Elizabeth Warren has introduced a bill that would expand food stamps for low-income college students

The mention of “food” and “college students” together might conjure up images of bustling dining halls and late-night snacks. Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community and Justice surveyed nearly 86,000 college students from 123 schools and found that nearly half are “food insecure.” By adding students who receive Pell Grants and independent students to this list of SNAP eligible students, Warren and Lawson’s bill could expand access to a huge swath of U.S. college students. The Dep


The mention of “food” and “college students” together might conjure up images of bustling dining halls and late-night snacks. Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community and Justice surveyed nearly 86,000 college students from 123 schools and found that nearly half are “food insecure.” By adding students who receive Pell Grants and independent students to this list of SNAP eligible students, Warren and Lawson’s bill could expand access to a huge swath of U.S. college students. The Dep
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, qualify, students, education, college, food, pell, warren, elizabeth, stamps, lowincome, bill, introduced, expand, student, snap, receive


Elizabeth Warren has introduced a bill that would expand food stamps for low-income college students

The legislation would also lower SNAP’s current work requirement for college students to 10 hours per-week and require the Department of Education to inform low-income students about their potential SNAP eligibility.

On Wednesday, Senator Elizabeth Warren and Congressman Al Lawson introduced The College Student Hunger Act of 2019 , which would expand SNAP benefits (or “food stamps”) to include Pell Grant-eligible students and “independent students,” such as those who are in foster care, who are veterans or who are homeless.

The mention of “food” and “college students” together might conjure up images of bustling dining halls and late-night snacks.

“As more and more students struggle to pay for college, 30% may be going hungry,” Warren tweeted. “Students shouldn’t have to choose between paying tuition and eating.”

Lawson echoed Warren in a statement. “The significant increase in college tuition over the last decade has forced students to make a choice between buying food or paying for books and housing expenditures. This bill will help to relieve some of that financial burden for them.”

Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community and Justice surveyed nearly 86,000 college students from 123 schools and found that nearly half are “food insecure.”

The survey found that 45% of respondents often or sometimes worry that they do not have money to buy food, worry that their food will run out before they have the money to buy more or that they can’t afford balanced meals. A 2018 U.S Government Accountability Office report found that there are roughly 2 million college students in the U.S. who qualify for SNAP benefits but do not receive them.

Currently, SNAP eligibility varies from state to state, but most non-disabled college students between the ages of 18 and 49 do not qualify unless they meet requirements beyond traditional measures like income. For instance, some low-income students who have a disability or who are caregivers to a dependent household member can qualify for SNAP.

By adding students who receive Pell Grants and independent students to this list of SNAP eligible students, Warren and Lawson’s bill could expand access to a huge swath of U.S. college students. The Department of Education reports that 32% of undergraduate college students receive Pell Grants, and roughly half of all undergraduate college students are considered independent, meaning they do not receive financial support from their parents.

And a college student’s struggle to afford food can have a significant impact on their education. Today, just 60% of first-time full-time students earn a bachelor’s degree in six years, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. “We can see very strong relationships between these issues and the chance that a student will get good grades so they keep their financial aid, to make it to the next semester, to make it to graduation,” Sara Goldrick-Rab, professor at Temple University, and founder of the Hope Center, told CNBC Make It.

She also says that students who experience food and housing insecurity during college are less likely to excel after graduation, and therefore less likely to keep up with their student loan payments. “If you’ve been food insecure and or homeless for a period of college, the chances that you’re okay and you’re going to be a good employee are much smaller.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-19  Authors: abigail hess
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Student loan borrowers with cancer are supposed to get a break from their bills. That’s not happening

Mazza, who was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer in April, has been unable to access the cancer deferment. At the end of January, the agency asked the Office of Management and Budget to conduct an emergency review and approval of its cancer deferment form. Source: Peter TannerTanner, an information technologist from Florida, was grateful to learn Congress was offering a reprieve for student loan borrowers with cancer. Tanner called Mohela, his student loan servicer, in February to request that


Mazza, who was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer in April, has been unable to access the cancer deferment. At the end of January, the agency asked the Office of Management and Budget to conduct an emergency review and approval of its cancer deferment form. Source: Peter TannerTanner, an information technologist from Florida, was grateful to learn Congress was offering a reprieve for student loan borrowers with cancer. Tanner called Mohela, his student loan servicer, in February to request that
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-29  Authors: annie nova
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Student loan borrowers with cancer are supposed to get a break from their bills. That's not happening

Peter Mazza, his wife, Megan, and their three children. Mazza, who was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer in April, has been unable to access the cancer deferment. Source: Peter Mazza

That is correct information, that the deferment application is not yet available. However, we would still like to contact us if this is something you may qualify for. We will flag your account, and send you the application as soon as it become available! — Nelnet (@Nelnet) June 17, 2019

Mazza, a lawyer for the Justice Department who lives in California, called his student loan servicer Nelnet in June to request that he get a break from his monthly $245 bill throughout his medical care. After around 10 frustrating phone calls with the servicer — where he said he was often given inaccurate information about the deferment — Mazza was finally told by Nelnet that it couldn’t offer him the cancer deferment until the Department of Education issues a form for him to fill out to prove his condition. “It’s such a tortured path,” Mazza said. “And at the end, there’s still no satisfaction.” Nelnet did not respond to a request for comment. The Department of Education appears to be taking steps to create and issue an application for the deferment. At the end of January, the agency asked the Office of Management and Budget to conduct an emergency review and approval of its cancer deferment form. However, the law had been on the books for four months by then.

It sounds like Congress wanted to do a good thing – and I feel like I’m not even getting half of what they intended. Peter Tanner

The Department of Education also required a 60-day comment period on the form, a seemingly longer timeline than necessary, Kantrowitz said. “The department could have required only a 30-day comment period, or even a 15-day comment period,” Kantrowitz said. Liz Hill, press secretary at the Department of Education, said the agency has established an interim process that allows borrowers to stop making payments on their loans as it works to implement the law passed by Congress. She also asked for borrowers running into issues to contact them at StudentAid.gov/feedback. “The department is committed to supporting students who are undergoing cancer treatments and are struggling to repay their student loans,” Hill said. Throughout the last year, Peter Tanner has spent weeks in the hospital, had three abdominal surgeries and lost more than 70 pounds. He has stage 4 bowel cancer and $15,000 in student debt.

Peter has stage 4 cancer. His student loans are still due. Source: Peter Tanner

Tanner, an information technologist from Florida, was grateful to learn Congress was offering a reprieve for student loan borrowers with cancer. His medical expenses have already forced him to take out a home equity loan on his house and lean on his credit cards. Tanner called Mohela, his student loan servicer, in February to request that his loans be put into the new deferment. He was put on hold multiple times, he said, and then delivered the bad news: “The bottom line they gave me was, ‘We don’t have an official application from the U.S. government,'” Tanner, 40, said. “‘Until we get that, we can’t enroll you in this program.'” In the meantime, he said, he was told the servicer would put his loans into a temporary forbearance, during which his payments would be paused but interest would continue to collect on his debt. “It sounds like Congress wanted to do a good thing – and I feel like I’m not even getting half of what they intended in the law,” Tanner said. A spokesperson for Mohela said that implementing a new deferment is complicated and that this timeline was not unusual. He said the form would be released soon and eligible borrowers would have any interest that accumulated on their loans waived. Scott Buchanan, executive director of the Student Loan Servicing Alliance, a trade association that represents student loan servicers, said he expects a final form and guidance from the Department of Education “very shortly.” The delayed rollout of the deferment is due to the fact that the law was effective at time of enactment, Buchanan said. “When Congress makes changes, historically they have provided a window of time for implementation,” he said. “That was not the case with the cancer deferment, which poses real challenges.” Yet there was likely a reason the provision didn’t come with a lag time, Kantrowitz said, “Cancer patients can’t wait.” Julie Roberts, a pediatric speech language pathologist from Ohio, owes more than $80,000 in student loans and has stage 4 breast cancer. In January 2018, she called her servicer, American Education Services, to request that her loans be placed into the cancer deferment. Roberts spoke to multiple people at AES but none of them seemed to understand the new option. She was told the bill had not yet passed and that she didn’t qualify for it — both of which are not true.

Julia Roberts’ GoFundMe account. Here’s the address: https://www.gofundme.com/tkxp88-stage-4-breast-cancer-single-mom Source: Julie Roberts


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-29  Authors: annie nova
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5 ways to fight wealth inequality, according to economists

The rise of income inequality and the struggles of so many families to get ahead have shaken American politics across the spectrum. Ideological conservatives warn of a socialist uprising that would ruin American capitalism. With bold and targeted steps, they argue, government can increase opportunity and incomes for many more people in ways that strengthen, not weaken, American capitalism. “I don’t think education by itself is a solution to income inequality,” says MIT’s David Autor. Expanding i


The rise of income inequality and the struggles of so many families to get ahead have shaken American politics across the spectrum. Ideological conservatives warn of a socialist uprising that would ruin American capitalism. With bold and targeted steps, they argue, government can increase opportunity and incomes for many more people in ways that strengthen, not weaken, American capitalism. “I don’t think education by itself is a solution to income inequality,” says MIT’s David Autor. Expanding i
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: john harwood
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5 ways to fight wealth inequality, according to economists

The rise of income inequality and the struggles of so many families to get ahead have shaken American politics across the spectrum. President Donald Trump invokes the plight of “the forgotten people.” Liberals call for massive new government programs. Wall Street titan Jamie Dimon proposes “a Marshall Plan for America.” Ideological conservatives warn of a socialist uprising that would ruin American capitalism. But economists who study the issue say it need not come to that. With bold and targeted steps, they argue, government can increase opportunity and incomes for many more people in ways that strengthen, not weaken, American capitalism. Here are five of them:

Bolstering human capital

“We could tax more from all the folks at the top to spend money making investments in the people who are being left behind,” says University of Maryland economist Melissa Kearney. That includes access to affordable health care, job training, apprenticeships and vocational education. Most important is improved basic education, beginning with prekindergarten programs for 3- and 4-year-olds. “I don’t think education by itself is a solution to income inequality,” says MIT’s David Autor. “It’s the best tool in our toolkit.”

Raising wages and returns

Government can make employment more profitable for low-income workers. A higher minimum wage is just one way, and a limited one. “There’s only so much you could do in terms of making workers more expensive without actually harming the people you’re trying to help,” Kearney said. Alternatives include increasing the earned income tax credit and subsidizing child-care services so more low-income parents can work. Easing occupational licensing requirements would smooth the path to more people taking up higher-paying lines of work, and loosening prohibitions against work would boost incomes for millions of Americans now reliant on disability benefits.

Altering corporate governance

In recent decades, the rise of “shareholder capitalism” in the American system has reduced the influence of workers in economic decision-making and enhanced the influence of business owners. Government and corporations can alter the social contract. “The idea that corporations should just maximize profits without any regard to any other objective is fairly recent,” Autor says. “It’s possible to imagine adjustments to the structure of corporate governance that would think a little harder about additional stakeholders and potential beneficiaries aside from just owners.” For example, Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has proposed that workers at a corporation be allowed to elect 40% of the board of directors. Similar arrangements in Germany have resulted in much more limited use of one manifestation of shareholder capitalism — stock buybacks.

Expanding infrastructure

Better roads, bridges and airports can improve productivity and prosperity for business owners and workers alike. So can digital connections to sparsely populated communities the 21st century economy has left behind “Forty percent of rural Americans don’t have access to broadband internet,” Kearney says. “That’s like electricity to a previous generation, so that’s an obvious infrastructure investment that would make a place more conducive to job growth.” At the same time, the cost of a decent home keeps many potential workers from opportunities in economically thriving cities. Relaxed zoning, development subsidies and rental assistance could increase the stock of affordable housing.

Protecting intellectual property


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: john harwood
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The US Treasury is calling for mandatory financial literacy courses for college students

The U.S. Department of the Treasury released a new report on behalf of the Financial Literacy and Education Commission that recommends mandatory financial literacy courses for college students. Indeed, there is a lot of research exploring this national problem: Nine out of 10 parents and students failed a 2018 quiz about student loan debt. Meanwhile, MarketWatch reported that half of college students taking an AIG survey on personal finance basics got two or fewer questions correct. And in a re


The U.S. Department of the Treasury released a new report on behalf of the Financial Literacy and Education Commission that recommends mandatory financial literacy courses for college students. Indeed, there is a lot of research exploring this national problem: Nine out of 10 parents and students failed a 2018 quiz about student loan debt. Meanwhile, MarketWatch reported that half of college students taking an AIG survey on personal finance basics got two or fewer questions correct. And in a re
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The US Treasury is calling for mandatory financial literacy courses for college students

The U.S. Department of the Treasury released a new report on behalf of the Financial Literacy and Education Commission that recommends mandatory financial literacy courses for college students.

With the cost of college rising faster than incomes and a staggering 44 million Americans owing more than $1.5 trillion in student loans, there has been growing concern that students and their families are taking on debt without truly understanding the long-term impact.

Indeed, there is a lot of research exploring this national problem: Nine out of 10 parents and students failed a 2018 quiz about student loan debt. Meanwhile, MarketWatch reported that half of college students taking an AIG survey on personal finance basics got two or fewer questions correct. And in a recent survey from the Brookings Institution, less than 30% of student respondents could correctly answer three questions on inflation, interest and risk diversification.

“Helping students and their families avoid the pitfalls associated with financing higher education, and empowering them to make optimal financial choices, should be a priority of all institutions of higher education,” the report reads. 


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-19  Authors: shawn m carter
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Trump’s new immigration plan emphasizes skills and education over family connections

President Donald Trump will unveil a sweeping new proposal Thursday designed to move the United States from a family based immigration system to what senior administration officials describe as an employment- and skill-based system. “We want to change the composition of who is coming through,” a senior administration official said. Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor, Jared Kushner, pitched the plan to Republican senators behind closed doors Tuesday on Capitol Hill. “What we’re doing is comple


President Donald Trump will unveil a sweeping new proposal Thursday designed to move the United States from a family based immigration system to what senior administration officials describe as an employment- and skill-based system. “We want to change the composition of who is coming through,” a senior administration official said. Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor, Jared Kushner, pitched the plan to Republican senators behind closed doors Tuesday on Capitol Hill. “What we’re doing is comple
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: ylan mui eamon javers, ylan mui, eamon javers
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Trump's new immigration plan emphasizes skills and education over family connections

The proposal includes two parts – a physical infrastructure component that would include border wall construction and be financed by new fees on trade collected at the border, and a revamped points system for those applying for U.S. citizenship.

President Donald Trump will unveil a sweeping new proposal Thursday designed to move the United States from a family based immigration system to what senior administration officials describe as an employment- and skill-based system.

Briefing reporters in the Roosevelt Room ahead of the president’s announcement Thursday, senior administration officials described a system for new arrivals that they said would be more fair and clear and also would significantly shift the population receiving American citizenship toward a much more highly educated, higher-income group.

“We want to change the composition of who is coming through,” a senior administration official said.

The plan is designed to give Republicans a positive proposal they can pitch on the campaign trail and in negotiations with Democrats, although Trump officials acknowledge that it is not likely to become law as is. Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor, Jared Kushner, pitched the plan to Republican senators behind closed doors Tuesday on Capitol Hill.

“What we’re doing is completing step one, which is having a proposal,” a senior administration official said. “We’ll see how everyone reacts and then we’ll see what step two and step three look like.”

The senior administration official quoted the Cheshire Cat from “Alice in Wonderland” to describe the purpose of the president’s new plan: “If you don’t know where you’re going, it doesn’t matter what path you take.”

The officials said they have aggressive economic goals for the plan, predicting that it would increase annual GDP by 0.17 percentage point over 10 years, add $500 billion in new tax revenue, and reduce spending on social safety net programs by about $100 billion.

It would do that largely by moving away from the current family based immigration system – under which a large factor in being considered for citizenship is whether the applicant has family already in the country – to an economic system that would take into account the applicant’s education, employability and even ability to create jobs in the United States.

The plan is silent on the question of what to do about undocumented migrants who are already inside the United States, or the employers who hire them to fill out lower-level agricultural, manufacturing and service work forces.

It also does not address the so-called Dreamers, young undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as children. Democratic lawmakers have made securing a pathway to citizenship for them one of their top legislative priorities.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-15  Authors: ylan mui eamon javers, ylan mui, eamon javers
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The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer


Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life. Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity. The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer
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The 5 best US states to live in, according to US News & World Report

Where you live doesn’t just affect what sports team you root for or whether you say “soda” vs. “pop.” Geography can have a major impact on your career, earnings and quality of life.

Each year, U.S. News & World Report surveys over 50,000 Americans in order to rank all U.S. states across 71 metrics in eight categories: crime and corrections, economy, education, environment, fiscal stability, healthcare, infrastructure and opportunity.

U.S. News ranks each state from one to 50 — with one being the best and 50 being the worst — across each of these eight categories and then uses a weighed average to create a final ranking of the best places to live in the country.

The resulting Best States of 2019 list reflects the states that offer residents public safety and just corrections programs, strong employment and growth, high-quality public education, clean air and water, long and short-term financial stability, access to high-quality healthcare as well as robust energy, internet and transportation infrastructure. U.S. News also calculated opportunity based on variables like cost of living and economic equality.

Here is are the top five states on U.S. News’ Best States of 2019 ranking:


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-14  Authors: abigail hess
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US education groups McGraw-Hill and Cengage reportedly plan an all-stock merger

Massive Saudi wealth fund zeros in on China, plans to open new… The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) is one of the Middle East’s largest, with some $300 billion in assets under management and an aim to increase that to $2 trillion by…World Economyread more


Massive Saudi wealth fund zeros in on China, plans to open new… The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) is one of the Middle East’s largest, with some $300 billion in assets under management and an aim to increase that to $2 trillion by…World Economyread more
US education groups McGraw-Hill and Cengage reportedly plan an all-stock merger Cached Page below :
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US education groups McGraw-Hill and Cengage reportedly plan an all-stock merger

Massive Saudi wealth fund zeros in on China, plans to open new…

The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) is one of the Middle East’s largest, with some $300 billion in assets under management and an aim to increase that to $2 trillion by…

World Economy

read more


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Even these Wharton business school students lack a basic personal finance education

Signage for the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School stands outside of the new campus in San Francisco, California. David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesWhen it comes to money, most people lack the know-how to make smart moves on their own. To address the problem, a few MBA students in 2016 founded Wharton Common Cents to shed some light on personal finance topics that aren’t often taught in the classroom. Students attending a Wharton Common Cents event. Source: Wharton Common Cent


Signage for the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School stands outside of the new campus in San Francisco, California. David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesWhen it comes to money, most people lack the know-how to make smart moves on their own. To address the problem, a few MBA students in 2016 founded Wharton Common Cents to shed some light on personal finance topics that aren’t often taught in the classroom. Students attending a Wharton Common Cents event. Source: Wharton Common Cent
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-27  Authors: jessica dickler
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Even these Wharton business school students lack a basic personal finance education

Signage for the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School stands outside of the new campus in San Francisco, California. David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

When it comes to money, most people lack the know-how to make smart moves on their own. Even at Wharton, one of the nation’s top business schools, financial illiteracy is widespread. To address the problem, a few MBA students in 2016 founded Wharton Common Cents to shed some light on personal finance topics that aren’t often taught in the classroom. “There are a ton of financial circumstances you have to deal with as a graduate student that you’re not fully prepared for,” said Laura Gentile, 29, incoming co-president of the student-run club. Without the know-how, “you are at a huge disadvantage.” The club’s mission is to provide fundamental skills and resources to create a secure financial future, Gentile said.

Students attending a Wharton Common Cents event. Source: Wharton Common Cents

Surprisingly, it’s the first-ever club of its kind at a business school, according to current President Anuj Khandelwal, 28. The club hosts nearly weekly programs for graduate students on topics such as the difference between credit and debit cards, saving now versus later and how to talk about money with a significant other. They are also bringing these lessons to members of the greater community, just outside the ivy-covered walls, including Jane Addams Place, a homeless shelter for women and children, and Say Yes to Education, an after-school program for public school students. “We acknowledge that Philly is one of the poorest cities in the nation,” Khandelwal said.


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Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here’s why

Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. In the years following the great recession, ed


Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. In the years following the great recession, ed
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Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak plans to donate his salary to public education—here's why

Sisolak is Nevada’s first Democratic governor in decades and ran on a platform that included reforming education spending, drawing on his experience serving for 10 years as a Nevada System of Higher Education regent. Before entering politics, Sisolak founded and ran a telemarketing business.

According to Sisolak’s statement, the Governor will donate the net of his $163,474 salary, and has instructed Department of Education officials to evenly divide his gift among the state’s 416 Title I schools — schools with high percentages of low-income students — so that each school receives at least $1,000 over his four years in office.

The gift is relatively small compared to the size of Nevada’s education budget — The Guinn Center reports that Nevada’s budget allocates nearly $6.6 billion to education — but draws attention to the need for increased education funding. “This unprecedented gesture serves to highlight the need for more funding in our schools now,” Keenan Korth, communications specialist for a Nevada teachers union, tells CNN.

In the years following the great recession, education funding was slashed in states across the country and Nevada experienced some of the greatest cuts. According to most-recent data from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CPBB), American elementary and high schools cut capital spending by $23 billion, or 31%, between 2008 and 2015. Nevada’s budget made the deepest cuts to capital spending, which was reduced by 82%.

The CPBB reports that during those years, Nevada reduced per-pupil state funding for pre-K students by 39.5% (about $1,448 after adjusting for inflation) and the student-to-teacher ratio in Nevada rose from 18.3 to 21.2.

Sisolak has called for restoring education funding to at least pre-recession levels and proposes shifting money from the state’s hotel and marijuana taxes towards schools.

During his first State of the State Address in January, the Governor emphasized his focus on education. “So far we’ve talked about a number of important issues,” he said. “But there is no issue more important to me than making sure every child in every classroom gets a great education.”

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: abigail hess, ethan miller getty image, ethan miller getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, salary, plans, steve, schools, state, spending, budget, education, states, public, donate, funding, nevadas, governor, nevada, educationheres, sisolak


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Elizabeth Warren’s $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here’s how

I’m calling for universal free college and the cancellation of student loan debt for more than 95% of Americans. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a national policy that would make two years of community college free for all eligible students. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that.” Today, at least 17 states offer tuition-free community college for residents. Warren’s proposal also emphasizes the benefits — bey


I’m calling for universal free college and the cancellation of student loan debt for more than 95% of Americans. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a national policy that would make two years of community college free for all eligible students. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that.” Today, at least 17 states offer tuition-free community college for residents. Warren’s proposal also emphasizes the benefits — bey
Elizabeth Warren’s $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here’s how Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: abigail hess, reuters karen pulfer focht, -elizabeth warren
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, student, aims, warrens, elizabeth, cycle, community, debtheres, free, college, debt, plan, cost, end, policy, students, obama, public, education


Elizabeth Warren's $1.25 trillion education plan aims to end the cycle of student debt—here's how

I’m calling for universal free college and the cancellation of student loan debt for more than 95% of Americans. This is the kind of big, structural change we need to make sure our kids have opportunity in this country. pic.twitter.com/KERw3APDMo

Free community college has become an increasingly popular policy among progressive politicians. In 2015, President Barack Obama proposed a national policy that would make two years of community college free for all eligible students.

“No hardworking student should be stuck in the red,” said Obama during his final State of the Union address in 2017. “We’ve actually got to cut the cost of college. Providing two years of community college at no cost for every responsible student is one of the best ways to do that.”

Today, at least 17 states offer tuition-free community college for residents.

Warren’s proposal also emphasizes the benefits — beyond reducing future student debt — that free public university would have on future and current college students.

“We expect everyone but the wealthy to take on mountains of debt if they want to get a post-secondary education. This is closing off opportunities for generations of Americans and widening this country’s racial wealth gap,” Warren wrote. “The cost of college deters people from attending college.”

She also argues that eliminating tuition and fees at public institutions would help increase graduation rates, especially among low-income students. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, just 40 percent of first-time full-time students earn a bachelor’s degree in four years, and only 59 percent earn their bachelor’s in six years.

With more than half of students struggling to graduate in four years, most students are forced to take — and pay for — extra years of college.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: abigail hess, reuters karen pulfer focht, -elizabeth warren
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trillion, student, aims, warrens, elizabeth, cycle, community, debtheres, free, college, debt, plan, cost, end, policy, students, obama, public, education


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