Sports money: 1-on-1 with Big3 summer basketball league founder Ice Cube on changes for 2020 season, why he won’t ‘harass’ Kobe Bryant

Cube founded the Big3 summer basketball league with entertainment executive Jeff Kwatinetz in 2017. He’s tirelessly promoting the young league, which aims to give NBA fans something different during the normal off-season. Cube announced some other significant rule changes this week as the league prepares to kick off its fourth season this summer. Q: The league has changed a few things as it prepares for the 2020 season. Q: You have any desires to own an NFL or NBA team?


Cube founded the Big3 summer basketball league with entertainment executive Jeff Kwatinetz in 2017.
He’s tirelessly promoting the young league, which aims to give NBA fans something different during the normal off-season.
Cube announced some other significant rule changes this week as the league prepares to kick off its fourth season this summer.
Q: The league has changed a few things as it prepares for the 2020 season.
Q: You have any desires to own an NFL or NBA team?
Sports money: 1-on-1 with Big3 summer basketball league founder Ice Cube on changes for 2020 season, why he won’t ‘harass’ Kobe Bryant Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-19  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, thats, ice, team, big3, season, wont, harass, dont, kobe, nba, game, fans, youre, think, cube, founder, league, summer


Sports money: 1-on-1 with Big3 summer basketball league founder Ice Cube on changes for 2020 season, why he won't 'harass' Kobe Bryant

BIG3 founder Ice Cube reacts during the game between the Ghost Ballers and the Power during week four of the BIG3 three on three basketball league at Dunkin’ Donuts Center on July 13, 2019 in Providence, Rhode Island.

Cube founded the Big3 summer basketball league with entertainment executive Jeff Kwatinetz in 2017. He’s tirelessly promoting the young league, which aims to give NBA fans something different during the normal off-season. The league has 12 teams made up of international and former NBA players. The games are harder and faster and are played half court in a traditional 3-on-3 style with three players per side shooting at one hoop.

“We’re not a senior anything,” Cube said in an interview with CNBC. “We just lowered our age to 22. Ain’t no seniors at 22. We’re young, new; we’re fast, and we’re strong. That’s where you want to be, and that’s what we are.”

Legendary rapper and entertainment entrepreneur Ice Cube made it crystal clear: The Big3 is not a senior tour meant for retired players finished with their careers in the National Basketball Association.

Cube announced some other significant rule changes this week as the league prepares to kick off its fourth season this summer.

“Bring the Fire” which allows a team to challenge a foul call once per half. When a challenge is issued, one player from each team will compete in a one-on-one possession, with the victor winning his team the foul call.

The BIG3 will continue to inject single foul shots for the 2020 season. The single free throws will be worth the number of points for the field goal attempt; however, if the possession is a three or four-point attempt, the player will shoot the foul shot from the top of the key in a selected three-point or four-point area.

The league will use a red ball entitled “FIREBALL.”

Currently, the BIG3 hasn’t mentioned any changes to the pay structure. Participants of the league earn roughly $10,000 per game plus bonuses that are tied to winning. Salaries can reach up to $100,000 for the 11-week traveling circuit.

In a Q&A with CNBC, Cube explained some of the changes for the Big3, why he’s done trying to recruit Kobe Bryant and offered some financial advice to young entrepreneurs.

Q: The league has changed a few things as it prepares for the 2020 season. What went into the decision to switch things up?

A: We wanted to put the stamp on our sport and give people a reason to watch us. So, we wanted to do things to make the game better, faster, more entertaining for the fans, and more competitive. Everything that fans want, we want to give them and be able to do that without upsetting purists. They can still watch their NBA basketball, but Fireball is what we do. Fireball 3 is how we play, and it’s our style of 3-on-3 with our rules. I think it’s more entertaining to watch, and more entertaining to play. So, we wanted to lean into that and not be handcuffed by traditional basketball.

Q: What has been the key for the Big 3 to able to sustain the success it has heading into Year 4?

A: I think we’ve got a product that fans want to see. It’s new, fresh and it’s exciting. It’s presented in a way that’s familiar but also something as new and fresh. That, to me, goes a long way in being successful. I think our business model is realistic and sustainable, not trying to have a team in every city but a game here and a game there, but having it be a festival atmosphere. You watch basketball half the day, have fun and see all the people you know. It’s been a ride, but it’s been fun.

Q: When did it hit you that the Big3 had the potential to grow?

A: Our first game in Brooklyn, it was packed. DeShawn Stevenson hit a game-winner, and he went crazy; the team went crazy, fans went crazy. I’m like, OK, this is what it’s all about. If we can get this reaction from a team that nobody has heard of, think about how it will be once people get familiar with teams and the league. So, it’s not until they played and [fans] went for it and [realized] it wasn’t a pick-up game or an All-Star game but a real competitive battle. I knew we had a league that could hold itself. As long as it’s like this, they’re going to watch.

Q: Why are you so dedicated to the promotional aspect? You could’ve attached your name to the league and stayed behind the scenes. Yet, every year you’re on media runs to promote the Big3 and out front as one of the main faces.

A: I’m a sports fan; I always loved basketball. To be able to be this hands-on in a sport that could outlive me, you have to put 110% into it or it won’t work. If I weren’t dedicated, this wouldn’t work. This is why leagues don’t work; it’s because it’s not easy. It’s like you have to catch lightning in a bottle and ride a wave. I got to be here for it to work unless I want it to fail.

Q: What would you say you’ve learned from David Stern on how to operate a league? You’re in a similar position as he was decades ago when faced with the challenge of growing the NBA to where it is today.

A: Dedication, vision, not scared to break the mold and recast it because it’s about not being satisfied with what you’ve done but more dedicated to what you’re doing and want to do. I’ve seen him take the NBA from when it was tape-delayed, like we were, to one of the biggest attractions on TV. That’s where we want to be. We’ve borrowed a lot from the NBA; they’ve shown us how to do it on this level. They are starting to borrow some things from us, and that’s cool. It seems like we’re right where we want to be.

Q: Every league goes through some type of scandal or issue. Major League Baseball has problems at the moment, while the NBA is fighting offload management concerns. What has the Big 3 learned from firing then-commissioner, Roger Mason Jr. in 2018?

A: You live and learn. There are people that you get into business with that you think are straight up, and sometimes they have hidden agendas and ulterior motives that you don’t see until it’s too late. The responsible thing to do is what we did in removing that element out of the league and keep pushing. We are fighting the good fight. We are putting athletes back in the arena, back in front of their fans. So, we want to keep pushing and leave all the negativity behind. We’ve had a few issues that we had to deal with, but anytime you have something good; you’re going to deal with a few nuances.

Q: Which of the changes are you most proud to see, and fans will enjoy?

A: I love the “Bring the Fire” rule, and our free throw rule with one shot — even the rule with no game clock – first to 50 [points]. We don’t have one garbage minute in our game. I think the NBA should do it. I think it should be first to 100 [points] wins, and if you don’t make it to 100, play out the 48 minutes.

Q: Speaking of rule changes, you’re a big NBA fan and Los Angeles Lakers supporter. What do you think of the NBA attempting to alter its schedule and postseason format?

A: I’m a traditionalist when it comes to the NBA. I don’t want too many changes; the game is great. It’s just the garbage time that has to be fixed; [24 seconds] on the clock shouldn’t take [24] minutes to play out. Put it that way.

Q: When are you going to convince Kobe Bryant to give the league a shot?

A: I’ve asked him, and he said he was done. I believe him. I’m not going to harass the man; if he’s done, I don’t want him in the Big3. I only want you in the Big3 if you still got that chip on your shoulder; if you still want to play and show people that you’re the best.

Q: What’s your stance on the state of the NBA right now, especially with the Lakers once again thriving, and the Clippers right there, too?

A: It’s great — the Lakers are looking good. They look like the best team in L.A. The Clippers are looking OK; we’ll see. To me, it doesn’t get real until the playoffs start, so I’m just waiting.

Q: What team wins the Western Conference if it comes down to it – Lakers or Clippers?

A: [Laughs] Lakers, man.

Q: It’s not like the Clippers are slouches. They are pretty good, too.

A: They are. They’re the dippers [laughs].

Q: How about the NFL? I know the Los Angeles teams didn’t make it, but give me your predictions?

A: I got the [San Francisco] 49ers, and I got the [Tennessee] Titans.

Q: You have any desires to own an NFL or NBA team?

A: No. Owning a league is cool. Owning a team is a nightmare.

Q: What is one piece of financial advice you would give to a young entrepreneur?

A: Trust and believe in yourself. Trust and believe in your ideas and find people who know how to do the things that you don’t quite know how to do yet. And always hire the best no matter race, creed, color, or gender.

Q: And how about a stock tip?

A: [Laughs] Buy low, sell high. That’s all.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-19  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, money, thats, ice, team, big3, season, wont, harass, dont, kobe, nba, game, fans, youre, think, cube, founder, league, summer


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Best annual fee credit cards that don’t charge authorized user fees

If you’re looking to build credit, becoming an authorized user on someone else’s credit card is a great option. While you can be added to a no annual fee credit card for no extra cost, some cards with fees may charge over $100 per authorized user. However, there are annual fee credit cards that don’t charge additional fees for authorized users. This is a win-win: Authorized users can build credit and the primary account holder can save money and earn more rewards. Below, CNBC Select reviews whic


If you’re looking to build credit, becoming an authorized user on someone else’s credit card is a great option.
While you can be added to a no annual fee credit card for no extra cost, some cards with fees may charge over $100 per authorized user.
However, there are annual fee credit cards that don’t charge additional fees for authorized users.
This is a win-win: Authorized users can build credit and the primary account holder can save money and earn more rewards.
Below, CNBC Select reviews whic
Best annual fee credit cards that don’t charge authorized user fees Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: alexandria white, erin lowry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, user, charge, annual, cards, credit, best, authorized, dont, fees, fee, users


Best annual fee credit cards that don't charge authorized user fees

If you’re looking to build credit, becoming an authorized user on someone else’s credit card is a great option. But it may not be free.

While you can be added to a no annual fee credit card for no extra cost, some cards with fees may charge over $100 per authorized user. Sometimes the perks authorized users receive are worthwhile, but other times it just doesn’t make sense to fork over an additional fee.

However, there are annual fee credit cards that don’t charge additional fees for authorized users. This is a win-win: Authorized users can build credit and the primary account holder can save money and earn more rewards.

Below, CNBC Select reviews which annual fee cards don’t charge authorized user fees.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: alexandria white, erin lowry
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, user, charge, annual, cards, credit, best, authorized, dont, fees, fee, users


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9 habits that can instantly destroy your reputation, according to these self-made millionaires

As billionaire and legendary investor Warren Buffett once said, “It takes 20 years to build a reputation, and five minutes to ruin it.” Here are the bad habits that can quickly put a dent in your reputation, according to these nine self-made millionaires and Advisors in The Oracles:1. But in order to build a great reputation, you need to showcase quality, thoughtful and valuable work. But feeling bad and ashamed about it can make you lose sight of the all the other great work you’re doing and th


As billionaire and legendary investor Warren Buffett once said, “It takes 20 years to build a reputation, and five minutes to ruin it.”
Here are the bad habits that can quickly put a dent in your reputation, according to these nine self-made millionaires and Advisors in The Oracles:1.
But in order to build a great reputation, you need to showcase quality, thoughtful and valuable work.
But feeling bad and ashamed about it can make you lose sight of the all the other great work you’re doing and th
9 habits that can instantly destroy your reputation, according to these self-made millionaires Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, instantly, founder, facebook, selfmade, destroy, follow, youre, doing, millionaires, dont, things, isnt, reputation, work, according, habits


9 habits that can instantly destroy your reputation, according to these self-made millionaires

Many of world’s most successful people have one thing in common: an impeccable reputation — which, when you really think about it, isn’t easy to develop and maintain. As billionaire and legendary investor Warren Buffett once said, “It takes 20 years to build a reputation, and five minutes to ruin it.” If you don’t have a strong and well-respected image, it isn’t too late to fix it. Here are the bad habits that can quickly put a dent in your reputation, according to these nine self-made millionaires and Advisors in The Oracles:

1. Not trusting your gut instinct.

“If something doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. I used to find myself at parties where there was cocaine on the table. And I knew that if I stayed, no one would believe that I wasn’t doing it. So I always left. Don’t ignore your instinct, because it’s right 99% of the time. Don’t make excuses or question it. Just it and move on.” —Jay Leno, comedian, star of CNBC’s “Jay Leno’s Garage,” and former host of NBC’s “The Tonight Show.” Follow him on Facebook and Instagram.

2. Ignoring your online reputation.

“It’s inevitable: When you become successful, people will post negative things about you online. Never take those complaints or comments lightly. Protect your brand and respond immediately by phone or a direct message. If possible, do it in person. Typically, when you express to someone that you actually care and want to address the issue in a peaceful manner, they’ll retract the post or even share how great you are. Treat these situations as opportunities, not problems. But you have to know which battles to fight and which to walk away from. Some people just want to make noise and spread negativity — and those are the ones to avoid.” —Grant Cardone, founder of Cardone Capital, a $750 million real estate empire. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

3. Only meeting expectations, instead of exceeding them.

“Whether it’s at work or in your personal life, simply meeting expectations isn’t enough. So always make it a point to under-promise and overdeliver. When you get an email or text, for example, don’t be like everyone else and respond the next day. Instead, surprise that person by getting back to them immediately. People notice these things — and when you exceed their expectations, they’ll like and respect you even more.” —Mike Peters, entrepreneur, philanthropist, XPRIZE Foundation board member, and founder of the Yomali group of companies, which has generated more than $1 billion in sales online.

4. Taking shortcuts.

“Today, anyone with a smartphone can become a video editor, photographer, or author. And because they can do it so quickly, it’s easier than ever to do a lousy job and slap something together in one afternoon. But in order to build a great reputation, you need to showcase quality, thoughtful and valuable work. This may take years of study, practice and hard work, which is why so few people do it. Not taking shortcuts is essential to building a reputation that precedes you — one that makes people want to work with and be around you.” —Jonathan Goodman, founder of the Personal Trainer Development Center. Follow him on Facebook and Instagram.

5. Being ashamed of your failures.

“It’s easy to get discouraged after a big failure. But feeling bad and ashamed about it can make you lose sight of the all the other great work you’re doing and the difference you’re making in people’s lives. Early in my career, I struggled in dealing with my failures, especially when they were followed by criticism. But I learned that you can do everything right, and there will still always be people trying to tear you down. That’s just the nature of the game. It also helps to be open about your failures. If you’re going to share your story and success to the world, always be 100% transparent. When you share the good and the bad, critics will eventually come around to your side.” —Marcello Arrambide, founder of Day Trading Academy and co-founder of SpeedUpTrader, a funding company for aspiring day traders. Follow him on Instagram and LinkedIn.

6. Being fake.

“Your reputation doesn’t just hinge on your work or credentials. Instead, it’s a product of the energy you give off. You can show yourself as an impressive person who has achieved incredible things, but that won’t override the certainty of what others intuitively feel about you. Often, people can tell if you’re being inauthentic. At the end of the day, all the elements of success depend on you being true to yourself. When you live unapologetically in line with your values, your light will shine in a way that is impossible to ignore.” — Katrina Ruth, founder and CEO of “The Katrina Ruth Show,” a multimillion-dollar online coaching business for entrepreneurs. Follow her on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

7. Prioritizing the wrong things.

“Some people have shady practices just to earn a few bucks here and there — but it’s not worth it. Your reputation is so much more important than money. It’s a lot like parenting: I want my kids to view me as a role model. When it comes to my company, for example, I always ask myself: Are we building the type of business that our clients would want to model? Are we taking care of them and doing things efficiently? Are we proud of what we’re doing?” —Yuri Elkaim, founder and CEO of Healthpreneur, former professional athlete, and New York Times best-selling author. Follow him on Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

8. Blaming.

“Several years ago, I lost everything in a Ponzi-like scheme. Even worse, my friends and family were also deceived into losing millions of dollars. I carried tremendous guilt and felt angry and ashamed. How could I have been lied to like that? How will I ever rebuild my reputation and regain others’ trust again? But then I turned to the words of my heroes, which gave me strength in my despair. Zig Ziglar said, ‘If you learn from defeat, you haven’t really lost.’ And Winston Churchill reminded me that ‘success is not final, failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts.’ Slowly, I faced the situation head-on. I apologized, took responsibility where I could, and spent time with those who were hurting. Maintaining an excellent reputation doesn’t mean you’ll never make mistakes; it’s how you respond to them that demonstrates the depth and strength of your character.” —Tom Shieh, CEO of Crimcheck, advisory board member to Defy Ventures, and advisor to Tiny Devotions. Follow him on Facebook.

9. Being inconsistent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, instantly, founder, facebook, selfmade, destroy, follow, youre, doing, millionaires, dont, things, isnt, reputation, work, according, habits


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The US is running a $1 trillion deficit, but politicians and investors don’t see a problem

The U.S. Treasury released eye-popping numbers this week that show the federal budget deficit is on course to cross $1 trillion in fiscal 2020, yet nobody seems to care. The government ran a deficit of $357 billion in the fiscal quarter ending in December and is on track to reach $1 trillion this fiscal year for the first time since 2012. Strategists and economists say the ballooning deficit doesn’t really matter, as much as it did when unemployment was high and the economy was weaker. Just seve


The U.S. Treasury released eye-popping numbers this week that show the federal budget deficit is on course to cross $1 trillion in fiscal 2020, yet nobody seems to care.
The government ran a deficit of $357 billion in the fiscal quarter ending in December and is on track to reach $1 trillion this fiscal year for the first time since 2012.
Strategists and economists say the ballooning deficit doesn’t really matter, as much as it did when unemployment was high and the economy was weaker.
Just seve
The US is running a $1 trillion deficit, but politicians and investors don’t see a problem Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fiscal, unemployment, deficit, spending, politicians, high, investors, dont, treasury, problem, trillion, theyre, running, rates, deficits


The US is running a $1 trillion deficit, but politicians and investors don't see a problem

The U.S. Treasury released eye-popping numbers this week that show the federal budget deficit is on course to cross $1 trillion in fiscal 2020, yet nobody seems to care.

The government ran a deficit of $357 billion in the fiscal quarter ending in December and is on track to reach $1 trillion this fiscal year for the first time since 2012. On a calendar basis, 2019 was the first year to touch $1 trillion since 2012.

As a result, the Treasury Department has been expanding its debt issuance to cover a deficit that has been rising every year since 2016, including a plan to issue a new 20-year note.

If interest rates “went up for a couple months, … people would say this is getting more expensive,” said Michael Schumacher, director rates strategy at Wells Fargo Securities. “Right now, they’re not focused on it and that’s one of the reasons why you have none of the political candidates focused on it. … They don’t care. The market is not penalizing them for it.”

Strategists and economists say the ballooning deficit doesn’t really matter, as much as it did when unemployment was high and the economy was weaker. Unemployment is now at five-decade lows, and U.S. interest rates are historically low, though higher than most other countries, making U.S. Treasury yields quite attractive.

“The deficits are big, but I don’t think at this point they are problematic because you’ve got this relatively high global savings rate, and even though the U.S. deficits are large, they’re still much lower than where they are in other parts of the world,” said Joseph LaVorgna, chief economist Americas at Natixis. He said the deficit normally does not grow when the unemployment rate is low.

Just several years ago, politicians would have been bickering about high spending and high deficits, and in the past administration, squabbling over spending and deficits shut down the government.

“First, deficit hawks are now an endangered species in Washington. During President Obama’s administration, Republicans worked hard to contain the deficit, insisting on rigid caps on spending,” wrote Bank of America economists. “More recently not only have the caps been raised, but the recent tax cuts were funded mainly with additional borrowing.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-17  Authors: patti domm
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fiscal, unemployment, deficit, spending, politicians, high, investors, dont, treasury, problem, trillion, theyre, running, rates, deficits


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Why Shaquille O’Neal won’t tell you who he’s voting for

O’Neal told CNBC Make It he isn’t so sure politics belong in sports. I’m just not going to talk about it,” O’Neal told CNBC Make It in December at the Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year event in New York City. “I can tell when a person is really motivated by doing it or I can tell when they are just trying to get likes,” he added. “I don’t speak out and I don’t disrespect people,” O’Neal tells CNBC Make It. “If I ever disrespect a person, it’s going to be a basketball player, and I’m on


O’Neal told CNBC Make It he isn’t so sure politics belong in sports.
I’m just not going to talk about it,” O’Neal told CNBC Make It in December at the Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year event in New York City.
“I can tell when a person is really motivated by doing it or I can tell when they are just trying to get likes,” he added.
“I don’t speak out and I don’t disrespect people,” O’Neal tells CNBC Make It.
“If I ever disrespect a person, it’s going to be a basketball player, and I’m on
Why Shaquille O’Neal won’t tell you who he’s voting for Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jade scipioni
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, person, oneal, dont, disrespect, athletes, tell, doing, hes, told, voting, shaquille, wont


Why Shaquille O'Neal won't tell you who he's voting for

Ricky Gervais got mixed reactions on Jan. 5 after the Golden Globes host told a room of Hollywood actors they should stay away from talking politics during their award acceptance speeches.

But NBA legend and Hall-of-Famer Shaquille O’Neal seems to have a similar opinion. O’Neal told CNBC Make It he isn’t so sure politics belong in sports.

Some athletes — most recently players like former 49er’s quarterback Colin Kaepernick and FIFA Women’s World Cup star Megan Rapinoe — are very public about jumping into the political fray. But during O’Neal’s nearly two decades playing professional basketball, he never spoke out publicly on political issues or to endorse a candidate.

“I’m not saying I will never endorse anybody. I’m just not going to talk about it,” O’Neal told CNBC Make It in December at the Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year event in New York City.

O’Neal believes giving opinions on “social media” can be dangerous for athletes in general.

“My thought is that if you are not an expert on it or if you haven’t been doing it. Don’t do it,” he says.

“I can tell when a person is really motivated by doing it or I can tell when they are just trying to get likes,” he added.

O’Neal retired from the NBA in 2011 and has since transformed himself into a savvy investor and business person. His growing empire includes restaurant franchises, fitness gyms, car washes, his own line of branded products and partnerships with Papa John’s and Carnival Cruise Line. In 2015, O’Neal sold the rights to his future endeavors to Authentic Brands Group (ABG), which acquired Sports Illustrated in May from Meredith Corporation.

O’Neal says his success is at least in part due to being smart with social media. He says he sticks to a format that he invented, which is “60% to make you laugh, 30% to inspire you and 10% to tell you what I’m selling.”

“I don’t speak out and I don’t disrespect people,” O’Neal tells CNBC Make It. “If I ever disrespect a person, it’s going to be a basketball player, and I’m only doing it for fun. It’s not what my parents raised me to do,” he says.

And no disrespect to athletes who see things differently. Rapinoe, who won 2019’s Sportsperson of The Year award, “is the epitome of the hard work that it takes for a woman to be recognized as great,” O’Neal says. “She’s an inspiration for other young girls.”

Like this story? Like CNBC Make It on Facebook.

Don’t miss:

Shaquille O’Neal on Papa John’s founder: ‘People don’t know when to keep their mouths shut’

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This is Tom Brady’s actual resume from 2000—before he knew he’d make it in the NFL


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jade scipioni
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Pelosi slams Facebook’s ‘shameful’ behavior and says execs ‘schmooze’ the Trump administration

They don’t care about the impact on children, they don’t care about truth, they don’t care about where this is all coming from, and they have said, even if they know it’s not true, they will print it,” Pelosi said in what appeared to be a reference to the company’s policy not to remove or fact-check political ads . House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., slammed Facebook during her weekly press briefing Thursday, accusing the company of only caring about profits and saying executives “schmooze” th


They don’t care about the impact on children, they don’t care about truth, they don’t care about where this is all coming from, and they have said, even if they know it’s not true, they will print it,” Pelosi said in what appeared to be a reference to the company’s policy not to remove or fact-check political ads .
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., slammed Facebook during her weekly press briefing Thursday, accusing the company of only caring about profits and saying executives “schmooze” th
Pelosi slams Facebook’s ‘shameful’ behavior and says execs ‘schmooze’ the Trump administration Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, behavior, facebook, schmooze, election, facebooks, dont, execs, slams, shameful, money, think, care, administration, pelosi, trump, antitrust


Pelosi slams Facebook's 'shameful' behavior and says execs 'schmooze' the Trump administration

“The Facebook business model is strictly to make money. They don’t care about the impact on children, they don’t care about truth, they don’t care about where this is all coming from, and they have said, even if they know it’s not true, they will print it,” Pelosi said in what appeared to be a reference to the company’s policy not to remove or fact-check political ads . “I think they have been very abusive of the great opportunity that technology has given them.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., slammed Facebook during her weekly press briefing Thursday, accusing the company of only caring about profits and saying executives “schmooze” the Trump administration to avoid taxes and antitrust action.

“All they want are their tax cuts and no antitrust action against them,” Pelosi said. “And they schmooze this administration in that regard because so far that’s what they have received. But I think that what they have said very blatantly, very clearly, that they intend to be accomplices for misleading the American people with money from God knows where, they didn’t even check on the money from Russia in the last election, they never even thought they should. So they have been very irresponsible.”

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has recently taken a more engaged approach with D.C. officials, returning to Capitol Hill for the first time since his grilling over the Cambridge Analytica scandal in September for closed-door meetings with lawmakers and President Donald Trump. The meetings came as Facebook faces multiple antitrust probes from federal and state investigators.

After learning about ways its platform was used by foreign actors to target American voters in the 2016 presidential election, Facebook made changes, cracking down on “coordinated inauthentic behavior” and introducing more disclosure requirements for political advertisers. But academics and politicians still fear the platform will be vulnerable to similar tactics in the lead-up to the 2020 election and that misinformation can still run rampant.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

WATCH: How Facebook makes money by targeting ads directly to you


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, behavior, facebook, schmooze, election, facebooks, dont, execs, slams, shameful, money, think, care, administration, pelosi, trump, antitrust


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US business leaders don’t see the ‘phase one’ China trade deal as a huge breakthrough

The partial trade deal signed Wednesday between the U.S. and China is hardly an immediate success, according to trade groups representing many of the nation’s biggest companies. “We’re certainly glad it’s not getting worse,” Stephen Lamar, president of American Apparel & Footwear Association, said Thursday on CNBC’s “The Exchange.” “[It’s] phase one in what has to be a multi-phase deal,” he said on “The Exchange.” “The most important thing is phase one moving to phase two, and in phase two we ca


The partial trade deal signed Wednesday between the U.S. and China is hardly an immediate success, according to trade groups representing many of the nation’s biggest companies.
“We’re certainly glad it’s not getting worse,” Stephen Lamar, president of American Apparel & Footwear Association, said Thursday on CNBC’s “The Exchange.”
“[It’s] phase one in what has to be a multi-phase deal,” he said on “The Exchange.”
“The most important thing is phase one moving to phase two, and in phase two we ca
US business leaders don’t see the ‘phase one’ China trade deal as a huge breakthrough Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, dont, goods, huge, exchange, breakthrough, lamar, deal, president, business, tariffed, leaders, phase, groups, trade, tariffs


US business leaders don't see the 'phase one' China trade deal as a huge breakthrough

The partial trade deal signed Wednesday between the U.S. and China is hardly an immediate success, according to trade groups representing many of the nation’s biggest companies.

“We’re certainly glad it’s not getting worse,” Stephen Lamar, president of American Apparel & Footwear Association, said Thursday on CNBC’s “The Exchange.” “The reality is all the goods that were being tariffed the day before the deal was announced are going to be tariffed on Feb. 14, which is the first day the deal takes effect.”

Neil Bradley, the Chamber of Commerce’s executive vice president and chief policy officer, said the group’s members recognize Wednesday’s agreement “for what it is.”

“[It’s] phase one in what has to be a multi-phase deal,” he said on “The Exchange.” “The most important thing is phase one moving to phase two, and in phase two we can really tackle the key fundamental problems that are driving this trade dispute.”

Like Lamar, Bradley noted there are still tariffs in place on “a large variety of goods that we import.”

But he emphasized the “phase one” deal delivered good news on the possibility of new tariffs and tariff reduction, with the Trump administration agreeing to cut duties on $120 billion in products to 7.5%. It also canceled tariffs that had been scheduled to take effect in December.

Bradley, who previously worked in the office of House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., said he is eager to see future negotiations between the U.S. and China result in further progress on concerns around intellectual property theft and state subsidies for Chinese companies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: kevin stankiewicz
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, china, dont, goods, huge, exchange, breakthrough, lamar, deal, president, business, tariffed, leaders, phase, groups, trade, tariffs


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NFL owners don’t like Carolina Panthers’ $60 million deal for new head coach Matt Rhule. Coaches love it

Usually, NFL head coaching deals don’t exceed five or six years, but Gruden changed that with this agreement. “It raised the bar,” former NFL head coach Tony Dungy told CNBC in an interview. In the NFL, coaching contracts are not included in a team’s salary cap, so those numbers don’t typically get released. Head coach Matt LaFleur of the Green Bay Packers is congratulated by head coach Pete Carroll of the Seattle Seahawks after their 28-23 win in the NFC Divisional Playoff game at Lambeau Field


Usually, NFL head coaching deals don’t exceed five or six years, but Gruden changed that with this agreement.
“It raised the bar,” former NFL head coach Tony Dungy told CNBC in an interview.
In the NFL, coaching contracts are not included in a team’s salary cap, so those numbers don’t typically get released.
Head coach Matt LaFleur of the Green Bay Packers is congratulated by head coach Pete Carroll of the Seattle Seahawks after their 28-23 win in the NFC Divisional Playoff game at Lambeau Field
NFL owners don’t like Carolina Panthers’ $60 million deal for new head coach Matt Rhule. Coaches love it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, owners, dont, matt, nfl, rhule, love, million, deal, coach, pay, coaching, panthers, university, head, coaches


NFL owners don't like Carolina Panthers' $60 million deal for new head coach Matt Rhule. Coaches love it

Carolina Panthers head coach Matt Rhule, second from left, laughs as he stands with team owner David Tepper, left, Tom Glick, President of Business Operations, and General Manager Marty Hurney during an introductory news conference at Atrium Health Dome in Charlotte, N.C., on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2020. David T. Foster | Charlotte Observer | Getty Images

Whether he knows it or not, Matt Rhule has cemented his place in the National Football League’s coaching history books — before he’s coached a single professional football game. Rhule, who signed a seven-year deal worth $60 million to become head coach of the Carolina Panthers, sent shock waves through the NFL when the news leaked last week. His deal is also being celebrated throughout coaching circles as other coaches hope it will push their salaries higher as well, according to interviews with sports agents and league officials, many of whom didn’t want to be identified because contract terms are confidential. While Panthers owner David Tepper will be paying Rhule roughly $8 million to $10 million per season, which is a lot in the league, that’s not a record amount for an NFL coach. New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick is currently the highest paid coach at $12 million per season, with Seattle’s Pete Carroll next at $11 million, according to Forbes. New Orleans coach Sean Payton and Pittsburgh Steelers coach Mike Tomlin are also earning at least $10 million a year, according to two people with knowledge of the contracts. Rhule’s deal attracted a lot of attention because, unlike other highly paid NFL coaches, the former head football coach at Baylor University has never coached an NFL team in his career, let alone win a Super Bowl like Belichick, Carroll, Payton and Tomlin.

Setting the bar

Top NFL coaches didn’t start regularly making multiple millions until the late 1990s when former Green Bay Packers coach Mike Holmgren set the bar for lucrative coaching contracts. He left his $2 million coaching gig in Wisconsin in 1998 to sign an eight-year deal with the Seahawks valued at roughly $4 million a season. The deal made Holmgren the highest-paid coach in the NFL in 1999 and set in motion a new pay scale for top head coaches. Jon Gruden’s $100 million deal signed with the Oakland Raiders in 2018 is interesting, not only for the amount, but the fact that it’s for 10 years, which was viewed in coaching circles as another shift. Usually, NFL head coaching deals don’t exceed five or six years, but Gruden changed that with this agreement. It’s estimated the average NFL head coaching salary is roughly $6 million to $7 million, but it could climb to as high as $10 million with Rhule’s deal, according to one sports agent.

Upset owners

‘Raised the bar’

The thinking in some NFL coaching circles is Rhule’s deal, which was longer than most thanks to Gruden’s precedent-setting 10-year deal, will help more top NFL coaches garner even more than Rhule’s $60 million contract. “It raised the bar,” former NFL head coach Tony Dungy told CNBC in an interview. “It’s like that player — as soon as one player makes that — then everybody else in the office the next time around, ‘Hey, so and so is worth this. I must be worth this.'” “There is no going back now,” Dungy added. “I think you’re going to see this increase because it’s telling the other coaches that money is out there. Carolina is not the only team that can afford to pay that.” In the NFL, coaching contracts are not included in a team’s salary cap, so those numbers don’t typically get released. Sports agents generally obey a code of silence when asked about coach pay. Teams report coach contract terms to the NFL for commissioner Roger Goodell to review, and numbers are documented in case there’s a dispute.

Value of a coach

Bob LaMonte, the agent who became one of the most powerful coaching agents in the NFL, said owners are increasingly seeing the value in a great coach and some, like Tepper, aren’t afraid to spend a lot of money to get one.

Head coach Matt LaFleur of the Green Bay Packers is congratulated by head coach Pete Carroll of the Seattle Seahawks after their 28-23 win in the NFC Divisional Playoff game at Lambeau Field on January 12, 2020 in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Dylan Buell | Getty Images

“Owners have the money to spend,” LaMonte said. “The coach, without him, it doesn’t matter going down the line with the players you have because he’s not going to be able to get you to the promised land if he’s not a great coach.” LaMonte is president of Public Sports Representation, an agency that represent coaches and NFL general managers, including Holmgren and Gruden. When he first founded the agency in 1979, his challenge was getting owners to understand “money-value wise what a coach was worth because coaches never had agents. Coaches didn’t make any money.”

Changing the pay scales

LaMonte helped change the pay scales when he negotiated the deals for Holmgren and Gruden, giving coaches more leverage. LaMonte “knew what other guys were making,” Dungy said. “So, you want my client; I know what [a team] is prepared to pay. We didn’t know that as coaches. We didn’t know what other guys were making, what could be done, so you were at the mercy of the owners. Bob just said, ‘Hey, I’ve got six or seven guys. I know what they’re making. If you want one of my other guys, you’ve got to step to the table with this,’ and it helped everybody out.” One reason why some owners were upset with Tepper is because they are worried it will drive up prices for talented college coaches like University of Alabama’s Nick Saban, who returned to college coaching after leading the Miami Dolphins.

College to NFL

When Saban first came to the NFL from Louisiana State University, his five-year head coaching contract in Miami was reportedly valued at roughly $5 million per season. In 2019, Saban made approximately $8.8 million at Alabama, which ranks second behind Clemson University’s Dabo Swinney at $9.3 million, according to Sporting News. University of Michigan head coach Jim Harbaugh’s win record would suggest even higher pay if he ever decides to return to the NFL. As a college coach, Rhule has only been to four bowl games with a combined record of 47-43 after stints at Temple University and Baylor University. Harbaugh’s college record is 76-39, including seven bowl appearances, and he led the San Francisco 49ers to Super Bowl XLVII in 2013. Tepper also signed Rhule for seven years when owners typically don’t commit to first-year head NFL coaches for more than four years. “But now they’re not going to be able to get them for anything less than five,” said the NFL agent who asked not to be identified. “I think the new standard has been set.”

The hard part


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-16  Authors: jabari young
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, owners, dont, matt, nfl, rhule, love, million, deal, coach, pay, coaching, panthers, university, head, coaches


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Target was strong where it needed strength, and that bodes well for the rest of the year

The main reason: Target showed strength in some of the areas that matter the most. “In other words, we don’t think the print is a result of anything systemic or structural.” “I don’t think anybody is ready to jump out the window in Minneapolis,” where Target is headquartered, Moody’s senior retail analyst Charlie O’Shea said. When you start looking at where Target has strength, that is where they need to be strong. Notably, Target saw continued strength in apparel, beauty, and food and beverage


The main reason: Target showed strength in some of the areas that matter the most.
“In other words, we don’t think the print is a result of anything systemic or structural.”
“I don’t think anybody is ready to jump out the window in Minneapolis,” where Target is headquartered, Moody’s senior retail analyst Charlie O’Shea said.
When you start looking at where Target has strength, that is where they need to be strong.
Notably, Target saw continued strength in apparel, beauty, and food and beverage
Target was strong where it needed strength, and that bodes well for the rest of the year Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stores, needed, food, retailer, sales, bodes, apparel, strength, strong, dont, target, think, rest


Target was strong where it needed strength, and that bodes well for the rest of the year

A cashier places a bag of items in a customer’s shopping cart at a Target Corp. store in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019.

Target delivered a bit of a shock to Wall Street on Wednesday morning.

The retailer has over the past year been considered a darling of its industry — posting impressive sales gains both in stores and online, and taking market share from rivals in key categories like apparel and food. It has shined as department store chains such as Macy’s and other mall-based companies such as L Brands have struggled. Its shares, as of Tuesday’s market close, had skyrocketed more than 80% from a year ago.

But Target’s 2019 holiday sales missed the mark, with CEO Brian Cornell saying, “While we knew this season was going be challenging, it was even more challenging than we expected.”

The company cited weakness in the electronics, toy and home categories, in particular. Its digital sales also underwhelmed, climbing only 19% compared with growth of 31% during the third quarter, and growth of 29% during the 2018 holiday season.

Despite Target shares tumbling 7% Wednesday, some analysts don’t expect the sales miss to be the start of a long-term problem at the discount retailer. The main reason: Target showed strength in some of the areas that matter the most.

“The good news is that some of the shortfall can be explained away,” Gordon Haskett analyst Chuck Grom said. “In other words, we don’t think the print is a result of anything systemic or structural.”

Cornell said Wednesday that he has confidence in the year ahead because the retailer has “built a financial model that — despite the softer sales — still delivered on the bottom line because of a strong gross margin mix, the unique role our stores played in digital fulfillment and our incredibly clean inventory position closing out the holidays.”

It was significant that Target was able to maintain its earnings outlook for the fourth quarter and full year even in the face of weaker-than-expected sales. It is scheduled to report its results in March.

Target’s turnaround strategy dates to 2017. Since then it has been opening smaller-format stores in urban markets, remodeling larger locations, adding faster delivery options like curbside pickup, and rolling out more private-label products. These strategies are continuing to work, analysts said.

“I don’t think anybody is ready to jump out the window in Minneapolis,” where Target is headquartered, Moody’s senior retail analyst Charlie O’Shea said.

“Having issues in consumer electronics for Target is not as meaningful as people may think. … When you start looking at where Target has strength, that is where they need to be strong. Apparel and food are the traffic drivers.”

Notably, Target saw continued strength in apparel, beauty, and food and beverage during the holidays. And those are the three areas where it has been investing more.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-15  Authors: lauren thomas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stores, needed, food, retailer, sales, bodes, apparel, strength, strong, dont, target, think, rest


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10 mistakes that rich and successful people never make, according to these self-made millionaires

Learning from the mistakes of others can make a big difference in helping you to achieve greatness and wealth in life. That’s why we asked 10 self-made millionaires and Advisors in The Oracles to share their advice on common actions that hold people back from success:1. “If you can apply the 40/70 rule, you’ll be successful at whatever you choose to do. —Holly Parker, founder and CEO of The Holly Parker Team at Douglas Elliman; award-winning broker who has made over $8 billion in sales. I once l


Learning from the mistakes of others can make a big difference in helping you to achieve greatness and wealth in life.
That’s why we asked 10 self-made millionaires and Advisors in The Oracles to share their advice on common actions that hold people back from success:1.
“If you can apply the 40/70 rule, you’ll be successful at whatever you choose to do.
—Holly Parker, founder and CEO of The Holly Parker Team at Douglas Elliman; award-winning broker who has made over $8 billion in sales.
I once l
10 mistakes that rich and successful people never make, according to these self-made millionaires Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, connect, business, founder, company, successful, mistakes, group, youll, ceo, selfmade, dont, millionaires, work, rich, worked, according


10 mistakes that rich and successful people never make, according to these self-made millionaires

Learning from the mistakes of others can make a big difference in helping you to achieve greatness and wealth in life. That’s why we asked 10 self-made millionaires and Advisors in The Oracles to share their advice on common actions that hold people back from success:

1. Failing to show up.

“Not showing up is the No. 1 reason most people fail, and it’s a very common and easy mistake to make. Showing up again and again requires faith and persistence, but it also creates discipline. You’ll never conquer what you don’t move toward. If you don’t make any moves, you’ll become stagnant, unmotivated and ultimately spiral downward.” —Grant Cardone, founder of Cardone Capital, a $750 million real estate empire. Follow Grant on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

2. Slacking off.

“It’s tempting to be lazy. But if you want to achieve great outcomes, you need to put in the work. I was raised by parents who told me that I could do whatever I wanted to do and be whoever I wanted to be, as long as I worked hard for it. If anything, I probably work too hard — but that’s exactly what it takes.” —Michael Ovitz, co-founder and former chairman of CAA; former president of The Walt Disney Company; investor and philanthropist. Follow Michael on Twitter and Instagram.

3. Having a negative attitude.

“When I hire someone for my business or partner with an entrepreneur on ‘Shark Tank,’ I look for one thing: a positive attitude. I used to think I could change someone with a bad attitude, but I have since learned to fire them. It only takes one negative person in a group of 10 happy people to bring the whole team down. But nothing gets in the way of someone who says, ‘We can do this.’ Even during tough times, you have to be able to bounce back and maintain a positive attitude — no matter what.” —Barbara Corcoran, founder of The Corcoran Group; podcast host of “Business Unusual”; “Shark Tank” investor.

4. Waiting too long to make a decision.

“If you can apply the 40/70 rule, you’ll be successful at whatever you choose to do. Years ago, I learned a valuable principle from General Colin Powell: You only need 40% to 70% of the information to make a decision. If you require total certainty, you’ll miss opportunities. So how do you make a call while leaving potential data on the table? Trust your gut, pull the trigger and move on. Effective leadership is a blend of knowledge and experience. Often, your ability to make decisions in the absence of information can be your ultimate value proposition.” —Shaun Rawls, founder and CEO of Rawls Consulting; built The Rawls Group of Keller Williams to over $4 billion in annual sales; author of the upcoming book “F’-IT-LESS.” Connect with Shaun on Facebook and Twitter.

5. Not smiling.

“The power of smiling is underrated. A warm, genuine smile instantly creates trust, which is the cornerstone of every business transaction. Not only does it add positive energy to your expression, but it also makes you seem approachable. People want to do business with people they like, connect with and feel comfortable around. Don’t fake it, either; the more authentic you are, the more you will make an impact. Studies have also found that smiling makes you happier, healthier and more creative. Best of all? It’s free.” —Holly Parker, founder and CEO of The Holly Parker Team at Douglas Elliman; award-winning broker who has made over $8 billion in sales. Connect with Holly on LinkedIn and Instagram.

6. Focusing on too many things at once.

“Pick one thing you’re passionate about and do it better than everyone else. Too many people have 1,000 brilliant ideas and never start any of them. Instead, they get involved in everyone else’s business. If you’re not a lawyer, for example, don’t pretend to be one. Stay in your lane and delegate to experienced professionals. Sign contracts and form your company properly. If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing right. I once left a company because the founder was more in love with his next idea than the success of the business. And while he was dreaming of new inventions, he starved his company of resources and attention. As a result, we lost many breakthrough opportunities.” —James Daily, founding partner of Daily Law Group, which helps high-profile clients with fiduciary abuse litigation. Connect with James on LinkedIn.

7. Not scheduling important reminders in your calendar.

“As an entrepreneur, I get things done by sticking to one rule: Scheduling and organizing each and every single thing I commit to. It might sound like a no-brainer, but most people fail to do this. If you can get into the rhythm of assigning yourself tasks and calendar appointments, you’ll never find yourself struggling to remember all the things you already forgot at 3 a.m.” —Dennis Najjar, co-founder of AccountingDepartment.com, a virtual accounting service for small businesses. Connect with Dennis on LinkedIn.

8. Blindly emulating the most successful people.

“When there are many potential solutions for a problem, it’s easy to pick one that worked for someone else. But here’s the truth: It doesn’t matter if it worked for someone else. What matters is whether it’s going to work for you. The best leaders don’t blindly emulate the most successful people around them. They know that wearing a black turtleneck every day won’t turn them into Steve Jobs. Instead, they look at the components of success and apply them to their own circumstances.” —Luke Freiler, CEO and co-founder of Centercode, a Customer Validation solutions provider that helps hundreds of enterprises and high-growth tech companies bring dynamic and delightful products to market. Connect with Luke on LinkedIn

9. Trying to control everything.

“If you want to achieve your goals, let go of the common belief that everything is within your control. Sometimes, you just have to accept the reality of a situation, be decisive and allocate your time to where you can truly make a difference. This is the key to achieving success in both your work and personal lives.” —Alon Rajic, CEO of Review Home Warranties, the world’s most comprehensive home warranty company review site.

10. Not leaping into the unknown.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2020-01-13  Authors: the oracles
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, connect, business, founder, company, successful, mistakes, group, youll, ceo, selfmade, dont, millionaires, work, rich, worked, according


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