‘I have the same rights as anybody else’ to run in the 2020 election, Mike Bloomberg says

Newly announced Democratic presidential candidate, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg meets Virginia House Delegate-Elect Nancy Guy (not seen) at a coffee shop on November 25, 2019 in Norfolk, Virginia. Addressing criticism that his ego pushed him to enter the 2020 presidential race, former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg says he has “the same rights as anybody else” to run. Bloomberg, whose net worth according to Forbes is around $55 billion, has seen pushback regarding his status as another


Newly announced Democratic presidential candidate, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg meets Virginia House Delegate-Elect Nancy Guy (not seen) at a coffee shop on November 25, 2019 in Norfolk, Virginia.
Addressing criticism that his ego pushed him to enter the 2020 presidential race, former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg says he has “the same rights as anybody else” to run.
Bloomberg, whose net worth according to Forbes is around $55 billion, has seen pushback regarding his status as another
‘I have the same rights as anybody else’ to run in the 2020 election, Mike Bloomberg says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, job, election, 2020, york, mayor, seen, race, rights, candidates, states, run, anybody, think, mike, bloomberg


'I have the same rights as anybody else' to run in the 2020 election, Mike Bloomberg says

Newly announced Democratic presidential candidate, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg meets Virginia House Delegate-Elect Nancy Guy (not seen) at a coffee shop on November 25, 2019 in Norfolk, Virginia.

Addressing criticism that his ego pushed him to enter the 2020 presidential race, former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg says he has “the same rights as anybody else” to run.

Bloomberg, whose net worth according to Forbes is around $55 billion, has seen pushback regarding his status as another wealthy white man to enter the race.

“Yeah, I guess it takes an ego to think that you could do the job,” he said in an interview that aired Friday on “CBS This Morning.”

He then revisited some of his accomplishments as mayor. “I have 12 years of experience in City Hall. And I think if you go back today and ask most people about those 12 years, they would say that the — not me, but the team that I put together — made an enormous difference in New York City. And New York City benefited from it and continues to benefit from it today from what we did then.”

He added that he had the best chance among all the candidates to beat President Donald Trump in 2020. “I think that I would do the best job of competing with him and beating him,” he said in the interview, which was conducted Thursday.

But jumping into the race should not be seen as a slap to front-runner Joe Biden, he added.

“He doesn’t have the job of president of the United States and neither do I,” Bloomberg said. “At the moment, the person that has it is Donald Trump. I’m trying to take away the job from Donald Trump.”

Bloomberg dismissed concerns about diversity in the field as black and Latino candidates struggle to compete. Sen. Kamala Harris dropped out this week, citing lack of resources. Currently, all the candidates who have qualified for the Democratic debate on Dec. 19 are white.

“Entry is not a barrier” Bloomberg said. “I thought there was a lot of diversity in the group of Democratic aspirants.”

But he added, “The public is out there picking and choosing and narrowing down this field. The truth of the matter is you had a lot of diversity in the candidates, some of whom were very competent. Why they aren’t there as you narrowed it down, I — you have to talk to other people who are experts. I don’t know.”

Among the billionaire’s biggest critics are Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, who have accused him of trying to buy the election. Since his campaign launch on Nov. 24, Bloomberg has invested more than $57 million in TV advertising.

Bloomberg decided to skip the first four nominating states — Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina — focusing his campaign on Super Tuesday on March 3, when the largest number of states and territories hold primaries or caucuses.

The former mayor teased the idea of a presidential bid for weeks prior to entering the race but said in March that he would not run for president.

A national poll from the Economist and YouGov puts him at 3% support among voters.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-06  Authors: yelena dzhanova
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, presidential, job, election, 2020, york, mayor, seen, race, rights, candidates, states, run, anybody, think, mike, bloomberg


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Sterling hits fresh seven-month high against dollar on UK election polls

Sterling reached a fresh seven-month high against the dollar Thursday, apparently propelled upward by a belief that the upcoming U.K. general election will result in a majority for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party. The pound has risen 1.5% against the greenback over the past three trading days and on Thursday morning reached a high of $1.3146 — the strongest level since early May. Commodity Futures Trading Commission data, released each Friday, reveals that net shorts against th


Sterling reached a fresh seven-month high against the dollar Thursday, apparently propelled upward by a belief that the upcoming U.K. general election will result in a majority for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party.
The pound has risen 1.5% against the greenback over the past three trading days and on Thursday morning reached a high of $1.3146 — the strongest level since early May.
Commodity Futures Trading Commission data, released each Friday, reveals that net shorts against th
Sterling hits fresh seven-month high against dollar on UK election polls Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hits, pound, dollar, brexit, early, sevenmonth, high, election, conservative, traders, shorts, polls, fresh, sterling, reached, trading


Sterling hits fresh seven-month high against dollar on UK election polls

Sterling reached a fresh seven-month high against the dollar Thursday, apparently propelled upward by a belief that the upcoming U.K. general election will result in a majority for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party.

The pound has risen 1.5% against the greenback over the past three trading days and on Thursday morning reached a high of $1.3146 — the strongest level since early May. Sterling is now above its 200-week moving average against its U.S. counterpart.

Against the euro, the pound firmed to 84.31 pence, the most since May 2017.

Global Fixed Income Strategist at Societe Generale, Kit Juckes, said sterling was going up “to the sound of shorts capitulating” in a reference to the growing number of traders who were removing bets against the currency.

Commodity Futures Trading Commission data, released each Friday, reveals that net shorts against the pound have been steadily falling since early August.

Currency traders appear to believe that a Conservative Party government, with a commitment to enact Brexit, will prove less damaging to the U.K. economy than a Labour-led government with a pledge to tax and spend.

With just one week until the election, poll-tracking data suggests that the Conservative Party is maintaining a 10-percentage point advantage over Labour. At least one political analyst has estimated that any number above 6% should translate to a Conservative majority in the U.K. Parliament.

U.K Finance Minister Sajid Javid told BBC radio on Thursday that there was not “a single doubt in my mind” that an “ambitious, deep, comprehensive, free-trade agreement” could be agreed with the EU after Brexit within a matter of months.

On Wednesday, the former House of Commons Speaker John Bercow argued that it was “utter nonsense” that any new government could complete Brexit quickly.

In a note emailed to clients Thursday, Swiss bank UBS said that if the Conservatives win and a Brexit deal is completed in early 2020, then the pound should rise to $1.35 against the U.S. dollar.

It warned that gains beyond this level would likely be capped by potential “pitfalls” in subsequent negotiations between London and Brussels.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-05  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, hits, pound, dollar, brexit, early, sevenmonth, high, election, conservative, traders, shorts, polls, fresh, sterling, reached, trading


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Don’t count out Jeremy Corbyn in the UK’s general election

Regarding the UK election on Dec. 12, the oddsmakers and the pollsters say that Boris Johnson is “on course for a comfortable majority.” YouGov also found that 54 per cent thought Mr Johnson came across as more prime ministerial, compared with 29 per cent for Mr Corbyn. Fifty-nine per cent said, however, that the Labour leader was more in touch with ordinary voters, compared with 25 per cent for Mr Johnson. Now that Cummings is running the Johnson campaign, he has chosen a strikingly similar mes


Regarding the UK election on Dec. 12, the oddsmakers and the pollsters say that Boris Johnson is “on course for a comfortable majority.”
YouGov also found that 54 per cent thought Mr Johnson came across as more prime ministerial, compared with 29 per cent for Mr Corbyn.
Fifty-nine per cent said, however, that the Labour leader was more in touch with ordinary voters, compared with 25 per cent for Mr Johnson.
Now that Cummings is running the Johnson campaign, he has chosen a strikingly similar mes
Don’t count out Jeremy Corbyn in the UK’s general election Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: john ellis, editor of online publication news items
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cent, election, jeremy, corbyn, message, yougov, johnson, general, count, labour, dont, campaign, uks, way


Don't count out Jeremy Corbyn in the UK's general election

Regarding the UK election on Dec. 12, the oddsmakers and the pollsters say that Boris Johnson is “on course for a comfortable majority.” The question is: Is that true?

It certainly appears to be true. The Times of London recently commissioned a massive survey of the British electorate, went through it constituency-by-constituency, weighted the results accordingly and came away with the following:

The Conservatives would win 359 seats, Labour 211, the SNP 43 and the Liberal Democrats 13 if the election were held today, according to a seat-by-seat analysis based on polling by YouGov for The Times.

Eurointelligence, a smart and useful newsletter about all things Europe, offered this assessment of the YouGov poll results:

We think the poll is more or less a good description of the status quo – not so much because of its technology, but its sheer size. YouGov interviewed some 100,000 people over a period of seven days, a number big enough to make YouGov’s multi-level regression and post-stratification (MRP) technology possible in the first place. The main polling result is that the Tories are leading Labour by some 11 points, very much in line with the poll trackers. YouGov says that, if the gap falls to below 7 percentage points, a hung parliament becomes more likely.

So that should be that.

But it doesn’t feel that way. And evidence to the contrary keeps popping up.

Here’s one disagreeable data point, courtesy of (again) Eurointelligence:

A last-minute spike in voter registration shows a 38% increase over 2017. Of those new registrations, two thirds are from the under-35. As young people are more likely to vote Labour, this would help the Labour Party. The UK newspapers attribute the spike ahead of last night’s deadline to a message from the Stormzy, a popular British rapper.

Here’s another: After the first nationally televised debate, The Times of London reported:

A snap YouGov poll after the ITV debate handed victory to Mr Johnson by the narrowest of margins, with 51 per cent saying that he was the better performer against 49 per cent for Mr Corbyn. YouGov also found that 54 per cent thought Mr Johnson came across as more prime ministerial, compared with 29 per cent for Mr Corbyn. Fifty-nine per cent said, however, that the Labour leader was more in touch with ordinary voters, compared with 25 per cent for Mr Johnson.

51-49? Huh? Post-debate polls are useful because they provide fresh insight into voter preference. Debates, in this age of polarization, are all-but-entirely perceived through the lens of partisanship. If you’re for Johnson, he has to go far, far astray to make you say he “lost” the debate. The same holds true for Corbyn. He could call for the reformation of the Soviet Union and he wouldn’t suffer any immediate, consequential voter attrition. He might (he almost certainly would) suffer the next day and the day after that, after the press had waterboarded him on the front pages and television newscasts. But even then, his candidacy would not collapse.

51%-49% got everyone’s attention. A statistical tie! And then there was this disquieting business about being “more in touch with ordinary voters.” Fifty-nine percent said Corbyn was “more in touch.” Twenty-five percent said Johnson was. Few things in politics are more disquieting than a 34-point deficit on an important metric of electoral success.

Johnson’s strategist, Dominic Cummings, secured his reputation for political mastery by guiding the Brexit referendum “Leave” campaign to victory. He did so by executing the most effective digital campaign in the history of modern British politics and by keeping the electorate focused on a simple message: “Take Back Control.” Indeed, he built the entire campaign around that idea and never once deviated from it. It was his version of James Carville’s relentless and effective four word mantra for the 1992 U.S. presidential election: “It’s the economy, stupid.”

Throughout the “Leave” campaign, Cummings viewed politicians like Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson as distractions and did everything he could to marginalize their importance to the electorate. He wanted voters entirely focused on (from his point of view) their empowerment. He wanted nothing to do with the self-aggrandizement of men like Farage and Johnson, whom he viewed with barely concealed disdain.

He was mostly successful. It worked. Leave won.

Now that Cummings is running the Johnson campaign, he has chosen a strikingly similar message: “Get Brexit Done.” Not: Elect Tories. Not: Keep Johnson. Not: Stay The Course. Get Brexit Done. He chose that message because research shows it is the surest path to victory.

And yet, even with that simple, straightforward, popular-enough proposition, Johnson’s Tories have not been able to put the election away. An upset remains possible and not improbable.

The UK’s heavily-populated anti-Corbyn press corps, sensing disaster, has taken to constantly “assessing” Johnson’s (important) strengths and (unimportant) weaknesses while portraying Corbyn as a cross between Joseph Stalin’s rightful heir and Jack the Ripper. The devil you know is a devil, they say. The devil you don’t is a monster.

Even with the onslaught of all this negative Corbyn press, however, Johnson keeps muddying the message and getting in the way; a disastrous visit to flood victims in the north, a dreadful interview with the BBC, the annoying and unhappy girlfriend, the list goes on (and on). Johnson has run a terrible campaign. It’s not lost on anyone that he can’t escape the grasp of an opponent who sports a (roughly) 60% unfavorable rating.

Toward the end of last week and over the weekend, the Johnson campaign and its allies talked to a number of key U.S. power brokers beseeching them to keep President Trump from “meddling” in the UK election campaign. Trump’s unfavorable rating in the UK is every bit as robust as Corbyn’s, if not more so. An endorsement from the U.S. president polls badly, across the board. As a result, every effort was made to convince Trump to keep his distance and forgo any tweets on the subject.

So far, Trump has “behaved” and “stayed focused,” in the condescending words of his self-important aides. How long he will be able to do so is an open question. But his mere presence has given salience to Corbyn’s unstated message, which is, basically, “Send Them a Message,” the slogan of the insurgent 1968 and 1972 presidential campaigns of late four-term Alabama Gov. George Wallace, a fellow master of grievance politics.

That’s a powerful message for a wide swath of the electorate. If you think Johnson is a charlatan and a cad, a posh populist, an Eton elitist through and through, then voting Labour (and thus supporting Corbyn) would seem meaningful in the same way that voting to “take back control” seemed satisfying and significant in 2016.

Corbyn isn’t anyone’s idea of posh. He’s the antithesis of the focus-grouped candidate. Which is part of what makes him formidable. He’s made more formidable by an illogical but enabling sequence: Since he’s going to lose anyway, like Trump in 2016, there’s no harm in voting Labour. Your voice will be heard, loud and clear. And let’s face it; nothing says “drain the swamp” quite like voting for Jeremy Corbyn.

That’s the mindset Labour is counting on. If enough people think that way, the odds of a hung Parliament increase accordingly. And that’s why we are where we are now — somewhere between an uneasy Tory win and a hung Parliament.

In the privacy of his office, Dominic Cummings must pine for the days when he managed the Leave campaign: unencumbered, under-estimated, under the radar. He’s none of those things now. He strives to keep it simple. Johnson seems almost compelled to make it sloppy. There’s no way to marginalize his importance to the electorate.

To quote Wallace one more time, in these kinds of political campaigns, at the end, when everyone is riveted to the news and partisans are hungry for more, “you gotta get it down there where the dogs can eat it.” Corbyn knows a thing or two about dog food. Don’t count him out. Don’t be surprised if a hung Parliament is the election’s result.

John Ellis is the Editor of News Items and a former columnist for The Boston Globe. You can reach him at jellis41@protonmail.com. You can sign up for the News Items newsletter here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-04  Authors: john ellis, editor of online publication news items
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cent, election, jeremy, corbyn, message, yougov, johnson, general, count, labour, dont, campaign, uks, way


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Trump says it might be better to wait until after 2020 election for a China trade deal

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that it might be better to wait until after the 2020 election to strike a trade deal with China. “In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal, but they want to make a deal now and we will see whether or not the deal is going to be right,” Trump told reporters in London. When asked if he had a deadline for the deal, he added: “I have no deadline, no … In some ways I think it is better to wait until after the election,


President Donald Trump said Tuesday that it might be better to wait until after the 2020 election to strike a trade deal with China.
“In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal, but they want to make a deal now and we will see whether or not the deal is going to be right,” Trump told reporters in London.
When asked if he had a deadline for the deal, he added: “I have no deadline, no …
In some ways I think it is better to wait until after the election,
Trump says it might be better to wait until after 2020 election for a China trade deal Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, waiting, trump, deadline, truthwashington, ways, china, better, wait, worth, trade, election, deal, 2020


Trump says it might be better to wait until after 2020 election for a China trade deal

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that it might be better to wait until after the 2020 election to strike a trade deal with China.

“In some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal, but they want to make a deal now and we will see whether or not the deal is going to be right,” Trump told reporters in London. The U.S. general election is set to take place in November 2020.

When asked if he had a deadline for the deal, he added: “I have no deadline, no … In some ways I think it is better to wait until after the election, if you want to know the truth.”

Washington and Beijing have imposed tariffs on billions of dollars’ worth of one another’s goods since the start of 2018, battering financial markets and souring business and consumer sentiment. The next tariff deadline is Dec. 15. If the two sides cannot pen down a deal by then, additional U.S. levies on Chinese exports will go into effect.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, waiting, trump, deadline, truthwashington, ways, china, better, wait, worth, trade, election, deal, 2020


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Delaying trade deal until after the 2020 election takes leverage away from China, Wilbur Ross says

Waiting until after the 2020 election to strike a China trade deal takes away some of Beijing’s leverage, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Tuesday. “That takes off the table something that they may think gives them some leverage,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street.” Ross’ comments reinforce earlier remarks from President Donald Trump that contributed to major U.S. stock indexes tumbling more than 1%. The president said that, “in some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the electio


Waiting until after the 2020 election to strike a China trade deal takes away some of Beijing’s leverage, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Tuesday.
“That takes off the table something that they may think gives them some leverage,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street.”
Ross’ comments reinforce earlier remarks from President Donald Trump that contributed to major U.S. stock indexes tumbling more than 1%.
The president said that, “in some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the electio
Delaying trade deal until after the 2020 election takes leverage away from China, Wilbur Ross says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, updatessubscribe, youtube, waiting, ross, delaying, leverage, president, takes, trade, election, wilbur, away, deal, ways, china


Delaying trade deal until after the 2020 election takes leverage away from China, Wilbur Ross says

Waiting until after the 2020 election to strike a China trade deal takes away some of Beijing’s leverage, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Tuesday.

“That takes off the table something that they may think gives them some leverage,” he told CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street.”

Ross’ comments reinforce earlier remarks from President Donald Trump that contributed to major U.S. stock indexes tumbling more than 1%. The president said that, “in some ways, I like the idea of waiting until after the election for the China deal.”

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-03  Authors: jacob pramuk
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, updatessubscribe, youtube, waiting, ross, delaying, leverage, president, takes, trade, election, wilbur, away, deal, ways, china


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Morgan Stanley says get defensive with stocks like Coca-Cola because of ‘late cycle’ economy

Trade tensions and the 2020 presidential election will add even more uncertainty to the aging U.S. economic recovery, making surefire defensive stocks and consumer staples more attractive investments, according to Morgan Stanley. “Trade, the election, and a late cycle economy keep the market searching for new leadership amid high uncertainty,” Wilson wrote. “We slightly favor the more defensive outcome given our well below consensus forecast for S&P 500 earnings growth next year.” Wilson also re


Trade tensions and the 2020 presidential election will add even more uncertainty to the aging U.S. economic recovery, making surefire defensive stocks and consumer staples more attractive investments, according to Morgan Stanley.
“Trade, the election, and a late cycle economy keep the market searching for new leadership amid high uncertainty,” Wilson wrote.
“We slightly favor the more defensive outcome given our well below consensus forecast for S&P 500 earnings growth next year.”
Wilson also re
Morgan Stanley says get defensive with stocks like Coca-Cola because of ‘late cycle’ economy Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, cocacola, growth, 500, economy, wilson, market, defensive, target, election, morgan, late, 2020, cycle, stanley, wrote


Morgan Stanley says get defensive with stocks like Coca-Cola because of 'late cycle' economy

A customer shops as bottles of Coca-Cola Co. brand soda sit on display for sale.

Trade tensions and the 2020 presidential election will add even more uncertainty to the aging U.S. economic recovery, making surefire defensive stocks and consumer staples more attractive investments, according to Morgan Stanley.

Chief U.S. equity strategist Michael Wilson told clients in a note Monday that expectations of “disappointing” S&P earnings next year should allow companies like Coca-Cola, Lowe’s and McDonald’s to outperform the broader market.

“Trade, the election, and a late cycle economy keep the market searching for new leadership amid high uncertainty,” Wilson wrote.

“We expect the market to vacillate between a pro-cyclical outcome and a defensive one as data comes in and trade tensions and the election evolve,” he added. “We slightly favor the more defensive outcome given our well below consensus forecast for S&P 500 earnings growth next year.”

The investment bank sees GDP growth in the U.S. stabilizing below trend under 2% for the next year and labor costs accelerating, both of which are set to pose headwinds in the new year.

Wilson also reiterated his 2020 S&P 500 target of 3,000, which implies that the major market index will fall 4.5% over the next 13 months. The projection makes Morgan Stanley one of the two most-bearish brokerages tracked by CNBC: The median S&P 500 strategist target for year-end 2020 is 3,325, 5.9% above Friday’s close.

UBS is the only other firm with a target as low as 3,000.

Wilson said his lackluster forecast for U.S. equities comes despite easier monetary policy and hopes that trade relations between Washington and Beijing are improving.

In fact, Wilson wrote that central bank liquidity and positive seasonal data could boost the S&P 500 to overshoot the upper end of his 2020 bull case. But by April, he wrote, the liquidity tailwind should fade and the market will refocus on company fundamentals.

“Uncertainty means rotations should continue and their durability will depend on whether growth is accelerating or decelerating,” Wilson wrote. “With the S&P 500 currently above the upper end of the channel due primarily to excessive central bank balance sheet expansion, we think risk reward skews lower, and would prefer to be more opportunistic when adding risk.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: thomas franck
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, stocks, cocacola, growth, 500, economy, wilson, market, defensive, target, election, morgan, late, 2020, cycle, stanley, wrote


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‘A toxic political force’: Westminster wary of Trump’s visit just days before the election, analysts say

The sitting prime minister also said he would walk out of trade talks with the U.S. if the health service was a pre-condition to negotiations. An overwhelming majority of Brits reject his politics, even as many realize that Britain without the United States is far weaker than with the United States in a ‘Special Relationship.’ “Sometimes he says it will be on the table in trade talks, sometimes he says it won’t be on the table. Johnson has repeatedly insisted the state-run NHS would not be on th


The sitting prime minister also said he would walk out of trade talks with the U.S. if the health service was a pre-condition to negotiations.
An overwhelming majority of Brits reject his politics, even as many realize that Britain without the United States is far weaker than with the United States in a ‘Special Relationship.’
“Sometimes he says it will be on the table in trade talks, sometimes he says it won’t be on the table.
Johnson has repeatedly insisted the state-run NHS would not be on th
‘A toxic political force’: Westminster wary of Trump’s visit just days before the election, analysts say Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, toxic, election, johnson, talks, nhs, table, told, wary, days, united, say, trade, states, trump, westminster, trumps, visit, force


'A toxic political force': Westminster wary of Trump's visit just days before the election, analysts say

U.S. President Donald Trump and Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrive for a bilateral meeting during the G7 summit on August 25, 2019 in Biarritz, France. Stefan Rousseau | Pool | Getty Images

President Donald Trump’s arrival in the U.K. just 10 days before Britons head to the ballot box could spell trouble for Prime Minister Boris Johnson, political analysts told CNBC. The U.S. president, who is scheduled to arrive in London on Monday, is likely to be pressed to comment on a range of hyper-sensitive political issues — ranging from the National Health Service (NHS) to prospective trade talks. Britons head to the ballot box on Dec. 12, in a vote likely to decide both the fate of the U.K.’s departure from the European Union and the future direction of the world’s fifth-largest economy. Johnson has urged Trump not to get involved in the upcoming election, fearing he could say something that threatens to derail the Conservative Party’s campaign. “What we don’t do traditionally as loving allies and friends, what we don’t do traditionally, is get involved in each other’s election campaigns,” Johnson, who’s center-right party currently holds a commanding lead in the latest opinion polls, told LBC radio on Friday. The sitting prime minister also said he would walk out of trade talks with the U.S. if the health service was a pre-condition to negotiations.

Beware of the ‘bogeyman’

Trump has typically been unafraid to comment on a wide range of U.K. election issues, with Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn often quick to use the U.S. president’s praise of Johnson as a key attack line against the Conservatives. In recent months, Trump has suggested Johnson and Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage would form an “unstoppable force” if they formed a cross-party alliance, claimed Corbyn would be “so bad” for Britain and indicated that the NHS would, in fact, be “on the table” during prospective trade talks. He has even warned that Johnson’s Brexit deal might ultimately block a much sought-after trade deal between the U.S. and the U.K. “He’s a bit of a bogeyman,” Matthew Oxenford, lead U.K. and Brexit analyst at the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), told CNBC via telephone.

Opposition Labour party leader Jeremy Corbyn (C) poses with NHS workers holding documents regarding the Conservative government’s UK-US trade talks in London after a press conference on November 27, 2019. TOLGA AKMEN | AFP | Getty Images

A lot of external commentators have offered their opinion on U.K. politics in recent weeks, Oxenford said, citing the outgoing European Council President Donald Tusk and former U.S. presidential candidate Hilary Clinton. But, when it comes to Trump, the “biggest issue” was clearly likely to be the NHS, Oxenford said. On a state visit to the U.K. earlier this year, the U.S. president suggested that the NHS — which has provided free healthcare at the point of use for more than 70 years — would be up for grabs during post-Brexit trade talks. Standing alongside former prime minister Theresa May in June, Trump told reporters: “Look, I think everything with a trade deal is on the table.” “When you’re dealing in trade everything is on the table. So, NHS or anything else, or a lot more than that — but everything will be on the table, absolutely.”

An overwhelming majority of Brits reject his politics, even as many realize that Britain without the United States is far weaker than with the United States in a ‘Special Relationship.’ Brian Klaas Professor of global politics at University College London

Trump has since sought to backtrack on his comments about the NHS, saying earlier this month that health would not feature in post-Brexit trade negotiations. “Sometimes he says it will be on the table in trade talks, sometimes he says it won’t be on the table. This confusion gives Labour an opportunity to use it as a good attack line,” Oxenford said.

Key battleground

Corbyn has warned a Conservative-led trade deal with the U.S. could drive up the price of medicines, warning Johnson’s party would sell-off parts of the health service to U.S. business after Brexit. Johnson has repeatedly insisted the state-run NHS would not be on the table in any trade talks. “Trump doesn’t have a filter. It won’t matter if his advisers tell him — or Boris pleads with him — not to speak about the election, the NHS, or what Britain will have to give up to the United States in a prospective trade deal,” Brian Klaas, a professor of global politics at University College London, told CNBC via email. “He also has a very limited understanding of British political sensitivities. In previous visits, it wasn’t clear that he knew what the NHS was, let alone how sensitive it is for an American president to speak about it,” he added.

President Donald Trump and Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May hold a joint news conference in London, Britain, June 4, 2019. Carlos Barria | Reuters

The NHS is often a key battleground during an election period, with politicians quick to champion an institution that is celebrated across the country. However, despite its recognition as one of Britain’s most cherished institutions, problems associated with the NHS remain a regular feature of public discourse. This includes near-constant concerns about a shortfall in funding, long waiting times for consultations and operations, cutbacks to social services, crumbling hospitals and staff shortages. “Trump is, in general, a toxic political force in the U.K. An overwhelming majority of Brits reject his politics, even as many realize that Britain without the United States is far weaker than with the United States in a ‘Special Relationship,'” Klaas said.

US-UK trade talks


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: sam meredith
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, political, toxic, election, johnson, talks, nhs, table, told, wary, days, united, say, trade, states, trump, westminster, trumps, visit, force


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How Germany could be set for a new political direction

picture alliance | picture alliance | Getty ImagesGermany’s ruling coalition government is hanging by a thread, potentially having major implications on the country’s spending habits and wider reforms across the continent. On Saturday, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s junior coalition party — the Social Democrats (SPD) — elected new leaders in a vote that will be confirmed later this week. The government, in particular Merkel’s CDU party, argues that economic growth is set to pick up next year and the


picture alliance | picture alliance | Getty ImagesGermany’s ruling coalition government is hanging by a thread, potentially having major implications on the country’s spending habits and wider reforms across the continent.
On Saturday, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s junior coalition party — the Social Democrats (SPD) — elected new leaders in a vote that will be confirmed later this week.
The government, in particular Merkel’s CDU party, argues that economic growth is set to pick up next year and the
How Germany could be set for a new political direction Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, direction, political, leaders, party, merkel, election, cdu, set, merkels, particular, ruling, coalition, spd, germany


How Germany could be set for a new political direction

30 November 2019, Berlin: Norbert Walter-Borjans and Saskia Esken wave after the announcement of the result of the vote on the SPD chairmanship in the Willy Brandt House. picture alliance | picture alliance | Getty Images

Germany’s ruling coalition government is hanging by a thread, potentially having major implications on the country’s spending habits and wider reforms across the continent. On Saturday, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s junior coalition party — the Social Democrats (SPD) — elected new leaders in a vote that will be confirmed later this week. Norbert Walter-Borjans and Saskia Esken, who ran on a joint ticket, want to renegotiate some of the terms of the ruling agreement with Merkel’s conservative party, the Christian Democratic Union of Germany (CDU). “The new leaders are likely to challenge the status quo in the federal government. In particular, Esken has positioned herself in favor of an exit from the grand coalition,” Ricardo Garcia, chief euro zone economist at UBS, said in a note to clients Monday. Saturday’s result is set to open the way for tough talks between the two partners. The new socialist leadership has said they would like to see more ambitious plans on climate change, higher minimum wages, as well as different fiscal rules. “We don’t think that all of these will be acceptable to the CDU/CSU, in particular to its more conservative members,” Garcia added.

At ‘odds’ over spending

Under Merkel’s leadership, Berlin has rigorously pushed for a balanced budget. Its fiscal prudency respects the German constitution, where a “debt brake” law basically forces its leaders to present budgets without structural deficits. The euro zone powerhouse saw a record budget surplus of 58 billion euros ($65 billion) in 2018.

We see a 30%–40% chance of the SPD walking out of the grand coalition. UBS

However, lower economic growth has sparked calls for the German government to change tack. The government, in particular Merkel’s CDU party, argues that economic growth is set to pick up next year and therefore there is no need to increase the country’s debt pile — something that the more-leftist arm of the SPD contests. The SPD’s spending policies “put them completely at odds with the CDU/CSU and at the moment it seems a bit of a struggle to see a middle ground being found,” analysts at Rabobank said in an email Monday morning.

A political compromise or fresh elections?

The current political landscape makes it difficult to predict what could unfold. On the one hand, the Socialist party has seen lower public support, leading some analysts to argue that the SPD could be about to take a more assertive role in the ruling coalition. On the other hand, the CDU is unlikely to agree to massive policy changes. The German conservatives also seem divided about the prospect of an early election, with Merkel due to leave politics in 2021. In addition, the nationalist Alternative for Germany (AFD) party has grown in popularity since its creation in 2013, having entered Parliament for the first time in the aftermath of the 2017 election. “We see a 30%–40% chance of the SPD walking out of the grand coalition,” UBS’s Garcia predicted.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel gives a statement to the media following an agreement over the weekend between leaders of the coalition government partners over the fate of domestic intelligence head Hans-Georg Maassen on September 24, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. Michele Tantussi | Getty Images News | Getty Images

If the SPD were to leave government, analysts have pointed to three possible outcomes: Merkel’s CDU remains in power but runs a minority government; Merkel could ask smaller parties to join her government, which could ultimately restore a majority; or early elections take place. Opinion polls show that if an election were to take place now, Merkel’s CDU party would get 27% of the votes — down from 32.9% in 2017. The estimated support for the SPD is also lower from the previous election at 14%, versus 20.5%.

Less time for Europe


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02  Authors: silvia amaro
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, direction, political, leaders, party, merkel, election, cdu, set, merkels, particular, ruling, coalition, spd, germany


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Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn big issues in UK election, former trade minister says


Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn big issues in UK election, former trade minister says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issues, election, corbyn, minister, brexit, big, jeremy, trade


Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn big issues in UK election, former trade minister says


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-12-02
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, issues, election, corbyn, minister, brexit, big, jeremy, trade


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Scotland’s general election is different and could change the United Kingdom forever

The ruling Conservative Party in the U.K. wants the upcoming general election to be framed largely as a de-facto vote on Brexit. The main opposition Labour party want to move the question on to domestic policies such as health and social care. Should Labour need a coalition to win power, it may turn to the Scottish National Party (SNP) to form a winning alliance. Ian Davidson is a Scottish Labour MP (Member of Parliament) who held successive Glasgow seats from 1992 until 2015. Leon Neal | Getty


The ruling Conservative Party in the U.K. wants the upcoming general election to be framed largely as a de-facto vote on Brexit.
The main opposition Labour party want to move the question on to domestic policies such as health and social care.
Should Labour need a coalition to win power, it may turn to the Scottish National Party (SNP) to form a winning alliance.
Ian Davidson is a Scottish Labour MP (Member of Parliament) who held successive Glasgow seats from 1992 until 2015.
Leon Neal | Getty
Scotland’s general election is different and could change the United Kingdom forever Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scotland, scotlands, united, election, change, snp, kingdom, forever, general, union, party, seats, scottish, different, conservative, getty, labour


Scotland's general election is different and could change the United Kingdom forever

The ruling Conservative Party in the U.K. wants the upcoming general election to be framed largely as a de-facto vote on Brexit. The main opposition Labour party want to move the question on to domestic policies such as health and social care. But in Scotland, where 59 of Parliament’s 650 seats exist, the rules are different. Leaving the European Union and local issues will still influence the thinking of Scottish voters but the question of Scotland’s future within the U.K. itself, remains the bigger concern. And the Scottish vote, albeit minor in the context of Westminster, may suddenly matter a whole lot on the day after the December 12 election. Should Labour need a coalition to win power, it may turn to the Scottish National Party (SNP) to form a winning alliance.

SNP banks on independence

Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon Getty Images | Staff

The SNP launched its manifesto on Wednesday and in its introduction, the party leader and First Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, branded the current U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson as “dangerous and unfit for office.” There is no love lost between the leaders in Edinburgh and London. Beyond the rancor, headline policies from the SNP included a promise to stop Brexit, remove Britain’s nuclear-armed submarines from Scottish waters, increase spend on the health service and tackle child poverty. But the big reason why the SNP was formed is to seek independence from the U.K. and Sturgeon also confirmed she wanted another referendum on the matter in 2020.

In 2014, 55% of people living in Scotland voted to remain in the United Kingdom. In 2015, Sturgeon said that “something material would have to change,” before she would propose another referendum. The party now argue that change arrived rapidly in June 2016 when a U.K.-wide referendum on Britain’s membership of the European union delivered a seismic “leave” result that the country is still bitterly divided over. A strong majority of Scots voted to remain in the European Union and the SNP is fighting hard on the doorsteps to argue that only it, with a mandate to leave the U.K., can protect Scots from the effects of leaving the EU. Currently the SNP hold 35 of the 59 seats but one prediction from polling guru John Curtice assesses that the December result could improve to 41 seats.

Labour’s collapse

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn addresses delegates on day four of the Labour Party conference at the Arena and Convention Centre on September 26, 2018 in Liverpool, England. Leon Neal | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Throughout the mid to late 20th century, the center-left Labour party always performed well in Scotland with support built on the bedrock of a strong trade union movement. As manufacturing, mining and shipping industries declined in number, union membership fell in tandem, chipping away at the robust support for Labour. As late as 1997, Scottish faith in Labour remained high. A swell of support for the incoming Tony Blair saw Labour in Scotland win 56 of the then 72 seats, gathering more than double the votes of any other party. But fast forward to 2019 and the latest poll from Panelbase suggests Labour could be all but wiped out in Scotland on December 12, with percentages suggesting it is on course to lose six of seven seats. Richard Leonard who heads the Scottish Labour party has said a pro-independence majority in Scottish parliamentary elections in 2021 would be a clear mandate for a second independence referendum and “would not be blocked by a U.K. Labour government.” This suggests that Labour is all but giving up the chase in Scotland and will hope to do a coalition deal with the SNP to take power in Downing Street. Ian Davidson is a Scottish Labour MP (Member of Parliament) who held successive Glasgow seats from 1992 until 2015. He is now fighting an unlikely battle to win Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk in the Scottish borders. Speaking to CNBC by phone Tuesday, Davidson said Labour is trapped between the Conservative and SNP messages which reject and support independence, respectively. The candidate said neither of those parties want to move off constitutional questions such as Brexit or independence and talk about their records in power as “neither are particularly good.” Davidson conceded that Labour had failed in part to shift the campaign narrative. “If we were fighting the election on the basis of what the SNP has done in Scotland, I think people would be much more enthusiastic about our offering. But we haven’t manage to get the debate on to that.”

Conservative opportunity

Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrives at Downing Street on October 28, 2019 in London, England. Leon Neal | Getty Images News | Getty Images

In 1955, Scots returned 36 of the 72 seats available to the Conservative Party. That high water mark trended lower until Blair’s first victory in 1997 which saw precisely no Conservative wins. Thereafter, only one Tory MP would win a seat in Scotland at each of the four subsequent elections, until 2017 when suddenly 13 constituencies voted Conservative and the popular vote rose to almost 29%. The sudden improvement was interpreted as a direct reflection on the Conservative’s strong anti-independence stance, targeting votes from people in Scotland who want to stay a part of the United Kingdom. There was little expectation that the Conservatives will improve even further but the latest poll from Panelbase offers the center-right party some hope. The survey, which quizzed 1,009 Scottish voters between November 20 and November 22, 2019, signposted a seven-point increase in support for the Scottish Tories since October.

The Conservative candidate for Edinburgh South West, Callum Laidlaw, told CNBC by phone that people he speaks to seem fatigued by politics, especially on the bigger questions of Brexit and independence. “I think people have begun to realize the more we discuss constitutional issues, then the lack of focus grows on issues such as public services,” said Laidlaw. When referendums, European and local elections are added to Scottish parliamentary ballots and general elections, Scottish people have been to the polls seven times in the last six years Laidlaw’s seat is considered a marginal with incumbent SNP MP Joanna Cherry only winning by just 1,097 votes at the last election in 2017.

Liberal Democrats

Newly elected European Parliament candidate Sheila Ritchie of the Scottish Liberal Democrats (C) is joined by leader Willie Rennie (R) after attending the declaration at the City Chambers on May 27, 2019 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Jeff J Mitchell | Getty Images


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-11-29  Authors: david reid
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, scotland, scotlands, united, election, change, snp, kingdom, forever, general, union, party, seats, scottish, different, conservative, getty, labour


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