A new market order is emerging, and this is how to trade it, money manager says

This is a symptom of the new market order that is emerging, according to Ben Kirby, portfolio manager at Thornburg Investment Management. We’re going to have lower returns and substantially higher volatility,” Kirby said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation. ” Among them, Kirby likes foreign telecoms China Mobile and France-based Orange, as well as U.S. stocks such as Home Depot. China Mobile yields 4.3%, Orange 5.2% and Home Depot 2.5%. Disclosure: Thornburg Investment Management owns shares of Ch


This is a symptom of the new market order that is emerging, according to Ben Kirby, portfolio manager at Thornburg Investment Management. We’re going to have lower returns and substantially higher volatility,” Kirby said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation. ” Among them, Kirby likes foreign telecoms China Mobile and France-based Orange, as well as U.S. stocks such as Home Depot. China Mobile yields 4.3%, Orange 5.2% and Home Depot 2.5%. Disclosure: Thornburg Investment Management owns shares of Ch
A new market order is emerging, and this is how to trade it, money manager says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emerging, dividendpaying, volatility, stocks, order, kirby, recession, trade, orange, china, manager, economy, stimulus, mobile, money, market


A new market order is emerging, and this is how to trade it, money manager says

It’s been a wild month on Wall Street.

An escalating trade war and an inverted yield curve have kicked off weeks of volatility that sent the S&P 500 at the worst of August’s sell-off 7% below its record high.

This is a symptom of the new market order that is emerging, according to Ben Kirby, portfolio manager at Thornburg Investment Management.

“The last few years have been periods of high returns and relatively low volatility. I think with the yield curve inversion and the economy slowing, PMI is in contraction in much of the world … we’re entering a period that’s the opposite of that. We’re going to have lower returns and substantially higher volatility,” Kirby said Tuesday on CNBC’s “Trading Nation. ”

A global economy creaking to a halt and the bond market flashing a warning sign have raised the chances of a coming recession, according to Kirby. The spread between the 2-year and 10-year Treasury note briefly inverted last week, a warning sign that investors are rushing to safe haven assets in fear the economy could begin to contract.

“Probably 60% of the time after [an inversion] happens you get a recession within the next 12 months,” Kirby said. “When you put it all together, we do have a slowing economy, we do have an economy that’s in all-out stimulus mode around the world, but there’s a limited amount of stimulus that can actually be applied, so as we do more and more stimulus, it becomes less and less effective.”

Pockets of strength, including U.S. job growth and low inflation, should keep a recession at bay for now, Kirby said, predicting a 25% chance in the next year. The odds rise when you stretch that time frame to 24 months, he said.

To hedge against a possible recession in the next two years, Kirby is sticking to stocks that pay investors while they hide out.

“I like dividend-paying equities. To me they’re one of the most attractive asset classes today, because hands you win, and tails you don’t lose too much,” Kirby said. “If stocks keep going up, your dividend-paying stocks will participate in that and … if stocks decline and we do go into a recession, then your dividend-paying equities can be defensive.”

Among them, Kirby likes foreign telecoms China Mobile and France-based Orange, as well as U.S. stocks such as Home Depot. China Mobile yields 4.3%, Orange 5.2% and Home Depot 2.5%.

Disclosure: Thornburg Investment Management owns shares of China Mobile, Orange and Home Depot.

Disclaimer


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-21  Authors: keris lahiff
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emerging, dividendpaying, volatility, stocks, order, kirby, recession, trade, orange, china, manager, economy, stimulus, mobile, money, market


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Thailand’s currency keeps getting stronger and that’s sparking concerns

That strength, however, is sparking concerns as the country’s domestic economy weakens, analysts said. Since the beginning of this year, Thailand’s currency has jumped more than 5% against the dollar. A stronger currency makes the country’s exports more expensive, causing them to be less attractive in international markets. Analysts at Singapore bank DBS said Monday that the strong baht is bad news for Thailand’s trade competitiveness. “While this should stem the appreciation pressure somewhat,


That strength, however, is sparking concerns as the country’s domestic economy weakens, analysts said. Since the beginning of this year, Thailand’s currency has jumped more than 5% against the dollar. A stronger currency makes the country’s exports more expensive, causing them to be less attractive in international markets. Analysts at Singapore bank DBS said Monday that the strong baht is bad news for Thailand’s trade competitiveness. “While this should stem the appreciation pressure somewhat,
Thailand’s currency keeps getting stronger and that’s sparking concerns Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thailands, stronger, analysts, bank, thats, exports, getting, concerns, baht, keeps, currency, cut, emerging, countrys, dollar, sparking, trade


Thailand's currency keeps getting stronger and that's sparking concerns

The Thai baht has soared against the U.S. dollar this year, significantly more than many other emerging market currencies.

That strength, however, is sparking concerns as the country’s domestic economy weakens, analysts said.

Since the beginning of this year, Thailand’s currency has jumped more than 5% against the dollar. On a year-over-year basis, it has bounded even higher — nearly 8%.

Other top performing emerging market currencies in the region have also strengthened against the dollar — but still lag behind the baht. Both the Indonesian rupiah and the Philippine peso, for instance, have risen more than 3% against the dollar so far this year.

“Policymakers and exporters in Thailand are once again voicing concern about the strength of the baht,” Gareth Leather, senior Asia economist at research firm Capital Economics, wrote in a note earlier this month. “While most (emerging market) currencies have appreciated against the US dollar in recent months, none have risen by as much as the baht.”

The strength of the baht has been supported by Thailand’s large trade surplus and a hawkish central bank, among other factors.

“(The) strong currency is worsening the (Thai) economy’s plight by hurting exports further,” Prakash Sakpal, Asia economist at Dutch bank ING, told CNBC.

A stronger currency makes the country’s exports more expensive, causing them to be less attractive in international markets.

Analysts at Singapore bank DBS said Monday that the strong baht is bad news for Thailand’s trade competitiveness. They cited a study by the Bank of Thailand, which showed that, for every 1% the baht strengthened against the dollar, it increases export prices — in dollar terms — by 0.3%.

Meanwhile, exports are already declining. They dropped for the third straight month in May, falling 5.79% from a year earlier. That was worse than the 3.6% decrease analysts had projected in a Reuters poll.

On Tuesday, data showed the country’s manufacturing output for June headed the same way: It fell 5.54% from a year earlier, which was worse than the forecast of a 3.15% decline.

“Considering these weak trade trends, together with a challenging outlook for regional growth … a strong currency comes at an inopportune time,” DBS analysts wrote, referring to slowing exports and imports, as well as declining tourism.

The country’s central bank could give in to pressure and cut rates to curb the rising baht, economists said. Still, they were not optimistic about the effectiveness of such a move.

“The (Bank of Thailand) could consider a rate cut to help reduce the baht’s yield appeal, but it will be no panacea,” DBS analysts said in their note, adding that a cut of 25 basis points would just undo a hike by the central bank last December.

ING’s Sakpal similarly said that any cut would see limited results.

“While this should stem the appreciation pressure somewhat, we may not see the (baht) being displaced from its best-performer emerging currency status just yet,” he said.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-31  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, thailands, stronger, analysts, bank, thats, exports, getting, concerns, baht, keeps, currency, cut, emerging, countrys, dollar, sparking, trade


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Analysts say some emerging market currencies look appealing as the Fed weighs rate cuts

Investors should be looking to buy emerging market currencies against the U.S. dollar, two analysts told CNBC on Monday. Those calls come as the U.S. Federal Reserve appears to be seriously considering cutting U.S. interest rates. “We do think there is a basket of emerging market currencies that look appealing as the Fed is poised now to begin cutting rates as opposed to raising rates, ” he told CNBC’s “Street Signs. ” The term “carry trade” refers to a strategy in which investors borrow in a cu


Investors should be looking to buy emerging market currencies against the U.S. dollar, two analysts told CNBC on Monday. Those calls come as the U.S. Federal Reserve appears to be seriously considering cutting U.S. interest rates. “We do think there is a basket of emerging market currencies that look appealing as the Fed is poised now to begin cutting rates as opposed to raising rates, ” he told CNBC’s “Street Signs. ” The term “carry trade” refers to a strategy in which investors borrow in a cu
Analysts say some emerging market currencies look appealing as the Fed weighs rate cuts Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: abigail ng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emerging, rates, rate, say, weighs, dollar, market, told, appealing, currency, think, interest, looking, cuts, fed, look, currencies


Analysts say some emerging market currencies look appealing as the Fed weighs rate cuts

Investors should be looking to buy emerging market currencies against the U.S. dollar, two analysts told CNBC on Monday.

Those calls come as the U.S. Federal Reserve appears to be seriously considering cutting U.S. interest rates. As dollar-based investments begin to yield less interest, that may weaken the greenback against the currencies of higher-interest countries — including many in the developing world.

“What we see now is that the dollar is probably topped out against a number of the emerging market currencies, ” said Mike Ryan, chief investment officer for the Americas at UBS Global Wealth Management.

“We do think there is a basket of emerging market currencies that look appealing as the Fed is poised now to begin cutting rates as opposed to raising rates, ” he told CNBC’s “Street Signs. ”

This does not signal broad-based U.S. dollar weakness, he added, noting that other developed-country central banks are also looking to pivot on rate policy.

Khoon Goh, head of Asia research at ANZ Bank, echoed that view.

“We already have the (Australian and New Zealand central banks) easing, so I think we’re in this situation where carry trades will very much come back into vogue, ” he told CNBC’s “Squawk Box. ”

The term “carry trade” refers to a strategy in which investors borrow in a currency with low interest rates in order to purchase assets in a currency with higher interest rates. That way, they can earn from their investments in another currency while paying less interest on the amount borrowed.

Goh said ANZ continues to favor some currencies in Asia such as the Indian rupee and the Indonesian rupiah. Benchmark interest rates in India and Indonesia are 5.75% and 6%, respectively, compared to the Fed’s target between 2.25% and 2.5%, according to Trading Economics.

The picture in terms of the U.S. dollar index is “a little bit more muddy,” but it’s clearer for high-yielding currencies of countries with a “compelling growth story” or scope for economic reforms that will spur foreign inflows, he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-09  Authors: abigail ng
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, emerging, rates, rate, say, weighs, dollar, market, told, appealing, currency, think, interest, looking, cuts, fed, look, currencies


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African swine fever could drive up inflation in emerging markets as pork prices soar

African swine fever, which has already ravaged pig herds in China and pushed up food prices there, could also drive up inflation in the other emerging markets, according to research firm Capital Economics. “The most obvious channel through which this will impact (emerging markets) is via higher inflation,” James Swanston, assistant economist at Capital Economics, wrote in a note last week. That compares with less than 1% in most other emerging markets, and about 3.5% in China, Swanston wrote. Da


African swine fever, which has already ravaged pig herds in China and pushed up food prices there, could also drive up inflation in the other emerging markets, according to research firm Capital Economics. “The most obvious channel through which this will impact (emerging markets) is via higher inflation,” James Swanston, assistant economist at Capital Economics, wrote in a note last week. That compares with less than 1% in most other emerging markets, and about 3.5% in China, Swanston wrote. Da
African swine fever could drive up inflation in emerging markets as pork prices soar Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, swanston, markets, african, wrote, prices, china, rise, capital, fever, soar, emerging, pork, inflation, drive, swine


African swine fever could drive up inflation in emerging markets as pork prices soar

A hired hand feeds a sow which recently gave birth to a new litter at the Grand Canal Pig Farm in Jiaxing, in China’s Zhejiang province.

African swine fever, which has already ravaged pig herds in China and pushed up food prices there, could also drive up inflation in the other emerging markets, according to research firm Capital Economics.

Outbreaks of the disease have been detected not just in China, but also in parts of Southeast Asia, Japan, Australia, Poland and Russia.

The Chinese government said in April it had culled more than a million pigs in a bid to control the outbreak, but some experts — such as Rabobank and TS Lombard — estimated that the number of hog culled could be more than 100 million.

“The most obvious channel through which this will impact (emerging markets) is via higher inflation,” James Swanston, assistant economist at Capital Economics, wrote in a note last week.

“If the disease spreads and increases in severity, it would probably make a notable contribution to inflation in parts of Asia … and Eastern Europe,” he said.

He singled out Taiwan, Cambodia, Vietnam, Russia, Poland and Romania, saying that pork is a relatively large part of the consumer price index basket in those countries — at around 2%. That compares with less than 1% in most other emerging markets, and about 3.5% in China, Swanston wrote.

Data from China’s National Bureau of Statistics on Wednesday showed that food prices in the country spiked 7.7% in May compared to a year ago, as pork prices surged 18.2% also in the same period.

The rise in inflation in China “probably has further to run,” while consumer prices in the other emerging markets would also be pushed up — by around 0.3 percentage points — if pork inflation were to rise to 15%, according to Capital Economics.

Recent spikes in prices have caused pork inflation in emerging economies to rise by as high as 15%, Swanston wrote.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-06-17  Authors: weizhen tan
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, swanston, markets, african, wrote, prices, china, rise, capital, fever, soar, emerging, pork, inflation, drive, swine


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Goldman Sachs cuts exposure to emerging markets on US-China trade tensions

The investment management arm of Goldman Sachs scaled back its “overweight” exposure to emerging market assets Thursday, amid rising trade tensions between the U.S. and China. High risk may lead to higher returns, but for now the MSCI emerging markets index has fallen more than 11% over a 12-month period. Last week, the U.S. raised tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports from China from 10% to 25%. China retaliated with tariffs worth $60 billion of goods imported from the U.S. from June 1. “The


The investment management arm of Goldman Sachs scaled back its “overweight” exposure to emerging market assets Thursday, amid rising trade tensions between the U.S. and China. High risk may lead to higher returns, but for now the MSCI emerging markets index has fallen more than 11% over a 12-month period. Last week, the U.S. raised tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports from China from 10% to 25%. China retaliated with tariffs worth $60 billion of goods imported from the U.S. from June 1. “The
Goldman Sachs cuts exposure to emerging markets on US-China trade tensions Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sachs, exposure, trade, tensions, billion, trump, cuts, uschina, worth, tariffs, markets, security, goldman, emerging


Goldman Sachs cuts exposure to emerging markets on US-China trade tensions

The investment management arm of Goldman Sachs scaled back its “overweight” exposure to emerging market assets Thursday, amid rising trade tensions between the U.S. and China.

“We have scaled back overweight exposure to EM (emerging market) currencies and EM debt until we gain clarity on the direction of travel for both U.S.-China trade relations and global growth, with the two being interconnected,” Goldman Sachs Asset Management (GSAM) said in a note published Thursday.

Flows into emerging markets can be dependent on cheap capital from the Federal Reserve and are very sensitive to a change in monetary policy in the U.S. Add to that domestic factors such as high current account deficits, weak currencies and a dependence on commodities, these markets can make for a risky investment.

High risk may lead to higher returns, but for now the MSCI emerging markets index has fallen more than 11% over a 12-month period. Meanwhile, the major stock indexes stateside are all down more than 3% this month.

Last week, the U.S. raised tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports from China from 10% to 25%. In addition to this, President Donald Trump indicated that more tariffs will be applied to roughly $300 billion worth of goods imported from China.

China retaliated with tariffs worth $60 billion of goods imported from the U.S. from June 1. “These events mark an abrupt escalation in U.S.-China trade tensions after a period of relative calm since the fourth-quarter of 2018,” GSAM said in a note.

Trade worries were eased slightly on Wednesday after CNBC reported Trump’s plans to postpone auto tariffs by up to six months. The White House faces a Saturday deadline to decide whether to slap duties on car and auto part imports over national security concerns.

However, this didn’t last long as Trump declared on Wednesday a national emergency over threats against American technology. The U.S. Department of Commerce announced the addition of Huawei Technologies and its affiliates to the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) Entity List, making it more difficult for the Chinese telecom giant to conduct business with U.S. companies.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-05-16  Authors: spriha srivastava
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, sachs, exposure, trade, tensions, billion, trump, cuts, uschina, worth, tariffs, markets, security, goldman, emerging


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Turkey’s lira takes another dive as central bank scares investors over interest rate plans

Turkey’s troubled lira fell to its lowest level since October on Thursday after its central bank scrapped a pledge to raise interest rates if needed. The Turkish central bank’s move has further shaken investor confidence in the country of 80 million, whose currency crash last year set off a run on emerging markets worldwide. Turkey’s Monetary Policy Committee’s statement on Thursday dropped its previous pledge that “if needed, further monetary tightening will be delivered.” Investors remain perp


Turkey’s troubled lira fell to its lowest level since October on Thursday after its central bank scrapped a pledge to raise interest rates if needed. The Turkish central bank’s move has further shaken investor confidence in the country of 80 million, whose currency crash last year set off a run on emerging markets worldwide. Turkey’s Monetary Policy Committee’s statement on Thursday dropped its previous pledge that “if needed, further monetary tightening will be delivered.” Investors remain perp
Turkey’s lira takes another dive as central bank scares investors over interest rate plans Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: natasha turak, kerem uzel, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plans, interest, currency, markets, lira, scares, monetary, rate, foreign, turkeys, investors, inflation, turkish, takes, dive, bank, central, emerging


Turkey's lira takes another dive as central bank scares investors over interest rate plans

Turkey’s troubled lira fell to its lowest level since October on Thursday after its central bank scrapped a pledge to raise interest rates if needed.

The monetary tightening pause, now in its seventh month, is repelling investors already worried about double-digit inflation, unorthodox policy, political influence over the central bank’s independence, and dramatic yet unexplained moves in Turkey’s foreign currency reserves.

The lira was trading at 5.9502 to the dollar at 2:30 p.m. London time, and was down 1.5% at one point during the session. It is now down 7% on the greenback in the last month.

The Turkish central bank’s move has further shaken investor confidence in the country of 80 million, whose currency crash last year set off a run on emerging markets worldwide.

“No other way to say this, but pretty ridiculous move by the CBRT (Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey) … why on Earth would you do that when you are still in the market’s cross wires, you are losing FX (foreign exchange) reserves and the lira is un-anchored,” Timothy Ash, senior emerging markets strategist at Bluebay Asset Management, said in an emailed note.

“It’s like the CBRT has just made mistake, after mistake over the past couple of years.”

Turkey’s Monetary Policy Committee’s statement on Thursday dropped its previous pledge that “if needed, further monetary tightening will be delivered.” It said instead that its decisions “will be determined to keep inflation in line with the targeted path,” widely interpreted by investors as dovish.

The bank’s benchmark rate is currently 24%.

Turkey’s currency had lost 36% of its value against the dollar by the end of last year and the country fell into a recession amid mounting inflation, investor fears over Turkish President Recep Erdogan’s control over the central bank, diplomatic fights with the U.S. and a widening current account deficit.

Now, as Erdogan’s ruling AK Party reckons with bruising losses in local elections, in which it appears to have lost key cities that had long been under its control, many regional watchers worry that the government will double down on populist policies that seek to keep rates low, despite the official inflation rate at nearly 20%.

Analysts also warn of further pressure to the currency amid mounting tensions with the U.S. over a weapons purchase deal with Russia.

Investors remain perplexed over a lack of explanation from the government for rapid drops in foreign reserves and reports that the central bank is borrowing in order to bolster them.

The lira has been ranked by analysts as the worst-performing emerging markets currency this month. Ratings agency Moody’s expects the Turkish economy to contract by 2% in 2019.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-25  Authors: natasha turak, kerem uzel, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, plans, interest, currency, markets, lira, scares, monetary, rate, foreign, turkeys, investors, inflation, turkish, takes, dive, bank, central, emerging


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An emerging crisis in China could give US the upper hand in trade talks

“We are not sure if the market appreciates how a worsening epidemic of African swine fever for China’s massive pig population could further force China’s hand on a broader trade war compromise,” Gilardi said. The only commodity outperforming lean hogs is RBOB gasoline, which is up about 60% year to date. U.S. and Chinese officials have indicated recently that both sides are coming close to a trade deal. Earlier this month, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He said a new consensus has been reached in the


“We are not sure if the market appreciates how a worsening epidemic of African swine fever for China’s massive pig population could further force China’s hand on a broader trade war compromise,” Gilardi said. The only commodity outperforming lean hogs is RBOB gasoline, which is up about 60% year to date. U.S. and Chinese officials have indicated recently that both sides are coming close to a trade deal. Earlier this month, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He said a new consensus has been reached in the
An emerging crisis in China could give US the upper hand in trade talks Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lead, gilardi, chinese, hand, war, pressure, upper, negotiations, crisis, pork, swine, trade, talks, emerging, chinas, china


An emerging crisis in China could give US the upper hand in trade talks

This could lead to even higher hog prices, which are already putting pressure on the Chinese consumer and could force China to make concessions in its negotiations with the U.S., analyst Ross Gilardi wrote in a note to clients.

“We are not sure if the market appreciates how a worsening epidemic of African swine fever for China’s massive pig population could further force China’s hand on a broader trade war compromise,” Gilardi said. “The growing threat is rampant pork price inflation for the masses, which puts more pressure on China to lift 62% import tariffs on US pork even though US pork imports are already up sharply versus pre-trade war levels.”

Lean-hog futures have rallied 52.4% this year and are among the best-performing commodities of 2019. The only commodity outperforming lean hogs is RBOB gasoline, which is up about 60% year to date. Meanwhile, the S&P 500 is only up about 16.4% this year.

U.S. and Chinese officials have indicated recently that both sides are coming close to a trade deal. Earlier this month, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He said a new consensus has been reached in the negotiations, according to China’s state news website Xinhua. In March, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the two countries had “constructive” trade talks.

Still, the African swine flu crisis is “seemingly weakening” China’s hand and “could also lead it to relax US soybean restrictions, which would be helpful to the US farmer, and be good for equipment demand,” Gilardi said.

—CNBC’s Michael Bloom contributed to this report.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: fred imbert
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, lead, gilardi, chinese, hand, war, pressure, upper, negotiations, crisis, pork, swine, trade, talks, emerging, chinas, china


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Turkey’s economy is spiraling — and a new election will make things worse

Turkey’s lira fell to a six-month low against the dollar this week as President Recep Erdogan’s ruling AK Party formally requested a new election for the city of Istanbul, where current tallies show it lost by a slim margin in local elections last month. The move spells more trouble ahead for a massive economy already rocked by volatility, political tensions and diplomatic standoffs and whose currency crash last year set off a run on emerging markets. “The market will not like months of uncertai


Turkey’s lira fell to a six-month low against the dollar this week as President Recep Erdogan’s ruling AK Party formally requested a new election for the city of Istanbul, where current tallies show it lost by a slim margin in local elections last month. The move spells more trouble ahead for a massive economy already rocked by volatility, political tensions and diplomatic standoffs and whose currency crash last year set off a run on emerging markets. “The market will not like months of uncertai
Turkey’s economy is spiraling — and a new election will make things worse Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: natasha turak, murad sezer, lockheed martin, -timothy ash, senior emerging markets strategist, bluebay asset management
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, uncertainty, things, economy, volatility, trouble, week, turkey, emerging, turkeys, vote, worse, tuesdayat, spiraling, election


Turkey's economy is spiraling — and a new election will make things worse

Turkey’s lira fell to a six-month low against the dollar this week as President Recep Erdogan’s ruling AK Party formally requested a new election for the city of Istanbul, where current tallies show it lost by a slim margin in local elections last month.

The move spells more trouble ahead for a massive economy already rocked by volatility, political tensions and diplomatic standoffs and whose currency crash last year set off a run on emerging markets.

“The market will not like months of uncertainty, if indeed the vote is repeated,” Timothy Ash, senior emerging markets strategist at Bluebay Asset Management, said in a note Tuesday.

“At this stage, whatever the result of the re-vote, the impression has been left that the election process in Turkey is not secure,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-17  Authors: natasha turak, murad sezer, lockheed martin, -timothy ash, senior emerging markets strategist, bluebay asset management
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Signs of a global economic recovery in the second half are emerging

Worries about the global economy percolate even as equities around the world rise, but an economist at Ned Davis Research says the worst of it may be over. Alejandra Grindal, senior international economist at the firm, said the aggregate of manufacturing purchasing managers’ indexes (PMIs) from across the globe stabilized in March after falling for 10 straight months. Meanwhile, the number of countries reporting expansion in the manufacturing sector rose for the first time in six months. “We mig


Worries about the global economy percolate even as equities around the world rise, but an economist at Ned Davis Research says the worst of it may be over. Alejandra Grindal, senior international economist at the firm, said the aggregate of manufacturing purchasing managers’ indexes (PMIs) from across the globe stabilized in March after falling for 10 straight months. Meanwhile, the number of countries reporting expansion in the manufacturing sector rose for the first time in six months. “We mig
Signs of a global economic recovery in the second half are emerging Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: fred imbert, str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, emerging, economic, recovery, ned, months, expansion, half, monetary, international, grindal, second, economist, signs, manufacturing, research


Signs of a global economic recovery in the second half are emerging

Worries about the global economy percolate even as equities around the world rise, but an economist at Ned Davis Research says the worst of it may be over.

Alejandra Grindal, senior international economist at the firm, said the aggregate of manufacturing purchasing managers’ indexes (PMIs) from across the globe stabilized in March after falling for 10 straight months. Meanwhile, the number of countries reporting expansion in the manufacturing sector rose for the first time in six months. She noted these indicators usually bottom about four to eight months “before the next expansion begins.”

“We might be getting signs of a global economic recovery in the second half of the year,” Grindal said at the Ned Davis Research annual investment conference in Boston. “At least it’s sort of giving you some rays of light.”

Grindal’s comments follow the International Monetary Fund decreasing its 2019 growth outlook to 3.3%, which would be the lowest since the financial crisis, from 3.5%. In its report, the IMF highlighted risks such as the potential of increasing trade tensions as well as tighter monetary policy from the Federal Reserve.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: fred imbert, str, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, global, emerging, economic, recovery, ned, months, expansion, half, monetary, international, grindal, second, economist, signs, manufacturing, research


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Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have

Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month. The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period. However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. “English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other


Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month. The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period. However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. “English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other
Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: chloe taylor, image, david madison, photographers choice, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speakers, market, uk, languages, foreign, eu, skills, employers, emerging, language, fewer, migration, job


Here are the top foreign languages that UK employers want you to have

Indeed analyzed the requirements in millions of job advertisements posted on its website, which is searched by more than 250 million people per month.

Demand for German speakers peaked just before the Brexit referendum in June 2016, according to the data.

The total number of job roles specifying language skills as a prerequisite increased by almost 3% in the same period.

However, Indeed noted that Brexit’s impact on migration could potentially lead to a “language gap” in the British employment market. According to the U.K.’s Office for National Statistics, net migration from the EU is now at its lowest level in a decade, which could signal a reduction in the talent pool when it comes to European language skills.

“Many U.K. employers who require multilingual staff are becoming increasingly unsettled as a perfect storm brews — fewer and fewer linguists are emerging from our education system just as Brexit uncertainty looks to be deterring workers relocating here from the EU,” Bill Richards, U.K. managing director of Indeed, said in a press release.

“English is a global language, but that cannot always offset the need for fluent speakers of other languages. While the U.K. market clearly continues to offer many opportunities for those with additional language skills, there is a danger of a shortfall emerging as insufficient supply butts up against rising demand,” he added.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: chloe taylor, image, david madison, photographers choice, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, speakers, market, uk, languages, foreign, eu, skills, employers, emerging, language, fewer, migration, job


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