Here’s the ‘dream salary’ Americans want—and how much they actually get paid

In an ideal world, Americans would like to earn well above $100,000 a year. Specifically, men say their “dream salary” is $445,000, while women wish they could earn a more modest, but still substantial, $279,000 per year. That’s according to a 2018 survey from MidAmerica Nazarene University (MNU) of 2,000 Americans. In reality, even the typical American family earns only a fraction of that: The median household income in the U.S. is $61,372. Here’s the full breakdown of how much full-time worker


In an ideal world, Americans would like to earn well above $100,000 a year. Specifically, men say their “dream salary” is $445,000, while women wish they could earn a more modest, but still substantial, $279,000 per year. That’s according to a 2018 survey from MidAmerica Nazarene University (MNU) of 2,000 Americans. In reality, even the typical American family earns only a fraction of that: The median household income in the U.S. is $61,372. Here’s the full breakdown of how much full-time worker
Here’s the ‘dream salary’ Americans want—and how much they actually get paid Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, nbcuniversal, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, actually, paid, heres, americans, median, salary, yearspecifically, dream, earn, payscale, world, wantand, 2018, american, typical


Here's the 'dream salary' Americans want—and how much they actually get paid

In an ideal world, Americans would like to earn well above $100,000 a year.

Specifically, men say their “dream salary” is $445,000, while women wish they could earn a more modest, but still substantial, $279,000 per year. That’s according to a 2018 survey from MidAmerica Nazarene University (MNU) of 2,000 Americans.

In reality, even the typical American family earns only a fraction of that: The median household income in the U.S. is $61,372.

And even during their peak earning years, the typical American with a BA isn’t making six figures: Compensation research firm PayScale found that the median salary for a college educated woman tops out at about $61,000, and for a man at just under $95,000.

Here’s the full breakdown of how much full-time workers with a Bachelor’s degree earn at every age. PayScale surveyed 972,788 U.S. workers between July 2015 and July 2018.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-12  Authors: kathleen elkins, nbc, nbcuniversal, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, actually, paid, heres, americans, median, salary, yearspecifically, dream, earn, payscale, world, wantand, 2018, american, typical


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Elon Musk’s $420 level may not be such a pipe dream for Tesla stock, technician says

The stock move briefly boosted share prices to levels seen before CEO Elon Musk infamously tweeted that he had “funding secured” to take the company private at $420 a share. Todd Gordon, founder of TradingAnalysis.com, says the charts suggest Musk’s $420-a-share valuation may not be such a pipe dream. Musk’s Aug. 7 tweet pushed the stock close to that level again before losses sent it back to the year’s lows. Denholm has been a member of the Tesla board since 2014. Tesla shares popped 1 percent


The stock move briefly boosted share prices to levels seen before CEO Elon Musk infamously tweeted that he had “funding secured” to take the company private at $420 a share. Todd Gordon, founder of TradingAnalysis.com, says the charts suggest Musk’s $420-a-share valuation may not be such a pipe dream. Musk’s Aug. 7 tweet pushed the stock close to that level again before losses sent it back to the year’s lows. Denholm has been a member of the Tesla board since 2014. Tesla shares popped 1 percent
Elon Musk’s $420 level may not be such a pipe dream for Tesla stock, technician says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: keris lahiff, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, stephen desaulniers, drew angerer, norm betts, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, musk, stock, dream, board, tesla, trading, think, gordon, shares, elon, technician, share, musks, level, 420, pipe


Elon Musk's $420 level may not be such a pipe dream for Tesla stock, technician says

Tesla’s board just got new leadership.

The appointment of longtime board member Robyn Denholm to chairwoman sent shares higher on Thursday. The stock move briefly boosted share prices to levels seen before CEO Elon Musk infamously tweeted that he had “funding secured” to take the company private at $420 a share. The unfounded post cost him a $20 million fine and the chairman’s seat.

Todd Gordon, founder of TradingAnalysis.com, says the charts suggest Musk’s $420-a-share valuation may not be such a pipe dream.

“I think if we hold the bid, and I think we will, the $389 high is in jeopardy and we should be able to get up to Elon’s $420 on the breakout,” Gordon said on CNBC’s “Trading Nation” on Thursday. “I’m going to try to play this on the long side.”

A move to $420 represents nearly 20 percent upside from Thursday’s closing price of $351.40

Tesla peaked at $389 in September 2017. Musk’s Aug. 7 tweet pushed the stock close to that level again before losses sent it back to the year’s lows.

Gordon says past weakness on the charts give him reason to believe the sell-off in recent months is a pullback before a pop. From its peak in April 2016 to a trough in June 2016, its stock pulled back around 34 percent. Another decline from September 2017 to February 2018 marks a 37 percent decline. The stock rebounded from both of those sell-offs.

“There’s actually a lot of rhyme and rhythm and repetition in this chart,” said Gordon. “We’re seeing a very clean setback, kind of corrective within an uptrend.”

The shift in board leadership has not changed one vocal Tesla bear’s position.

“It’s great that there’s a new chairman in place for checks and balances, but the choice does not ease my concern about the instability of management,” Mark Tepper, president of Strategic Wealth Partners, said on “Trading Nation” on Thursday. “Robyn has been part of the Musk team for quite some time. She’s a Musk loyalist.”

Denholm has been a member of the Tesla board since 2014. She has left her role as chief financial officer of Australian telecom Telstra to focus on her new position at the electric car maker.

“That suggests to me that she might not be the best person to keep him in check. I think he needs a better babysitter, so we’re still staying away,” he added.

Tesla shares popped 1 percent on the news on Thursday, but have dropped 13 percent this year.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-09  Authors: keris lahiff, david paul morris, bloomberg, getty images, stephen desaulniers, drew angerer, norm betts, kcna, thomas barwick getty images, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, musk, stock, dream, board, tesla, trading, think, gordon, shares, elon, technician, share, musks, level, 420, pipe


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Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her


When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made. But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed. “I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters. “I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her
Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


Sustainability entrepreneur helps Asia business combat climate change

When Stephanie Dickson landed her dream job straight out of college, she thought she had it made.

She had fantasized her whole life about working in fashion and, suddenly, she had a job that allowed her to do that, organizing some of the industry’s biggest events across Asia.

But then one day the veil fell, and Dickson realized the job she had dreamed of was not what it seemed.

“I got my dream job,” Dickson told CNBC Make It. “But about three and a half years in, I just became really disconnected with the work I was doing.”

It was then 2015, and climate change was gaining increasing attention on the international stage. To Dickson’s surprise, she found there was one industry lurking at the center of the issue: Her own.

In fact, alongside commonly cited culprits like the energy, transport and agriculture sectors, the fashion industry is today considered one of the world’s largest polluters.

“I felt completely blindsided,” said Dickson, whose disillusionment led her to start watching documentaries and reading up on the issue. “I’d been working in this industry and I had no idea what actually was going on.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-11-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, green is the new black asia, green is the new black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, climate, job, working, dickson, combat, asia, entrepreneur, sustainability, change, issue, work, industry, fashion, dream, helps, business, worlds, watching


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Usain Bolt’s soccer dream could be gathering pace with a reported professional contract offer

Eight-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt has been offered a contract by Australian professional soccer side Central Coast Mariners, according to his agent. The 32-year-old scored two goals for Mariners in a trial match this month as he seeks a switch from athletics to soccer. “In response to the media stories, yes, Usain has been offered a contract,” his agent Ricky Simms was quoted as saying to Australian media over the weekend, declining to comment further. The contract offer would be the second


Eight-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt has been offered a contract by Australian professional soccer side Central Coast Mariners, according to his agent. The 32-year-old scored two goals for Mariners in a trial match this month as he seeks a switch from athletics to soccer. “In response to the media stories, yes, Usain has been offered a contract,” his agent Ricky Simms was quoted as saying to Australian media over the weekend, declining to comment further. The contract offer would be the second
Usain Bolt’s soccer dream could be gathering pace with a reported professional contract offer Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: adam reed, cameron spencer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mariners, usain, media, professional, contract, soccer, second, restaurant, offered, bolt, reported, australian, open, gathering, bolts, offer, pace, dream


Usain Bolt's soccer dream could be gathering pace with a reported professional contract offer

Eight-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt has been offered a contract by Australian professional soccer side Central Coast Mariners, according to his agent.

The 32-year-old scored two goals for Mariners in a trial match this month as he seeks a switch from athletics to soccer.

“In response to the media stories, yes, Usain has been offered a contract,” his agent Ricky Simms was quoted as saying to Australian media over the weekend, declining to comment further.

Questions will always be asked about whether signing Bolt was more about public relations than his footballing prowess. Despite scoring those goals in one pre-season friendly, some have raised concerns over his ability to effectively make the transition between sports.

Bolt wasn’t involved in Mariners’ A-League opening draw against Brisbane Roar on Sunday, after which Coach Mike Mulvey said he knew nothing about any contract for the Jamaican.

“That’s for a few pay grades above my level,” Mulvey said. “I do appreciate how important this story is for the rest of the world.”

“But you have a look at our frontline today and you wonder if he could get into any of those positions, wouldn’t you?” he went on to say.

The contract offer would be the second made to Bolt, after Maltese club Valletta FC approached the Jamaican with a two-year contract that he turned down.

Football Federation Australia (FFA) has made it clear that the “marquee” money that has in the past helped Australian clubs lure the likes of former Juventus and Italy forward Alessandro Del Piero to the A-League will not be available to sign Bolt.

That means any contract from the Mariners, whose average home crowd last season was just over 7,000, is unlikely to be highly lucrative, with local media speculating it would be worth about 150,000 Australian dollars ($106,560) a season.

According to Forbes, Bolt was earning upwards of $20 million a year mostly from endorsements before his retirement from athletics in 2017 and his biggest deal with sports brand Puma pays him more than $10 million annually.

Bolt remains the world record holder in both the 100 meter and 200 meter sprint events and has recently moved into the restaurant business. His first Track and Records establishment in the United Kingdom is due to open at the end of October, with several more set to follow.

“London is my second home and a place very close to my heart — so it’s brilliant to be sharing a taste of Jamaica in the capital,” Bolt said earlier this month on social media.

The Jamaican-based company Kingston Live Entertainment Group is behind Bolt’s restaurant push and it plans to open fifteen more over the next five years.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-22  Authors: adam reed, cameron spencer, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, mariners, usain, media, professional, contract, soccer, second, restaurant, offered, bolt, reported, australian, open, gathering, bolts, offer, pace, dream


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Career coach reveals 9 ways to leverage LinkedIn and land a dream job

“I felt like I had rejected a million job seekers in my career,” she said. So in 2012 she set out in an RV to teach 1 million people how to do it the right way and land their dream job. Here are nine essential ways to successfully leverage LinkedIn and land your dream job. Your LinkedIn profile is your online resume. Your LinkedIn profile typically shows your geographic region and not the specific city you live in.


“I felt like I had rejected a million job seekers in my career,” she said. So in 2012 she set out in an RV to teach 1 million people how to do it the right way and land their dream job. Here are nine essential ways to successfully leverage LinkedIn and land your dream job. Your LinkedIn profile is your online resume. Your LinkedIn profile typically shows your geographic region and not the specific city you live in.
Career coach reveals 9 ways to leverage LinkedIn and land a dream job Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: barbara booth, source, kristi kohut, the august group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, word, resume, million, key, leverage, linkedin, land, coach, kohut, ways, candidates, dream, profile, career, reveals, recruiter


Career coach reveals 9 ways to leverage LinkedIn and land a dream job

Abby Kohut is on a personal mission: to teach 1 million people across the country the job-search secrets that recruiters won’t tell you.

A recruiter for 17 years, Kohut was frustrated by the errors she was seeing on the resumes she received and the basic mistakes candidates were making during an interview.

While she claims she hired more than 10,000 people during this time, she said she was disturbed by how many people she had to turn away, primarily because it was evident they just weren’t educated about the dos and don’ts in the job-search process.

“I felt like I had rejected a million job seekers in my career,” she said. So in 2012 she set out in an RV to teach 1 million people how to do it the right way and land their dream job. So far, she claims she has educated and inspired more than 265,000 job seekers.

Also known as Absolutely Abby — because she tells people the absolute truth about the hiring process — Kohut has nearly 100,000 followers on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn who listen to her job-search and career-enrichment secrets. She covers everything from resume writing, job boards and salary negotiation to cover letters, the proper way to dress for an interview and networking, but she believes the most powerful tool in today’s hiring landscape is LinkedIn.

According to the Jobvite Recruiter Nation Survey, 87 percent of recruiters use LinkedIn when searching for ideal candidates. The networking site has 500 million users worldwide, reaching 200 countries and territories around the globe. More than 133 million users are in the United States alone.

“Monster started it all off, then LinkedIn took over the market. I don’t have a choice, because that’s how things are done these days,” she said. “When I had the mail, I could evaluate each resume based on the resume itself. But now the computer is making the decisions for me. It’s easier, but good people now get ruled out,” she said.

There are ways to set yourself apart from thousands of other candidates on the professional networking site, said Kohut. Here are nine essential ways to successfully leverage LinkedIn and land your dream job.

1. Stuff your profile with key words and use them multiple times. Your LinkedIn profile is your online resume. So in order for a recruiter to find you, you must include the proper search terms in your profile — and not a deriative of the word, said Kohut. She adds that you must think of your key words in terms of what a recruiter would type in to search for an ideal candidate.

For instance, she said, “If I were looking to hire a director of finance, a key word might be GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles), another might be budgets, stocks or Microsoft Excel.” She recommends using key words from the job description.

“Key words are very picky. There is no gray. It’s black and white,” she said. “If I’m looking for a project manager and your profile says ‘project management,’ I won’t find you.”

Kohut also said it’s important to use the key word at least three to five times throughout your profile — for example, in each job entry, the summary and under technical skills.

“If you can find a way to say the word multiple times, you will appear higher in their search. The tense of the word also matters. So if a recruiter searches the term budgeting, ‘budgeted’ won’t be found.”

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2. Get into the recruiter’s head. “I look at a resume for 5 to 10 seconds. If I like it, I will look at it for 20, and then I will stop and take some sort of action,” said Kohut.

But before a recruiter even has your resume in hand, they must find you, and all start by searching for candidates by job title. Job titles appear in bold on your profile under Experience and should reflect the common titles recruiters are searching for today. “One of my clients said his company called him a resultant — a great title, but no one is searching for a resultant.”

Using a title that is more descriptive rather than “founder” or “owner” is also important, as job descriptions are collapsed on a mobile device on LinkedIn, leaving only the titles visible.

3. Use the right Zip code. Kohut said she always searches for candidates by Zip code. “Let’s say I am looking for candidates within a 25-mile range of the company I am recruiting for,” she said. “If you are looking for a job in Manhattan and you live in Suffolk County, Long Island, I won’t find you. You should have a Manhattan Zip code on your profile.”

You can choose how your location and other profile fields appear to other members from the introduction card on your profile. This is where you insert your Zip code. Your LinkedIn profile typically shows your geographic region and not the specific city you live in.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: barbara booth, source, kristi kohut, the august group
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, job, word, resume, million, key, leverage, linkedin, land, coach, kohut, ways, candidates, dream, profile, career, reveals, recruiter


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Strivr CEO Derek Belch left dream job to help others train for theirs

“That David believed in this idea, and in me, was all I needed to hear to take the leap,” the Strivr CEO says today. Walmart will use Strivr’s virtual reality learning modules on Oculus devices to train employees who work in their 4,700 U.S. stores. Strivr modules can help retail employees get a feeling for a store’s layout well before their first day on the job, among other things. The company has raised $21 million in venture funding to date from investors, including BMW iVentures, the NFL’s s


“That David believed in this idea, and in me, was all I needed to hear to take the leap,” the Strivr CEO says today. Walmart will use Strivr’s virtual reality learning modules on Oculus devices to train employees who work in their 4,700 U.S. stores. Strivr modules can help retail employees get a feeling for a store’s layout well before their first day on the job, among other things. The company has raised $21 million in venture funding to date from investors, including BMW iVentures, the NFL’s s
Strivr CEO Derek Belch left dream job to help others train for theirs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-09  Authors: lora kolodny, visual china group, getty images, alex wong, matthew busch, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virtual, derek, train, ceo, work, dream, help, job, belch, theirs, left, signia, employees, stores, strivr, walmart, vr, venture


Strivr CEO Derek Belch left dream job to help others train for theirs

For Belch the decision to leave his coaching career behind wasn’t easy. He says his mentor, Stanford’s head football coach, David Shaw, convinced him to go entrepreneurial and even invested in Strivr to help get the start-up off the ground.

“That David believed in this idea, and in me, was all I needed to hear to take the leap,” the Strivr CEO says today.

Strivr landed on CNBC’s 2018 Upstart 100 list after inking a big deal last month with Walmart. It also has signed deals to bring 3-D immersive learning to employees at BMW, JetBlue, Fidelity, the NFL, Tyson Foods and others.

Walmart will use Strivr’s virtual reality learning modules on Oculus devices to train employees who work in their 4,700 U.S. stores. (The VR courses will be offered to associates who are not able to attend Walmart Academies for in-person instruction.)

Strivr modules can help retail employees get a feeling for a store’s layout well before their first day on the job, among other things.

The company has raised $21 million in venture funding to date from investors, including BMW iVentures, the NFL’s strategic investment fund, Great Point Ventures and Signia Venture Partners.

Zaw Thet, an early Strivr investor and partner with Signia, notes: “Virtual reality has been up and down the hype cycle a few times. The time when every household has some form of VR headset is coming, but as we all know, it has taken a while and may take a while longer. The beauty of Strivr is that they aren’t dependent on widespread consumer adoption of VR headsets. With just 17,000 headsets, Strivr will train more than 1 million Walmart employees at the stores they work in.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-09  Authors: lora kolodny, visual china group, getty images, alex wong, matthew busch, bloomberg
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, virtual, derek, train, ceo, work, dream, help, job, belch, theirs, left, signia, employees, stores, strivr, walmart, vr, venture


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Two-thirds of employees dream about this one thing every second of every day

If you find yourself daydreaming at work and your thoughts turn to a new job, you are not alone. About two-thirds of working adults surveyed spend literally every second of every day wishing they could be at a different job, according to an August survey from Monster.com. The reasons are simple. You could be bored because you’re underemployed and don’t find your work challenging enough. You might have a toxic workplace or a difficult supervisor.


If you find yourself daydreaming at work and your thoughts turn to a new job, you are not alone. About two-thirds of working adults surveyed spend literally every second of every day wishing they could be at a different job, according to an August survey from Monster.com. The reasons are simple. You could be bored because you’re underemployed and don’t find your work challenging enough. You might have a toxic workplace or a difficult supervisor.
Two-thirds of employees dream about this one thing every second of every day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: jill cornfield, hero images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, second, underemployed, day, thing, wishing, twothirds, workplace, work, dream, youre, employees, toxic, turn, job, working


Two-thirds of employees dream about this one thing every second of every day

If you find yourself daydreaming at work and your thoughts turn to a new job, you are not alone.

About two-thirds of working adults surveyed spend literally every second of every day wishing they could be at a different job, according to an August survey from Monster.com.

The reasons are simple. You could be bored because you’re underemployed and don’t find your work challenging enough. You might have a toxic workplace or a difficult supervisor.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-08  Authors: jill cornfield, hero images, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, second, underemployed, day, thing, wishing, twothirds, workplace, work, dream, youre, employees, toxic, turn, job, working


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23,000 Millennial and Gen Z workers listed their dream employers and there’s 1 key difference

The lists can be key for young job seekers trying to think strategically about their careers. Since Snapchat launched six years ago, the platform has become a primary means of communication for Gen Z. Comparably notes that while Millennials and Gen Z are often grouped together, their lifestyles vary widely. An older Millennial of 34 is more likely to have a family and be established in their career where a 21-year-old member of Gen Z is just entering the workforce. To stand out, gen z should kee


The lists can be key for young job seekers trying to think strategically about their careers. Since Snapchat launched six years ago, the platform has become a primary means of communication for Gen Z. Comparably notes that while Millennials and Gen Z are often grouped together, their lifestyles vary widely. An older Millennial of 34 is more likely to have a family and be established in their career where a 21-year-old member of Gen Z is just entering the workforce. To stand out, gen z should kee
23,000 Millennial and Gen Z workers listed their dream employers and there’s 1 key difference Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-12  Authors: zameena mejia, robert daly, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennial, listed, difference, lists, google, thats, think, workers, theres, key, dream, young, employers, companies, nazar, gen, ages


23,000 Millennial and Gen Z workers listed their dream employers and there's 1 key difference

If you were born in the ’80s, ’90s or early 2000s, you probably can’t remember a time without a smartphone or computer. There’s also a chance you might see Google, Apple or Amazon as the ultimate employer.

That’s the finding from career data site Comparably. The site surveyed 23,000 employees between the ages of 18 to 35 on their dream workplace. The resulting lists were nearly identical, naming top tech companies such as Google, Amazon, Microsoft, Uber and Facebook.

The lists can be key for young job seekers trying to think strategically about their careers.

While very similar, the lists had one key difference. Those ages 18 to 25 chose Snap Inc as a top company. Their older counterparts, ages 26 to 34, chose Netflix instead.

Lifestyle could be a factor, according to Comparably CEO Jason Nazar. Since Snapchat launched six years ago, the platform has become a primary means of communication for Gen Z. “They also see their parents on social networks such as Facebook and that’s not where they want to be,” he adds.

Nazar says, “They live in this product day to day, it’s a natural reaction to say that’s where they want to work.”

Comparably notes that while Millennials and Gen Z are often grouped together, their lifestyles vary widely. An older Millennial of 34 is more likely to have a family and be established in their career where a 21-year-old member of Gen Z is just entering the workforce.

Despite these differences, they all value the same top names. With so many young people targeting the same companies, the real lesson for jobseekers is the competition they’ll be facing. After all, tech companies are famously selective as it is. Some estimate applicants at Google have only a .2 percent chance of getting hired.

To stand out, gen z should keep in mind a few important factors, says Nazar. Large companies aren’t just looking for high IQs and Ivy League degrees. They’re also looking for candidates with high emotional intelligence (EQ) and relevant experience.

He suggests that younger workers should worry less about breaking into big name companies and more about building a skillset that helps them stand apart. Think strategically, Nazar says. “Go somewhere where you can take on more responsibility and build relationships with senior folks more easily and organically,” he continues.

“The big names will turn down a candidate,” who only looks good on paper, he says. “Show that you’re a positive person who wants to be coached and has the ability to impact their environment.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-12  Authors: zameena mejia, robert daly, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, millennial, listed, difference, lists, google, thats, think, workers, theres, key, dream, young, employers, companies, nazar, gen, ages


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Author who studies millionaires: How a simple daily routine can turn your dreams into reality

Dream-Setting is a process in which you:Define your ideal, future life, via a script of 1,000 words or more. In this script, you go out into the future five or more years and paint a picture with words of every facet of your ideal, future life. Clearly, the hardest part of this Dream-Setting process is pursuing and achieving the goals behind your dream, or the Goal Pursuit & Achievement Process (Step 4). Step 4’s Goal Pursuit & Achievement Process is the hardest part because it requires that you


Dream-Setting is a process in which you:Define your ideal, future life, via a script of 1,000 words or more. In this script, you go out into the future five or more years and paint a picture with words of every facet of your ideal, future life. Clearly, the hardest part of this Dream-Setting process is pursuing and achieving the goals behind your dream, or the Goal Pursuit & Achievement Process (Step 4). Step 4’s Goal Pursuit & Achievement Process is the hardest part because it requires that you
Author who studies millionaires: How a simple daily routine can turn your dreams into reality Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-11  Authors: tom corley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pursuit, achievement, turn, author, studies, dreams, future, routine, millionaires, goals, reality, daily, goal, process, pursue, script, simple, life, dream


Author who studies millionaires: How a simple daily routine can turn your dreams into reality

In my book, “Change Your Habits, Change Your Life,” I introduced my readers to one of the tools successful entrepreneurs in my Rich Habits Study used that helped them become self-made millionaires. This tool is something called Dream-Setting.

Dream-Setting is a process in which you:

Define your ideal, future life, via a script of 1,000 words or more. In this script, you go out into the future five or more years and paint a picture with words of every facet of your ideal, future life. The home you own, the neighborhood you live in, the income you earn, the money you accumulate, the car you drive, the amazing people who are your closest friends, the places in the world you travel to, etc. Bullet point each dream within your script Build goals around each dream Pursue each goal until it is achieved

As you realize each dream, you climb your individual Dream Ladder. When you reach the top of your ladder, only then are you living the life of your dreams.

Clearly, the hardest part of this Dream-Setting process is pursuing and achieving the goals behind your dream, or the Goal Pursuit & Achievement Process (Step 4).

Step 4’s Goal Pursuit & Achievement Process is the hardest part because it requires that you:

Develop the knowledge and skills which enable you to pursue each goal, and Take action on each goal

Each of these two Goal Pursuit & Achievement Processes requires effort. Effort = time. Somehow, you must find the time to pursue and achieve the goals behind your dreams.

What makes devoting time to your goals so hard is that many who are pursuing their dreams and the goals behind their dreams have jobs which limit how much time they have to engage in this Goal Pursuit and Achievement Process.

So what do you do?

You must create a daily routine in which you block off time, every day, to dedicate to this Goal Pursuit & Achievement Process.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-11  Authors: tom corley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pursuit, achievement, turn, author, studies, dreams, future, routine, millionaires, goals, reality, daily, goal, process, pursue, script, simple, life, dream


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Nearly half of California’s gig economy workers struggling with poverty, new survey says

The 2018 California Workers Survey defined the gig economy as including jobs with ride-hailing platforms such as Uber and Lyft, and providing services such as shopping, delivering household items or assisting in childcare. According to the report, about 48 percent of those participating in the gig economy are struggling with poverty. At the same time, the PRRI survey found nearly one-third of all Californians and 47 percent of workers in the Golden State are struggling with poverty, while 53 per


The 2018 California Workers Survey defined the gig economy as including jobs with ride-hailing platforms such as Uber and Lyft, and providing services such as shopping, delivering household items or assisting in childcare. According to the report, about 48 percent of those participating in the gig economy are struggling with poverty. At the same time, the PRRI survey found nearly one-third of all Californians and 47 percent of workers in the Golden State are struggling with poverty, while 53 per
Nearly half of California’s gig economy workers struggling with poverty, new survey says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-28  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, nearly, gig, economy, american, californias, poverty, struggling, california, californians, prri, state, survey, dream, half


Nearly half of California's gig economy workers struggling with poverty, new survey says

The 2018 California Workers Survey defined the gig economy as including jobs with ride-hailing platforms such as Uber and Lyft, and providing services such as shopping, delivering household items or assisting in childcare. According to the report, about 48 percent of those participating in the gig economy are struggling with poverty.

At the same time, the PRRI survey found nearly one-third of all Californians and 47 percent of workers in the Golden State are struggling with poverty, while 53 percent are not. California ranks as the fifth-largest economy in the world, but its high cost of housing in many parts of the state mean more than one in five children live in poverty, according to the California Budget & Policy Center, an independent policy research center based in Sacramento.

“It is striking that nearly one-third of Californians are finding that the promise of the American Dream — that if you work hard, you’ll get ahead — is not coming true for them,” Robert Jones, CEO of PRRI, said in a release.

“Grasping the magnitude of this problem and understanding the real-life struggles and hardships that impact these more vulnerable workers is critical for California policymakers, businesses, and non-profits who want to work to create a healthier, more robust employment environment in the state,” Jones said.

The survey also found the state’s San Joaquin Valley region, known for its agriculture economy, has 68 percent of workers who are struggling with poverty. The Central Valley region has historically suffered higher unemployment than the rest of the state.

By comparison, only 27 percent of the workers in the Bay Area were considered to be struggling with poverty.

The report also found Californians are generally discouraged when it comes to the existence of the American Dream or the California Dream. PRRI defined the California Dream as the idea that the American Dream is more attainable in California than in other parts of the country.

Only 47 percent of Californians believe the American Dream about economic opportunity for hard work still holds true today. Also, residents of the state are even more downbeat when it comes to the California Dream — 55 percent of those surveyed believe the American Dream is harder to achieve in the nation’s most populous state.

Roughly two-thirds of Californians say they would advise young people in their area to relocate to find more opportunities in a different community. The survey also found young Californians (ages 18 to 29) are less likely to believe a college education is a good investment for the future when compared with seniors (those 65 and older).

The PRRI survey also found that 56 percent of California workers struggling with poverty would find it difficult to pay for a $400 emergency expense. It also revealed that 42 percent of workers in this category have put off medical treatment.

The survey findings are based on a total sample of 3,318 California residents, age 18 and up. Interviews were conducted between May 18 and June 11.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-08-28  Authors: jeff daniels
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, workers, nearly, gig, economy, american, californias, poverty, struggling, california, californians, prri, state, survey, dream, half


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