Botswana lifts 5-year ban on hunting elephants, pitting traders against preservationists

“Most of the countries surrounding Botswana allow [hunting] and many elephants have moved into Botswana because of the poaching in neighboring countries.” Safari Club International, a U.S.-based hunting group praised the government’s stance, claiming that lifting the ban would be good for wildlife. The Botswana government claims there has been an increase in human-elephant conflict — a consequence of the growing elephant population — and elephant-related damage to livestock. In Botswana elephant


“Most of the countries surrounding Botswana allow [hunting] and many elephants have moved into Botswana because of the poaching in neighboring countries.” Safari Club International, a U.S.-based hunting group praised the government’s stance, claiming that lifting the ban would be good for wildlife. The Botswana government claims there has been an increase in human-elephant conflict — a consequence of the growing elephant population — and elephant-related damage to livestock. In Botswana elephant
Botswana lifts 5-year ban on hunting elephants, pitting traders against preservationists Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: nadine el-bawab
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, botswana, 5year, elephant, hunting, ban, elephants, wildlife, jones, international, pitting, ivory, lifts, population, traders, preservationists, communities


Botswana lifts 5-year ban on hunting elephants, pitting traders against preservationists

BOTSWANA – 2014/06/13: Female African elephant (Loxodonta africana) with baby in the Chitabe area of the Okavango Delta in the northern part of Botswana. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Botswana’s government lifted a 5-year ban on elephant hunting on Thursday, spurring criticism from wildlife conservation groups who see the move as a step backward in protecting the population.

The reversal has tipped off international controversy over wildlife protection, economic stimulus and ivory trading.

Botswana has the highest elephant population of any African country, with an estimated population between 120,000 and 130,000, according to Mark Jones, a veterinarian and the head of policy at the Born Free Foundation, a global wildlife conservation charity.

Jones said trophy hunting is unlikely to have any real impact on the population’s numbers — but is likely to harm the animals themselves.

“Elephants are highly intelligent creatures and will move away from areas where they are in danger,” Jones said. “Most of the countries surrounding Botswana allow [hunting] and many elephants have moved into Botswana because of the poaching in neighboring countries.”

Safari Club International, a U.S.-based hunting group praised the government’s stance, claiming that lifting the ban would be good for wildlife.

“We thank the President of Botswana and all others involved in Botswana for their forward thinking and having the courage to bypass doing what is easy in order to do what is right for the benefit of the wildlife of Botswana and the people of Botswana,” said SCI President Paul Babaz in a statement. “They need to be able to manage their own wildlife so that there will be more wildlife in wild places in harmony with the people for generations to come.”

The Botswana government claims there has been an increase in human-elephant conflict — a consequence of the growing elephant population — and elephant-related damage to livestock.

In Botswana elephants are not confined to fenced reserves. That allows them to migrate freely over large distances throughout the country, and even cross over into neighboring countries.

“We are concerned that hunting causes extreme stress to elephants, which are intelligent, thinking, communicating animals. The elephants begin to associate humans with violence and they retaliate — hence the large number of human fatalities,” Paula Kahumbu, CEO of nonprofit Wildlife Direct, said in a statement.

Still, experts maintain hunting is not a credible method of population control or an effective means to combat higher rates of violence and damage.

There are more humane and legitimate ways to litigate the size of the population and prevent them from crossing into crop-fields. The use of chili or the introduction of beehives have proved to be effective in doing so, Jones said.

Officials also say the ban has caused local communities to suffer as a result of the loss of income from trophy hunters.

“Most of the money generated by hunting is captured by the state and by the hunting companies. Communities make very little gain – studies have shown that less than 2% of the funds generated by hunting reach communities,” Kahumbu said.

Moreover, Botswana is one of four African states proposing the decriminalization of commercial trade of ivory, which is outlawed under international law. “Poaching for ivory is the biggest single threat to elephants,” Jones said.

The U.S., U.K. and China have all outlawed ivory trade.

There were reports of a number of elephants being poached just last year, according to Jones, but allowing the sale of ivory to resume in some countries would stimulate hunting of the animals and put them in grave danger.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-24  Authors: nadine el-bawab
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, botswana, 5year, elephant, hunting, ban, elephants, wildlife, jones, international, pitting, ivory, lifts, population, traders, preservationists, communities


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Apple just bought an elephants documentary and an animated movie for its streaming service

Apple is poised to enter the world of video streaming and has bought the rights to two films, according to a report on entertainment website Deadline. It bought worldwide rights to “The Elephant Queen,” a documentary directed by Emmy Award-winning filmmakers Victoria Stone and Mark Deeble. The movie features Athena the elephant leading her herd to a new home and is narrated by British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor. Before the festival, Apple had bought the rights to “Wolfwalkers,” an animated movie by


Apple is poised to enter the world of video streaming and has bought the rights to two films, according to a report on entertainment website Deadline. It bought worldwide rights to “The Elephant Queen,” a documentary directed by Emmy Award-winning filmmakers Victoria Stone and Mark Deeble. The movie features Athena the elephant leading her herd to a new home and is narrated by British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor. Before the festival, Apple had bought the rights to “Wolfwalkers,” an animated movie by
Apple just bought an elephants documentary and an animated movie for its streaming service Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, documentary, elephants, worldwide, elephant, service, bought, animated, movie, apple, festival, world, video, streaming, rights


Apple just bought an elephants documentary and an animated movie for its streaming service

Apple is poised to enter the world of video streaming and has bought the rights to two films, according to a report on entertainment website Deadline.

It bought worldwide rights to “The Elephant Queen,” a documentary directed by Emmy Award-winning filmmakers Victoria Stone and Mark Deeble.

The movie features Athena the elephant leading her herd to a new home and is narrated by British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor. It took four years to make and was shown at the Toronto International Film Festival on Saturday, with the creators announcing Apple’s acquisition on Twitter.

Before the festival, Apple had bought the rights to “Wolfwalkers,” an animated movie by Irish director Tomm Moore about a father and daughter traveling to Ireland to destroy a pack of wolves.

Apple is thought to be launching its video service in March 2019. It is late to the party compared with other tech companies such as Amazon, but an investor note last week suggested it could be making $4.4 billion in streaming sales by 2025. Morgan Stanley analyst Katy Huberty raised her price target from $232 to $245 a share and said that there was much potential for Apple users to spend more time on its devices in areas including video and augmented reality.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-09-10  Authors: lucy handley
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, documentary, elephants, worldwide, elephant, service, bought, animated, movie, apple, festival, world, video, streaming, rights


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Trump administration once again lifts ban on importing elephant trophies

Zinke recently told people privately that Trump has called him several times to discuss what to do about elephant trophies. The world’s largest land mammal, the African elephant has been classified as threatened under the U.S. A licensed two-week African elephant hunt can cost more than $50,000 per person, not including airfare, according to advertised rates. As a result, the number of African elephants has shrunk from about 5 million a century ago to about 400,000 remaining. According to the Un


Zinke recently told people privately that Trump has called him several times to discuss what to do about elephant trophies. The world’s largest land mammal, the African elephant has been classified as threatened under the U.S. A licensed two-week African elephant hunt can cost more than $50,000 per person, not including airfare, according to advertised rates. As a result, the number of African elephants has shrunk from about 5 million a century ago to about 400,000 remaining. According to the Un
Trump administration once again lifts ban on importing elephant trophies Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elephants, african, interior, importing, elephant, lifts, trophies, trophy, ban, wildlife, killed, zimbabwe, administration, trump


Trump administration once again lifts ban on importing elephant trophies

The Trump administration has quietly decided once again to allow Americans to import the body parts of African elephants shot for sport, despite presidential tweets decrying the practice as a “horror show.”

President Donald Trump personally intervened in November when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service first said it would lift an Obama-era ban on elephants imported from Zimbabwe and Zambia. The agency contends that encouraging wealthy big-game hunters to kill the threatened species would help raise money for conservation programs.

“Big-game trophy decision will be announced next week but will be very hard pressed to change my mind that this horror show in any way helps conservation of Elephants or any other animal,” Trump tweeted on Nov. 19, placing the policy on hold after a public backlash to the earlier decision.

More than three months later, the federal agency overseen by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke issued a letter dated March 1 announcing that the importation of elephant trophies will now be approved on a “case-by-case basis.” The letter cites a December ruling in a long-running lawsuit challenging the ban filed by Safari Club International and the lobbying arm of the National Rifle Association.

Zinke recently told people privately that Trump has called him several times to discuss what to do about elephant trophies. Neither the Interior Department nor Fish and Wildlife issued a media release over the last week to announce the decision, which was quickly condemned by environmental advocates.

“The Trump administration is trying to keep these crucial trophy import decisions behind closed doors, and that’s totally unacceptable,” said Tanya Sanerib, international legal director at the Center for Biological Diversity. “Elephants aren’t meant to be trophies, they’re meant to roam free.”

Trump’s two adult sons are trophy hunters. A photo of Donald Trump Jr. holding a knife and the bloody severed tail of an elephant he reportedly killed in Zimbabwe in 2011 has sparked outrage among animal rights activists.

Zinke is also an avid hunter who after arriving at Interior last year ordered the arcade game “Big Buck Hunter Pro” to be installed in the employee cafeteria at the agency’s Washington headquarters, a move he said would promote wildlife and habitat conservation.

In June, the department removed longstanding protections for grizzly bears near Yellowstone National Park, a step to potentially allow them to be hunted. The Fish and Wildlife Service also quietly began issuing permits in October allowing African lions killed in Zimbabwe and Zambia to be imported. Previously, only wild lions killed in South Africa were eligible.

The world’s largest land mammal, the African elephant has been classified as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act since 1979. A licensed two-week African elephant hunt can cost more than $50,000 per person, not including airfare, according to advertised rates.

Illicit demand for elephant ivory has led to devastating losses from illegal poaching as the natural habitat available for the animals to roam has also dwindled by more than half. As a result, the number of African elephants has shrunk from about 5 million a century ago to about 400,000 remaining. And that number continues to decline each year.

According to the United Nations, as many as 100,000 African elephants were killed between 2010 and 2012. For forest elephants, the population declined by an estimated 62 percent between 2002 and 2011.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-07
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, elephants, african, interior, importing, elephant, lifts, trophies, trophy, ban, wildlife, killed, zimbabwe, administration, trump


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Trump administration quietly OKs elephant trophy imports — again

Fish and Wildlife Service has reversed an Obama-era ban on elephant trophy imports. A licensed two-week African elephant hunt can cost more than $50,000 per person, not including airfare, according to advertised rates. The world’s largest land mammal, the African elephant has been classified as threatened under the U.S. As a result, the number of African elephants has shrunk from about 5 million a century ago to about 400,000 remaining. According to the United Nations, as many as 100,000 African


Fish and Wildlife Service has reversed an Obama-era ban on elephant trophy imports. A licensed two-week African elephant hunt can cost more than $50,000 per person, not including airfare, according to advertised rates. The world’s largest land mammal, the African elephant has been classified as threatened under the U.S. As a result, the number of African elephants has shrunk from about 5 million a century ago to about 400,000 remaining. According to the United Nations, as many as 100,000 African
Trump administration quietly OKs elephant trophy imports — again Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-07  Authors: carolyn mcatee cerbin, jekesai njikizana, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oks, african, wildlife, trophy, elephant, imports, elephants, ban, species, hunting, administration, quietly, trump, zimbabwe


Trump administration quietly OKs elephant trophy imports — again

Good news for you big-game hunters. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has reversed an Obama-era ban on elephant trophy imports. Instead, the FWS will assess each case on an “individual basis.”

The March 1 announcement comes a bit more than three months after President Trump paused a first attempt to loosen the ban after public outcry. The president, seemingly joining the uproar, called the relaxation on imports a “horror show.”

The Trump administration said in November it would allow the importation of body parts from African elephants shot for sport, contending that encouraging wealthy big-game hunters to kill them would aid the vulnerable species.

The FWS said in a written notice in November that permitting elephants from Zimbabwe and Zambia to be brought back as trophies would raise money for conservation programs. A licensed two-week African elephant hunt can cost more than $50,000 per person, not including airfare, according to advertised rates.

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The change marked a shift in efforts to stop the importation of elephant tusks and hides, overriding a 2014 ban imposed by the Obama administration. The policy applied to the remains of African elephants killed between January 2016 and December 2018.

“Legal, well-regulated sport hunting as part of a sound management program can benefit certain species by providing incentives to local communities to conserve those species and by putting much-needed revenue back into conservation,” the agency said in a statement.

Animal rights activists and environmental groups expressed skepticism then that killing elephants could help save them. Wayne Pacelle, the president and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States, said the policy change sent the wrong signal amid international efforts to curb illegal poaching.

“What kind of message does it send to say to the world that poor Africans who are struggling to survive cannot kill elephants in order to use or sell their parts to make a living, but that it’s just fine for rich Americans to slay the beasts for their tusks to keep as trophies?” Pacelle asked.

But the move was quickly praised by groups that champion big-game trophy hunting, including Safari Club International and the lobbying arm of the National Rifle Association. The two groups had sued to challenge the ban in court.

Chris Cox, executive director of the National Rifle Association’s Institute for Legislative Action, called the action “a significant step forward in having hunting receive the recognition it deserves as a tool of sound wildlife management, which had been all but buried in the previous administration.”

“By lifting the import ban on elephant trophies in Zimbabwe and Zambia the Trump administration underscored, once again, the importance of sound scientific wildlife management and regulated hunting to the survival and enhancement of game species in this country and worldwide,” Cox said.

President Trump’s two adult sons are avid trophy hunters. A photo of Donald Trump Jr. holding a knife and the bloody severed tail of an elephant he reportedly killed in Zimbabwe in 2011 sparked outrage among animal rights activists.

The world’s largest land mammal, the African elephant has been classified as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act since 1979.

Illicit demand for elephant ivory has led to devastating losses from illegal poaching as the natural habitat available for the animals to roam has also dwindled by more than half. As a result, the number of African elephants has shrunk from about 5 million a century ago to about 400,000 remaining. And that number continues to decline each year.

According to the United Nations, as many as 100,000 African elephants were killed between 2010 and 2012. For forest elephants, the population declined by an estimated 62% between 2002 and 2011.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-03-07  Authors: carolyn mcatee cerbin, jekesai njikizana, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, oks, african, wildlife, trophy, elephant, imports, elephants, ban, species, hunting, administration, quietly, trump, zimbabwe


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Trump decision to allow trophy hunting imports angers top Republican

On Friday, House Foreign Affairs Committee chair Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., slammed the decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announced this week, to allow the importation of endangered African elephants killed for trophies in Zimbabwe and Zambia. But according to Royce, the ban on trophy hunting endangered species in Zimbabwe was about national security, as much as it is about conserving wildlife populations. President Donald Trump had yet to weigh in on the new trophy import rules Frid


On Friday, House Foreign Affairs Committee chair Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., slammed the decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announced this week, to allow the importation of endangered African elephants killed for trophies in Zimbabwe and Zambia. But according to Royce, the ban on trophy hunting endangered species in Zimbabwe was about national security, as much as it is about conserving wildlife populations. President Donald Trump had yet to weigh in on the new trophy import rules Frid
Trump decision to allow trophy hunting imports angers top Republican Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-17  Authors: christina wilkie, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, elephants, republican, imports, trophy, killed, angers, species, conservation, zimbabwe, decision, hunting, royce, wildlife, allow, trump


Trump decision to allow trophy hunting imports angers top Republican

The Trump administration’s reversal of a ban on the import of trophy hunted animals from Africa has driven a wedge between the White House and a powerful Republican committee chairman.

On Friday, House Foreign Affairs Committee chair Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif., slammed the decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announced this week, to allow the importation of endangered African elephants killed for trophies in Zimbabwe and Zambia.

“Elephants and other big game in Africa are blood currency for terrorist organizations, and they are being killed at an alarming rate,” Royce said in a statement.

“Today Zimbabwe is in economic and political crisis,” he said. “I have zero confidence that the regime – which for years has promoted corruption at the highest levels – is properly managing and regulating conservation programs.”

As of Friday, Zimbabwe’s longtime president, Robert Mugabe, was believed to be under house arrest following his detention earlier this week by members of the military, in a move the military insisted was not a coup d’etat. Mugabe has led Zimbabwe for nearly 40 years, overseeing a frequently corrupt regime that violently suppressed political opposition.

It is unclear why the Fish and Wildlife Service chose to reverse the Obama-era ban on trophy elephants from Zimbabwe now, but an agency official told ABC News that “new information” from Zimbabwe and Zambia caused it to rethink the ban.

“Legal, well-regulated sport hunting as part of a sound management program can benefit the conservation of certain species by providing incentives to local communities to conserve the species and by putting much-needed revenue back into conservation,” an agency spokesperson said in a statement.

News of the decision sparked an immediate backlash from conservation groups, who pointed to the African elephant’s endangered status.

In Washington, Republican responses to news of the ban’s reversal were largely muted — the GOP has a long record of supporting individual gun rights and increased access to public lands for hunters.

But according to Royce, the ban on trophy hunting endangered species in Zimbabwe was about national security, as much as it is about conserving wildlife populations.

“The administration should withdraw this decision until Zimbabwe stabilizes,” Royce said Friday. “Elephants and other big game in Africa are blood currency for terrorist organizations, and they are being killed at an alarming rate. Stopping poaching isn’t just about saving the world’s most majestic animals for the future – it’s about our national security.”

President Donald Trump had yet to weigh in on the new trophy import rules Friday. But his two eldest sons, Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump are avid hunters, and have been photographed trophy hunting leopards in Zimbabwe.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2017-11-17  Authors: christina wilkie, joshua roberts
Keywords: news, games, cnbc, companies, elephants, republican, imports, trophy, killed, angers, species, conservation, zimbabwe, decision, hunting, royce, wildlife, allow, trump


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