Vanity Fair’s Radhika Jones shares the lessons she learned from all-girls education and Tina Brown

Radhika Jones just wrapped up her first Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit as editor-in-chief of the storied magazine. Jones, started in the role in December 2017, took the helm from legendary editor Graydon Carter, who ran the magazine for a 25 years. “It’s such an interesting time to take the role, just because there is so much change outside of Vanity Fair in the worlds that we cover. It feels like we have all this opportunity to tell new stories with new faces and new voices,” says Jones.


Radhika Jones just wrapped up her first Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit as editor-in-chief of the storied magazine. Jones, started in the role in December 2017, took the helm from legendary editor Graydon Carter, who ran the magazine for a 25 years. “It’s such an interesting time to take the role, just because there is so much change outside of Vanity Fair in the worlds that we cover. It feels like we have all this opportunity to tell new stories with new faces and new voices,” says Jones.
Vanity Fair’s Radhika Jones shares the lessons she learned from all-girls education and Tina Brown Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: julia boorstin, -radhika jones, editor-in-chief, vanity fair
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tina, brown, cover, waithe, editor, fairs, trying, carter, fair, lessons, vanity, magazine, jones, conversation, radhika, learned, education, shares


Vanity Fair's Radhika Jones shares the lessons she learned from all-girls education and Tina Brown

Radhika Jones just wrapped up her first Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit as editor-in-chief of the storied magazine.

Jones, started in the role in December 2017, took the helm from legendary editor Graydon Carter, who ran the magazine for a 25 years. The 45-year-old wasted no time making her mark on the magazine, putting new faces, such as Lena Waithe, on the cover and bringing a particularly diverse assortment of executives and creators to this year’s summit stage.

“It’s such an interesting time to take the role, just because there is so much change outside of Vanity Fair in the worlds that we cover. It feels like we have all this opportunity to tell new stories with new faces and new voices,” says Jones. “It’s true I am of a different generation than Graydon Carter, but I’m also very conscious that the editor before him, Tina Brown, was younger than I am now when she took the job and infused the magazine with her own energy and with the kind of prevalent stories of her own time.”

Jones says the vision for Vanity Fair is bigger than any single editor. While Carter sparred with President Trump for decades before he was elected and frequently criticized him in the magazine’s Editor’s Letter, Jones hasn’t made such explicit political statements. But she is engaging in the larger political conversation, particularly as it relates to diversity and inclusion.

“I have been really fired up by all of the conversations that we are having in our culture since the election, with the rise of #MeToo, it feels like there is a huge range of conversation about workplace culture, about women’s anger, about being heard, about power,” says Jones. “There’s a lot of energy around those conversations and we’re trying to tap into them.”

One example? Putting Waithe on the cover. Jones says she’s representative of an emerging new guard.

Now Jones is navigating her own leadership style, and how it differs from her predecessor’s: “For me it was a question of becoming comfortable with my own ability to lead, not trying to imitate someone else leading but becoming comfortable with my own style of communication and conversation and decision-making.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-10-16  Authors: julia boorstin, -radhika jones, editor-in-chief, vanity fair
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, tina, brown, cover, waithe, editor, fairs, trying, carter, fair, lessons, vanity, magazine, jones, conversation, radhika, learned, education, shares


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What to do when a rewards program isn’t so rewarding

Save money when booking a vacation Tuesday, 17 May 2016 | 8:00 AM ET | 01:19Don’t be so quick to ditch a rewards program that doesn’t seem so rewarding. U.S. consumers collectively hold 3.8 billion memberships in loyalty programs, up from 3.3 billion in 2015, according to new data from research firm Colloquy. True to the name, loyalty programs tend to be the most rewarding for loyal (i.e. “Rarely does a loyalty program acquire [new] customers. But so long as the program is free, experts say, the


Save money when booking a vacation Tuesday, 17 May 2016 | 8:00 AM ET | 01:19Don’t be so quick to ditch a rewards program that doesn’t seem so rewarding. U.S. consumers collectively hold 3.8 billion memberships in loyalty programs, up from 3.3 billion in 2015, according to new data from research firm Colloquy. True to the name, loyalty programs tend to be the most rewarding for loyal (i.e. “Rarely does a loyalty program acquire [new] customers. But so long as the program is free, experts say, the
What to do when a rewards program isn’t so rewarding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-21  Authors: kelli b grant, andresr, getty images, -zach honig, editor-in-chief, the points guy
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, rewarding, program, consumers, isnt, rewards, colloquy, long, loyalty, programs, points, memberships, point, firm


What to do when a rewards program isn't so rewarding

Save money when booking a vacation Tuesday, 17 May 2016 | 8:00 AM ET | 01:19

Don’t be so quick to ditch a rewards program that doesn’t seem so rewarding.

U.S. consumers collectively hold 3.8 billion memberships in loyalty programs, up from 3.3 billion in 2015, according to new data from research firm Colloquy. But more than half of those memberships (54 percent) are inactive, and 28 percent of consumers have abandoned a program “without ever having redeemed a point or mile.”

Slow earnings was a prime reason, with 57 percent of shoppers telling Colloquy they ditched because it took too long to rack up enough points or miles to claim a reward. (The firm polled 2,258 U.S. adults in late 2016.)

Fair point. True to the name, loyalty programs tend to be the most rewarding for loyal (i.e. frequent) users.

“Rarely does a loyalty program acquire [new] customers. That’s not what it’s made for,” said Melissa Fruend, a partner at Colloquy. “It’s made for folks who are already interested in the brand.”

But so long as the program is free, experts say, there can be value in signing up even as an occasional or one-time user.

“I always recommend joining,” said Zach Honig, editor-in-chief The Points Guy. “Otherwise, you’re just throwing opportunities away.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-07-21  Authors: kelli b grant, andresr, getty images, -zach honig, editor-in-chief, the points guy
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, rewarding, program, consumers, isnt, rewards, colloquy, long, loyalty, programs, points, memberships, point, firm


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