How encryption affects the detection of cyber sex crimes

How encryption affects the detection of cyber sex crimes3 Hours AgoLucille Dejito of the International Justice Mission says cyber sex trafficking is a hidden, layered crime, and stakeholders including technology firms need to agree that child safety is a “shared priority.”


How encryption affects the detection of cyber sex crimes3 Hours AgoLucille Dejito of the International Justice Mission says cyber sex trafficking is a hidden, layered crime, and stakeholders including technology firms need to agree that child safety is a “shared priority.”
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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, need, shared, safety, detection, crimes, affects, sex, technology, stakeholders, priority, trafficking, mission, encryption, cyber


How encryption affects the detection of cyber sex crimes

How encryption affects the detection of cyber sex crimes

3 Hours Ago

Lucille Dejito of the International Justice Mission says cyber sex trafficking is a hidden, layered crime, and stakeholders including technology firms need to agree that child safety is a “shared priority.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-14
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, need, shared, safety, detection, crimes, affects, sex, technology, stakeholders, priority, trafficking, mission, encryption, cyber


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Facebook’s plan for encryption is a dream for child pornographers, FBI says

Facebook could soon become a “dream come true for predators and child pornographers” if it follows through with its plans to make user messages inaccessible to law enforcement, according to FBI Director Christopher Wray. With encryption, Facebook would no longer be able to access the content of messages between its users, but just metadata like timestamps showing when messages were sent. A recent New York Times investigation found that law enforcement has a harder time tracking down child pornog


Facebook could soon become a “dream come true for predators and child pornographers” if it follows through with its plans to make user messages inaccessible to law enforcement, according to FBI Director Christopher Wray. With encryption, Facebook would no longer be able to access the content of messages between its users, but just metadata like timestamps showing when messages were sent. A recent New York Times investigation found that law enforcement has a harder time tracking down child pornog
Facebook’s plan for encryption is a dream for child pornographers, FBI says Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: lauren feiner
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, dream, pornographers, plan, child, facebook, services, plans, apple, wray, fbi, facebooks, encryption, enforcement, law


Facebook's plan for encryption is a dream for child pornographers, FBI says

Christopher Wray, director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) testifies on Worldwide Threats during a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, January 29, 2019.

Facebook could soon become a “dream come true for predators and child pornographers” if it follows through with its plans to make user messages inaccessible to law enforcement, according to FBI Director Christopher Wray.

At a “Lawful Access Summit” hosted by the Department of Justice on Friday, Wray warned that Facebook’s plans to integrate and encrypt its three messaging services would pose a grave threat to the ability of law enforcement to catch child predators. At the moment, Facebook is the top referrer of tips to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, according to Wray, providing 90% of its 18 million tips each year.

With encryption, Facebook would no longer be able to access the content of messages between its users, but just metadata like timestamps showing when messages were sent. Wray said most of the tips Facebook provides are based on content, not metadata. A recent New York Times investigation found that law enforcement has a harder time tracking down child pornography shared through encrypted technology.

The summit comes as Attorney General William Barr and officials from the U.K. and Australia called on Facebook to halt its encryption plans until they can determine it will not harm public safety.

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Wray’s remarks. In response to Barr’s letter, a Facebook spokesperson told CNBC on Thursday that the company has been consulting with experts in child safety as well as governments and other tech companies to ensure its newly encrypted services are secure. Facebook “strongly oppose[s] government attempts to build backdoors because they would undermine the privacy and security of people everywhere,” according to the statement.

Several popular messaging services, including Signal and Apple’s iMessage, use encryption by default.

At Friday’s event, Wray said law enforcement is not advocating for a “back door,” calling the term a “straw man.”

“We, the FBI and our state and local law enforcement partners, we go through the front door with a warrant from a neutral judge only after we’ve met the requirements of the Fourth Amendment,” Wray said.

The FBI came head to head with Apple in 2016 over a similar case. At the time, a federal judge asked Apple to help the FBI unlock the phone of the shooter in the 2015 San Bernardino attack, but Apple CEO Tim Cook called the order “dangerous,” saying it could allow the government to overstep in future cases and demand technology companies to surveil users. In the end, the Department of Justice said it was able to access the phone’s data without Apple and asked the judge to drop the case.

Facebook’s encryption plans also came at a time of increasing antitrust scrutiny on the company, which will likely explore its acquisitions of WhatsApp and Instagram, two services that would be included in the integration. Antitrust experts have speculated that integrating the messaging services would make it harder to unscramble the eggs if antitrust enforcement were to occur.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-04  Authors: lauren feiner
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A cybersecurity chief’s 8 tips on how to protect yourself online as data breaches continue

Encryption is viewed by many as “bulletproof” technology to protect data from cyberthieves. Organizations swear by it, and consumers feel overly confident knowing that their recent transactions and personal data are encrypted. High-profile data breaches, including Thursday’s DoorDash breach, continue. In September 2017 Equifax announced a data breach that exposed the personal information of 147 million people. In November 2018, Marriott disclosed a data breach that affected 327 million customers


Encryption is viewed by many as “bulletproof” technology to protect data from cyberthieves. Organizations swear by it, and consumers feel overly confident knowing that their recent transactions and personal data are encrypted. High-profile data breaches, including Thursday’s DoorDash breach, continue. In September 2017 Equifax announced a data breach that exposed the personal information of 147 million people. In November 2018, Marriott disclosed a data breach that affected 327 million customers
A cybersecurity chief’s 8 tips on how to protect yourself online as data breaches continue Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: tom kellermann, chief cybersecurity officer, carbon black, smith collection gado, archive photos, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, data, system, online, technology, cybersecurity, chiefs, tips, million, consumers, organizations, protect, encryption, breach, personal, continue, breaches, recent


A cybersecurity chief's 8 tips on how to protect yourself online as data breaches continue

Encryption is viewed by many as “bulletproof” technology to protect data from cyberthieves. Organizations swear by it, and consumers feel overly confident knowing that their recent transactions and personal data are encrypted. Despite the confidence around this “go to” technology, time has shown that encryption is just not enough. In fact, it’s failing us.

High-profile data breaches, including Thursday’s DoorDash breach, continue. While the details of the Doordash incident — which included the last four digits of payment cards for some consumers, as well as names, emails, delivery addresses and phone numbers — require further analysis, other recent corporate hacks shows us that encryption either did absolutely nothing to prevent hackers from infiltrating systems or, worse, helped disguise cybercriminals while wreaking havoc in organizations’ systems.

Doordash is just the latest in a string of cybersecurity incidents affecting hundreds of millions of consumers. In September 2017 Equifax announced a data breach that exposed the personal information of 147 million people. During the incident, an attacker was able to crack into Equifax’s system in mid-May and hide within encrypted traffic until the end of July — more than two months without anyone noticing.

In November 2018, Marriott disclosed a data breach that affected 327 million customers, which in my opinion was based on a false sense of security in encryption. Hackers had been hiding in Marriott’s system since July 2014, gaining access to a whopping 25.6 million passport numbers in the breach, of which 5.25 million were unencrypted. While it seemed Marriott believed encryption would save the day, the technology was ultimately implemented incorrectly, leaving the organization blindsided during the breach.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-09-27  Authors: tom kellermann, chief cybersecurity officer, carbon black, smith collection gado, archive photos, getty images
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The head of security for cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase describes his biggest challenge: Education

Coinbase security chief Philip Martin has a big challenge: Explaining the fundamentals of security to customers whose financial worth absolutely depends on remembering their passwords and keeping their keys safe. But at a typical bank, cryptography is often limited to two basic categories: masking personal information, like Social Security numbers, and ensuring websites are secured. What that means is that you can’t revoke a cryptocurrency key, if that key is lost, compromised, there is no abili


Coinbase security chief Philip Martin has a big challenge: Explaining the fundamentals of security to customers whose financial worth absolutely depends on remembering their passwords and keeping their keys safe. But at a typical bank, cryptography is often limited to two basic categories: masking personal information, like Social Security numbers, and ensuring websites are secured. What that means is that you can’t revoke a cryptocurrency key, if that key is lost, compromised, there is no abili
The head of security for cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase describes his biggest challenge: Education Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-18  Authors: kate fazzini
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, key, keys, encryption, head, way, challenge, biggest, exchange, describes, coinbase, cryptocurrency, information, social, martin, security, education, transactions


The head of security for cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase describes his biggest challenge: Education

Coinbase security chief Philip Martin has a big challenge: Explaining the fundamentals of security to customers whose financial worth absolutely depends on remembering their passwords and keeping their keys safe.

“We have the problem of a global cryptocurrency company figuring out how to talk about security, in a way that plays in Japan in San Francisco and in Europe, and across the age divide, in a way that actually resonates to the people we’re talking to,” he said.

Coinbase is one of the largest cryptocurrency trading and payment platforms, most recently valued at around $8 billion, and supports more than a quarter million bitcoin transactions per day.

Financial companies have to deal with encryption as part of the day-to-day security duties. But at a typical bank, cryptography is often limited to two basic categories: masking personal information, like Social Security numbers, and ensuring websites are secured. But cryptocurrency wallets are different, because encryption plays such a fundamental role. This is new to a lot of consumers working with Bitcoin for the first time, Martin said.

“We deal with long-lived keys that we generate that live for a very long time, that are the direct controller of liquid value,” said Martin, who previously served as an information security lead at Palantir Technologies and in U.S. Army counterintelligence.

“Possession of a key is possession of your currency. What that means is that you can’t revoke a cryptocurrency key, if that key is lost, compromised, there is no ability to get [the value] back.”

This makes the stakes of theft of encrypted data more severe, than, say, the theft of encrypted social security data at a financial institutions, he explained. “The consequences of loss are much higher.” It also means attackers are much more aggressive about gaining access to that encryption, he said.

Those high consequences mean Coinbase’s security organization must help contribute to a broad communication plan to customers, that helps explain clearly how to handle their keys, passwords and other important information for securing their accounts.

For those new to cryptocurrency, “a lot of work is going to how do I interact with the ecosystem? How do I act differently here than if I am protecting my social media account?” he said.

Traditional banks have an advantage, he added, in that “transactions in the traditional fiat system are reversible,” whereas transactions via blockchain are by and large irrevocable. Banks might have more problems with wire fraud involving CEO impersonation, but cryptocurrency users are often subject to cold-call “tech support” scams, he said, in which a criminal calls a customer to convince them to give up valuable security information, starting with “I’m here to help you with your coinbase account problem.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-08-18  Authors: kate fazzini
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FBI Director Wray: I strongly share Barr’s concerns about encrypted devices and messaging platforms, cites Sutherland Springs Apple case

“As the attorney general discussed a few days ago, our requests can’t be assessed in a vacuum. The company has said in the past it does not comment on law enforcement matters. If it is not addressed, it impedes not only federal law enforcement, but our state and local partners as well,” Wray said. Wray was named the eighth director of the FBI in August 2017, after a two-decade career with the Justice Department. He later worked in the D.C. office of the deputy attorney general, and was nominated


“As the attorney general discussed a few days ago, our requests can’t be assessed in a vacuum. The company has said in the past it does not comment on law enforcement matters. If it is not addressed, it impedes not only federal law enforcement, but our state and local partners as well,” Wray said. Wray was named the eighth director of the FBI in August 2017, after a two-decade career with the Justice Department. He later worked in the D.C. office of the deputy attorney general, and was nominated
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FBI Director Wray: I strongly share Barr's concerns about encrypted devices and messaging platforms, cites Sutherland Springs Apple case

FBI Director Christopher Wray discusseses the findings of the Inspector General’s report on the FBI’s handling of a probe into former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, during a news conference in Washington, U.S., June 14, 2018.

FBI Director Christopher Wray said Thursday that he strongly supported Attorney General William Barr’s comments earlier this week that tech companies need to provide a way for law enforcement to access criminals’ and suspects’ encrypted phones and apps.

“I get frustrated when I hear people suggest that we are trying to weaken encryption or weaken cybersecurity more broadly,” Wray said. “As the attorney general discussed a few days ago, our requests can’t be assessed in a vacuum. That’s important because this is an issue that is becoming worse and worse all the time.”

Wray, who was speaking at the International Conference on Cyber Security at Fordham University’s law school, said the FBI has been “hearing increasingly” from cryptologists that there are solutions that could work to protect encryption and fulfill law enforcement’s need for accessing encrypted communications.

Wray cited recent cases where he said cooperation from unnamed application providers was necessary in helping solve two previously unknown child sex abuse cases. In one case, Wray said, a tip came in from a New England town that a nine-year-old girl was being abused. Information from one application provider helped locate and rescue the girl. In another case, two young girls were rescued in less than 12 hours with the cooperation of an application provider.

But in another famous case, the 2017 church shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas, Wray said “now more than 600 days later, the FBI has still not been able to crack the encryption on the phone of the attacker.”

The Bureau believes there is information about possible collaborators or other individuals that may pose a threat to a similar attack, but cannot proceed in opening it without the cooperation of the phone’s manufacturer, which reportedly is Apple. The FBI has filed warrants with Apple for information from the phone. The company has said in the past it does not comment on law enforcement matters.

“This is not just a national security issue, it’s a fundamental public safety issue. If it is not addressed, it impedes not only federal law enforcement, but our state and local partners as well,” Wray said.

Wray was named the eighth director of the FBI in August 2017, after a two-decade career with the Justice Department. Wray started his career as a prosecutor in the Northern District of Georgia, focused on federal criminal cases including public corruption, gun trafficking, drug crimes and fraud.

He later worked in the D.C. office of the deputy attorney general, and was nominated by President George W. Bush in 2003 to the role of assistant attorney general for the DOJ’s criminal division. He served on the Corporate Fraud Task Force and was the DOJ supervisor of the Enron fraud investigation.

Follow @CNBCtech on Twitter for the latest tech industry news.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-07-25  Authors: kate fazzini
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Tech consumers should not be forced to sacrifice privacy for security

The result is a law enforcement request for a “backdoor” to devices from tech companies – a way to bypass a device’s security measures and gain access to protected devices. The goal is to develop a standardized national encryption policy that protects users’ privacy rights. Tech companies can – and do – work with law enforcement to help obtain data through means that don’t require new technical rules. Transparency between law enforcement and tech companies is critical. But law enforcement needs


The result is a law enforcement request for a “backdoor” to devices from tech companies – a way to bypass a device’s security measures and gain access to protected devices. The goal is to develop a standardized national encryption policy that protects users’ privacy rights. Tech companies can – and do – work with law enforcement to help obtain data through means that don’t require new technical rules. Transparency between law enforcement and tech companies is critical. But law enforcement needs
Tech consumers should not be forced to sacrifice privacy for security Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-13  Authors: gary shapiro, president, cto of the consumer technology association, okan ozer, anadolu agency, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, information, tech, sacrifice, technology, encryption, users, consumers, privacy, security, law, enforcement, companies, forced


Tech consumers should not be forced to sacrifice privacy for security

We all expect privacy, especially when it comes to our phones. But how do we feel about upholding the privacy of criminals and terrorists? And what should we do if the information needed to catch or prosecute a criminal – or potentially save lives – is locked away in someone’s encrypted phone?

One problem the technology industry has recently faced is the “backdoor encryption” problem – a situation where law enforcement agencies want access to information on digital and mobile devices that may be instrumental in solving a time-sensitive case. The result is a law enforcement request for a “backdoor” to devices from tech companies – a way to bypass a device’s security measures and gain access to protected devices.

In June, a bipartisan team of legislators put forward the ENCRYPT Act (Ensuring National Constitutional Rights for Your Private Telecommunications). The bill, sponsored by Rep. Ted Lieu (D-CA), would restrict state and local governments from requiring backdoors to exist, and also prevent any restriction of encryption capabilities. The goal is to develop a standardized national encryption policy that protects users’ privacy rights. This bill is an encouraging step forward and one supported by the Consumer Technology Association (CTA).

“Having 50 different mandatory state-level encryption standards is bad for security, consumers, innovation and ultimately law enforcement,” Rep. Lieu explained in a statement about the bill. “Encryption exists to protect us from bad actors, and can’t be weakened without also putting every American in harm’s way.”

“End-to-end” encryption, which ensures information exchanged online can be viewed only by the participants in the conversation, is a common offering of internet companies. It assures users their sensitive data will not fall into the hands of hackers. As Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) put it, “If you want to be in a safe community, you shouldn’t be able to weaken encryption.”

This protection was put to the test in December 2015 after two shooters opened fire on workers at the San Bernardino, California, Inland Regional Center, killing 14 people. Critical information about the attack was locked in one of the shooter’s iPhones. The FBI asked Apple for access, and Apple refused. The company argued that if the platform’s backdoor “key” leaked, the security of everyone using the platform – including tens of millions of device users in the U.S. – would be compromised. Before a hearing could take place, the FBI was able to unlock the phone with the aid of a third party, but the battle over encryption continues.

The law enforcement community has claimed that laws have not kept pace with innovation, preventing investigators from gaining information necessary to keep us safe. But law enforcement already has access to a vast amount of powerful technology. Tech companies can – and do – work with law enforcement to help obtain data through means that don’t require new technical rules. Apple, for example, has a policy of releasing iCloud backup data when presented with a valid search warrant, and tools such as facial recognition software, iris scans and gait analyses can be invaluable in identifying criminals.

Transparency between law enforcement and tech companies is critical. But law enforcement needs to avoid overreach, and tech companies should clearly explain data protection policies to customers as well as law enforcement agencies.

That way, the privacy and security of millions of law-abiding users won’t be compromised – and their confidence in technology will remain strong. Encryption doesn’t have to be a black-and-white issue. In an ideal world, we won’t have to choose between privacy and security, but instead be able to find ways for the two to coexist.

Gary Shapiro is president and CEO of the Consumer Technology Association, the U.S. trade association representing more than 2,200 consumer technology companies, and author of the New York Times best-selling books, Ninja Innovation: The Ten Killer Strategies of the World’s Most Successful Businesses and The Comeback: How Innovation Will Restore the American Dream. His views are his own. Connect with him on Twitter: @GaryShapiro


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-07-13  Authors: gary shapiro, president, cto of the consumer technology association, okan ozer, anadolu agency, getty images
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Geopolitical analyst George Friedman says blockchain will become ‘obsolete’

Respected geopolitical analyst George Friedman thinks blockchain, the technology underlying bitcoin, will one day become “obsolete.” The technology eliminates the need for a third-party intermediary such as a bank by quickly and securely recording transactions between two parties by using encryption technology. Since the development of bitcoin, hundreds of other cryptocurrencies and blockchain projects have emerged. However, they emphasize such a scenario is still years away and blockchain techn


Respected geopolitical analyst George Friedman thinks blockchain, the technology underlying bitcoin, will one day become “obsolete.” The technology eliminates the need for a third-party intermediary such as a bank by quickly and securely recording transactions between two parties by using encryption technology. Since the development of bitcoin, hundreds of other cryptocurrencies and blockchain projects have emerged. However, they emphasize such a scenario is still years away and blockchain techn
Geopolitical analyst George Friedman says blockchain will become ‘obsolete’ Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-15  Authors: evelyn cheng, jordan naylor, wireimage, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, encryption, cryptocurrency, technology, analyst, blockchain, friedman, obsolete, world, day, geopolitical, george, global, projects


Geopolitical analyst George Friedman says blockchain will become 'obsolete'

Respected geopolitical analyst George Friedman thinks blockchain, the technology underlying bitcoin, will one day become “obsolete.”

“I’ve never known any encryption technology not to be broken,” Friedman told CNBC on Thursday from the sidelines of the UBS CIO Global Forum in New York. “I doubt between Russia, China, U.S. intelligence services” that blockchain can’t be decrypted.

“It’s useful. It’s visible,” he said. But “at some point it’ll be obsolete.”

Friedman is founder of online publication Geopolitical Futures and the author of “The Next 100 Years: A Forecast for the 21st Century.” His views on the world often run contrary to mainstream thought. For example, he expects the U.S. will remain a dominant power, while China will struggle and is not as strong of a global player as others think.

Bitcoin, the cryptocurrency that soared well over 1,000 percent last year, is the first application of blockchain. The technology eliminates the need for a third-party intermediary such as a bank by quickly and securely recording transactions between two parties by using encryption technology.

Since the development of bitcoin, hundreds of other cryptocurrencies and blockchain projects have emerged. Proponents say blockchain can one day change the world as much as the internet did.

Some analysts have noted that if and when an emerging technology called quantum computing matures, it could easily decrypt blockchain. However, they emphasize such a scenario is still years away and blockchain technology itself may also have evolved by that point.

Friedman said blockchain is “one of those hypes. People [are] profiting from it, making extraordinary claims about it.”

Investors have poured more than $9 billion into new cryptocurrency projects called initial coin offerings this year, according to financial research firm Autonomous Next.

— CNBC’s Miguel Pineda contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-06-15  Authors: evelyn cheng, jordan naylor, wireimage, getty images
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FBI reportedly provided inaccurate encryption threat stats to Congress

The FBI reportedly overstated encryption threat figures to both Congress and the public due to a programming error, according to The Washington Post. The more accurate number, however, is likely between 1,000 to 2,000 devices, the Post reported. Attorney General Jeff Sessions also cited the figures in March, saying “each of those devices was tied to a threat to the American people.” The FBI told the Post the incorrect numbers were due to an internal accounting system that used three separate dat


The FBI reportedly overstated encryption threat figures to both Congress and the public due to a programming error, according to The Washington Post. The more accurate number, however, is likely between 1,000 to 2,000 devices, the Post reported. Attorney General Jeff Sessions also cited the figures in March, saying “each of those devices was tied to a threat to the American people.” The FBI told the Post the incorrect numbers were due to an internal accounting system that used three separate dat
FBI reportedly provided inaccurate encryption threat stats to Congress Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-23  Authors: ashley turner, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
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FBI reportedly provided inaccurate encryption threat stats to Congress

The FBI reportedly overstated encryption threat figures to both Congress and the public due to a programming error, according to The Washington Post.

The bureau claimed that investigators were locked out of about 7,800 mobile devices connected to criminal investigations. The more accurate number, however, is likely between 1,000 to 2,000 devices, the Post reported.

FBI Director Christopher Wray used the inflated statistics for about seven months to make a compelling argument for the need to defend against “Going Dark,” or the use of encrypted software to prevent investigators from accessing digital data even with a court order. Attorney General Jeff Sessions also cited the figures in March, saying “each of those devices was tied to a threat to the American people.”

The FBI told the Post the incorrect numbers were due to an internal accounting system that used three separate databases, which lead to the repeated counting of mobile devices. The bureau first became aware of the miscount a month ago and still does not have an accurate number of encrypted phones tied to investigations in 2017.

Though the encryption statistics were incorrect, the FBI told the Post that “Going Dark remains a serious problem for the FBI.”

The encryption and data privacy debate became prominent after the FBI asked Apple to unlock the iPhone belonging to Syed Farook, the shooter who killed 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif. in 2015. Apple refused to do so — CEO Tim Cook said unlocking Farook’s phone would require writing a new software that would be a “master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks.”

The FBI did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

Read The Washington Post’s full report here.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-23  Authors: ashley turner, mandel ngan, afp, getty images
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Twitter reportedly looking to build encrypted chat for private conversations

Here’s why this matters:It shows that Twitter is taking privacy seriously — perhaps more so than Facebook, which still doesn’t offer encrypted chats in Facebook Messenger. Encryption allows users to message one another without fear that other parties will hack into and read the conversations. It also suggests that Twitter may soon compete more directly with services such as Facebook-owned WhatsApp, which allows one-on-one and group conversations with end-to-end encryption. An encrypted message f


Here’s why this matters:It shows that Twitter is taking privacy seriously — perhaps more so than Facebook, which still doesn’t offer encrypted chats in Facebook Messenger. Encryption allows users to message one another without fear that other parties will hack into and read the conversations. It also suggests that Twitter may soon compete more directly with services such as Facebook-owned WhatsApp, which allows one-on-one and group conversations with end-to-end encryption. An encrypted message f
Twitter reportedly looking to build encrypted chat for private conversations Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-05-08  Authors: todd haselton, drew angerer, getty images, cnbc, erin black
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, facebook, encrypted, encryption, feature, build, looking, message, private, conversations, services, reportedly, twitter, chat, users, whatsapp, techcrunch


Twitter reportedly looking to build encrypted chat for private conversations

Twitter is building a feature into its app that will allow users to send secret messages to one another, according to data spotted by TechCrunch inside the company’s Android application.

Here’s why this matters:

It shows that Twitter is taking privacy seriously — perhaps more so than Facebook, which still doesn’t offer encrypted chats in Facebook Messenger. Encryption allows users to message one another without fear that other parties will hack into and read the conversations.

It also suggests that Twitter may soon compete more directly with services such as Facebook-owned WhatsApp, which allows one-on-one and group conversations with end-to-end encryption. Twitter doesn’t have some functions offered by WhatsApp — such as support for voice calls — but otherwise already has many of the same features.

An encrypted message feature could help keep users on Twitter and away from other services. Currently, users who might begin a private conversation on Twitter might leave to use another app, such as Signal or WhatsApp, to continue chatting with encryption.

Twitter may also get the leg up on WhatsApp if it Facebook starts to dig into those conversations. WhatsApp co-founder Jan Koum recently left WhatsApp, and The Washington Post said the departure may have been related to “differences in approach” on Facebook’s ad targeting and encryption plans.

The function could also potentially set the stage for Twitter to one day launch a stand-alone messaging service that operates independently of its primary app.

Twitter declined to comment but CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted this, which seems telling:

Read the full report on TechCrunch.


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Whatsapp co-founder Jan Koum leaving Facebook

Koum’s Monday post announcing his departure did not mention privacy concerns, and did not specifically address his roles in Facebook outside WhatsApp. “Those values will always be at the heart of WhatsApp,” Zuckerberg wrote in a comment on Koum’s Facebook post. Koum is leaving Facebook less than two months after fellow WhatsApp co-founder Brian Acton told his followers to delete Facebook’s app. Acton left Facebook to help launch the Signal Foundation, which supports secure messaging service Sign


Koum’s Monday post announcing his departure did not mention privacy concerns, and did not specifically address his roles in Facebook outside WhatsApp. “Those values will always be at the heart of WhatsApp,” Zuckerberg wrote in a comment on Koum’s Facebook post. Koum is leaving Facebook less than two months after fellow WhatsApp co-founder Brian Acton told his followers to delete Facebook’s app. Acton left Facebook to help launch the Signal Foundation, which supports secure messaging service Sign
Whatsapp co-founder Jan Koum leaving Facebook Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: anita balakrishnan, david ramos, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whatsapp, cofounder, im, zuckerberg, team, acton, leaving, outside, jan, koums, facebook, encryption, post, koum


Whatsapp co-founder Jan Koum leaving Facebook

Koum’s Monday post announcing his departure did not mention privacy concerns, and did not specifically address his roles in Facebook outside WhatsApp. But according to the Post, Koum was “worn down by the differences in approach,” particularly around data targeting, encryption, ad-based revenue and mobile payments.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg responded to the post on Monday, writing he was thankful for what Koum taught him about “about encryption and its ability to take power from centralized systems and put it back in people’s hands.”

“Those values will always be at the heart of WhatsApp,” Zuckerberg wrote in a comment on Koum’s Facebook post. But Zuckerberg has also pushed WhatsApp to “move faster” to grow its business base, despite scrutiny from the European Commission surrounding the company.

Koum is leaving Facebook less than two months after fellow WhatsApp co-founder Brian Acton told his followers to delete Facebook’s app. Acton left Facebook to help launch the Signal Foundation, which supports secure messaging service Signal.

Koum’s 2014 employment offer from Facebook included restricted stock units with a four-year quarterly vesting period, indicating those options should be free by the end of the year. Kuom sold almost $2.83 billion in shares in 2017, far more than most technology executives.

Koum told an audience in January that the team missed Acton, but said he still goes to work because it’s like he “won the lottery.”

Here’s Koum’s full post:

It’s been almost a decade since Brian and I started WhatsApp, and it’s been an amazing journey with some of the best people. But it is time for me to move on. I’ve been blessed to work with such an incredibly small team and see how a crazy amount of focus can produce an app used by so many people all over the world. I’m leaving at a time when people are using WhatsApp in more ways than I could have imagined. The team is stronger than ever and it’ll continue to do amazing things. I’m taking some time off to do things I enjoy outside of technology, such as collecting rare air-cooled Porsches, working on my cars and playing ultimate frisbee. And I’ll still be cheering WhatsApp on – just from the outside. Thanks to everyone who has made this journey possible.

Here’s Zuckerberg’s response:

Jan: I will miss working so closely with you. I’m grateful for everything you’ve done to help connect the world, and for everything you’ve taught me, including about encryption and its ability to take power from centralized systems and put it back in people’s hands. Those values will always be at the heart of WhatsApp.

This is a developing story, please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2018-04-30  Authors: anita balakrishnan, david ramos, getty images
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, whatsapp, cofounder, im, zuckerberg, team, acton, leaving, outside, jan, koums, facebook, encryption, post, koum


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