Only 15% of Americans can identify Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a photo

Despite being CEO of one of the most well-known tech companies in the world and having 4.2 million Twitter followers, only 15% of 4,272 adults who answered a Pew Research Center survey about digital knowledge were able to identify Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey from a photo. The survey question asked people who the “technology leader” photographed was and presented a few multiple-choice options. When the data were further broken down, 23% of survey respondents who had a bachelor’s degree or


Despite being CEO of one of the most well-known tech companies in the world and having 4.2 million Twitter followers, only 15% of 4,272 adults who answered a Pew Research Center survey about digital knowledge were able to identify Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey from a photo. The survey question asked people who the “technology leader” photographed was and presented a few multiple-choice options. When the data were further broken down, 23% of survey respondents who had a bachelor’s degree or
Only 15% of Americans can identify Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a photo Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, jack, asked, ceo, survey, answered, twitter, tech, americans, question, cofounder, identify, dorsey


Only 15% of Americans can identify Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey in a photo

Do you know who this man is?

Despite being CEO of one of the most well-known tech companies in the world and having 4.2 million Twitter followers, only 15% of 4,272 adults who answered a Pew Research Center survey about digital knowledge were able to identify Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey from a photo.

The survey question asked people who the “technology leader” photographed was and presented a few multiple-choice options. The selections included high-profile founders such as Elon Musk, co-founder of Telsa, as well as Google co-founder Sergey Brin and Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick.

A whopping 77% of people said they didn’t know Dorsey, while 7% guessed incorrectly. This question yielded the most amount of “unsure” responses in the entire survey.

When the data were further broken down, 23% of survey respondents who had a bachelor’s degree or higher were able to clock Dorsey in the photo. Age was another factor that influenced their awareness: 20% of those ages 18 to 29 answered correctly, compared to only 7% of people ages 65 and up.

The photo in question was from Dorsey’s April 2019 TED Talk. In it, he’s wearing a black beanie, and has a long beard.

Dorsey was the only tech leader respondents were asked to identify. But those surveyed also lacked knowledge about other prominent social media platforms. Only 29% of Americans knew that messaging app WhatsApp and Instagram are owned by Facebook, for example.

The rest of the survey contained more general questions about internet use. For example, the survey asked people how “private browsing” works, what “net neutrality” means and what two-factor authentication looks like on a web page.

Younger adults (defined as 18 to 29) answered more questions correctly than those in the 65-plus group, suggesting that they might be more internet literate.

These findings are part of a larger Pew Research Center survey called the American Trends Panel.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-11  Authors: cory stieg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, respondents, jack, asked, ceo, survey, answered, twitter, tech, americans, question, cofounder, identify, dorsey


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The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell
The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


The lesson from Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that inspired these students to build a multimillion start-up

Siu Rui Quek had always been entrepreneurial. As a teen, he would fuel his passion for technology and earn extra cash buying and selling gadgets online. But it was a lesson learned in his early twenties from enterprising icons Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey that set him on course for the big times. That lesson? Know your mission. Quek is co-founder and CEO of $550 million online consumer marketplace Carousell. He started the business with his college friends Marcus Tan and Lucas Ngoo back in 2012 after they were inspired by talks from the top tech talents during an internship in Silicon Valley. And, even today, he says those presentations played a vital role in shaping Carousell’s success.

I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way. Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell

“The one thing that we really learned and took away,” Quek told CNBC Make It, “is to be absolutely mission-oriented and mission-first.” “This idea of being mission-first just helps people transcend personal egos (and) helps create collaboration,” he said. To be sure, the founders did not mentor Quek and his friends directly. “I always joke that I have a mentor, which is Mark Zuckerberg, but it’s only one-way — I know him but he doesn’t know me,” Quek said.

Carousell’s co-founders from left to right, Marcus Tan, Siu Rui Quek and Lucas Ngoo. Carousell

But, by watching their presentations and studying their style, Quek said he and his co-founders were inspired to think about the big picture and how they could use technology to solve big issues. “I think the one commonality all of them had was just this whole fascination for using technology to solve problems and make a big impact,” said Quek. For Carousell, that meant building a platform to simplify buying and selling online, which, Quek said, plays into the company’s wider mission to “inspire every person in the world to start selling.”

You’ve just got to love what you do and be obsessed about that problem you’re solving Siu Rui Quek co-founder and CEO, Carousell


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-09  Authors: karen gilchrist
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, students, mentor, jack, zuckerberg, inspired, multimillion, siu, startup, technology, know, dorsey, mark, lesson, rui, build, big, online, quek


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Kamala Harris asks Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to consider suspending Trump’s account

Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, August 10, 2019. Democratic presidential hopeful Kamala Harris called on Twitter’s CEO on Tuesday to consider suspending President Donald Trump’s account, saying his tweets violate the site’s anti-bullying policy. Harris said Trump’s tweets were an attempt to “target, harass” and “out” the whistleblower. President Trump’s use of technology to communicate directly with the American people and share his Administration’


Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, August 10, 2019. Democratic presidential hopeful Kamala Harris called on Twitter’s CEO on Tuesday to consider suspending President Donald Trump’s account, saying his tweets violate the site’s anti-bullying policy. Harris said Trump’s tweets were an attempt to “target, harass” and “out” the whistleblower. President Trump’s use of technology to communicate directly with the American people and share his Administration’
Kamala Harris asks Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to consider suspending Trump’s account Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consider, dorsey, ceo, trump, harris, trumps, kamala, accounts, president, letter, twitter, suspending, tweets, jack, tech, asks


Kamala Harris asks Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to consider suspending Trump's account

2020 Democratic U.S. presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaks at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa, August 10, 2019.

Democratic presidential hopeful Kamala Harris called on Twitter’s CEO on Tuesday to consider suspending President Donald Trump’s account, saying his tweets violate the site’s anti-bullying policy.

In a letter to Twitter’s Jack Dorsey, the senator from California pointed to a series of tweets from the president referring to the whistleblower who filed a complaint about Trump’s July 25 call with the president of Ukraine. Harris said Trump’s tweets were an attempt to “target, harass” and “out” the whistleblower.

Harris also pointed to Trump’s tweet that “a Civil War” could break out if Democrats successfully remove the president from office. She said the tweet suggests “that violence could be incited should Congress issue formal articles of impeachment against him.”

“Time to do something about this,” Harris tweeted to Dorsey. She included Trump’s tweet calling the impeachment inquiry a “COUP.”

Twitter said it plans to respond to the letter.

A White House spokesperson told CNBC in an emailed statement, “It is not surprising that Kamala Harris, someone who believes in bigger government and more regulation, would like to silence her political opponents. In fact, it’s rather authoritarian of her. President Trump’s use of technology to communicate directly with the American people and share his Administration’s unprecedented accomplishments should be praised, not criticized.”

Harris’ letter touches on a longstanding issue for Twitter in how it deals with accounts from world leaders who violate its policies. In June, Twitter announced that it would flag, but not remove, abusive tweets from world leaders. In what amounted to a compromise, Twitter said it would put a disclaimer on such tweets and make it harder for them to spread. Still, Twitter said it would keep the messages on the platform in case they would be in the public interest to access.

In a New York Times op-ed, technology contributor Kara Swisher wrote that Trump has been able to get away with tweets like the “Civil War” one because “the tweet’s message was implicit rather than explicit.”

“The company’s weak response shows how utterly incapable it is in dealing with these thorny issues,” Swisher wrote.

On Wednesday, fellow Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, a senator from Massachusetts, took a different stand from Harris. Asked by a reporter if Trump should be banned from Twitter, Warren simply said “no.”

The company has taken an especially cautious approach to monitoring speech as conservative lawmakers have repeatedly accused Twitter and other tech companies of political bias.

Twitter is immune from liability from Trump and others’ tweets due to a law known as Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Under the highly contested law, internet platforms are not legally responsible for the speech of their users. Several lawmakers have argued that the law, which originally aided the growth and innovation of nascent tech companies, is no longer appropriate for today’s tech giants.

But Twitter has taken steps to remove accounts of prominent nonworld leaders who have violated its rules. Twitter announced last year, for example, that it would permanently ban right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his company, InfoWars, from the platform after claiming the accounts had violated its abusive behavior policy. Harris referenced this ban and the suspension of “[d]isgraced hedge fund manager” Martin Shkreli and actor James Woods for past violations on the platform.

“I believe the President’s recent tweets rise to the level that Twitter should consider suspending his account,” Harris wrote. “Others have had their accounts suspended for less offensive behavior. And when this kind of abuse is being spewed from the most powerful office in the United States, the stakes are too high to do nothing.”

Download Kamala Harris’ letter to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey or read the full letter below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-02  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, consider, dorsey, ceo, trump, harris, trumps, kamala, accounts, president, letter, twitter, suspending, tweets, jack, tech, asks


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Jack Dorsey: Bitcoin is ‘not functional as a currency’ right now

Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey is an advocate of digital currency bitcoin. The peaks and troughs are like an investment asset and are equivalent to gold,” Dorsey told the Australian Financial Review in a story published Thursday. “What we need to do is make it more usable and accessible as a currency, but it’s not there yet,” Dorsey said. Bitcoin is volatile: It is currently trading at around $10,250, according to digital currency exchange Coinbase; in December 2017 it traded above $19,500,


Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey is an advocate of digital currency bitcoin. The peaks and troughs are like an investment asset and are equivalent to gold,” Dorsey told the Australian Financial Review in a story published Thursday. “What we need to do is make it more usable and accessible as a currency, but it’s not there yet,” Dorsey said. Bitcoin is volatile: It is currently trading at around $10,250, according to digital currency exchange Coinbase; in December 2017 it traded above $19,500,
Jack Dorsey: Bitcoin is ‘not functional as a currency’ right now Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, usable, traded, jack, right, digital, troughs, dorsey, bitcoin, volatile, functional, trading, currency


Jack Dorsey: Bitcoin is 'not functional as a currency' right now

Twitter and Square CEO Jack Dorsey is an advocate of digital currency bitcoin. But he also says it is not ready to be a currency.

“It’s not functional as a currency. The peaks and troughs are like an investment asset and are equivalent to gold,” Dorsey told the Australian Financial Review in a story published Thursday.

“What we need to do is make it more usable and accessible as a currency, but it’s not there yet,” Dorsey said.

Bitcoin is volatile: It is currently trading at around $10,250, according to digital currency exchange Coinbase; in December 2017 it traded above $19,500, and in January 2019, it traded below $3,350.

Still, Dorsey is a supporter of both bitcoin and the broader idea of an Internet-based currency.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-09  Authors: catherine clifford
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, twitter, usable, traded, jack, right, digital, troughs, dorsey, bitcoin, volatile, functional, trading, currency


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Jack Dorsey is having an epic year — and he’s not talking about it

Twitter CEO and co-founder Jack Dorsey gestures while interacting with students at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in New Delhi on November 12, 2018. Shares of Twitter and Square — the two San Francisco-based companies he leads — have both rallied more than 45% in 2019 so far. Nevertheless, Dorsey is producing solid financial metrics this year and with very few public comments about them. “Sarah was more than a CFO – she also had operations responsibilities and was essentially a ‘shadow


Twitter CEO and co-founder Jack Dorsey gestures while interacting with students at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in New Delhi on November 12, 2018. Shares of Twitter and Square — the two San Francisco-based companies he leads — have both rallied more than 45% in 2019 so far. Nevertheless, Dorsey is producing solid financial metrics this year and with very few public comments about them. “Sarah was more than a CFO – she also had operations responsibilities and was essentially a ‘shadow
Jack Dorsey is having an epic year — and he’s not talking about it Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-30  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hes, growth, squares, dorsey, ceo, dorseys, jack, street, ellis, talking, square, epic, twitter, twitters, having


Jack Dorsey is having an epic year — and he's not talking about it

Twitter CEO and co-founder Jack Dorsey gestures while interacting with students at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in New Delhi on November 12, 2018. Prakash Singh | AFP | Getty Images

Jack Dorsey is on a winning streak this year, but unlike some Silicon Valley CEOs, you probably won’t hear him discuss it. Shares of Twitter and Square — the two San Francisco-based companies he leads — have both rallied more than 45% in 2019 so far. Twitter’s performance marks a sharp turnaround from the stock’s lows two years ago, and Square continues to launch new products and remains one of the most loved names in the mobile payments business. Other CEOs have run two companies — most notably Steve Jobs who successfully ran Apple and Pixar — but Wall Street has been hesitant about the long-term viability of a similar track for Dorsey. Nevertheless, Dorsey is producing solid financial metrics this year and with very few public comments about them. Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, senior associate dean for leadership studies at Yale School of Management, said Dorsey’s performance speaks for itself. He is a “a genius who, unlike [Tesla CEO Elon] Musk, doesn’t have to throw in your face,” Sonnenfeld said, and unlike WeWork founder and CEO Adam Neumann, “doesn’t just pretend to be one.” “He truly is brilliant and dedicated – while avoiding the temptations of vanity and flamboyance his own technology offers some with less discipline,” Sonnenfeld told CNBC. “Like Steve Jobs spanning the leadership of three companies, Dorsey is in rarefied air.” The 42-year-old founded Square in 2009, three years after starting Twitter, and has led as CEO there since day one. Dorsey’s chief executive job at Twitter has been more fluid. He has moved to and from the executive chairman role in the past decade. He took over as CEO for a second time in 2015 after Dick Costolo’s departure and what was announced as an interim leadership role became permanent.

Driving results

Twitter is recovering from political controversy after questions over foreign influence on social media platforms in the 2016 election, which led Dorsey to testify before two Congressional committees. The social media platform is also navigating questions over free speech and online abuse. Meanwhile, Wall Street analysts have questioned Twitter’s user growth. Twitter’s future is looking brighter after this recent quarter though. Revenue was up 18% year over year, the company said, due to domestic growth and it reached an average of 139 million monetizable daily active users in the second quarter — a 14% increase year over year. Twitter beat analyst estimates on the top and bottom lines last week, which helped boost the stock by 8.9%. The rally last week added more than $2.6 billion to Twitter’s market cap and shares are up more than 45% this year. Square meanwhile is adding to its years-long ascent in share price and reports second-quarter results on Thursday. Analysts have bid up the stock thanks to a slew of new product launches, e-commerce opportunities and growth in its popular peer-to-peer cash app. Lisa Ellis, a partner at MoffettNathanson and head of the payments, processors and IT services business, said Dorsey is widely viewed as being “truly visionary” and mission-centric. At Square, she said those qualities have led to the invention of payments hardware, pace of product introductions and ability to attract talent. Despite Square’s 45% rally year to date, it’s still lagging payment bellwethers Mastercard, Visa, and PayPal — known as the “MVP” stocks — year over year. While Square’s 25% performance over a year isn’t bad, “payments is just white-hot,” Ellis said. Square and Twitter both declined to comment on Dorsey’s performance.

Making room at the top

One downside for Dorsey though, according to Ellis, is investors’ concern about his ability to “create space” for strong leaders around him. The stock dropped doubled digits on the day after CFO Sarah Friar announced her departure last fall. Many viewed her as next in line for the top job at Square, and her role as a necessary push-back for the ambitious and entrepreneurial Dorsey. Square hired former Blizzard Entertainment CFO Amrita Ahuja to fill Friar’s shoes in January. “The departure of Square’s long-time CFO, Sarah Friar, last fall continues to be quite controversial,” Ellis said. “Sarah was more than a CFO – she also had operations responsibilities and was essentially a ‘shadow CEO / President’ to Jack.” The company has been focused on growth in their consumer products like the Cash App, and it is applying for a bank charter. But Ellis highlighted Square’s payment volumes, which have been slowing for four quarters in a row, and said its point of sale business is under competitive pressure. And while Dorsey is undoubtedly entrepreneurial — Ellis said that may trait not suit Square’s next chapter. “I worry a bit that Jack is extremely entrepreneurial, so [he] is the right guy to run a company for the first 8 to 10 years, but not necessarily the right guy to take it for the next 10 years, through a period of a lot less glamorous, less sexy growth,” she said.

Celebrity CEO

Wall Street and Main Street seem equally fascinated with Jack Dorsey. The nose-ring-wearing, St. Louis, Missouri-born executive has gained favor with cryptocurrency fanatics for his early days in the coding and hacking community. He was also widely embraced by bitcoin communities after Square added the ability to trade the cryptocurrency on its popular peer-to-peer Cash App last January.

Jack Dorsey, chief executive officer of Twitter Inc. and Square Inc., speaks during an Empowering Entrepreneurs events at Ryerson University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on Tuesday, April 2, 2019. Bloomberg | Getty Images

And even if his business moves are being applauded this year, Dorsey’s lifestyle choices are consistently under the microscope. His methods for reaching peak cognitive performance — from fasting, to ice baths, to journaling — are the subject of countless podcasts and blogs. The New York Times likened his lifestyle influence to “Gwyneth Paltrow for Silicon Valley.” Dorsey’s public appearances have been limited this year and have largely focused on self-care and health instead of corporate metrics. Dorsey did interviews with Rolling Stone and went on The Bill Simmons Podcast earlier this year to talk about the state of the company, which resulted in a slight drop in Twitter shares. He also appeared on ultra-marathoner Rich Roll’s podcast to talk about solitude and self-care. Doresy spent 10 days in Myanmar for a meditation retreat, which excluded “devices, reading, writing, physical exercise, music, intoxicants, meat, talking, or even eye contact with others,” Dorsey tweeted at the time. Critics accused him of being tone deaf as Myanmar stands accused of carrying out a mass genocide and crimes against an ethnic minority group.

Next chapter


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-30  Authors: kate rooney
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hes, growth, squares, dorsey, ceo, dorseys, jack, street, ellis, talking, square, epic, twitter, twitters, having


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Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor


“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor
Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much.”

“Was that the right decision at the time? Probably not,” said Dorsey, who is also founder of fintech company Square.

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much,” he continued.

Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all.

“It doesn’t actually push what we believe now to be the most important thing,” he said, “which is healthy contribution back to the network and conversation to the network.”

Dorsey has been at pains to rebuild Twitter’s status — and share price — following a series of scandals over its treatment of user data, hate speech, political campaigning and mental health issues. Twitter’s shares rose over 17% Tuesday after the firm reported a rising number of users and higher revenues.

Going forward, the CEO said the company would be reconsidering how the site displays likes, followers and retweets.

“Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted.

“(We have to) ask the deep question: Is this really the number that we want people to drive up? … I don’t believe that’s the case right now,” he said.

Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice baths

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


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Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor


“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. “If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all. “Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted. Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice bathsLike this stor
Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


Jack Dorsey reveals his big Twitter regret

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much.”

“Was that the right decision at the time? Probably not,” said Dorsey, who is also founder of fintech company Square.

“If I had to start the service again, I would not emphasize the ‘follower’ count as much. I would not emphasize the ‘like’ count as much,” he continued.

Dorsey went as far as to say that he probably would not create a “like” function at all.

“It doesn’t actually push what we believe now to be the most important thing,” he said, “which is healthy contribution back to the network and conversation to the network.”

Dorsey has been at pains to rebuild Twitter’s status — and share price — following a series of scandals over its treatment of user data, hate speech, political campaigning and mental health issues. Twitter’s shares rose over 17% Tuesday after the firm reported a rising number of users and higher revenues.

Going forward, the CEO said the company would be reconsidering how the site displays likes, followers and retweets.

“Those are not things that we thought of 13 years ago, and we believe are extremely important right now,” Dorsey noted.

“(We have to) ask the deep question: Is this really the number that we want people to drive up? … I don’t believe that’s the case right now,” he said.

Don’t miss: Billionaire Jack Dorsey’s 11 ‘wellness’ habits: From no food all weekend to ice baths

Like this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube!


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: karen gilchrist, bloomberg, getty images, -jack dorsey, founder, ceo of twitter
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, jack, reveals, dorsey, believe, start, regret, right, number, probably, big, count, service, twitter, emphasize, important, twitters


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Twitter stock surges more than 15% on earnings beat

Twitter’s first-quarter earnings report crushed expectations, sending the stock surging as much as 17% Tuesday. This metric includes “Twitter users who log in and access Twitter on any given day through Twitter.com or our Twitter applications that are able to show ads,” according to the company. In the fourth quarter, Twitter said it had 126 million mDAUs. In the U.S., Twitter reported 28 million average mDAUs forthe first quarter, compared with 26 million a year earlier. The shift to a new metr


Twitter’s first-quarter earnings report crushed expectations, sending the stock surging as much as 17% Tuesday. This metric includes “Twitter users who log in and access Twitter on any given day through Twitter.com or our Twitter applications that are able to show ads,” according to the company. In the fourth quarter, Twitter said it had 126 million mDAUs. In the U.S., Twitter reported 28 million average mDAUs forthe first quarter, compared with 26 million a year earlier. The shift to a new metr
Twitter stock surges more than 15% on earnings beat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: lauren feiner, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dorsey, users, beat, quarter, surges, million, report, twitter, reported, mdaus, maus, 15, earnings, stock


Twitter stock surges more than 15% on earnings beat

Twitter’s first-quarter earnings report crushed expectations, sending the stock surging as much as 17% Tuesday.

The pop added around $3.9 billion to Twitter’s market cap, bringing it over $30 billion.

Here’s what Twitter reported Tuesday:

Earnings per share: adjusted 37 cents vs. 15 cents expected in a Refinitiv survey of analysts

Revenue: $787 million vs. $776.1 million expected in the Refinitiv survey

Monthly active users (MAUs), excluding SMS users: 330 million vs. 318 million expected in a FactSet consensus estimate

This quarter will be the last for which Twitter reports monthly active users (MAUs), the company announced during its last earnings report. As a replacement, Twitter began to report what it calls monetizable daily active users (mDAUs) last quarter, which it said would better reflect its audience. This metric includes “Twitter users who log in and access Twitter on any given day through Twitter.com or our Twitter applications that are able to show ads,” according to the company.

Twitter reported 134 million average mDAUs for the first quarter, compared with 120 million a year earlier. In the fourth quarter, Twitter said it had 126 million mDAUs.

In the U.S., Twitter reported 28 million average mDAUs forthe first quarter, compared with 26 million a year earlier. It reported 105 million average international mDAUs for the first quarter, compared with 94 million a year earlier.

The shift to a new metric came after Twitter reported MAUs that fell short of analyst estimates for two straight quarters during its fiscal year 2018. Twitter previously blamed the shortfall in part on a July 2018 purge of “locked” accounts that was meant to get rid of bots and fake users, among other factors. Twitter said the 330 million average MAUs it reported for the first quarter was a decrease of 6 million year over year.

Twitter forecast second-quarter revenue of $770 million to $830 million, compared with analyst estimates of $783.9 million to $853.6 million in the Refinitiv survey. The company reiterated its announcement from last quarter that it expects cash operating expenses to increase about 20% year over year in 2019 as it continues to invest in “health, conversation, revenue product and sales, and platform.”

Twitter’s stock slid after its previous earnings report when it provided light guidance for the first quarter, but it is still up about 10% over the past 12 months. Twitter has been toying with the best way to optimize the experience on the platform for user well-being rather than purely based on engagement metrics. CEO Jack Dorsey told Rolling Stone in an interview published in January that his team has considered “what happens if we remove the ‘like’ counts from tweets.”

Twitter rolled out a public beta test through a separate app last month where it has tested new features, including hiding some replies by default to unclutter conversations and hiding engagement options until a user taps on a tweet, TechCrunch reported.

On a call with analysts following the report, Dorsey said the prototype “twttr” app results so far have been promising, but he did not provide a concrete timeline for the broader release of new features.

“Generally, most of the people that have been testing the prototype app prefer it over the main Twitter production app,” Dorsey said. “So it’s shown that we’re heading in the right direction, but we still have some work to do before we feel confident that we should put it in production.”

In Twitter’s earnings release, Dorsey said the company is “taking a more proactive approach” to abuse on its platform.

“We are reducing the burden on victims and, where possible, taking action before abuse is reported,” Dorsey said. Twitter now removes 2.5 times more tweets sharing personal information, and about 38% of abuse tweets taken down each week are detected by machine learning models, he said.

On the analyst call, Dorsey addressed a question about regulation, saying Twitter is “completely open to regulation where it makes sense.”

“Regulations like GDPR have been a net positive, and not just for our service but for our broader industry in general,” Dorsey said. “It’s added a lot more clarity around privacy and how data is being used to the people that we serve.”

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Watch: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey was paid $1.40 in 2018


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: lauren feiner, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dorsey, users, beat, quarter, surges, million, report, twitter, reported, mdaus, maus, 15, earnings, stock


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Twitter stock surges more than 15% on earnings beat

Twitter’s first-quarter earnings report crushed expectations, sending the stock surging as much as 17% Tuesday. This metric includes “Twitter users who log in and access Twitter on any given day through Twitter.com or our Twitter applications that are able to show ads,” according to the company. In the fourth quarter, Twitter said it had 126 million mDAUs. In the U.S., Twitter reported 28 million average mDAUs forthe first quarter, compared with 26 million a year earlier. The shift to a new metr


Twitter’s first-quarter earnings report crushed expectations, sending the stock surging as much as 17% Tuesday. This metric includes “Twitter users who log in and access Twitter on any given day through Twitter.com or our Twitter applications that are able to show ads,” according to the company. In the fourth quarter, Twitter said it had 126 million mDAUs. In the U.S., Twitter reported 28 million average mDAUs forthe first quarter, compared with 26 million a year earlier. The shift to a new metr
Twitter stock surges more than 15% on earnings beat Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: lauren feiner, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dorsey, users, beat, quarter, surges, million, report, twitter, reported, mdaus, maus, 15, earnings, stock


Twitter stock surges more than 15% on earnings beat

Twitter’s first-quarter earnings report crushed expectations, sending the stock surging as much as 17% Tuesday.

The pop added around $3.9 billion to Twitter’s market cap, bringing it over $30 billion.

Here’s what Twitter reported Tuesday:

Earnings per share: adjusted 37 cents vs. 15 cents expected in a Refinitiv survey of analysts

Revenue: $787 million vs. $776.1 million expected in the Refinitiv survey

Monthly active users (MAUs), excluding SMS users: 330 million vs. 318 million expected in a FactSet consensus estimate

This quarter will be the last for which Twitter reports monthly active users (MAUs), the company announced during its last earnings report. As a replacement, Twitter began to report what it calls monetizable daily active users (mDAUs) last quarter, which it said would better reflect its audience. This metric includes “Twitter users who log in and access Twitter on any given day through Twitter.com or our Twitter applications that are able to show ads,” according to the company.

Twitter reported 134 million average mDAUs for the first quarter, compared with 120 million a year earlier. In the fourth quarter, Twitter said it had 126 million mDAUs.

In the U.S., Twitter reported 28 million average mDAUs forthe first quarter, compared with 26 million a year earlier. It reported 105 million average international mDAUs for the first quarter, compared with 94 million a year earlier.

The shift to a new metric came after Twitter reported MAUs that fell short of analyst estimates for two straight quarters during its fiscal year 2018. Twitter previously blamed the shortfall in part on a July 2018 purge of “locked” accounts that was meant to get rid of bots and fake users, among other factors. Twitter said the 330 million average MAUs it reported for the first quarter was a decrease of 6 million year over year.

Twitter forecast second-quarter revenue of $770 million to $830 million, compared with analyst estimates of $783.9 million to $853.6 million in the Refinitiv survey. The company reiterated its announcement from last quarter that it expects cash operating expenses to increase about 20% year over year in 2019 as it continues to invest in “health, conversation, revenue product and sales, and platform.”

Twitter’s stock slid after its previous earnings report when it provided light guidance for the first quarter, but it is still up about 10% over the past 12 months. Twitter has been toying with the best way to optimize the experience on the platform for user well-being rather than purely based on engagement metrics. CEO Jack Dorsey told Rolling Stone in an interview published in January that his team has considered “what happens if we remove the ‘like’ counts from tweets.”

Twitter rolled out a public beta test through a separate app last month where it has tested new features, including hiding some replies by default to unclutter conversations and hiding engagement options until a user taps on a tweet, TechCrunch reported.

On a call with analysts following the report, Dorsey said the prototype “twttr” app results so far have been promising, but he did not provide a concrete timeline for the broader release of new features.

“Generally, most of the people that have been testing the prototype app prefer it over the main Twitter production app,” Dorsey said. “So it’s shown that we’re heading in the right direction, but we still have some work to do before we feel confident that we should put it in production.”

In Twitter’s earnings release, Dorsey said the company is “taking a more proactive approach” to abuse on its platform.

“We are reducing the burden on victims and, where possible, taking action before abuse is reported,” Dorsey said. Twitter now removes 2.5 times more tweets sharing personal information, and about 38% of abuse tweets taken down each week are detected by machine learning models, he said.

On the analyst call, Dorsey addressed a question about regulation, saying Twitter is “completely open to regulation where it makes sense.”

“Regulations like GDPR have been a net positive, and not just for our service but for our broader industry in general,” Dorsey said. “It’s added a lot more clarity around privacy and how data is being used to the people that we serve.”

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.

Watch: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey was paid $1.40 in 2018


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: lauren feiner, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dorsey, users, beat, quarter, surges, million, report, twitter, reported, mdaus, maus, 15, earnings, stock


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Trump met with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey

President Donald Trump met with Twitter co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey at the White House on Tuesday, press secretary Sarah Sanders confirmed after the meeting had ended. Shortly thereafter, Trump tweeted: “Lots of subjects discussed regarding their platform, and the world of social media in general. Following the meeting, a Twitter spokesperson told NBC News that “Jack had a constructive meeting with the President of the United States today at the president’s invitation. The president uses Twit


President Donald Trump met with Twitter co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey at the White House on Tuesday, press secretary Sarah Sanders confirmed after the meeting had ended. Shortly thereafter, Trump tweeted: “Lots of subjects discussed regarding their platform, and the world of social media in general. Following the meeting, a Twitter spokesperson told NBC News that “Jack had a constructive meeting with the President of the United States today at the president’s invitation. The president uses Twit
Trump met with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: christina wilkie, chris kleponis, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, twitter, social, meeting, ceo, president, republican, met, political, jack, trump, trumps, dorsey, white


Trump met with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey

President Donald Trump met with Twitter co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey at the White House on Tuesday, press secretary Sarah Sanders confirmed after the meeting had ended.

Shortly thereafter, Trump tweeted: “Lots of subjects discussed regarding their platform, and the world of social media in general. Look forward to keeping an open dialogue!”

Following the meeting, a Twitter spokesperson told NBC News that “Jack had a constructive meeting with the President of the United States today at the president’s invitation. They discussed Twitter’s commitment to protecting the health of the public conversation ahead of the 2020 U.S. elections and efforts underway to respond to the opioid crisis.”

Trump’s positive assessment of the meeting represented a reversal from his attitude toward the company just hours before, on Tuesday morning, when he used his personal Twitter account to criticize the tech giant.

There is no evidence to support Trump’s claim that Twitter is “very discriminatory,” or that it is “hard for people to sign on.” Trump’s allegation that Twitter is “constantly taking people off list,” likewise appears to be unfounded, although the site does take steps to remove automated accounts that impersonate real people, known as bots. It was also unclear precisely what Trump was referring to by, “Big complaints from many people.”

In response to similar criticism from Trump in March, the company said, “We enforce the Twitter rules impartially for all users, regardless of their background or political affiliation.”

Trump is a prolific tweeter, and his account had more than 59 million followers as of Tuesday afternoon. The president uses Twitter practically every day to communicate directly with the public on issues affecting every facet of his administration.

Over the course of a day, Trump’s Twitter topics can range from serious foreign policy matters like the North Korean nuclear talks, to small scale domestic political rivalries.

The social media platform was instrumental in driving Trump’s meteoric rise through the ranks of Republican politics. In 2015 and 2016, Trump’s blunt, outspoken tweets helped him to break through a crowded Republican primary field to win the party’s presidential nomination and from there, the White House.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: christina wilkie, chris kleponis, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, public, twitter, social, meeting, ceo, president, republican, met, political, jack, trump, trumps, dorsey, white


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