s clear evidence of some sort of trend change starting to unfold with the shares and at this point in time, you don’t have that. I’m avoiding the shares altogether,” said Johnson.

Erin Gibbs, chief investment officer at Gibbs Wealth Management, also sees Gap as a no-touch stock here.

“When you really look at the fundamentals, even though the valuations are dropping, we’re looking at a 22% decline in earnings over the next 12 months. And even as far out as 2022, you’re still seeing an earnings contraction expected. So their valuation should be going down if you’re actually expecting them to make less money,” Gibbs said during the same segment.

Gap posted a 15% decline in earnings in its recent quarter. For the full year, analysts surveyed by FactSet anticipate a 26% contraction in profit.

Gibbs also doesn’t see the departure of Peck as a point against the company. Board Chairman Robert Fisher, son of Gap’s founders, has been named interim CEO.

Peck’s abrupt departure has raised doubts about plans to spin off Gap’s Old Navy brand.

“I actually don’t see the CEO leaving as a negative thing. I think that was the one hope that they might build a turn-it- around, but now that puts the Old Navy spinoff in question, the one bright spot. You really don’t want to get into the stock right now,” said Gibbs.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, retailers, shares, point, worse, gibbs, dont, market, traders, worstperforming, stock, earnings, youre, retail, theres, say


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Economists recommend saving at least $2,467 in an emergency fund—here’s how to get there

According to a 2019 report by economists Emily Gallagher and Jorge Sabat, $2,467 is a good “minimum savings rule,” for low-income households, specifically. If you have that much saved, your probability of falling into financial hardship — defined as not being able to pay rent, bills or for medical care — is low. But once you have at least $2,467, “all of a sudden, saving an additional dollar didn’t seem to be that helpful anymore,” says Gallagher. Having $2,467 in savings isn’t optimal, Gallaghe


According to a 2019 report by economists Emily Gallagher and Jorge Sabat, $2,467 is a good “minimum savings rule,” for low-income households, specifically.
If you have that much saved, your probability of falling into financial hardship — defined as not being able to pay rent, bills or for medical care — is low.
But once you have at least $2,467, “all of a sudden, saving an additional dollar didn’t seem to be that helpful anymore,” says Gallagher.
Having $2,467 in savings isn’t optimal, Gallaghe
Economists recommend saving at least $2,467 in an emergency fund—here’s how to get there Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saved, recommend, emergency, hardship, financial, rule, dont, saving, fundheres, falling, economists, speak, savings, 2467, gallagher


Economists recommend saving at least $2,467 in an emergency fund—here's how to get there

According to a 2019 report by economists Emily Gallagher and Jorge Sabat, $2,467 is a good “minimum savings rule,” for low-income households, specifically. If you have that much saved, your probability of falling into financial hardship — defined as not being able to pay rent, bills or for medical care — is low.

To get to that number, Gallagher and Sabat, who are also assistant professors of finance, used data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to graph the relationship between falling into hardship in the next six months and how much you have saved as a buffer.

They looked at financial information for more than 70,000 lower-income households, which the report defines as those earning under 200% of the poverty line. To put that into context, that’s up to about $30,000 a year for a family of four, says Gallagher. This group represents “about 30% of the U.S. working-age population,” she adds.

They found that if you have very little saved — say $200 to $500 — each additional dollar you set aside dramatically reduces your likelihood of falling into financial hardship. But once you have at least $2,467, “all of a sudden, saving an additional dollar didn’t seem to be that helpful anymore,” says Gallagher. “It still reduced your probability of falling into hardship a little bit, but it wasn’t nearly as effective as when you were at low levels of savings.”

Having $2,467 in savings isn’t optimal, Gallagher emphasizes: “Our results don’t speak at all to achieving longer term financial goals, like paying for college or affording a house.” If you’re planning ahead for bigger expenses in the future, you’ll want to aim to save much more. For people who struggle to set aside a portion of their income, though, $2,467 represents a good “minimum savings rule that you should be working toward,” she says.

“Our data doesn’t speak to middle- or higher-income people, but if this rule works for lower-income people, it should also work for middle- and higher-income people,” she adds.

While saving $2,467 is more realistic than putting away three to six months’ worth of living expenses, which money experts typically encourage, many Americans don’t have that much: Just 43% of Americans say they could come up with $2,000 for an unexpected expense, according to the FINRA Investor Education Foundation. Nearly half don’t have an emergency fund.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: kathleen elkins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, saved, recommend, emergency, hardship, financial, rule, dont, saving, fundheres, falling, economists, speak, savings, 2467, gallagher


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Gen Z shoppers grew up online but don’t like to shop there. This holiday, they’ll be at the mall

Generation Z may be the first generation to have grown up with cellphones and laptops, but that doesn’t mean they’ll do their holiday shopping online. The young generation is less likely than millennials and Generation X to shop online, according to a report from The NPD Group based on online surveys of 3,485 consumers in September. “College students are coming home, and now they have the opportunity to shop with either family or friends,” Cohen said. He added that they like to use the mall as a


Generation Z may be the first generation to have grown up with cellphones and laptops, but that doesn’t mean they’ll do their holiday shopping online.
The young generation is less likely than millennials and Generation X to shop online, according to a report from The NPD Group based on online surveys of 3,485 consumers in September.
“College students are coming home, and now they have the opportunity to shop with either family or friends,” Cohen said.
He added that they like to use the mall as a
Gen Z shoppers grew up online but don’t like to shop there. This holiday, they’ll be at the mall Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: mallika mitra, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, npd, mall, online, grew, cohen, gen, generation, dont, discovery, shoppers, wissink, shop, shopping, holiday, theyll


Gen Z shoppers grew up online but don't like to shop there. This holiday, they'll be at the mall

Generation Z may be the first generation to have grown up with cellphones and laptops, but that doesn’t mean they’ll do their holiday shopping online.

The young generation is less likely than millennials and Generation X to shop online, according to a report from The NPD Group based on online surveys of 3,485 consumers in September.

This is in part due to the younger generation’s lack of credit cards and funds, as well as how they see shopping as a form of entertainment, said Marshal Cohen, chief industry advisor of The NPD Group.

“College students are coming home, and now they have the opportunity to shop with either family or friends,” Cohen said. “The mall isn’t just about shopping.”

He added that they like to use the mall as a spot to hangout and grab a bite to eat.

Younger shoppers are also still in “discovery mode,” said Stephanie Wissink, a Jefferies analyst. They’re still forming their opinion on brands.

“The discovery process in stores is a lot more immersive,” Wissink said. “The trial, the try on, the socialization of having others shopping with you.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: mallika mitra, lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, npd, mall, online, grew, cohen, gen, generation, dont, discovery, shoppers, wissink, shop, shopping, holiday, theyll


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The streaming wars officially kick off this week, but don’t expect the cheap plans to last forever

The streaming wars are here. In the coming months, AT&T’s WarnerMedia will launch HBO Max and Comcast’s NBCUniversal will start its first streaming service called Peacock. (Apple’s streaming service Apple TV+ launched earlier this month, but its library is limited to just a handful of shows. Disney will give subscribers Disney+, Hulu (with ads) and ESPN+ in a bundle for $12.99 per month. The first battle in the streaming wars will be over eyeballs.


The streaming wars are here.
In the coming months, AT&T’s WarnerMedia will launch HBO Max and Comcast’s NBCUniversal will start its first streaming service called Peacock.
(Apple’s streaming service Apple TV+ launched earlier this month, but its library is limited to just a handful of shows.
Disney will give subscribers Disney+, Hulu (with ads) and ESPN+ in a bundle for $12.99 per month.
The first battle in the streaming wars will be over eyeballs.
The streaming wars officially kick off this week, but don’t expect the cheap plans to last forever Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, week, disney, expect, subscribers, service, kick, plans, dont, month, streaming, cheap, netflix, wars, officially, start, hbo, forever, shows


The streaming wars officially kick off this week, but don't expect the cheap plans to last forever

The streaming wars are here.

With a massive library of popular shows and movies from Pixar, Star Wars, Marvel and more, Disney+ is poised to be Netflix’s biggest competitor when it launches on Tuesday.

And that’s just the start. In the coming months, AT&T’s WarnerMedia will launch HBO Max and Comcast’s NBCUniversal will start its first streaming service called Peacock. (Apple’s streaming service Apple TV+ launched earlier this month, but its library is limited to just a handful of shows. It’s not expected to be a major player in streaming until it can beef up its programming.)

Netflix may have a head start with more than 150 million subscribers across the globe, but Disney has priced Disney+ at a very attractive $6.99 per month, making it a no-brainer as an add-on to your current streaming or cable TV package. On top of that, Verizon wireless subscribers with unlimited plans have the option to get Disney+ free for a year, which could help boost Disney’s subscriber count into the millions before the year is up.

Meanwhile, Netflix has been steadily raising its prices over the last few years. Its most popular plan costs $12.99 per month. While Netflix has been optimistic about the rising tide of new competitors lifting all players in streaming, it also admitted in its third-quarter earnings report that increased competition and higher pricing could limit its subscriber growth.

Disney has yet another attractive offer. Disney will give subscribers Disney+, Hulu (with ads) and ESPN+ in a bundle for $12.99 per month. That means you get to stream shows from NBC, ABC, Fox and more, a bunch of ESPN stuff and everything on Disney+ for the same price you’re already paying for Netflix. It’s the best deal in streaming.

HBO Max, which includes all the standard HBO shows plus more content from WarnerMedia like “Big Bang Theory” and “Friends,” goes for $14.99 per month, the same price as “regular” HBO. (The hope is that HBO subscribers will convert to Max.) NBCUniversal’s ad-supported Peacock is expected to be free for everyone, CNBC reported earlier this month. (There’ll also be a paid, ad-free version.)

Now for the kicker.

Don’t expect all this free and cheap streaming to last. Right now the goal for all these new services is to grow their subscribers as quickly as possible. Eventually, the prices will go up. It’s the same strategy Netflix has employed over the years: get subscribers hooked on the service, then gradually raise prices. The first battle in the streaming wars will be over eyeballs.

The money comes later.

Disclosure: Comcast is the parent company of NBCUniversal, which owns CNBC.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: steve kovach
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, week, disney, expect, subscribers, service, kick, plans, dont, month, streaming, cheap, netflix, wars, officially, start, hbo, forever, shows


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99% of Americans don’t use a financial advisor — here’s why

In fact, only 1% of those polled said they use a financial advisor. “Finding a financial advisor isn’t something you can be pushed to do,” said certified financial planner Winnie Sun, president and founder of California-based Sun Group Wealth Partners. The remaining 99% of those surveyed said they either do it themselves; have their spouse, parent or someone other than a financial advisor handle it for them or didn’t answer. Plus, people may not understand the different functions a financial adv


In fact, only 1% of those polled said they use a financial advisor.
“Finding a financial advisor isn’t something you can be pushed to do,” said certified financial planner Winnie Sun, president and founder of California-based Sun Group Wealth Partners.
The remaining 99% of those surveyed said they either do it themselves; have their spouse, parent or someone other than a financial advisor handle it for them or didn’t answer.
Plus, people may not understand the different functions a financial adv
99% of Americans don’t use a financial advisor — here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: michelle fox, sheila bair, former chair of the fdic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, sure, americans, isnt, financial, work, dont, advisor, money, boneparth, investment, heres


99% of Americans don't use a financial advisor — here's why

skynesher | Getty Images

If you manage your own money, you are like most other Americans, according to the new CNBC Invest in You survey released Monday. In fact, only 1% of those polled said they use a financial advisor. Yet how do you know if it is the right move? And if you think you want an advisor, what do you need to look for? “Finding a financial advisor isn’t something you can be pushed to do,” said certified financial planner Winnie Sun, president and founder of California-based Sun Group Wealth Partners. “You’ll know when the time is right.” The remaining 99% of those surveyed said they either do it themselves; have their spouse, parent or someone other than a financial advisor handle it for them or didn’t answer. The national poll, conducted for CNBC and Acorns by SurveyMonkey Oct. 21–25, surveyed 2,776 adults and had a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

What’s holding people back?

There are a number of reasons people are staying away from getting professional financial help, experts said. For one, there is a lot more information online these days, compared to past generations, so people feel like they can do it themselves, said Sun, a member of the CNBC Digital Financial Advisor Council. Younger Americans are also saddled with more debt, like student loans, so they don’t have a lot to invest, she said. Then there is the cost. Many people think using a financial advisor is expensive and only for the wealthy, said certified financial planner Douglas Boneparth, president and founder of Bone Fide Wealth in New York. Plus, people may not understand the different functions a financial advisor can provide, he added. More from Invest in You:

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7 tips to avoid overspending and going into debt this holiday season “They think it’s specifically about managing money and not about receiving financial advice and financial planning,” said Boneparth, who specializes in financial planning for millennials and authored the book “The Millennial Money Fix.” For those who don’t think they have enough assets, there are a growing number of advisors that will work with a less-wealthy population, he pointed out. You can also get complimentary consultation and work with planners on an hourly basis.

When to hire an advisor

The decision on when to hire a financial advisor is a very personal one and isn’t necessarily tied to a certain amount of money saved or a specific age. Boneparth, also a member of the CNBC Digital Financial Advisor Council, said it’s about “becoming financially-planning ready.” “It has to do with where they are in terms of responsibilities in their life,” he explained. “The moment in which you are financially-planning ready is when your responsibilities go up and your free time goes down.” He called it an inflection point — when you may have taken on things like marriage, children and buying a home and find yourself with less time and energy to deal with handling your money and investments. For Sun a good indication on when you should speak to someone is when you feel like you want to make a difference in your life and aren’t sure where to go. Another signal is if the information you are getting online isn’t speaking to you or making any sense, she added. “You don’t want to make a mistake,” she said.

Vetting an advisor

The most important thing to look for in a financial advisor is someone you can have a conversation with and listens to you, Sun said. Experience also matters. You’ll want someone who has been in the industry at least through one recession, she advises. “It is really easy to manage money when the market is doing well. It is harder when the market isn’t doing well,” Sun said.

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There are also different types of investment professionals. Brokers, who are regulated by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (Finra), buy and sell assets like stocks for their clients. Finra is overseen by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Investment advisors, who are overseen by the SEC and state securities agencies, manage portfolios and provide investment advice. Boneparth suggests looking for a fee-only certified financial planner, who must pass a rigorous exam and adhere to a professional code of conduct. A fee-only advisor doesn’t receive a commission for selling you a product. However, thanks to the SEC’s new investor protection rule, all investment advisory firms registered with the agency must now act in the best interest of their clients. Once you have a name, check him or her out first. You can do a background check to see how long the advisor has been in practice and if there have been any complaints. Finra and the SEC both have websites that allow you to do that. To verify someone’s CFP certification and background, go to the CFP Board’s website. “There are so many advisors out there,” Sun said. “You want to take the time to do your due diligence to make sure that the two of you can work together and it’s a long-term relationship.”

Investing on your own

If you decide to stick it out it on your own, make sure you are in a position to make informed decisions, Boneparth said. That means asking yourself three questions when faced with deciding on an investment or other financial move: Can I afford it? Will I feel good about doing it? Does this decision make sense?


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-11  Authors: michelle fox, sheila bair, former chair of the fdic
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, think, sure, americans, isnt, financial, work, dont, advisor, money, boneparth, investment, heres


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Bloomberg leads Trump by 6 points in 2020 election matchup

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg leads President Donald Trump by 6 percentage points in a hypothetical 2020 matchup, according to a new Morning Consult/Politico poll. Forty-three percent of likely voters would back Bloomberg if the election were held today, compared to 37% who would vote for Trump. He is currently in sixth place, with just 4% of Democratic primary voters backing him. Bloomberg has the highest unfavorability rating, 25%, of any Democratic candidate among among primary


Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg leads President Donald Trump by 6 percentage points in a hypothetical 2020 matchup, according to a new Morning Consult/Politico poll.
Forty-three percent of likely voters would back Bloomberg if the election were held today, compared to 37% who would vote for Trump.
He is currently in sixth place, with just 4% of Democratic primary voters backing him.
Bloomberg has the highest unfavorability rating, 25%, of any Democratic candidate among among primary
Bloomberg leads Trump by 6 points in 2020 election matchup Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, voters, trump, votersthe, points, election, primary, matchup, york, poll, vote, leads, bloomberg, 2020, democratic


Bloomberg leads Trump by 6 points in 2020 election matchup

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg leads President Donald Trump by 6 percentage points in a hypothetical 2020 matchup, according to a new Morning Consult/Politico poll.

Forty-three percent of likely voters would back Bloomberg if the election were held today, compared to 37% who would vote for Trump. Twenty-one percent those polled, however, said they don’t know or don’t have an opinion.

The poll comes as Bloomberg considers jumping into the Democratic presidential primary. The billionaire is still not sure if he’ll enter the race, a source told CNBC, but he is troubled by what he sees in the Democratic field.

Bloomberg, however, might struggle to get ahead in the primary. He is currently in sixth place, with just 4% of Democratic primary voters backing him. Bloomberg has the highest unfavorability rating, 25%, of any Democratic candidate among among primary voters.

The poll was conducted among a national sample of 5,387 registered voters, including 2,225 Democratic primary voters.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: spencer kimball
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dont, voters, trump, votersthe, points, election, primary, matchup, york, poll, vote, leads, bloomberg, 2020, democratic


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Many Americans are drowning in medical debt. Here’s what to know if you need some relief

Separate research published this year found that 66.5% of all personal bankruptcies are tied to medical issues. Bliss Butler, pictured with her boyfriend, has struggled with high medical bills after several unexpected health emergencies. Dr. Marty Makary, surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital and professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. And research has shown that that disparity does not reflect a difference in the quality of care, Makary said


Separate research published this year found that 66.5% of all personal bankruptcies are tied to medical issues.
Bliss Butler, pictured with her boyfriend, has struggled with high medical bills after several unexpected health emergencies.
Dr. Marty Makary, surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital and professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
And research has shown that that disparity does not reflect a difference in the quality of care, Makary said
Many Americans are drowning in medical debt. Here’s what to know if you need some relief Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, johns, hopkins, makary, care, dont, hospital, relief, americans, butler, medical, price, need, drowning, debt, health, heres


Many Americans are drowning in medical debt. Here's what to know if you need some relief

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For 137 million Americans, they can be the scariest bills to open. That’s the number of adults who have faced medical financial hardship in the past year, research shows. In fact, medical debt is the top reason that people, regardless of age, would consider cashing in their 401(k)s or other retirement savings, TD Ameritrade found. And even then, raiding their long-term savings is often not enough. Separate research published this year found that 66.5% of all personal bankruptcies are tied to medical issues. It’s a problem that Bliss Butler knows all too well. Butler, 59, who lives just outside of Oklahoma City, lost her job at an area museum in 2013. Because it was difficult to make her COBRA medical continuation payments, she ended up uninsured.

Bliss Butler, pictured with her boyfriend, has struggled with high medical bills after several unexpected health emergencies.

Then several health crises cropped up. First, Butler had a kidney stone, which required a trip to the emergency room and a hospital stay, as well as a follow-up visit to a surgery center to remove a stent. Then, she broke her leg. Because she was still in debt from her previous medical bills, she avoided taking an ambulance. She had to have surgery and that came with a hefty bill for about $60,000. Another health scare, when Butler experienced heart palpitations, sent her to the ER again. Today, Butler admits she doesn’t know the full tally of her medical debts. Separate invoices appear with alarming numbers such as $36,860.75 and $19,881.58.

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It’s difficult to understand what they are specifically billing her for, Butler said, not to mention how much she really owes. Butler said she has already spent all of the $20,000 she had accumulated in her retirement savings. “I’ve never been on any kind of public assistance,” she said. “I’ve never been on Medicaid. “I’ve always worked for a living.”

Now, her next step is likely filing for bankruptcy. That’s after years of working, being careful with her money and largely avoiding accumulating other debts. “I don’t think that my particular story is that unusual,” Butler said. “There are so many people that are in the same position that I am.”

Know your rights

A lack of transparency when it comes to medical billing has inspired Dr. Marty Makary, professor of health policy and management at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and a surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, to work to change the system.

Dr. Marty Makary, surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital and professor of health policy and management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

That has included representing patients pro bono in court when hospitals sue them over unpaid bills. “We have an irrational marketplace where price gouging has become an accepted way of doing business,” said Makary, who is author of the book, “The Price We Pay: What Broke American Health Care — and How to Fix It.” What many consumers don’t realize is that it’s possible to shop around on price when it comes to the care they receive, Makary said. Costs can vary widely, from $44,000 for heart surgery at one hospital to $500,000 for the same procedure at another. And research has shown that that disparity does not reflect a difference in the quality of care, Makary said. Websites like MDSave.com and Sesame.com allow consumers to compare prices, he said. Even in an emergency situation where you need care immediately, you can take steps to protect yourself financially, he said.

We have an irrational marketplace where price gouging has become an accepted way of doing business. Marty Makary professor and surgeon, Johns Hopkins

Many medical providers have you sign both health-care and financial consent forms. However, you don’t necessarily have to agree to both. “If you don’t feel comfortable signing the form, you can put that in the signature line,” Makary said. You can choose to write, “I don’t feel comfortable signing my life away financially” or “Did not read” on the signature line, he said.

Negotiate your debts


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-10  Authors: lorie konish
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, know, johns, hopkins, makary, care, dont, hospital, relief, americans, butler, medical, price, need, drowning, debt, health, heres


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