‘Bomb cyclone’ pushes east across the US leaving blizzards, floods and tornadoes in its wake

Thirteen tornados were reported Thursday in Kentucky, Indiana and Michigan, said Bob Oravec, a meteorologist with the National Weather Center’s Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland, but no immediate reports of serious damage. Meteorologists referred to the storm as a bomb cyclone, a winter hurricane that forms when the barometric pressure drops 24 millibars in 24 hours. There were no remaining blizzard warnings Friday, Oravec said. Flood warnings and watches remained in effect for


Thirteen tornados were reported Thursday in Kentucky, Indiana and Michigan, said Bob Oravec, a meteorologist with the National Weather Center’s Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland, but no immediate reports of serious damage. Meteorologists referred to the storm as a bomb cyclone, a winter hurricane that forms when the barometric pressure drops 24 millibars in 24 hours. There were no remaining blizzard warnings Friday, Oravec said. Flood warnings and watches remained in effect for
‘Bomb cyclone’ pushes east across the US leaving blizzards, floods and tornadoes in its wake Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: david zalubowski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wake, storm, floods, winter, watches, 24, cyclone, weather, oravec, michigan, east, leaving, pushes, bomb, denver, warnings, using, tornadoes, blizzards


'Bomb cyclone' pushes east across the US leaving blizzards, floods and tornadoes in its wake

Thirteen tornados were reported Thursday in Kentucky, Indiana and Michigan, said Bob Oravec, a meteorologist with the National Weather Center’s Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland, but no immediate reports of serious damage.

Meteorologists referred to the storm as a bomb cyclone, a winter hurricane that forms when the barometric pressure drops 24 millibars in 24 hours.

At the height of the storm, two feet of snow was dumped in the mountain regions of Colorado, forcing the cancellation of more than 1,300 flights in Denver and leading to more than 1,000 motorists trapped on roadsides, with many having to be rescued by police using school buses to ferry them to safety.

There were no remaining blizzard warnings Friday, Oravec said.

“There’s still a good threat of thunderstorms in Louisiana, Mississippi and up into the Great Lakes region as the system pushes into Canada, but it’s not like it was,” he said.

Most power outages were cleared by early Friday, according to the tracking site PowerOutage.US and air traffic was returned to normal at Denver International Airport, a regional hub hardest hit by the storm.

Flood warnings and watches remained in effect for Nebraska, Iowa and Michigan, forecasters said.

WATCH: Jeremy Grantham says no company doing enough to fight climate change


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-03-15  Authors: david zalubowski
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wake, storm, floods, winter, watches, 24, cyclone, weather, oravec, michigan, east, leaving, pushes, bomb, denver, warnings, using, tornadoes, blizzards


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Iran is turning its ‘people into paupers’ instead of providing food, Saudi prince says

Iran is funding militias throughout the Middle East while turning its own people into paupers, Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal told CNBC Tuesday. “I’ve described Iran in the past, and I think the description still fits, the leadership in Iran has developed into a paper tiger with steel claws,” he told CNBC Tuesday. Iran and Saudi Arabia are rival religious and political powers in the Middle East. Relations between the Sunni-majority Saudi Arabia and Shia-dominated Iran have hit rock-bottom


Iran is funding militias throughout the Middle East while turning its own people into paupers, Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal told CNBC Tuesday. “I’ve described Iran in the past, and I think the description still fits, the leadership in Iran has developed into a paper tiger with steel claws,” he told CNBC Tuesday. Iran and Saudi Arabia are rival religious and political powers in the Middle East. Relations between the Sunni-majority Saudi Arabia and Shia-dominated Iran have hit rock-bottom
Iran is turning its ‘people into paupers’ instead of providing food, Saudi prince says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: natasha turak, holly ellyatt, win mcnamee, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turning, iran, syria, providing, militant, east, yemen, told, food, middle, prince, steel, paupers, militias, saudi, instead


Iran is turning its 'people into paupers' instead of providing food, Saudi prince says

Iran is funding militias throughout the Middle East while turning its own people into paupers, Saudi Arabian Prince Turki Al-Faisal told CNBC Tuesday.

“I’ve described Iran in the past, and I think the description still fits, the leadership in Iran has developed into a paper tiger with steel claws,” he told CNBC Tuesday.

“The ‘steel claws’ are the militias that they have established throughout the Middle East, whether it’s Hezbollah (in Lebanon) or the Houthis (in Yemen) or the al-Abbas (a Shia militant group in Syria) or the various militias operating in Iraq and Syria whose main purpose is to further Iran’s influence and its domination of the areas in the Middle East,” he said, speaking to CNBC’s Hadley Gamble at the Milken Institute summit in Abu Dhabi.

Iran and Saudi Arabia are rival religious and political powers in the Middle East. Relations between the Sunni-majority Saudi Arabia and Shia-dominated Iran have hit rock-bottom in recent years with civil wars in Yemen, Syria and Iraq seen as proxy battlegrounds between the two countries. Iranian support for the militant group Hezbollah in Lebanon and even, sporadically, to the Taliban in Afghanistan, in the form of weaponry and military training, has also made Iran a pariah on the global stage.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-02-12  Authors: natasha turak, holly ellyatt, win mcnamee, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, turning, iran, syria, providing, militant, east, yemen, told, food, middle, prince, steel, paupers, militias, saudi, instead


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Amazon is opening Middle East marketplace after buying Souq in 2017

As Amazon searches for growth outside the U.S., its next big push is the Middle East. With the launch of the Middle East marketplace in the coming months, Amazon is downplaying Souq.com, the Dubai-based online retailer it bought for $580 million in 2017 — its priciest international acquisition. “Following Amazon’s acquisition of Souq, I want to offer you participation in a groundbreaking new sales project in the Mid East,” Amazon wrote in an invitation to a select group of sellers. “Our program


As Amazon searches for growth outside the U.S., its next big push is the Middle East. With the launch of the Middle East marketplace in the coming months, Amazon is downplaying Souq.com, the Dubai-based online retailer it bought for $580 million in 2017 — its priciest international acquisition. “Following Amazon’s acquisition of Souq, I want to offer you participation in a groundbreaking new sales project in the Mid East,” Amazon wrote in an invitation to a select group of sellers. “Our program
Amazon is opening Middle East marketplace after buying Souq in 2017 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: eugene kim, ari levy, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, east, international, sellers, souq, buying, north, growth, 2017, middle, retail, sales, marketplace, opening


Amazon is opening Middle East marketplace after buying Souq in 2017

As Amazon searches for growth outside the U.S., its next big push is the Middle East.

Amazon has been reaching out in recent weeks to large third-party sellers in North America, informing them of an upcoming opportunity to reach consumers, first in the United Arab Emirates and then in Saudi Arabia, according to several merchants who spoke with CNBC. They all asked not to be identified because the discussions with Amazon were private.

With the launch of the Middle East marketplace in the coming months, Amazon is downplaying Souq.com, the Dubai-based online retailer it bought for $580 million in 2017 — its priciest international acquisition. The company is telling North American sellers not to sign up to sell on Souq because it plans to have all that inventory on Amazon’s own site.

“Following Amazon’s acquisition of Souq, I want to offer you participation in a groundbreaking new sales project in the Mid East,” Amazon wrote in an invitation to a select group of sellers. “Our program is simple, straightforward and allows you to expand your selection to a new base of Amazon buyers.”

An Amazon spokesperson declined to comment.

The move comes as Amazon seeks to find a formula for profitable growth in its retail business, which counts on North America for 69 percent of revenue. The U.K., Germany, and Japan account for the majority of international sales. Amazon has struggled to build substantial businesses in China and India because of local laws and hefty competition, and its retail division still loses money every quarter when excluding the U.S. and Canada.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: eugene kim, ari levy, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, east, international, sellers, souq, buying, north, growth, 2017, middle, retail, sales, marketplace, opening


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Middle East gas reserves can be a catalyst for peace, Egypt minister says

Gas reserves in the Middle East can create opportunities for employment, business and peacemaking, according to Egypt’s petroleum minister. Amid a push by Egypt to transform itself into a regional gas hub, the country hosted the East Med Gas Hub earlier in January and gathered officials from Israel, Cyprus, Greece, Jordan, Italy and Palestine. Speaking Monday at the BHGE Annual Meeting in Florence, Italy, Egypt Petroleum Minister Tarek El-Molla told CNBC that the commodity can aid the peace proc


Gas reserves in the Middle East can create opportunities for employment, business and peacemaking, according to Egypt’s petroleum minister. Amid a push by Egypt to transform itself into a regional gas hub, the country hosted the East Med Gas Hub earlier in January and gathered officials from Israel, Cyprus, Greece, Jordan, Italy and Palestine. Speaking Monday at the BHGE Annual Meeting in Florence, Italy, Egypt Petroleum Minister Tarek El-Molla told CNBC that the commodity can aid the peace proc
Middle East gas reserves can be a catalyst for peace, Egypt minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: holly ellyatt, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, catalyst, east, opportunities, petroleum, gas, told, egypt, reserves, minister, middle, italy, greece, hub, jordan, peace


Middle East gas reserves can be a catalyst for peace, Egypt minister says

Gas reserves in the Middle East can create opportunities for employment, business and peacemaking, according to Egypt’s petroleum minister.

Amid a push by Egypt to transform itself into a regional gas hub, the country hosted the East Med Gas Hub earlier in January and gathered officials from Israel, Cyprus, Greece, Jordan, Italy and Palestine. Speaking Monday at the BHGE Annual Meeting in Florence, Italy, Egypt Petroleum Minister Tarek El-Molla told CNBC that the commodity can aid the peace process in the region.

“We were very proud to host the Palestinians the Israelis, sitting together in one room, on the roundtable together with other neighboring countries like Greece, Cyprus, Jordan and Italy,” he told CNBC’s Steve Sedgwick.

“So the benefit will be there and the welfare will cover all the countries because gas will be the cause of the revenues to generate opportunities, job opportunities, business opportunities and it will bless all the people there (in the Middle East) hence it is the catalyst and it will be the peacemaker really,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-29  Authors: holly ellyatt, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, catalyst, east, opportunities, petroleum, gas, told, egypt, reserves, minister, middle, italy, greece, hub, jordan, peace


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Bahrain development chief brushes off Middle East political risk concerns: ‘It’s nothing new’

The man in charge of attracting foreign investment into Bahrain is not worried about one of the key issues associated with economic stability in the Middle East: political risk. This is something the region has dealt with for a long time, Khalid al-Rumaihi, the chief executive of the Bahrain Economic Development Board, told CNBC Thursday. “We have to be careful not to have a broad-brush when talking about the Middle East,” Al-Rumaihi told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble during the World Economic Forum in D


The man in charge of attracting foreign investment into Bahrain is not worried about one of the key issues associated with economic stability in the Middle East: political risk. This is something the region has dealt with for a long time, Khalid al-Rumaihi, the chief executive of the Bahrain Economic Development Board, told CNBC Thursday. “We have to be careful not to have a broad-brush when talking about the Middle East,” Al-Rumaihi told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble during the World Economic Forum in D
Bahrain development chief brushes off Middle East political risk concerns: ‘It’s nothing new’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: natasha turak, phil weymouth bloomberg via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brushes, told, economic, seen, region, bahrain, alrumaihi, development, risk, east, concerns, services, economy, middle, political, chief, country


Bahrain development chief brushes off Middle East political risk concerns: 'It's nothing new'

The man in charge of attracting foreign investment into Bahrain is not worried about one of the key issues associated with economic stability in the Middle East: political risk.

This is something the region has dealt with for a long time, Khalid al-Rumaihi, the chief executive of the Bahrain Economic Development Board, told CNBC Thursday. But he believes that the rewards outweigh the risks taken by investors.

“We have to be careful not to have a broad-brush when talking about the Middle East,” Al-Rumaihi told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble during the World Economic Forum in Davos, when asked about security concerns in the region. “You have to look at what are the dynamics of each of those regions.”

“Politics and political risk has been a part of that region for years, it’s nothing new and investors do a risk-reward trade-off,” he said. “For the Gulf people have seen not just a region that is exporting oil but is transforming its economy. Vision 2030 in Saudi Arabia is a great example of that, and the opportunities that that will bring in terms of value chains that can be localized in the country. So I think it opens up huge opportunities in the country and the risk is not outweighing reward.”

The GCC’s smallest economy is looking to grow its technology, manufacturing and financial services sectors in particular, in a push to diversify its economy away from oil dependence. Its foreign investment inflows have shot up sharply in recent years, jumping by 114 percent between 2017 and 2018, according to the UN Conference on Trade and Development. Al-Rumaihi singled out major projects by Amazon Web Services, which is launching three new data centers in the country this year.

But Bahrain hasn’t seen the same success as some of its neighbors in developing into a financial hub at the scale of Abu Dhabi or Dubai. It recently averted a debt crisis with the help of a $10 billion bailout from its Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) neighbors, and has introduced reforms aimed at reducing public spending and government inefficiency. Its debt is currently a whopping 89 percent of its gross domestic product (GDP).


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-24  Authors: natasha turak, phil weymouth bloomberg via getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, brushes, told, economic, seen, region, bahrain, alrumaihi, development, risk, east, concerns, services, economy, middle, political, chief, country


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WEF: Trade war makes dealing with China more difficult, CEO says

A long-running trade war between the world’s two-largest economies is taking its toll on business sentiment in the Middle East, according to the chief executive of real estate and property services firm Majid Al Futtaim. A trade dispute between the U.S. and China has battered financial markets in recent months, with market participants increasingly concerned the conflict could soon destabilize the global economy. “From an import and an export standpoint, China is a very important trade partner (


A long-running trade war between the world’s two-largest economies is taking its toll on business sentiment in the Middle East, according to the chief executive of real estate and property services firm Majid Al Futtaim. A trade dispute between the U.S. and China has battered financial markets in recent months, with market participants increasingly concerned the conflict could soon destabilize the global economy. “From an import and an export standpoint, China is a very important trade partner (
WEF: Trade war makes dealing with China more difficult, CEO says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: sam meredith, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worse, worlds, war, dealing, ceo, wef, difficult, trade, middle, east, bejjani, makes, world, china


WEF: Trade war makes dealing with China more difficult, CEO says

A long-running trade war between the world’s two-largest economies is taking its toll on business sentiment in the Middle East, according to the chief executive of real estate and property services firm Majid Al Futtaim.

A trade dispute between the U.S. and China has battered financial markets in recent months, with market participants increasingly concerned the conflict could soon destabilize the global economy.

“From an import and an export standpoint, China is a very important trade partner (to the Middle East). So, the question is … Is it going to be better or worse?” CEO Alain Bejjani told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos on Monday.

“One thing is for sure, dealing with China is becoming more difficult,” Bejjani added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-22  Authors: sam meredith, vcg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, worse, worlds, war, dealing, ceo, wef, difficult, trade, middle, east, bejjani, makes, world, china


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Former US national security advisor: Trump team deserves ‘no more than a C+’ on Middle East approach

U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration deserves “no more than a C plus” for how it has addressed conflict in the Middle East, according to a former U.S. national security advisor. However, Jones ultimately expressed optimism that the United States will stay committed to the region. On one such issue — the planned U.S. troop withdrawal from Syria — Jones said the tensions that have arisen between Washington and Ankara should not be litigated in public, but rather by careful discussion betwe


U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration deserves “no more than a C plus” for how it has addressed conflict in the Middle East, according to a former U.S. national security advisor. However, Jones ultimately expressed optimism that the United States will stay committed to the region. On one such issue — the planned U.S. troop withdrawal from Syria — Jones said the tensions that have arisen between Washington and Ankara should not be litigated in public, but rather by careful discussion betwe
Former US national security advisor: Trump team deserves ‘no more than a C+’ on Middle East approach Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: shirley tay, delil souleiman, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plus, syria, national, say, middle, president, east, trump, regard, security, advisor, deserves, washington, nato, approach, jones, kurdish, team


Former US national security advisor: Trump team deserves 'no more than a C+' on Middle East approach

U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration deserves “no more than a C plus” for how it has addressed conflict in the Middle East, according to a former U.S. national security advisor.

James Jones — who served as NSA under former President Barack Obama and as supreme allied commander of NATO forces in Europe during George W. Bush’s presidency — said Monday that it isn’t clear exactly what the White House wants to do in the Middle East because of apparently “disparate” messages it has sent. However, Jones ultimately expressed optimism that the United States will stay committed to the region.

“I think generally — with regard to the main threats: with regard to Iran, with regard to ISIS, with regard to Russia — I would say, at this point, because there’s some confusion, I would say, no more than a C plus,” Jones told CNBC’s “Capital Connection” when asked what grade he would give to the administration’s handling of the various issues in the Middle East.

On one such issue — the planned U.S. troop withdrawal from Syria — Jones said the tensions that have arisen between Washington and Ankara should not be litigated in public, but rather by careful discussion between the two governments.

“You really have to have serious meetings at both capitals with the intent of fixing what right now is somewhat fractured,” he said.

That comment came after Trump threatened in a Sunday evening Twitter post to “devastate” Turkey’s economy if the NATO ally “hit” the Kurds.

As the U.S. prepares to withdraw from Syria, it’s set to leave behind an increasingly fraught situation between its Kurdish partners on the ground and its ally in Ankara. Turkey has said it is planning an offensive against the Kurds, but Washington has said it requires guarantees of safety for the Kurdish fighters that helped it against Islamic State, the extremist group also known as ISIS.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-14  Authors: shirley tay, delil souleiman, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plus, syria, national, say, middle, president, east, trump, regard, security, advisor, deserves, washington, nato, approach, jones, kurdish, team


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Falling oil prices will be a hidden blessing for Saudi start-ups, investor says

In a part of the world better known for towering skyscrapers and oil than for its startup scene, Gulf Arab entrepreneurs might be seeing bright times ahead. That’s according to Fadi Ghandour, executive chairman of Wanda Group, whose venture capital fund invests in tech companies all over the Middle East and North Africa. Now that oil prices are dramatically down from their October highs, the veteran Middle East investor says the market moves “will definitely be a blessing in disguise” and in tha


In a part of the world better known for towering skyscrapers and oil than for its startup scene, Gulf Arab entrepreneurs might be seeing bright times ahead. That’s according to Fadi Ghandour, executive chairman of Wanda Group, whose venture capital fund invests in tech companies all over the Middle East and North Africa. Now that oil prices are dramatically down from their October highs, the veteran Middle East investor says the market moves “will definitely be a blessing in disguise” and in tha
Falling oil prices will be a hidden blessing for Saudi start-ups, investor says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-11  Authors: natasha turak, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middle, falling, investor, arab, prices, hidden, faster, east, scale, ghandour, blessing, region, startups, oil, saudi


Falling oil prices will be a hidden blessing for Saudi start-ups, investor says

In a part of the world better known for towering skyscrapers and oil than for its startup scene, Gulf Arab entrepreneurs might be seeing bright times ahead. That’s according to Fadi Ghandour, executive chairman of Wanda Group, whose venture capital fund invests in tech companies all over the Middle East and North Africa.

“For years we’ve said there is an inverse relationship between how change happens on the regulatory environment and the price of oil — the lower the price of oil, the faster the change process happens,” Ghandour told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble on Thursday, pointing to Arab Gulf countries like Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates whose economies have historically been dependent on hydrocarbon revenues.

Now that oil prices are dramatically down from their October highs, the veteran Middle East investor says the market moves “will definitely be a blessing in disguise” and in that it will force the development of sustainable, knowledge-based economies and jobs. He believes that startups founded five or more years ago are now reaching their maturity stage, meaning there will be more businesses scaling up in the next several years — if they can get the necessary support.

“These companies born somewhere around 2011, 2012, have raised much more money, they are growing much faster, the region is adopting mobile smartphone technology much faster, they are interacting much faster and at a much larger scale, specifically in Saudi Arabia,” Ghandour said.

“This is the time when there is size, there is scale, and the big funds globally who don’t want to take the risk early on, are going to be looking for entry into a market that they don’t have much presence in.” He pointed to New York-based global equity firm General Atlantic’s investment of $120 million in Dubai-based website Property Finder last November. The Middle East real estate platform was founded in 2007 and has been profitable since 2013.

Investments in Middle East and North Africa (MENA)-based startups went up by 31 percent between 2017 and 2018 to $893 million, with 366 deals made, according to Magnitt, a regional data platform for investors. The database also found that more than 155 institutions invested in MENA startups in 2018, 30 percent of which were from outside the region and 47 percent of which had not previously invested in the region.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-11  Authors: natasha turak, simon dawson, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middle, falling, investor, arab, prices, hidden, faster, east, scale, ghandour, blessing, region, startups, oil, saudi


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Forget the US and Asia, the top 5 countries for expats are in Europe and the Middle East

If you plan to embark on a new career move this year, you should try casting your eye to Europe or the Middle East. That’s according to a new report from HSBC, which found that the top five countries for expat workers were all outside North America and Asia. It found that select nations in the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region scored most highly. Notable expat destinations in Asia and North America — such as the U.S., Canada and Hong Kong — also made gains this year and appeared in th


If you plan to embark on a new career move this year, you should try casting your eye to Europe or the Middle East. That’s according to a new report from HSBC, which found that the top five countries for expat workers were all outside North America and Asia. It found that select nations in the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region scored most highly. Notable expat destinations in Asia and North America — such as the U.S., Canada and Hong Kong — also made gains this year and appeared in th
Forget the US and Asia, the top 5 countries for expats are in Europe and the Middle East Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, david jrg engel, eyeem, eyeem premium, getty images, shanshihan, moment, jorg greuel, stone, laurie noble
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, region, forget, north, europe, countries, workers, asia, middle, destinations, report, expats, east, expat


Forget the US and Asia, the top 5 countries for expats are in Europe and the Middle East

If you plan to embark on a new career move this year, you should try casting your eye to Europe or the Middle East. That’s according to a new report from HSBC, which found that the top five countries for expat workers were all outside North America and Asia.

Based on responses from 22,318 expats working in 163 countries, the report measured those destinations deemed best for international workers along a series of metrics — such as work/life balance, earnings prospects and career development. It found that select nations in the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region scored most highly.

Strong salaries, positive work cultures, job security and personal fulfillment opportunities all enabled the region to jump forward in the bank’s annual list and gain the top spots. Notable expat destinations in Asia and North America — such as the U.S., Canada and Hong Kong — also made gains this year and appeared in the top 10. But Singapore saw a drop this year, missing out on the top five to take its place among the final 10.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-01-08  Authors: karen gilchrist, david jrg engel, eyeem, eyeem premium, getty images, shanshihan, moment, jorg greuel, stone, laurie noble
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, region, forget, north, europe, countries, workers, asia, middle, destinations, report, expats, east, expat


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Trump risks ‘damaging America’s reputation for the long term’ with Syria withdrawal, experts warn

U.S. President Donald Trump’s abrupt announcement this week that he intends to withdraw all American troops out of Syria risks dealing a serious blow to his country’s credibility as an ally and partner, former national security officials and regional experts warned. Geopolitical experts are also sounding the alarm on the state of America’s international partnerships. Trump has long opposed U.S. military involvement in Syria, and his backers view the withdrawal decision as a campaign promise kept


U.S. President Donald Trump’s abrupt announcement this week that he intends to withdraw all American troops out of Syria risks dealing a serious blow to his country’s credibility as an ally and partner, former national security officials and regional experts warned. Geopolitical experts are also sounding the alarm on the state of America’s international partnerships. Trump has long opposed U.S. military involvement in Syria, and his backers view the withdrawal decision as a campaign promise kept
Trump risks ‘damaging America’s reputation for the long term’ with Syria withdrawal, experts warn Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-22  Authors: natasha turak, win mcnamee, getty images, delil souleiman, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middle, officials, trump, risks, withdrawal, syria, reputation, wrote, defense, east, state, long, experts, term, damaging, warn


Trump risks 'damaging America's reputation for the long term' with Syria withdrawal, experts warn

U.S. President Donald Trump’s abrupt announcement this week that he intends to withdraw all American troops out of Syria risks dealing a serious blow to his country’s credibility as an ally and partner, former national security officials and regional experts warned.

That decision, announced in a Twitter post, was reportedly the “breaking point” for Secretary of Defense James Mattis, who submitted his resignation letter a day later. The 68-year-old retired Marine Corps general said he was leaving the administration in part because he does not agree with Trump on a number of issues, and cited the importance of alliances.

Geopolitical experts are also sounding the alarm on the state of America’s international partnerships.

“(Trump’s Syria move) risks not only jeopardizing the near-term U.S. interest of stabilizing a key part of the Middle East, but also damaging America’s reputation for the long term,” Turkey expert Soner Cagaptay and former Defense Department and Senate Foreign Relations Committee member Dana Stroul wrote in a brief for The Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

Trump has long opposed U.S. military involvement in Syria, and his backers view the withdrawal decision as a campaign promise kept. He announced the defeat the Islamic State (IS), arguing that America should no longer fight others’ battles for them.

But defense officials and lawmakers reject the assertion that IS is finished, and say that America still has commitments to allies on the ground and a reputation to uphold.

“Next time the U.S. needs to challenge an imminent terror threat somewhere in the world, we’ll presumably want to do so ‘by, with & through,’ using local partners,” wrote Charles Lister, senior fellow at the Middle East Institute and author of “The Syrian Jihad.”

“You think they’re going to trust us now? Not a chance.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-12-22  Authors: natasha turak, win mcnamee, getty images, delil souleiman, afp
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, middle, officials, trump, risks, withdrawal, syria, reputation, wrote, defense, east, state, long, experts, term, damaging, warn


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