Trump’s new immigration plan emphasizes skills and education over family connections

President Donald Trump will unveil a sweeping new proposal Thursday designed to move the United States from a family based immigration system to what senior administration officials describe as an employment- and skill-based system. “We want to change the composition of who is coming through,” a senior administration official said. Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor, Jared Kushner, pitched the plan to Republican senators behind closed doors Tuesday on Capitol Hill. “What we’re doing is comple


President Donald Trump will unveil a sweeping new proposal Thursday designed to move the United States from a family based immigration system to what senior administration officials describe as an employment- and skill-based system. “We want to change the composition of who is coming through,” a senior administration official said. Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor, Jared Kushner, pitched the plan to Republican senators behind closed doors Tuesday on Capitol Hill. “What we’re doing is comple
Trump’s new immigration plan emphasizes skills and education over family connections Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: ylan mui eamon javers, ylan mui, eamon javers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, connections, education, official, proposal, administration, plan, senior, united, step, officials, skills, emphasizes, trumps, family, immigration, system


Trump's new immigration plan emphasizes skills and education over family connections

The proposal includes two parts – a physical infrastructure component that would include border wall construction and be financed by new fees on trade collected at the border, and a revamped points system for those applying for U.S. citizenship.

President Donald Trump will unveil a sweeping new proposal Thursday designed to move the United States from a family based immigration system to what senior administration officials describe as an employment- and skill-based system.

Briefing reporters in the Roosevelt Room ahead of the president’s announcement Thursday, senior administration officials described a system for new arrivals that they said would be more fair and clear and also would significantly shift the population receiving American citizenship toward a much more highly educated, higher-income group.

“We want to change the composition of who is coming through,” a senior administration official said.

The plan is designed to give Republicans a positive proposal they can pitch on the campaign trail and in negotiations with Democrats, although Trump officials acknowledge that it is not likely to become law as is. Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor, Jared Kushner, pitched the plan to Republican senators behind closed doors Tuesday on Capitol Hill.

“What we’re doing is completing step one, which is having a proposal,” a senior administration official said. “We’ll see how everyone reacts and then we’ll see what step two and step three look like.”

The senior administration official quoted the Cheshire Cat from “Alice in Wonderland” to describe the purpose of the president’s new plan: “If you don’t know where you’re going, it doesn’t matter what path you take.”

The officials said they have aggressive economic goals for the plan, predicting that it would increase annual GDP by 0.17 percentage point over 10 years, add $500 billion in new tax revenue, and reduce spending on social safety net programs by about $100 billion.

It would do that largely by moving away from the current family based immigration system – under which a large factor in being considered for citizenship is whether the applicant has family already in the country – to an economic system that would take into account the applicant’s education, employability and even ability to create jobs in the United States.

The plan is silent on the question of what to do about undocumented migrants who are already inside the United States, or the employers who hire them to fill out lower-level agricultural, manufacturing and service work forces.

It also does not address the so-called Dreamers, young undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as children. Democratic lawmakers have made securing a pathway to citizenship for them one of their top legislative priorities.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: ylan mui eamon javers, ylan mui, eamon javers
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, connections, education, official, proposal, administration, plan, senior, united, step, officials, skills, emphasizes, trumps, family, immigration, system


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The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer


Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer
The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. “pop.” Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life.

Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity.

U.S. News ranks each state from one to 50 — with one being the best and 50 being the worst — across each of these eight categories and then uses a weighed average to create a final ranking of the best places to live in the country.

The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer residents public safety and just corrections programs, strong employment and growth, high-quality public education, clean air and water, long and short-term financial stability, access to high-quality healthcare as well as robust energy, internet and transportation infrastructure. U.S. News also calculated opportunity based on variables like cost of living and economic equality.

Here is are the top five states on U.S. News’ Best States of 2019 ranking:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, ranking, highquality, report, stability, live, states, according, healthcare, infrastructure, world, public, education, best


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US education groups McGraw-Hill and Cengage reportedly plan an all-stock merger

Massive Saudi wealth fund zeros in on China, plans to open new… The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) is one of the Middle East’s largest, with some $300 billion in assets under management and an aim to increase that to $2 trillion by…World Economyread more


Massive Saudi wealth fund zeros in on China, plans to open new… The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) is one of the Middle East’s largest, with some $300 billion in assets under management and an aim to increase that to $2 trillion by…World Economyread more
US education groups McGraw-Hill and Cengage reportedly plan an all-stock merger Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-01
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wealth, public, merger, cengage, allstock, zeros, pif, newthe, education, plan, fund, mcgrawhill, saudi, reportedly, plans, trillion, open, groups


US education groups McGraw-Hill and Cengage reportedly plan an all-stock merger

Massive Saudi wealth fund zeros in on China, plans to open new…

The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) is one of the Middle East’s largest, with some $300 billion in assets under management and an aim to increase that to $2 trillion by…

World Economy

read more


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Even these Wharton business school students lack a basic personal finance education

Signage for the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School stands outside of the new campus in San Francisco, California. David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesWhen it comes to money, most people lack the know-how to make smart moves on their own. To address the problem, a few MBA students in 2016 founded Wharton Common Cents to shed some light on personal finance topics that aren’t often taught in the classroom. Students attending a Wharton Common Cents event. Source: Wharton Common Cent


Signage for the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School stands outside of the new campus in San Francisco, California. David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesWhen it comes to money, most people lack the know-how to make smart moves on their own. To address the problem, a few MBA students in 2016 founded Wharton Common Cents to shed some light on personal finance topics that aren’t often taught in the classroom. Students attending a Wharton Common Cents event. Source: Wharton Common Cent
Even these Wharton business school students lack a basic personal finance education Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-27  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, wharton, education, club, money, finance, lack, school, financial, personal, basic, topics, outside, common, students, knowhow


Even these Wharton business school students lack a basic personal finance education

Signage for the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School stands outside of the new campus in San Francisco, California. David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

When it comes to money, most people lack the know-how to make smart moves on their own. Even at Wharton, one of the nation’s top business schools, financial illiteracy is widespread. To address the problem, a few MBA students in 2016 founded Wharton Common Cents to shed some light on personal finance topics that aren’t often taught in the classroom. “There are a ton of financial circumstances you have to deal with as a graduate student that you’re not fully prepared for,” said Laura Gentile, 29, incoming co-president of the student-run club. Without the know-how, “you are at a huge disadvantage.” The club’s mission is to provide fundamental skills and resources to create a secure financial future, Gentile said.

Students attending a Wharton Common Cents event. Source: Wharton Common Cents

Surprisingly, it’s the first-ever club of its kind at a business school, according to current President Anuj Khandelwal, 28. The club hosts nearly weekly programs for graduate students on topics such as the difference between credit and debit cards, saving now versus later and how to talk about money with a significant other. They are also bringing these lessons to members of the greater community, just outside the ivy-covered walls, including Jane Addams Place, a homeless shelter for women and children, and Say Yes to Education, an after-school program for public school students. “We acknowledge that Philly is one of the poorest cities in the nation,” Khandelwal said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-27  Authors: jessica dickler
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, business, wharton, education, club, money, finance, lack, school, financial, personal, basic, topics, outside, common, students, knowhow


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Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here’s why

Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. In the years following the great recession, ed


Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. In the years following the great recession, ed
Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here’s why Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: abigail hess, ethan miller getty image, ethan miller getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, plans, steve, schools, state, spending, budget, education, states, public, donate, funding, nevadas, governor, nevada, educationheres, sisolak


Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here's why

Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. Before entering politics, Sisolak founded and ran a telemarketing business.

According to Sisolak’s statement, the Governor will donate the net of his $163,474 salary, and has instructed Department of Education officials to evenly divide his gift among the state’s 416 Title I schools — schools with high percentages of low-income students — so that each school receives at least $1,000 over his four years in office.

The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. “This unprecedented gesture serves to highlight the need for more funding in our schools now,” Keenan Korth, communications specialist for a Nevada teachers union, tells CNN.

In the years following the great recession, education funding was slashed in states across the country and Nevada experienced some of the greatest cuts. According to most-recent data from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CPBB), American elementary and high schools cut capital spending by $23 billion, or 31%, between 2008 and 2015. Nevada’s budget made the deepest cuts to capital spending, which was reduced by 82%.

The CPBB reports that during those years, Nevada reduced per-pupil state funding for pre-K students by 39.5% (about $1,448 after adjusting for inflation) and the student-to-teacher ratio in Nevada rose from 18.3 to 21.2.

Sisolak has called for restoring education funding to at least pre-recession levels and proposes shifting money from the state’s hotel and marijuana taxes towards schools.

During his first State of the State Address in January, the Governor emphasized his focus on education. “So far we’ve talked about a number of important issues,” he said. “But there is no issue more important to me than making sure every child in every classroom gets a great education.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: abigail hess, ethan miller getty image, ethan miller getty images
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Elizabeth Warren’s $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here’s how

I’m calling for universal free college and the cancellation of student loan debt for more than 95% of Americans. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a national policy that would make two years of community college free for all eligible students. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that.” Today, at least 17 states offer tuition-free community college for residents. Warren’s proposal also emphasizes the benefits — bey


I’m calling for universal free college and the cancellation of student loan debt for more than 95% of Americans. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a national policy that would make two years of community college free for all eligible students. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that.” Today, at least 17 states offer tuition-free community college for residents. Warren’s proposal also emphasizes the benefits — bey
Elizabeth Warren’s $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: abigail hess, reuters karen pulfer focht, -elizabeth warren
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, student, aims, warrens, elizabeth, cycle, community, debtheres, free, college, debt, plan, cost, end, policy, students, obama, public, education


Elizabeth Warren's $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here's how

I’m calling for universal free college and the cancellation of student loan debt for more than 95% of Americans. This is the kind of big, structural change we need to make sure our kids have opportunity in this country. pic.twitter.com/KERw3APDMo

Free community college has become an increasingly popular policy among progressive politicians. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a national policy that would make two years of community college free for all eligible students.

“No hardworking student should be stuck in the red,” said Obama during his final State of the Union address in 2017. “We’ve actually got to cut the cost of college. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that.”

Today, at least 17 states offer tuition-free community college for residents.

Warren’s proposal also emphasizes the benefits — beyond reducing future student debt — that free public university would have on future and current college students.

“We expect everyone but the wealthy to take on mountains of debt if they want to get a post-secondary education. This is closing off opportunities for generations of Americans and widening this country’s racial wealth gap,” Warren wrote. “The cost of college deters people from attending college.”

She also argues that eliminating tuition and fees at public institutions would help increase graduation rates, especially among low-income students. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, just 40 percent of first-time full-time students earn a bachelor’s degree in four years, and only 59 percent earn their bachelor’s in six years.

With more than half of students struggling to graduate in four years, most students are forced to take — and pay for — extra years of college.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: abigail hess, reuters karen pulfer focht, -elizabeth warren
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, student, aims, warrens, elizabeth, cycle, community, debtheres, free, college, debt, plan, cost, end, policy, students, obama, public, education


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Is education the key to the kingdom?

In New York City, home to our nation’s financial markets, a staggering 74 percent of its students are considered economically disadvantaged. They are parallel worlds, a few miles apart and largely invisible to one another. This is an increasing challenge across our country: How do we build a path to economic mobility for more of our kids? Now, I understand how to make more thoughtful decisions about my life. It’s a new way to think.”


In New York City, home to our nation’s financial markets, a staggering 74 percent of its students are considered economically disadvantaged. They are parallel worlds, a few miles apart and largely invisible to one another. This is an increasing challenge across our country: How do we build a path to economic mobility for more of our kids? Now, I understand how to make more thoughtful decisions about my life. It’s a new way to think.”
Is education the key to the kingdom? Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: nan morrison, -nan morrison, president, ceo the council for economic education
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, wrote, way, york, financial, understand, told, economic, youthis, key, worlds, education, students, kingdom


Is education the key to the kingdom?

In New York City, home to our nation’s financial markets, a staggering 74 percent of its students are considered economically disadvantaged.

They are parallel worlds, a few miles apart and largely invisible to one another. This is an increasing challenge across our country: How do we build a path to economic mobility for more of our kids? That is the Council for Economic Education’s mission.

More from Invest in You:

This tax mistake in college left me owing the IRS

Here’s what we need to do to improve financial literacy

America’s juiciest money secrets, as told to CNBC

One of our students wrote the following about the courses that CEE helps provide in economics and personal finance:

“At first, it felt like a foreign language. Now, I understand how to make more thoughtful decisions about my life. It’s a new way to think.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: nan morrison, -nan morrison, president, ceo the council for economic education
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Activist investor Praesidium takes 5% stake in education software company Instructure

Activist investor Praesidium Investment Management said Tuesday that it’s taken a new stake in cloud-based education software company Instructure. Oram detailed the investment from 13D Monitor’s 2019 Active-Passive Investor Summit in New York. Praesidium owned about 5%, or 1.8 million shares, of Instructure as of April 15, according to the government filing. According to the company’s website, Canvas is used by more than 3,000 universities, school districts and institutions around the world. Act


Activist investor Praesidium Investment Management said Tuesday that it’s taken a new stake in cloud-based education software company Instructure. Oram detailed the investment from 13D Monitor’s 2019 Active-Passive Investor Summit in New York. Praesidium owned about 5%, or 1.8 million shares, of Instructure as of April 15, according to the government filing. According to the company’s website, Canvas is used by more than 3,000 universities, school districts and institutions around the world. Act
Activist investor Praesidium takes 5% stake in education software company Instructure Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: thomas franck, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, activist, management, praesidium, software, shares, companys, education, investment, investor, canvas, company, instructure, oram, stake, changes, universities, takes


Activist investor Praesidium takes 5% stake in education software company Instructure

Activist investor Praesidium Investment Management said Tuesday that it’s taken a new stake in cloud-based education software company Instructure.

Praesidium manager Kevin Oram, who filed a 13D with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday, said that despite the company’s big investments in new business, its stock looks cheap. Oram detailed the investment from 13D Monitor’s 2019 Active-Passive Investor Summit in New York.

Praesidium owned about 5%, or 1.8 million shares, of Instructure as of April 15, according to the government filing. Shares were up 6.3% Tuesday afternoon.

Instructure is best known for its Canvas platform, which offers schools and universities a system through which professors and administrators can store student records, input grades and schedule courses. According to the company’s website, Canvas is used by more than 3,000 universities, school districts and institutions around the world.

Activist investors often build positions in what they view as undervalued companies with the goal of advocating for key changes, though Oram added that Praesidium typically lobbies for changes in private discussions with management.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: thomas franck, source
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, activist, management, praesidium, software, shares, companys, education, investment, investor, canvas, company, instructure, oram, stake, changes, universities, takes


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5 jobs that pay more than $75,000 that you can get with an associate’s degree

High-paying jobs don’t just belong to those with advanced degrees. But you’ll need to carefully pick the subject you earn an associate’s degree in to do so. To help you get the best return for your education investment, CNBC Make It combed through data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to identify all the occupations that pay workers with an associate’s degree more than $75,000 a year. Getting one of these top-dollar jobs means you’ll be drastically out-earning your peers with a similar educat


High-paying jobs don’t just belong to those with advanced degrees. But you’ll need to carefully pick the subject you earn an associate’s degree in to do so. To help you get the best return for your education investment, CNBC Make It combed through data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to identify all the occupations that pay workers with an associate’s degree more than $75,000 a year. Getting one of these top-dollar jobs means you’ll be drastically out-earning your peers with a similar educat
5 jobs that pay more than $75,000 that you can get with an associate’s degree Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, getty images, derek davis, portland press herald, rubberball productions, brand x pictures, monty rakusen, smith collection gado, archive photos, the washington post
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, occupations, degree, figures, 75000, highpaying, education, youll, associates, pay, outearning, jobs, earn


5 jobs that pay more than $75,000 that you can get with an associate's degree

High-paying jobs don’t just belong to those with advanced degrees. If you want to earn in the high five figures or even into the six figures, you can get there with only two years of higher education.

But you’ll need to carefully pick the subject you earn an associate’s degree in to do so.

To help you get the best return for your education investment, CNBC Make It combed through data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to identify all the occupations that pay workers with an associate’s degree more than $75,000 a year.

Getting one of these top-dollar jobs means you’ll be drastically out-earning your peers with a similar education and, maybe, even out-earning those with a four-year degree. The average annual salary of someone with an associate’s degree is $41,496 a year, according to the BLS, or about $34,000 less than the lowest-paying gig on this list.

So if you’re ready to land a high-paying job without staying in college for another two-to-five years, consider one of these five occupations:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: kerri anne renzulli, getty images, derek davis, portland press herald, rubberball productions, brand x pictures, monty rakusen, smith collection gado, archive photos, the washington post
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Texas Tech med school agrees to no longer consider race in admissions

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, under pressure from the Department of Education, will no longer consider race as a factor in its medical school admissions process, according to an agreement signed by the health center’s president in February. The Office for Civil Rights is also investigating admissions practices at Harvard and Yale. The move appears to be the first time the Trump administration has secured a commitment from a school to no longer consider race in admissions. The


The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, under pressure from the Department of Education, will no longer consider race as a factor in its medical school admissions process, according to an agreement signed by the health center’s president in February. The Office for Civil Rights is also investigating admissions practices at Harvard and Yale. The move appears to be the first time the Trump administration has secured a commitment from a school to no longer consider race in admissions. The
Texas Tech med school agrees to no longer consider race in admissions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: tucker higgins, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, consider, admissions, tech, agrees, race, department, civil, texas, agreement, longer, school, education, med, rights, university


Texas Tech med school agrees to no longer consider race in admissions

The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, under pressure from the Department of Education, will no longer consider race as a factor in its medical school admissions process, according to an agreement signed by the health center’s president in February.

The agreement, which was reviewed by CNBC, comes nearly 14 years after the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights launched an investigation into whether the center’s admissions policies violated the Civil Rights Act’s prohibition on racial discrimination. The Office for Civil Rights is also investigating admissions practices at Harvard and Yale.

The move appears to be the first time the Trump administration has secured a commitment from a school to no longer consider race in admissions. The agreement requires that the school revise all of its admissions and recruitment materials by September. The pact’s existence was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

The Trump administration has been hostile to affirmative action policies, which were encouraged under President Barack Obama. In July, the Departments of Justice and Education announced that they had scrapped Obama-era policy guidelines that called on schools to factor in the race of their applicants in order to achieve diversity.

“The Supreme Court has issued clear guidance on the appropriate consideration of race in college admissions,” Liz Hill, press secretary for the Education Department, said in a statement.

The Supreme Court has long upheld affirmative action under certain conditions and did so again recently in a 2016 case involving the University of Texas.

A representative for the medical school did not immediately provide comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-09  Authors: tucker higgins, leah millis
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, consider, admissions, tech, agrees, race, department, civil, texas, agreement, longer, school, education, med, rights, university


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