Here’s an example of the perfect LinkedIn profile summary, according to Harvard career experts

The LinkedIn profile summarySimply signing up for an account, quickly filling in the blanks and then letting your profile remain dormant won’t do you any good. Together, they make up what’s known as your “LinkedIn profile summary,” and it’s one of the first things people see when they visit your page. Below is an example of a strong LinkedIn profile summary, according to the career experts at Harvard: *** NAME:Jessica Yan PROFESSIONAL HEADLINE:Research Scientist | Ph.D. LinkedIn profile checklis


The LinkedIn profile summarySimply signing up for an account, quickly filling in the blanks and then letting your profile remain dormant won’t do you any good. Together, they make up what’s known as your “LinkedIn profile summary,” and it’s one of the first things people see when they visit your page. Below is an example of a strong LinkedIn profile summary, according to the career experts at Harvard: *** NAME:Jessica Yan PROFESSIONAL HEADLINE:Research Scientist | Ph.D. LinkedIn profile checklis
Here’s an example of the perfect LinkedIn profile summary, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, experts, summary, harvard, help, linkedin, heres, professional, network, career, profile, perfect, according, include, example, skills


Here's an example of the perfect LinkedIn profile summary, according to Harvard career experts

If you want to have a successful career, maintaining an online presence on LinkedIn is crucial. Not only is it an effective way to network with other professionals in your field, but it can get you noticed by others and potentially land you several job opportunities. In fact, I landed a great job at a major company because I regularly updated my profile and published career-related content almost daily. (That job ultimately inspired me to start my own company.) Believe it or not, that was six years ago — and today, LinkedIn has only become increasingly important.

The LinkedIn profile summary

Simply signing up for an account, quickly filling in the blanks and then letting your profile remain dormant won’t do you any good. Of the many elements that make up a strong profile, two of the most important ones are your professional headline and “About” section, explain career experts at Harvard University’s Office for Alumni Affairs and Career Advancement. Together, they make up what’s known as your “LinkedIn profile summary,” and it’s one of the first things people see when they visit your page. Your professional headline is especially important because it’s the text that gets displayed in search results for both Google and LinkedIn. Below is an example of a strong LinkedIn profile summary, according to the career experts at Harvard: *** NAME:

Jessica Yan PROFESSIONAL HEADLINE:

Research Scientist | Ph.D. Candidate | Data Analytics, Biotech, Pharma “ABOUT” SECTION:

I’m a research scientist working to better understand how neural activity motivates and shapes human behavior. My expertise includes project design and management, data analysis and interpretation, and the development and implementation of research tools. I enjoy generating new ideas and devising feasible solutions to broadly relevant problems. My colleagues would describe me as a driven, resourceful individual who maintains a positive, proactive attitude when faced with adversity. Currently, I’m seeking opportunities that will allow me to develop and promote technologies that benefit human health. Specific fields of interest include data analytics, biotechnology, and pharmaceuticals. *** Here’s what makes it a strong profile summary: Can be skimmed in 30 seconds or less

Professional headline is below 120 characters, lists career focus and components of work

Includes industry-related keywords, core skills, strengths, talents and interests

Well written in a professional style, no spelling and grammatical mistakes

Answers questions that provides deeper insight about the individual: What makes her unique? Where is her career headed? How would others describe her? What are her values and personal traits?

LinkedIn profile checklist

While your profile summary holds major emphasis, you’ll need to spend time on savvying up the rest of it. Here’s a quick checklist of the basics to help you get started: Upload your photo . Ideally, this should be done in professional attire. Profiles with photos are 14 times more likely to be viewed, according to the career experts.

. Ideally, this should be done in professional attire. Profiles with photos are 14 times more likely to be viewed, according to the career experts. Customize your public profile URL. The address should look something like: www.linkedin.com/in/yourname. This will make it easier for you to include it on business cards, resumes and email signatures.

The address should look something like: www.linkedin.com/in/yourname. This will make it easier for you to include it on business cards, resumes and email signatures. Enhance your profile with additional sections. Displaying further information (e.g., accomplishments, skills, volunteer experience, certifications, expertise) can also increase the amount of times people view your profile, notes LinkedIn. This, in turn, can help you build your network and connect to new opportunities.

Displaying further information (e.g., accomplishments, skills, volunteer experience, certifications, expertise) can also increase the amount of times people view your profile, notes LinkedIn. This, in turn, can help you build your network and connect to new opportunities. Elaborate on your work history in the “Experience” section. Use targeted keywords and include specific information about what you’ve done in your previous positions that led to measurable results. (Don’t lie about titles or duties; you’ll likely get called out by old colleagues — and it will be embarrassing.)

Use targeted keywords and include specific information about what you’ve done in your previous positions that led to measurable results. (Don’t lie about titles or duties; you’ll likely get called out by old colleagues — and it will be embarrassing.) Education : Include, in reverse chronological order, any programs or schools you went to.

: Include, in reverse chronological order, any programs or schools you went to. Customize your “Skills & Endorsements” section. Ensuring a relevant list of skills on your profile allows others in your network to endorse you. (Skills with the most endorsements will be listed first). This will also help others understand your strengths and match you with the right opportunities.

Ensuring a relevant list of skills on your profile allows others in your network to endorse you. (Skills with the most endorsements will be listed first). This will also help others understand your strengths and match you with the right opportunities. Include recommendations. These should come from former supervisors, coworkers, clients, vendors, professors or fellow students. (Basically, anyone who will have good things to say about you and your work.)

Be an active member and build your network


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-25  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, times, experts, summary, harvard, help, linkedin, heres, professional, network, career, profile, perfect, according, include, example, skills


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Here’s an example of the perfect cover letter, according to Harvard career experts

That’s where the cover letter comes in. Linda Spencer, associate director and coordinator of career advising at Harvard Extension School, says that a solid cover letter answers two key questions: Why are you the right fit for the job? Here’s an example of what a strong cover letter looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge): Credit: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center Don’t know where to start?


That’s where the cover letter comes in. Linda Spencer, associate director and coordinator of career advising at Harvard Extension School, says that a solid cover letter answers two key questions: Why are you the right fit for the job? Here’s an example of what a strong cover letter looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge): Credit: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center Don’t know where to start?
Here’s an example of the perfect cover letter, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-23  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, example, skills, experts, company, according, heres, career, perfect, job, harvard, cover, youre, writing, letter, dont


Here's an example of the perfect cover letter, according to Harvard career experts

Found your dream job? Don’t be so confident that you’ll get hired: It’s very likely that there are several other qualified candidates competing for that same position. That’s where the cover letter comes in. Including a cover letter to complement your resume can be an effective way to impress hiring managers: It displays your strong writing skills, sets you apart from other applicants and shows that you went the extra mile. Linda Spencer, associate director and coordinator of career advising at Harvard Extension School, says that a solid cover letter answers two key questions: Why are you the right fit for the job? How will you add value to the organization? “It takes the average employer about seven seconds to review these documents,” says Spencer. “They’re not reading, they’re skimming. So you need to make it clear right off the bat how you can add value.” Here’s an example of what a strong cover letter looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge): Credit: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center Don’t know where to start? The career experts share tips on how to write a cover letter that stands out:

1. Address the letter to a specific person

“To whom it may concern” is one of the fastest ways to get your application deleted. Always try to address your letter to a specific person — usually the hiring manager or department head. Include their name, title, company and address at the very top below the date. If you don’t know who to address, LinkedIn is a great place to start. Simply enter the company name and some keywords into the search bar (e.g., “Google, hiring manager, sales”) and a variety of related profiles will appear.

2. Clearly state the purpose of your letter

Your opening line doesn’t need to be anything extravagant. In fact, it should be the complete opposite, according Harvard’s career experts. Keep it simple and straightforward: State why you’re writing, the position you’re applying for and, if applicable, how you found the job listing.

3. Don’t rehash your entire resume

You’re not writing a 1,000-word essay that summarizes your resume. The cover letter is your chance to explain why you’re genuinely interested in the company and its mission. No need to make it super formal, either. Use your own voice and add some personal flourishes to make the letter more interesting. “If you have relevant school or work experience, be sure to point it out with one or two key examples,” the career experts note. “Emphasize skills or abilities that relate to the job. Be sure to do this in a confident manner and keep in mind that the reader will also view your letter as an example of your writing skills.”

4. Use action words and don’t overuse the pronoun “I”

Instead of using flowery words and cliche claims like “fast thinker” and “highly creative,” go for action words. Here are a few examples of action verbs to use when highlighting specific skills: To demonstrate leadership skills : Accomplished, contracted, assigned, directed, orchestrated, headed, delegated

: Accomplished, contracted, assigned, directed, orchestrated, headed, delegated To demonstrate communication skills : Addressed, translated, presented, negotiated, moderated, promoted, edited

: Addressed, translated, presented, negotiated, moderated, promoted, edited To demonstrate research skills : Constructed, examined, critique, systematized, investigated, modeled, formulated

: Constructed, examined, critique, systematized, investigated, modeled, formulated To demonstrate creative skills: Revitalized, redesigned, developed, integrated, conceptualized, fashioned, shaped Avoid using too many “I” statements because it can come off as though you’re mostly interested in what you can gain from the company. The focus should be on what the company can gain from you.

5. Reiterate your enthusiasm and thank the reader

The closing of your letter should: Reiterate your interest in the position

Thank the reader for his or her consideration

State that you look forward hearing back from them

Include your signature at the very bottom

6. Keep your format consistent


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-23  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, example, skills, experts, company, according, heres, career, perfect, job, harvard, cover, youre, writing, letter, dont


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Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es


Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache. But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience. Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource CenterDon’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the es
Here’s an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


Here's an example of the perfect resume, according to Harvard career experts

Just the thought of writing a resume can lead to a huge headache.

But it doesn’t have to be so complicated. Try to think of your resume as an award-winning short memoir about your professional experience.

Certainly, they aren’t exactly the same (resumes shouldn’t be written in a narrative style), but both share a few similarities: They tell the truth, differentiate you from others, highlight your most unique qualities and capture readers’ attention.

Here’s what a strong resume looks like, according to Harvard career experts (click here to enlarge):

IMAGE CREDIT: Harvard University, Office of Career Services / Harvard Extension School, Career and Academic Resource Center

Don’t know where to start? The career experts suggest considering the essential tips below:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-10  Authors: dustin mckissen
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, unique, heres, resume, perfect, harvard, example, according, writing, try, truth, experts, university, written, career


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Simon Sinek: To be successful, you should sometimes ‘lie to get what you want’

Maybe not, argues Simon Sinek, author of “Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action” and the forthcoming book “The Infinite Game.” In a blog post, Sinek writes about an experience he had with his friend Michael, a strict vegetarian, and what it can teach us about the benefits of lying. He can always find something to eat,” Sinek writes in the post. When the soup arrived, Sinek writes that Michael asks, for a second time, whether the stock is really vegetable. “Within less


Maybe not, argues Simon Sinek, author of “Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action” and the forthcoming book “The Infinite Game.” In a blog post, Sinek writes about an experience he had with his friend Michael, a strict vegetarian, and what it can teach us about the benefits of lying. He can always find something to eat,” Sinek writes in the post. When the soup arrived, Sinek writes that Michael asks, for a second time, whether the stock is really vegetable. “Within less
Simon Sinek: To be successful, you should sometimes ‘lie to get what you want’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: dustin mckissen, -simon sinek
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, simon, chicken, server, vegetarian, michael, soup, really, sinek, successful, lie, vegetable, stock, writes


Simon Sinek: To be successful, you should sometimes 'lie to get what you want'

We’ve all been raised to believe that lying is wrong…right?

Maybe not, argues Simon Sinek, author of “Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action” and the forthcoming book “The Infinite Game.” In a blog post, Sinek writes about an experience he had with his friend Michael, a strict vegetarian, and what it can teach us about the benefits of lying.

“[Michael] loves going out for dinner with his friends and never complains. He can always find something to eat,” Sinek writes in the post. “When we went out for dinner recently, I witnessed a little trick he uses to ensure he stays a vegetarian when he’s not doing the cooking himself.”

After Michael decided to order soup, he asked the server whether it was vegetable or chicken stock. She assured him that it was vegetable.

When the soup arrived, Sinek writes that Michael asks, for a second time, whether the stock is really vegetable. “Because I’m really allergic to chicken and if there’s any chicken in it I will have a seizure,” Michael persists.

The server, now uncertain, said she would check again with someone else in the kitchen.

“Within less than a minute,” according to Sinek, “she walked back and took the bowl of soup away from Michael.”

Turns out, the soup was made with chicken stock.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-13  Authors: dustin mckissen, -simon sinek
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, simon, chicken, server, vegetarian, michael, soup, really, sinek, successful, lie, vegetable, stock, writes


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Self-made billionaires make time for these 6 little things every day

No, we’re not talking about going to the sauna or doing hot yoga. Developing the courage to do something outside of your comfort zone is a sign that you’re leveling up. If you hate public speaking, be the first to speak at your next team meeting. Although you might get so nervous that you end up with sweat stains beneath your armpit sleeves, just do it anyway. Mark Zuckerberg spent years learning Mandarin.


No, we’re not talking about going to the sauna or doing hot yoga. Developing the courage to do something outside of your comfort zone is a sign that you’re leveling up. If you hate public speaking, be the first to speak at your next team meeting. Although you might get so nervous that you end up with sweat stains beneath your armpit sleeves, just do it anyway. Mark Zuckerberg spent years learning Mandarin.
Self-made billionaires make time for these 6 little things every day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: dustin mckissen, adam galica, -michael jordan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, things, talking, selfmade, spent, team, youre, little, yogadeveloping, sweat, stains, wont, zone, day, billionaires, zuckerberg


Self-made billionaires make time for these 6 little things every day

No, we’re not talking about going to the sauna or doing hot yoga.

Developing the courage to do something outside of your comfort zone is a sign that you’re leveling up. Otherwise, you won’t get very far in life. If you hate public speaking, be the first to speak at your next team meeting. Although you might get so nervous that you end up with sweat stains beneath your armpit sleeves, just do it anyway. It’ll get easier.

Mark Zuckerberg spent years learning Mandarin. And guess what? He did a pretty good job mastering it. Fear and growth cannot exist in the same space. One has to leave in order for the other to flourish.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: dustin mckissen, adam galica, -michael jordan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, things, talking, selfmade, spent, team, youre, little, yogadeveloping, sweat, stains, wont, zone, day, billionaires, zuckerberg


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Self-made billionaires make time for these 6 little things every day

No, we’re not talking about going to the sauna or doing hot yoga. Developing the courage to do something outside of your comfort zone is a sign that you’re leveling up. If you hate public speaking, be the first to speak at your next team meeting. Although you might get so nervous that you end up with sweat stains beneath your armpit sleeves, just do it anyway. Mark Zuckerberg spent years learning Mandarin.


No, we’re not talking about going to the sauna or doing hot yoga. Developing the courage to do something outside of your comfort zone is a sign that you’re leveling up. If you hate public speaking, be the first to speak at your next team meeting. Although you might get so nervous that you end up with sweat stains beneath your armpit sleeves, just do it anyway. Mark Zuckerberg spent years learning Mandarin.
Self-made billionaires make time for these 6 little things every day Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: dustin mckissen, adam galica, -michael jordan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, things, talking, selfmade, spent, team, youre, little, yogadeveloping, sweat, stains, wont, zone, day, billionaires, zuckerberg


Self-made billionaires make time for these 6 little things every day

No, we’re not talking about going to the sauna or doing hot yoga.

Developing the courage to do something outside of your comfort zone is a sign that you’re leveling up. Otherwise, you won’t get very far in life. If you hate public speaking, be the first to speak at your next team meeting. Although you might get so nervous that you end up with sweat stains beneath your armpit sleeves, just do it anyway. It’ll get easier.

Mark Zuckerberg spent years learning Mandarin. And guess what? He did a pretty good job mastering it. Fear and growth cannot exist in the same space. One has to leave in order for the other to flourish.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-06  Authors: dustin mckissen, adam galica, -michael jordan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, things, talking, selfmade, spent, team, youre, little, yogadeveloping, sweat, stains, wont, zone, day, billionaires, zuckerberg


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Technology gains won’t make up for these job losses-commentary

“We need to begin by acknowledging the fact that we have to rethink the relationship between human beings, work, and the economy.” The wonders of the free market and creative destruction will keep middle-aged dislocated salespeople from going hungry. In other words, the theory of creative destruction works when you’re talking about specific companies or industries falling by the wayside because a better alternative has come along. However, the theory of creative destruction isn’t as applicable w


“We need to begin by acknowledging the fact that we have to rethink the relationship between human beings, work, and the economy.” The wonders of the free market and creative destruction will keep middle-aged dislocated salespeople from going hungry. In other words, the theory of creative destruction works when you’re talking about specific companies or industries falling by the wayside because a better alternative has come along. However, the theory of creative destruction isn’t as applicable w
Technology gains won’t make up for these job losses-commentary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-19  Authors: dustin mckissen, george marks, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, human, creative, lossescommentary, wont, need, ideas, right, destruction, market, technology, gains, middleaged, work, way, job


Technology gains won't make up for these job losses-commentary

“We need to begin by acknowledging the fact that we have to rethink the relationship between human beings, work, and the economy.”

Traditional economic theory says that the gains from technology will create as many or more jobs than the number destroyed, and statistically speaking, people like my father-in-law will be fine. The wonders of the free market and creative destruction will keep middle-aged dislocated salespeople from going hungry. That’s what every economics textbook says.

But speaking statistically and speaking realistically are two different things.

Once his company transitions completely to online sales, what are the options for someone like my father-in-law?

Be a salesperson somewhere else? Every other company that could potentially hire my father-in-law is also trying to convert customers to online sales.

Get retrained for another job? Aid for retraining is restricted to employees who lose jobs because of trade, not technology. And, as research has shown, retraining is far from a foolproof solution.

Learn to be a coder? Though there isn’t any data on this, the market for middle-aged, entry-level coders is probably weak.

In other words, the theory of creative destruction works when you’re talking about specific companies or industries falling by the wayside because a better alternative has come along. The elimination of the typewriter wasn’t an economic disaster, because typewriters gave way to a better alternative that created even more jobs. More people make their living from the production of computers than ever made their living from the production of typewriters.

However, the theory of creative destruction isn’t as applicable when one of the things being destroyed is the very idea of human labor.

If economic theories like creative destruction do not provide an answer, maybe politics can.

I know I lost some of you right there.

“It’s the free market,” you say. “It will solve its own problems!” That’s easy to say when the only way you’ve ever made a living hasn’t disappeared. Just like there are no atheists in a foxhole, there are very few Ayn Rand followers in an unemployment line. And before you have any condescending ideas about the reading habits of people who end up in unemployment lines, it’s worth remembering that bankers and CEOs also tend to misplace their copy of Atlas Shrugged whenever they need bailed out.

In fact, in the face of massive job loss, even the world’s most powerful Ayn Rand fan, current Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, can stop caring about what the free market wants.

But both the left and the right offer about as many helpful ideas of how to deal with the changing nature of human labor as an economics textbook does.

A tax cut from the right or an increase in the minimum wage from the left does nothing for a middle-aged, middle-class worker whose skill set (and human touch) has been permanently replaced by yet another interaction with a screen. That’s one reason why politics has gotten so awful. Neither the left nor the right has any new ideas for new problems, so all they do is turn up the volume on old ideas.

So, what can be done for someone like my father-in-law and the millions of other people who will be permanently displaced by technology?

We need to begin by acknowledging the fact that we have to rethink the relationship between human beings, work, and the economy. That doesn’t mean we need to adopt socialism or communism. What it means is that we need to accept the idea that we need to find a new “ism” that works in a world that none of the thinkers who came up with the old “isms” could have imagined.

Developing a new “ism” should also not be viewed as a criticism of capitalism. The parts of the world that operated under some variation of capitalism have fared better, even if the gains weren’t evenly distributed. People lived longer, healthier, and more educated lives. A big reason why all of that happened is because capitalism allows people to pursue their full potential through work. If technology has evolved to the point where there aren’t enough avenues for people to do that, the way we organize our society needs to evolve, too.

Letting all we’ve achieved wither away because we can’t think of a new idea would be a tragedy. It would be a little like allowing a family to fall apart just because the kids grew up.

Except rather than a lifetime of figuring out where to spend Thanksgiving, you get to experience the real life Hunger Games (where no one looks like Katniss or Gale—or even Peeta).

It is possible to create a society that can adapt to the changes ahead.

But first we need to recognize that our old ideas aren’t a solution, and that a middle-class, middle-aged, technologically displaced worker won’t be helped by a tax cut or a higher minimum wage.

Or a few coding lessons.

Commentary by Dustin McKissen, the founder and CEO of McKissen + Company, a strategy, marketing, and public relations firm based in St. Charles, Missouri. The firm does consulting work analyzing how politics effects the business climate for clients in the U.S., Europe, and Latin America. McKissen was named one of LinkedIn’s “Top Voices” in 2015 and 2016. He holds a Bachelors degree in Public Policy, and a Masters degree in Public Administration and is currently pursuing a PhD in Organizational and Industrial Psychology. Follow him on Twitter @DMcKissen.

For more insight from CNBC contributors, follow @CNBCOpinion on Twitter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-19  Authors: dustin mckissen, george marks, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, human, creative, lossescommentary, wont, need, ideas, right, destruction, market, technology, gains, middleaged, work, way, job


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How Kodak created loyal employees-commentary

He knew that there was only one way to create loyalty, and that was to be loyal.” Watzman’s book is well researched and illustrates a simple fact: There is no secret to creating loyal employees. George Eastman created one of the world’s most loyal workforces because he was loyal. You don’t have to create a sophisticated internal branding campaign to convince employees to be loyal when you define leader the way George Eastman did. He knew that there was only one way to create loyalty, and that wa


He knew that there was only one way to create loyalty, and that was to be loyal.” Watzman’s book is well researched and illustrates a simple fact: There is no secret to creating loyal employees. George Eastman created one of the world’s most loyal workforces because he was loyal. You don’t have to create a sophisticated internal branding campaign to convince employees to be loyal when you define leader the way George Eastman did. He knew that there was only one way to create loyalty, and that wa
How Kodak created loyal employees-commentary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-05  Authors: dustin mckissen, keystone-france, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, way, economics, george, company, eastmans, created, kodak, loyal, employees, good, loyalty, employeescommentary, knew


How Kodak created loyal employees-commentary

“George Eastman’s workers knew he had their back. He believed a hard day’s work should be rewarded with a good life, and he put his money where his mouth was. He knew that there was only one way to create loyalty, and that was to be loyal.”

Watzman’s book is well researched and illustrates a simple fact: There is no secret to creating loyal employees. George Eastman created one of the world’s most loyal workforces because he was loyal. You don’t have to create a sophisticated internal branding campaign to convince employees to be loyal when you define leader the way George Eastman did.

George Eastman’s workers knew he had their back. He believed a hard day’s work should be rewarded with a good life, and he put his money where his mouth was. He knew that there was only one way to create loyalty, and that was to be loyal.

What happened, then? If it worked well, why is so hard to find—particularly in a large corporation—a company like Eastman Kodak today?

One reason can be found in the parts of The End of Loyalty focused on GE. Unlike Kodak, GE was unionized, and in the 1950s the company took a confrontational stance toward organized labor. That effort was led by Lemuel Boulware, GE’s Vice President of Community and Labor Relations. Boulware’s hardline stance toward labor became known as “Boulwareism.”

Boulware wasn’t just known for his combative stance toward his unions. During his tenure, the company undertook a program designed to educate employees on the principles of Economics 101, from a decidedly corporate viewpoint. That program including mandated reading, most notably journalist Henry Hazlitt’s Economics in One Lesson. GE’s efforts also included hiring Ronald Reagan to tour the company’s plants and give speeches touting management’s perspective.

Reagan excelled in his role, and earned the label “The Great Communicator” on merit.

If you’ve ever opened an Economics 101 textbook, you learn that there is literally no difference between a human being and a wrench. Both are forms of capital. Granted, I am not a tool guy—my wife is the man around our house—but it would not cause me a great deal of pain to get rid of a wrench.

But human beings and wrenches are very different. There is no way to make a loyal wrench. And there is no way to make a loyal employee if you think of him or her the same way you would a wrench.

The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America illustrates a simple fact:

When it comes to loyalty, there is no secret sauce. Loyalty is gained when it is given.

Loyalty is also highly influenced by power. In the United States, companies often have the power to terminate employees for any reason (or no reason) and the ability to restrict them from earning outside income. Most companies make that clear with a stack of documents employees sign on day 1. The fact that the vast, vast majority of employers do not follow George Eastman’s example and have so tilted the balance of power in favor of the company means that the type of loyalty Watzman writes about might be gone, replaced by corporate feudalism rebranded as “loyalty.”

How do we change that? We can change the way we teach business and economics, and recognize that a human being is different from a wrench.

And though Kodak has had well-known struggles in the digital age, the near century-long dominance of their industry shows that when it comes to creating loyal employees—and understanding the relationship between loyalty and results—following George Eastman’s example would be a good place to start.

Commentary by Dustin McKissen, the founder and CEO of McKissen + Company, a strategy, marketing, and public relations firm based in St. Charles, Missouri. The firm does consulting work analyzing how politics effects the business climate for clients in the U.S., Europe, and Latin America. McKissen was named one of LinkedIn’s “Top Voices” in 2015 and 2016. He holds a Bachelors degree in Public Policy, and a Masters degree in Public Administration and is currently pursuing a PhD in Organizational and Industrial Psychology. Follow him on Twitter @DMcKissen.

For more insight from CNBC contributors, follow @CNBCOpinion on Twitter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-05  Authors: dustin mckissen, keystone-france, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, way, economics, george, company, eastmans, created, kodak, loyal, employees, good, loyalty, employeescommentary, knew


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Harvard Business School gets blamed for income inequality-commentary

There are more Fortune 500 CEOS with MBAs from Harvard than from Wharton, Stanford, and European business school INSEAD combined.” Still, McDonald lays a lot at the feet of one business school, saying, “The Harvard Business School became (and remains) so intoxicated with its importance that it blithely assumed away one of the most important questions it could ask, which was whether the capitalist system it was uniquely positioned to help improve was designed properly for the long term. Societall


There are more Fortune 500 CEOS with MBAs from Harvard than from Wharton, Stanford, and European business school INSEAD combined.” Still, McDonald lays a lot at the feet of one business school, saying, “The Harvard Business School became (and remains) so intoxicated with its importance that it blithely assumed away one of the most important questions it could ask, which was whether the capitalist system it was uniquely positioned to help improve was designed properly for the long term. Societall
Harvard Business School gets blamed for income inequality-commentary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-07  Authors: dustin mckissen, lisi cai, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, blamed, income, school, person, institution, public, mckissen, business, gets, inequalitycommentary, tumor, hbs, inequality, harvard, isnt


Harvard Business School gets blamed for income inequality-commentary

“Clearly, the school has had a huge impact on American and global business practices. There are more Fortune 500 CEOS with MBAs from Harvard than from Wharton, Stanford, and European business school INSEAD combined.”

Still, McDonald lays a lot at the feet of one business school, saying, “The Harvard Business School became (and remains) so intoxicated with its importance that it blithely assumed away one of the most important questions it could ask, which was whether the capitalist system it was uniquely positioned to help improve was designed properly for the long term. Today, in 2016, with economic inequality at a hundred-year high and meaningful progress on climate change and other social and environmental issues embarrassingly paltry, the answer to that question is obvious. It is not.”

McDonald isn’t the first to criticize HBS, and if you’re an institution that produces once-in-a-generation examples of awful leadership every few years, you should rethink your approach—even if most HBS alumni do not lead the nation into catastrophic wars. Using the family analogy, the fact that Billy is president of the bank does not negate the time Jeff ate a guy he met at the park.

But HBS isn’t responsible for every broken thing in the economy and our business culture. McDonald’s book falls into a tendency we have to attribute everything we wish were different in society to a single person or institution. It’s like finding out you have a tumor, then blaming all your shortcomings on the tumor. Societally, we give the tumor a name: “If only Donald Trump/Hillary Clinton/Harvard Business School weren’t here, everything would be better.”

One person or institution is never the root of all evil, but believing so is a lot easier than accepting responsibility.

Income inequality doesn’t exist because administrators and professors at one school became beholden to corporate benefactors and abdicated their role as educators and thinkers. That may have happened—McDonald makes a convincing case that it did—but that’s not why incomes have stagnated for middle- and working-class families while CEO pay has skyrocketed. As McDonald himself argues, HBS doesn’t typically drive changes in business—it justifies change after it occurs.

Inaction on income inequality and “other social and environmental issues” isn’t the fault of HBS. The school may be as insidious and damaging as McDonald argues it is, but the real tumor isn’t one MBA program.

The real tumor is the way you and I and everyone we know have bought into the idea that worth is the same thing as wealth, and that we have no responsibility to one another.

Income inequality wasn’t forced on us. The huge disparages we see in wealth between the top 1% and the rest of us are the result of specific government policies enacted (at least in the United States) by politicians from both parties.

How have we responded?

Usually by reelecting the same politicians—or not voting at all.

Harvard Business School didn’t create the extremely unequal economy we live in or pollute our natural spaces. To the extent that it played a role—and I believe it did—it was a role the rest of us allowed the school and its alumni to play.

It is always easier to point the finger at a person or institution and say, “You there—if only you were gone, things would be better.”

But as my daughter once told me, when you point the finger at someone else there are four fingers pointing back at you. The Golden Passport makes a solid argument that one finger should be pointed at Harvard Business School—but we shouldn’t forget where the other four fingers are pointed.

Commentary by Dustin McKissen, the founder and CEO of McKissen + Company, a strategy, marketing, and public relations firm based in St. Charles, Missouri. The firm does consulting work analyzing how politics effects the business climate for clients in the U.S., Europe, and Latin America. McKissen was named one of LinkedIn’s “Top Voices” in 2015 and 2016. He holds a Bachelors degree in Public Policy, and a Masters degree in Public Administration and is currently pursuing a PhD in Organizational and Industrial Psychology. Follow him on Twitter @DMcKissen.

For more insight from CNBC contributors, follow @CNBCOpinion on Twitter.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-06-07  Authors: dustin mckissen, lisi cai, getty images
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, blamed, income, school, person, institution, public, mckissen, business, gets, inequalitycommentary, tumor, hbs, inequality, harvard, isnt


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