Trump vows to ‘reciprocate’ against EU tariffs after Harley reports nearly 27% drop in profit

President Donald Trump appeared to reverse course on Harley Davidson on Tuesday, pledging to retaliate against “unfair” European Union tariffs that the company partially blamed for its nearly 27% drop in first-quarter profit. Trump, who called for a boycott against the motorcycle company last year amid a spat over steel, said that the EU tariffs have forced Harley to move U.S. jobs overseas. Harley announced plans last year to move production of its motorcycles destined for the EU to overseas fa


President Donald Trump appeared to reverse course on Harley Davidson on Tuesday, pledging to retaliate against “unfair” European Union tariffs that the company partially blamed for its nearly 27% drop in first-quarter profit. Trump, who called for a boycott against the motorcycle company last year amid a spat over steel, said that the EU tariffs have forced Harley to move U.S. jobs overseas. Harley announced plans last year to move production of its motorcycles destined for the EU to overseas fa
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: emma newburger, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, nearly, reports, eu, drop, unfair, production, harley, jobs, steel, tariffs, vows, overseas, reciprocate, company, profit


Trump vows to 'reciprocate' against EU tariffs after Harley reports nearly 27% drop in profit

President Donald Trump appeared to reverse course on Harley Davidson on Tuesday, pledging to retaliate against “unfair” European Union tariffs that the company partially blamed for its nearly 27% drop in first-quarter profit.

Trump, who called for a boycott against the motorcycle company last year amid a spat over steel, said that the EU tariffs have forced Harley to move U.S. jobs overseas. “So unfair to U.S. We will Reciprocate!” he said in a tweet.

Harley announced plans last year to move production of its motorcycles destined for the EU to overseas facilities from the U.S. to avoid EU tariffs imposed in retaliation against Trump’s duties on aluminum and steel imports. In response, Trump called for a boycott of the company and threatened higher taxes as retaliation.

The White House did not immediately respond to requests for comment on Tuesday. Harley said it hasn’t moved jobs overseas due to tariffs, but moving production of EU motorcycles to their plant in Thailand, which came on late last year to support customers in the ASEAN region. No jobs were impacted here in the US as a result.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: emma newburger, nicholas kamm, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, trump, nearly, reports, eu, drop, unfair, production, harley, jobs, steel, tariffs, vows, overseas, reciprocate, company, profit


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Hillary Clinton on Mueller report: DOJ rule saved Trump from indictment

Clinton, whom Trump defeated in the 2016 election, also called for the release of an unredacted version of Mueller’s report. “I’m really of the mind that the Mueller report is part of the beginning. As more high-profile Democrats call for impeachment proceedings against Trump, Clinton emphasized that the process should “be something undertaken in a really serious, diligent way, based on evidence.” Clinton’s husband, Bill Clinton, was impeached during his second term as president, but was not rem


Clinton, whom Trump defeated in the 2016 election, also called for the release of an unredacted version of Mueller’s report. “I’m really of the mind that the Mueller report is part of the beginning. As more high-profile Democrats call for impeachment proceedings against Trump, Clinton emphasized that the process should “be something undertaken in a really serious, diligent way, based on evidence.” Clinton’s husband, Bill Clinton, was impeached during his second term as president, but was not rem
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: emma newburger, don emmert, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, rule, mueller, evidence, crimes, trump, hillary, called, clinton, doj, impeachment, impeached, saved, indictment, really, proceedings, report


Hillary Clinton on Mueller report: DOJ rule saved Trump from indictment

Clinton, whom Trump defeated in the 2016 election, also called for the release of an unredacted version of Mueller’s report. “I’m really of the mind that the Mueller report is part of the beginning. It’s not the end,” she said.

“Every American who cares about holding our adversaries accountable, looking to prevent what happened from ever happening again, should take the time to go through,” she added.

As more high-profile Democrats call for impeachment proceedings against Trump, Clinton emphasized that the process should “be something undertaken in a really serious, diligent way, based on evidence.”

“I have a weird personal history about impeachment,” she said, referring to her time as a staff attorney for the House Judiciary Committee during the Watergate investigation. “It shouldn’t be a preordained conclusion. It should be based on evidence, not on partisan advantage.”

Nixon resigned before he could be impeached. Clinton’s husband, Bill Clinton, was impeached during his second term as president, but was not removed from office.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts has called on elected officials to begin impeachment proceedings, along with other 2020 Democratic candidates including Sen. Kamala Harris of California and Rep. Seth Moulton of Massachusetts.

Meanwhile, Trump has railed against calls for his impeachment. He wrote on Twitter on Monday that “Only high crimes and misdemeanors can lead to impeachment.”

“There were no crimes by me (No Collusion, No Obstruction), so you can’t impeach,” Trump said.

WATCH: Clinton says without Comey letter, evidence shows she’s have won


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-23  Authors: emma newburger, don emmert, afp, getty images
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FAA panel says Boeing 737 Max software is ‘operationally suitable’ in new report

The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday released its initial review of Boeing’s update to its 737 Max anti-stall software suspected of contributing to two fatal plane crashes, calling it “operationally suitable.” The draft report from the FAA’s Flight Standardization Board recommends that pilots take additional computer-based training for the MCAS automated flight system. Boeing said it’s completed 96 flights totaling over 159 hours of air time with its software fix for the Max jet. The c


The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday released its initial review of Boeing’s update to its 737 Max anti-stall software suspected of contributing to two fatal plane crashes, calling it “operationally suitable.” The draft report from the FAA’s Flight Standardization Board recommends that pilots take additional computer-based training for the MCAS automated flight system. Boeing said it’s completed 96 flights totaling over 159 hours of air time with its software fix for the Max jet. The c
FAA panel says Boeing 737 Max software is ‘operationally suitable’ in new report Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: emma newburger, jason redmond, afp, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, boeing, fix, max, works, wells, operationally, faa, 737, systemthe, panel, boeings, suitable, flight, company, board, report, software


FAA panel says Boeing 737 Max software is 'operationally suitable' in new report

The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday released its initial review of Boeing’s update to its 737 Max anti-stall software suspected of contributing to two fatal plane crashes, calling it “operationally suitable.”

The draft report from the FAA’s Flight Standardization Board recommends that pilots take additional computer-based training for the MCAS automated flight system.

The company’s shares jumped by about 2% on the news.

Boeing said it’s completed 96 flights totaling over 159 hours of air time with its software fix for the Max jet. The company is also updating airlines by bringing representatives into flight simulators and showing them the modified flight control system.

The company has stopped deliveries and has cut Max production by 20% as it works on a fix. The jets have been grounded since mid-March. Wells Fargo said Tuesday that Boeing’s troubles with the Max will reduce second-quarter GDP growth by 0.2%.

Separately, Institutional Shareholder Services on Tuesday recommended that shareholders vote in favor of a proposal that would require Boeing to have an independent chairman of the board. That title is currently held by CEO Dennis Muilenburg.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: emma newburger, jason redmond, afp, getty images
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Wall Street and finance executives place first bets on 2020 Democrats

Wall Street and finance executives placed their early 2020 bets on a variety of Democratic presidential candidates, from Pete Buttigieg to Kamala Harris, even as the contenders try to distance themselves from big-money donors. Sen. Bernie Sanders, who led the Democratic fundraising field with an $18 million haul in the first quarter, did not appear to get donations from finance executives. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, another longtime critic of Wall Street and big businesses, received few donations fr


Wall Street and finance executives placed their early 2020 bets on a variety of Democratic presidential candidates, from Pete Buttigieg to Kamala Harris, even as the contenders try to distance themselves from big-money donors. Sen. Bernie Sanders, who led the Democratic fundraising field with an $18 million haul in the first quarter, did not appear to get donations from finance executives. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, another longtime critic of Wall Street and big businesses, received few donations fr
Wall Street and finance executives place first bets on 2020 Democrats Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: brian schwartz, john w schoen, emma newburger, hillary kladke, moment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, campaign, president, million, 2020, trump, fundraising, place, investment, 2800, executives, bets, street, wall, donations, quarter, democrats


Wall Street and finance executives place first bets on 2020 Democrats

Wall Street and finance executives placed their early 2020 bets on a variety of Democratic presidential candidates, from Pete Buttigieg to Kamala Harris, even as the contenders try to distance themselves from big-money donors.

The first-quarter fundraising totals are the latest indication that high-profile Democratic financiers are waiting for the field to thin out before they open their funding networks and checkbooks to potential challengers to President Donald Trump next year.

Some donors have also been eagerly waiting for former Vice President Joe Biden to enter the race before they open their extensive money networks to other candidates, according to people familiar with the deliberations.

Meanwhile, as Democrats vie for limited dollars in a crowded group, Trump’s campaign raised a whopping $30 million in the first quarter and has more than $40 million in cash on hand, giving the president a clear edge even as he suffers from low approval ratings.

The early fundraising totals, which were disclosed on Monday in Federal Election Commission filings, show that some players in the financial industry are interested in backing certain candidates early on, including Sens. Cory Booker and Kirsten Gillibrand and former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, who led the Democratic fundraising field with an $18 million haul in the first quarter, did not appear to get donations from finance executives. Eighty-four percent of the take came from donations of $200 or less.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, another longtime critic of Wall Street and big businesses, received few donations from people in the financial industry. Warren raised $6 million, with 70% coming from small donations.

O’Rourke rode a small-donor base to a stunning near-defeat of Republican Sen. Ted Cruz in deep red Texas last year. He has said repeatedly he will not accept any contributions from corporate PACs, lobbyists and special interest groups. However, his stance didn’t dissuade some big-money backers to send some checks his way, as he racked up $9.4 million in total donations last quarter.

Mark Gallogly, the co-founder of investment firm Centerbridge Partners, donated $2,800 to O’Rourke’s campaign. Gallogly, a major bundler for President Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012, had been telling friends he was leaning toward supporting O’Rourke’s candidacy. Bo Crowell, a managing director at investment banking firm Macquarie Capital, also sent $2,800 O’Rourke’s way. His LinkedIn page says he’s been an investment banker with 17 years of health-care experience.

Harris, Booker, Gillibrand and fellow Sen. Amy Klobuchar have echoed O’Rourke’s calls to reject money from PACs and corporations. Yet, also like O’Rourke, they have received support from corporate and finance leaders.

Beverly Anderson, an executive vice president at Wells Fargo, donated $2,800 to Harris’ campaign. Tia Breakley, a managing director at private equity behemoth Blackstone, gave Harris $1,000. Blackstone is run by Steve Schwarzman, one of Trump’s top supporters. Harris has raked in a total of $12 million since she announced her candidacy in January, putting her among the top tier of Democratic candidates.

Meanwhile, Booker received $2,800 from Mark Robinson, a partner at private equity titan Centerview Partners, which has advised pharmaceutical and biotech companies. Boaz Weinstein, the founder and chief investment officer of Saba Capital Management, donated $2,800 to Booker.

Saba’s Michael D’Angelo, a partner and chief operating officer at the firm, gave Gillibrand $2,800.

Gillibrand finished the quarter bringing in just under $3 million, while Booker saw $5 million added to his campaign coffer.

Read more: Pete Buttigieg raises $1 million within four hours of 2020 campaign announcement

Buttigieg, the South Bend, Indiana, mayor, raised just over $7 million in the first quarter. According to filings, $5,600 came from Stephen Schuler, a director at Chicago-based investment firm Wicklow Capital. During the 2018 congressional midterm elections, Schuler spent well over $1 million in support of Democrats, records show. Employees at Wicklow Capital combined to give at least $11,200 to Buttigieg throughout the most recent quarter. He has publicly sworn off support from corporate PACs and contributions from the fossil fuel industry.

While most of the fundraising for each candidate came through grassroots small donations under $200, political finance veterans say 2020 candidates shouldn’t let up in appealing to traditional big-money spenders — particularly if they don’t want to play catch-up with Trump during the general election.

“I think this period of a campaign is about building that network, and right now we are relying way too much on digital fundraising,” Rufus Gifford, Obama’s finance director during his 2012 re-election campaign, told CNBC on Tuesday. “I think we can beat Trump. But can we beat Trump … being out-raised 3 to 1? Let’s be sure that the candidate won’t have to spend so much time raising money come the general election.”

Representatives for the 2020 campaigns mentioned in this story did not return requests for comment.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-16  Authors: brian schwartz, john w schoen, emma newburger, hillary kladke, moment, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, finance, campaign, president, million, 2020, trump, fundraising, place, investment, 2800, executives, bets, street, wall, donations, quarter, democrats


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United Airlines cancels all 737 Max flights through early July

United Airlines has extended cancellations of the Boeing 737 Max through early July, following similar moves by other major airlines coping with the jet’s prolonged grounding. American Airlines said Sunday it will cancel all Max flights through Aug. 19. On Friday, Southwest Airlines removed the Max jet from its schedule through Aug. 5. United had previously cancelled Max flights through June 5. The widespread cancellations come after the Max’s anti-stall software was implicated in two fatal cras


United Airlines has extended cancellations of the Boeing 737 Max through early July, following similar moves by other major airlines coping with the jet’s prolonged grounding. American Airlines said Sunday it will cancel all Max flights through Aug. 19. On Friday, Southwest Airlines removed the Max jet from its schedule through Aug. 5. United had previously cancelled Max flights through June 5. The widespread cancellations come after the Max’s anti-stall software was implicated in two fatal cras
United Airlines cancels all 737 Max flights through early July Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: emma newburger, katherine frey, the washington post, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, widespread, united, cancellations, flights, aug, southwest, early, similar, software, airlines, 737, max, cancels


United Airlines cancels all 737 Max flights through early July

United Airlines has extended cancellations of the Boeing 737 Max through early July, following similar moves by other major airlines coping with the jet’s prolonged grounding.

American Airlines said Sunday it will cancel all Max flights through Aug. 19. On Friday, Southwest Airlines removed the Max jet from its schedule through Aug. 5. United had previously cancelled Max flights through June 5.

The widespread cancellations come after the Max’s anti-stall software was implicated in two fatal crashes in Ethiopia and Indonesia since October.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-15  Authors: emma newburger, katherine frey, the washington post, getty images
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American Airlines cancels all 737 Max flights through August 19

American Airlines is extending cancellations for the Boeing 737 Max aircraft through August 19, a key summer travel period, as the jets remain grounded. The cancellations amount to about 115 flights per day, roughly 1.5% of American’s total flying per day in the summer, the airline said. Boeing has slowed production and stopped deliveries as it works on a software fix. United has canceled Max flights through June 5. As major airlines continue to extend cancellations, Boeing said Thursday that it


American Airlines is extending cancellations for the Boeing 737 Max aircraft through August 19, a key summer travel period, as the jets remain grounded. The cancellations amount to about 115 flights per day, roughly 1.5% of American’s total flying per day in the summer, the airline said. Boeing has slowed production and stopped deliveries as it works on a software fix. United has canceled Max flights through June 5. As major airlines continue to extend cancellations, Boeing said Thursday that it
American Airlines cancels all 737 Max flights through August 19 Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: emma newburger, shannon stapleton
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, cancels, max, american, remain, boeing, 19, software, cancellations, travel, fix, summer, flights, 737, airlines


American Airlines cancels all 737 Max flights through August 19

American Airlines is extending cancellations for the Boeing 737 Max aircraft through August 19, a key summer travel period, as the jets remain grounded.

The cancellations amount to about 115 flights per day, roughly 1.5% of American’s total flying per day in the summer, the airline said. They come after the Max’s anti-stall software was implicated in an Ethiopian crash in March that killed 157 people.

It’s unclear when the Max, which has been grounded since mid-March, will return. Boeing has slowed production and stopped deliveries as it works on a software fix.

On Friday, Southwest Airlines removed the Max jet from its schedule through Aug. 5. United has canceled Max flights through June 5.

“We remain confident that the impending software updates, along with the new training elements Boeing is developing for the MAX, will lead to recertification of the aircraft soon,” American CEO Doug Parker and President Robert Isom wrote in a letter to employees Sunday.

Parker also said canceling the flights now will help the airline plan for its busiest travel season of the year.

As major airlines continue to extend cancellations, Boeing said Thursday that it’s completed 96 flights with the new Max software fix. The planemaker will likely submit the fix to Federal Aviation Administration regulators within the next couple weeks.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-14  Authors: emma newburger, shannon stapleton
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Southwest removes Boeing 737 Max from flight schedule through early August as grounding persists

There’s no timetable for the return of the Max, which has been grounded since mid-March. Boeing has slowed production and stopped deliveries as it works on a software fix. Other major airlines like American and United have canceled thousands of flights because of prolonged groundings. American, which operates 24 Max planes and has 76 more on order, canceled roughly 1,200 flights in March. United has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s in its fleet, and like American, has canceled 737 Max flights through


There’s no timetable for the return of the Max, which has been grounded since mid-March. Boeing has slowed production and stopped deliveries as it works on a software fix. Other major airlines like American and United have canceled thousands of flights because of prolonged groundings. American, which operates 24 Max planes and has 76 more on order, canceled roughly 1,200 flights in March. United has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s in its fleet, and like American, has canceled 737 Max flights through
Southwest removes Boeing 737 Max from flight schedule through early August as grounding persists Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: emma newburger, joe raedle, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, grounding, canceled, schedule, early, boeing, american, max, flight, tom, works, persists, southwest, flights, travel, united, removes, 737


Southwest removes Boeing 737 Max from flight schedule through early August as grounding persists

There’s no timetable for the return of the Max, which has been grounded since mid-March. Boeing has slowed production and stopped deliveries as it works on a software fix.

Other major airlines like American and United have canceled thousands of flights because of prolonged groundings. American, which operates 24 Max planes and has 76 more on order, canceled roughly 1,200 flights in March. United has 14 of the Boeing 737 Max 9s in its fleet, and like American, has canceled 737 Max flights through June 5.

“The limited number of customers, who have already booked their travel and will be affected by this amended schedule, are being proactively notified so that we can reaccommodate their flight plans well in advance of their travel date,” Southwest President Tom Nealon said in a statement.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-12  Authors: emma newburger, joe raedle, getty images
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Boeing CEO says it’s completed 96 test flights with 737 Max software fix

The test flights are one prong of a broad effort by Boeing to get the Max back in the air. Boeing says representatives from two-thirds of the 50 airlines that have the Max in their fleets have tested the new software in a simulator. The company said it will cut Max production by 20% as it works on a software fix to get the jets running again. Investigators suspect that faulty data feeding into the aircraft’s MCAS flight system played a major role in the Indonesia and Ethiopia accidents. Investig


The test flights are one prong of a broad effort by Boeing to get the Max back in the air. Boeing says representatives from two-thirds of the 50 airlines that have the Max in their fleets have tested the new software in a simulator. The company said it will cut Max production by 20% as it works on a software fix to get the jets running again. Investigators suspect that faulty data feeding into the aircraft’s MCAS flight system played a major role in the Indonesia and Ethiopia accidents. Investig
Boeing CEO says it’s completed 96 test flights with 737 Max software fix Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: phil lebeau, emma newburger, stephen brashear, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, test, completed, system, flights, ceo, 737, software, jets, 96, faa, fix, boeing, max, weeks, flight, grounded


Boeing CEO says it's completed 96 test flights with 737 Max software fix

The test flights are one prong of a broad effort by Boeing to get the Max back in the air. The company is also updating airlines by bringing representatives into flight simulators and showing them how the modified flight control system will feel in the cockpit. Boeing says representatives from two-thirds of the 50 airlines that have the Max in their fleets have tested the new software in a simulator.

“We want everyone to be confident in it and the additional training and educational resources we’re developing and deploying,” Muilenberg said, adding that the last few weeks have been the most “heartwrenching” of his career.

The company will likely submit its plan to fix the Max, which has been grounded since mid-March, to the Federal Aviation Administration and other regulators within the next two weeks, according to people familiar with the matter. Getting those regulators to approve the plan will likely take several more weeks.

“I expect that the airplane is still several weeks away from getting the final seal of approval to be flown again, not so much that the software fix is a problem, but just from an optics standpoint,” said Jeff Guzzetti, former director of the FAA’s accident investigation civision. Guzzetti believes the FAA is stinging from criticism its relationship with Boeing was “too cozy” because the FAA designated Boeing engineers to self-certify parts of the 737 Max before the plane was given final approval in 2017.

Boeing has scrambled to restore faith in its 737 Max after the jet’s anti-stall software was implicated in two crashes in the last five months that killed 346 people and grounded the planes worldwide. The company said it will cut Max production by 20% as it works on a software fix to get the jets running again. They’ve been grounded since mid-March.

Investigators suspect that faulty data feeding into the aircraft’s MCAS flight system played a major role in the Indonesia and Ethiopia accidents. Investigators and lawmakers have scrutinized Boeing’s software system malfunction, from the original design to the training and safety certifications.

When designing the newest Max jets, Boeing allegedly increased the power of the automated system that pushes the plane nose down, making it hard for pilots to regain control of the doomed jets. Changes to the anti-stall system were not fully reviewed by the FAA.

Boeing said Tuesday that deliveries and new orders for all of its 737 jets fell in the first quarter, and earlier in the week, Wall Street analysts downgradedBoeing stock. The company’s shares have have fallen nearly 9 percent in the past month.

WATCH: What the future of FAA oversight may look like


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-11  Authors: phil lebeau, emma newburger, stephen brashear, getty images
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More than 3,500 Amazon employees push for aggressive action on climate change

Over 3,500 Amazon employees on Wednesday urged the company to take aggressive action on climate change and reduce its carbon footprint. “We believe this is a historic opportunity for Amazon to stand with employees and signal to the world that we’re ready to be a climate leader.” It’s rare for tech employees to release their names publicly when criticizing their employers, especially at this scale. An Amazon spokesperson did not comment on the letter but told CNBC the company is taking many steps


Over 3,500 Amazon employees on Wednesday urged the company to take aggressive action on climate change and reduce its carbon footprint. “We believe this is a historic opportunity for Amazon to stand with employees and signal to the world that we’re ready to be a climate leader.” It’s rare for tech employees to release their names publicly when criticizing their employers, especially at this scale. An Amazon spokesperson did not comment on the letter but told CNBC the company is taking many steps
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: emma newburger, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, amazon, zero, change, aggressive, employees, tech, climate, names, renewable, push, 3500, letter, carbon, action


More than 3,500 Amazon employees push for aggressive action on climate change

Over 3,500 Amazon employees on Wednesday urged the company to take aggressive action on climate change and reduce its carbon footprint.

Workers called on Amazon to stop offering custom cloud-computing services that support the oil and gas industry in extracting more fossil fuels. They also said Amazon has failed to disclose a company-wide plan to reach zero carbon emissions within the timeline required by science, and that its 100% renewable energy goal has no deadline.

The letter represents the biggest employee-driven push against climate risk in the tech industry yet, as activist tech workers increasingly launch public campaigns to pressure employers on issues like workplace sexual harassment and employee wages.

“Amazon has the resources and scale to spark the world’s imagination and redefine what is possible and necessary to address the climate crisis,” the employees wrote to Amazon’s board of directors and CEO Jeff Bezos. “We believe this is a historic opportunity for Amazon to stand with employees and signal to the world that we’re ready to be a climate leader.”

The letter accused Amazon of donating to climate-delaying legislators, citing the company’s donations in 2018 to 68 members of Congress who voted against climate legislation.

Workers also urged Amazon to terminate all custom solutions specifically designed for oil and gas extraction and exploration, undergo a “complete transition” from fossil fuels and reduce its pollution in vulnerable communities.

The employees are pushing Amazon to approve a shareholder resolution that would force the company to unveil a plan to combat its carbon footprint. The resolution was filed in late 2018, and would be voted on next month.

The 3,541 employees, all of whom attached their names to the letter, comprise less than 1 percent of Amazon’s workforce, according to FactSet data.

It’s rare for tech employees to release their names publicly when criticizing their employers, especially at this scale. For instance, hundreds of Google employees walked out last November to protest the company’s handling of sexual misconduct, but few names were attached to the protest.

An Amazon spokesperson did not comment on the letter but told CNBC the company is taking many steps to address climate change.

“Earlier this year, we announced that we will share our company-wide carbon footprint, along with related goals and programs. We also announced Shipment Zero, our vision to make all Amazon shipments net zero carbon, with 50% of all shipments net zero by 2030,” he said.

On Monday, Amazon announced a renewable energy initiative to build three new wind farms. The company’s last renewable energy project was two years ago.

“In our mission to become ‘Earth’s most customer-centric company,’ we believe our climate impact must be a top consideration in everything we do,” the workers said. “We have the power to shift entire industries, inspire global action on climate, and lead on the issue of our lifetimes.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated the percentage of Amazon’s work force that signed the letter. It is 0.5 percent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: emma newburger, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, amazon, zero, change, aggressive, employees, tech, climate, names, renewable, push, 3500, letter, carbon, action


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More than 3,500 Amazon employees push for aggressive action on climate change

Over 3,500 Amazon employees on Wednesday urged the company to take aggressive action on climate change and reduce its carbon footprint. “We believe this is a historic opportunity for Amazon to stand with employees and signal to the world that we’re ready to be a climate leader.” It’s rare for tech employees to release their names publicly when criticizing their employers, especially at this scale. An Amazon spokesperson did not comment on the letter but told CNBC the company is taking many steps


Over 3,500 Amazon employees on Wednesday urged the company to take aggressive action on climate change and reduce its carbon footprint. “We believe this is a historic opportunity for Amazon to stand with employees and signal to the world that we’re ready to be a climate leader.” It’s rare for tech employees to release their names publicly when criticizing their employers, especially at this scale. An Amazon spokesperson did not comment on the letter but told CNBC the company is taking many steps
More than 3,500 Amazon employees push for aggressive action on climate change Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: emma newburger, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, amazon, zero, change, aggressive, employees, tech, climate, names, renewable, push, 3500, letter, carbon, action


More than 3,500 Amazon employees push for aggressive action on climate change

Over 3,500 Amazon employees on Wednesday urged the company to take aggressive action on climate change and reduce its carbon footprint.

Workers called on Amazon to stop offering custom cloud-computing services that support the oil and gas industry in extracting more fossil fuels. They also said Amazon has failed to disclose a company-wide plan to reach zero carbon emissions within the timeline required by science, and that its 100% renewable energy goal has no deadline.

The letter represents the biggest employee-driven push against climate risk in the tech industry yet, as activist tech workers increasingly launch public campaigns to pressure employers on issues like workplace sexual harassment and employee wages.

“Amazon has the resources and scale to spark the world’s imagination and redefine what is possible and necessary to address the climate crisis,” the employees wrote to Amazon’s board of directors and CEO Jeff Bezos. “We believe this is a historic opportunity for Amazon to stand with employees and signal to the world that we’re ready to be a climate leader.”

The letter accused Amazon of donating to climate-delaying legislators, citing the company’s donations in 2018 to 68 members of Congress who voted against climate legislation.

Workers also urged Amazon to terminate all custom solutions specifically designed for oil and gas extraction and exploration, undergo a “complete transition” from fossil fuels and reduce its pollution in vulnerable communities.

The employees are pushing Amazon to approve a shareholder resolution that would force the company to unveil a plan to combat its carbon footprint. The resolution was filed in late 2018, and would be voted on next month.

The 3,541 employees, all of whom attached their names to the letter, comprise less than 1 percent of Amazon’s workforce, according to FactSet data.

It’s rare for tech employees to release their names publicly when criticizing their employers, especially at this scale. For instance, hundreds of Google employees walked out last November to protest the company’s handling of sexual misconduct, but few names were attached to the protest.

An Amazon spokesperson did not comment on the letter but told CNBC the company is taking many steps to address climate change.

“Earlier this year, we announced that we will share our company-wide carbon footprint, along with related goals and programs. We also announced Shipment Zero, our vision to make all Amazon shipments net zero carbon, with 50% of all shipments net zero by 2030,” he said.

On Monday, Amazon announced a renewable energy initiative to build three new wind farms. The company’s last renewable energy project was two years ago.

“In our mission to become ‘Earth’s most customer-centric company,’ we believe our climate impact must be a top consideration in everything we do,” the workers said. “We have the power to shift entire industries, inspire global action on climate, and lead on the issue of our lifetimes.”

Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated the percentage of Amazon’s work force that signed the letter. It is 0.5 percent.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-04-10  Authors: emma newburger, andrew harrer, bloomberg, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, company, amazon, zero, change, aggressive, employees, tech, climate, names, renewable, push, 3500, letter, carbon, action


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