Here’s how a traditional boat helped inspire the sustainable features of a 2,000-seat opera house

These include the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, which stretches more than 2,700 feet into the heavens. While these skyscrapers are undoubtedly impressive in terms of their scale and ambition, in the years ahead they will need to become increasingly sustainable. Multinational firm Atkins is responsible for the design of Dubai Opera, a 2,000-seat theater that opened in 2016. Roupen Yacoubian, Atkins’ head of architecture for the Middle East, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy” that dhow


These include the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, which stretches more than 2,700 feet into the heavens.
While these skyscrapers are undoubtedly impressive in terms of their scale and ambition, in the years ahead they will need to become increasingly sustainable.
Multinational firm Atkins is responsible for the design of Dubai Opera, a 2,000-seat theater that opened in 2016.
Roupen Yacoubian, Atkins’ head of architecture for the Middle East, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy” that dhow
Here’s how a traditional boat helped inspire the sustainable features of a 2,000-seat opera house Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, energy, helped, yacoubian, house, water, sustainable, 2000seat, features, opera, waste, design, venues, inspire, buildings, boat, traditional, building, terms, heres


Here's how a traditional boat helped inspire the sustainable features of a 2,000-seat opera house

The skyline of Dubai is dotted with imposing structures. These include the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, which stretches more than 2,700 feet into the heavens.

While these skyscrapers are undoubtedly impressive in terms of their scale and ambition, in the years ahead they will need to become increasingly sustainable. Under Dubai’s Clean Energy Strategy, authorities want to generate 75% of power from clean sources of energy by the year 2050, while authorities have also introduced regulations to ensure that new buildings reduce energy and water consumption, among other things.

Multinational firm Atkins is responsible for the design of Dubai Opera, a 2,000-seat theater that opened in 2016. Its appearance is based on the traditional dhow boats used in the region.

While visually striking, the boat-inspired design also offers benefits in terms of how the building functions. Roupen Yacoubian, Atkins’ head of architecture for the Middle East, told CNBC’s “Sustainable Energy” that dhow boats had a “restricted base and a broad crown.” This form, he explained, “allows the building to cast a shadow on itself at peak periods in the day in order to manage and mitigate solar radiation.”

“I think the other feature that really stands out for me is the active one, which is … a flexible design, a flexible building that can accommodate … several different types of venues and modes,” Yacoubian added. This meant that the building was being intensely used and avoided the need to construct separate venues for different kinds of concerts, he said.

The façade of the structure is made up of more than 1,200 glass panels. “These glass panels have anti-reflective coating internally and externally in order to mitigate the solar radiation,” Yacoubian said.

In terms of making the building sector more sustainable in general, Derek Clements-Croome, an emeritus professor at the University of Reading, listed four principle areas for improvement: energy, waste, water and pollution.

Clements-Croome’s areas of interest include intelligent buildings and cities. “Intelligent buildings that are well-designed will have substantial savings in water consumption, energy and smart waste systems, for example, to reuse waste and also will be less polluting,” he explained.

“All of those things are very important but it’s difficult to give precise figures about savings — they will vary a lot depending on the context.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, energy, helped, yacoubian, house, water, sustainable, 2000seat, features, opera, waste, design, venues, inspire, buildings, boat, traditional, building, terms, heres


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Departing Energy Secretary Rick Perry says he’s not sure he’ll comply with subpoena in impeachment inquiry

Rick Perry, U.S. secretary of energy, speaks during the 2019 CERAWeek by IHS Markit conference in Houston, Texas, on Wednesday, March 13, 2019. Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who will be leaving his post by the year’s end , said Friday that he is not sure whether he will comply with a subpoena from House Democrats conducting an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. But Perry, who revealed a day earlier that he would be stepping down as Energy Secretary, told CNBC’s Squawk on the Street”


Rick Perry, U.S. secretary of energy, speaks during the 2019 CERAWeek by IHS Markit conference in Houston, Texas, on Wednesday, March 13, 2019.
Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who will be leaving his post by the year’s end , said Friday that he is not sure whether he will comply with a subpoena from House Democrats conducting an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.
But Perry, who revealed a day earlier that he would be stepping down as Energy Secretary, told CNBC’s Squawk on the Street”
Departing Energy Secretary Rick Perry says he’s not sure he’ll comply with subpoena in impeachment inquiry Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, perry, trump, impeachment, inquiry, officials, administration, house, advice, hell, subpoena, hes, texas, energy, rick, secretary, sure


Departing Energy Secretary Rick Perry says he's not sure he'll comply with subpoena in impeachment inquiry

Rick Perry, U.S. secretary of energy, speaks during the 2019 CERAWeek by IHS Markit conference in Houston, Texas, on Wednesday, March 13, 2019.

A parade of current and former Trump administration officials have been called on to cooperate with Congress as it investigates issues surrounding Trump’s request for Ukraine to launch corruption probes into the 2016 presidential election and former Vice President Joe Biden and his son.

Perry faces a Friday deadline to hand over a slew of Ukraine-related documents to the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees .

Energy Secretary Rick Perry, who will be leaving his post by the year’s end , said Friday that he is not sure whether he will comply with a subpoena from House Democrats conducting an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

But Perry, who revealed a day earlier that he would be stepping down as Energy Secretary, told CNBC’s Squawk on the Street” that he would follow the advice of administration lawyers.

“Until the advice of counsel comes out today, I don’t know what that answer’s gonna be, actually,” Perry said, referring to his decision on compliance with the subpoena.

“So let’s just hold off on saying we are or we aren’t going to address that issue until we get final advice of counsel.”

Trump said at a rally in Texas on Thursday night that Perry would be leaving at the end of the year.

The White House has rejected the impeachment inquiry as a “witch hunt” and is refusing to comply with its proceedings. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has blasted Democrats’ requests for officials in his department to cooperate with the probe, saying he will “use all means at my disposal to prevent and expose any attempts to intimidate the dedicated professionals whom I am proud to lead and serve alongside at the Department of State.”

Democrats in response suggested that it was Pompeo who was making an “effort to intimidate witnesses,” adding that any attempt to do so “is illegal and will constitute evidence of obstruction of the impeachment inquiry.”

Some current and former officials have opted to testify regardless of the messages from the Trump administration.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, perry, trump, impeachment, inquiry, officials, administration, house, advice, hell, subpoena, hes, texas, energy, rick, secretary, sure


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Trump nominates Rick Perry deputy and former lobbyist Dan Brouillette to be Energy secretary

Dan Brouillette, United States Deputy Secretary of Energy, seen during an interview with the German Press Agency (dpa) in te course of the 54th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, 16 February 2018. President Donald Trump on Friday announced that he has nominated Deputy Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette to replace departing Energy chief Rick Perry. “I am pleased to nominate Deputy Secretary Dan Brouillette to be the new Secretary of Energy. From 1998 to 2000, Brouillette worked as a lob


Dan Brouillette, United States Deputy Secretary of Energy, seen during an interview with the German Press Agency (dpa) in te course of the 54th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, 16 February 2018.
President Donald Trump on Friday announced that he has nominated Deputy Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette to replace departing Energy chief Rick Perry.
“I am pleased to nominate Deputy Secretary Dan Brouillette to be the new Secretary of Energy.
From 1998 to 2000, Brouillette worked as a lob
Trump nominates Rick Perry deputy and former lobbyist Dan Brouillette to be Energy secretary Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, perry, energy, nominates, dan, deputy, brouillette, secretary, trump, worked, usaa, nominated, rick, united, lobbyist


Trump nominates Rick Perry deputy and former lobbyist Dan Brouillette to be Energy secretary

Dan Brouillette, United States Deputy Secretary of Energy, seen during an interview with the German Press Agency (dpa) in te course of the 54th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany, 16 February 2018.

President Donald Trump on Friday announced that he has nominated Deputy Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette to replace departing Energy chief Rick Perry.

“I am pleased to nominate Deputy Secretary Dan Brouillette to be the new Secretary of Energy. Dan’s experience in the sector is unparalleled. A total professional, I have no doubt that Dan will do a great job!” Trump tweeted Friday afternoon.

Brouillette, 57, had previously served as a top lobbyist for the Ford Motor Company. Before joining Trump’s Department of Energy, he was the head of public policy for the United Services Automobile Association, or USAA, a military-focused financial institution. He reportedly worked for USAA for 11 years.

From 1998 to 2000, Brouillette worked as a lobbyist for firm Fleishman-Hillard.

Trump announced in April 2017 that Brouillette would be nominated to the Energy Department — his second stint at the agency, where he had worked as assistant secretary for Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs under former President George W. Bush.

Perry will step down at the end of the year, Trump said at a rally in Dallas on Thursday night.

This is breaking news. Please check back for updates.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-18  Authors: kevin breuninger
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, perry, energy, nominates, dan, deputy, brouillette, secretary, trump, worked, usaa, nominated, rick, united, lobbyist


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‘Never back down’—How to negotiate for a raise like Megan Rapinoe

But Rapinoe says this balancing act is part and parcel of being a female athlete. In the United States, women work longer hours of unpaid labor, doing tasks like cleaning, child care and taking care of sick family members, compared to men. When you add both paid and unpaid work together, women work longer hours and still must spend time and energy advocating for themselves. When you do face challenges, Rapinoe suggests finding a group of peers you can rely on for support. If Rapinoe’s current ba


But Rapinoe says this balancing act is part and parcel of being a female athlete.
In the United States, women work longer hours of unpaid labor, doing tasks like cleaning, child care and taking care of sick family members, compared to men.
When you add both paid and unpaid work together, women work longer hours and still must spend time and energy advocating for themselves.
When you do face challenges, Rapinoe suggests finding a group of peers you can rely on for support.
If Rapinoe’s current ba
‘Never back down’—How to negotiate for a raise like Megan Rapinoe Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, megan, youre, womens, gap, rapinoe, sport, balancing, energy, raise, women, negotiate, work, team, downhow


'Never back down'—How to negotiate for a raise like Megan Rapinoe

According to the lawsuit, if the men’s and women’s teams won each of the 20 non-tournament games they are contractually required to play, women’s team players would earn a maximum of $99,000 ($4,950 per game), while men’s team players would earn $263,320 ($13,166 per game).

To be sure, few athletes have schedules as packed as Rapinoe. This year, the 2019 FIFA best women’s player award-winner helped the United States clinch a record-breaking fourth World Cup championship and co-founded a business — all while leading her team through their lawsuit against the USSF for gender discrimination and unequal pay.

“The attention’s not exhausting,” she says. “The logistics of it all is exhausting.”

From the outside, all the activity and attention seem exhausting.

The player is currently in the training for the 2020 Summer Olympics and is also involved in highly-publicized negotiations with the U.S. Soccer Federation. She is also being constantly pulled for photos and interviews.

It’s a rainy Wednesday on the night of the Women’s Sports Foundation’s Annual Salute and Megan Rapinoe, midfielder for the U.S. Women’s National Team, is about to win an award for being the 2019 Team Sportswoman of the Year.

Megan Rapinoe accepts her WSF Sportswoman Of The Year Award (Team Sport) at The Women’s Sports Foundation’s 40th Annual Salute to Women in Sports Awards Gala, celebrating the most accomplished women in sports and the girls they inspire at Cipriani Wall Street on October 16, 2019 in New York City.

Balancing her commitments on and off the field is an imperfect art, she admits.

“In order for me to be my absolute best [in soccer], I have to not do anything else,” she tells CNBC Make It. “But in order for me to capitalize on everything that I’m doing on the field, I have to be pulled away from what I’m doing.”

But Rapinoe says this balancing act is part and parcel of being a female athlete.

“It’s what female athletes do. We have to do everything,” she says. “Not only do we have to do everything you need for our sport, we have to maximize everything financially outside of our sport, which takes days and time and flights. And then there’s the advocacy part.”

This balancing act is something many women can relate to. In the United States, women work longer hours of unpaid labor, doing tasks like cleaning, child care and taking care of sick family members, compared to men. When you add both paid and unpaid work together, women work longer hours and still must spend time and energy advocating for themselves.

Economists estimate that the U.S. gender pay gap — the gap between the median salaries of all working men and women in the U.S. — is about 80 cents earned by women for every dollar earned by a man. For black, Latina and Native American women, this gap is even wider.

Rapinoe’s advice to women who are working on balancing it all while advocating and negotiating for themselves is simple: “Do not back down,” she says. “You’re probably going against your employer or your boss and it can be very daunting, but believe in yourself and believe in what you’re doing and just don’t back down.”

When you do face challenges, Rapinoe suggests finding a group of peers you can rely on for support.

“It’s hard sometimes, but seek out other women or networks to boost your confidence,” she explains. “We’re really lucky being on a team; we have 23 other women. If ever you’re feeling a wavering moment, everyone’s like ‘We’ve got this!’ We’re lucky in that sense.

“But yeah, just never back down.”

As for the USWNT’s negotiations, the team isn’t showing signs of backing down either. In August, mediation talks between the USWNT and the USSF fell apart, and the case is scheduled to go to trial on May 5, 2020, if a resolution is not found.

Rapinoe says she hopes the two groups can come to a settlement before then. “I don’t think a really public trial is in their best interest for sure, but hopefully not ours,” she says. “It’s gonna take a lot of time and energy on everyone’s part to go through a whole public trial.”

If Rapinoe’s current balancing act is any evidence, it seems she is prepared to give her time and energy to the cause.

“Hopefully it ends in something that both sides feel good about,” she says.

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Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: abigail hess
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, megan, youre, womens, gap, rapinoe, sport, balancing, energy, raise, women, negotiate, work, team, downhow


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Energy Secretary Rick Perry told Trump he intends to step down

Energy Secretary Rick Perry told President Donald Trump on Thursday that he intends to leave his post, two administration sources told a White House pool reporter. A senior administration official said that his resignation would become effective “very soon.” Perry, formerly the governor of Texas, had largely avoided headlines since joining the Trump administration in 2017. Trump also told House Republicans that Perry urged Trump to take the July call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky t


Energy Secretary Rick Perry told President Donald Trump on Thursday that he intends to leave his post, two administration sources told a White House pool reporter.
A senior administration official said that his resignation would become effective “very soon.”
Perry, formerly the governor of Texas, had largely avoided headlines since joining the Trump administration in 2017.
Trump also told House Republicans that Perry urged Trump to take the July call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky t
Energy Secretary Rick Perry told Trump he intends to step down Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, senior, step, staff, administration, house, white, president, trump, subpoena, secretary, rick, intends, perry, energy


Energy Secretary Rick Perry told Trump he intends to step down

Energy Secretary Rick Perry told President Donald Trump on Thursday that he intends to leave his post, two administration sources told a White House pool reporter.

The timing of his departure, first reported by Bloomberg, was not immediately clear. A senior administration official said that his resignation would become effective “very soon.” Multiple representatives of the Department of Energy did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Perry, formerly the governor of Texas, had largely avoided headlines since joining the Trump administration in 2017. But in recent weeks he became entangled in the Democratic-led impeachment probe into Trump’s actions involving Ukraine.

Perry was one of three political appointees overseeing the U.S. relationship with the country after acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney transferred that portfolio away from career staff, George Kent, a senior State Department official, told House investigators this week behind closed doors. Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., described Kent’s account to reporters.

Trump also told House Republicans that Perry urged Trump to take the July call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky that has become the focus of the impeachment inquiry, according to Axios, a news website. Perry’s office has said that he wanted the president to take the call to discuss energy-related matters.

House Democrats, investigating whether Trump conditioned military assistance for the country on an investigation of his political rival, hit Perry with a subpoena for documents earlier this month. The subpoena included a demand for a variety of Ukraine-related materials by Friday.

Perry recently denied reports that he was planning to leave his post.

— CNBC’s Kayla Tausche contributed to this report.


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-17  Authors: tucker higgins
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, told, senior, step, staff, administration, house, white, president, trump, subpoena, secretary, rick, intends, perry, energy


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Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Amazon, T-Mobile, Beyond Meat, Dish & more

T-Mobile US CEO John Legere testifies before a House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee hearing in Washington, February 13, 2019. Erin Scott | Reuters


T-Mobile US CEO John Legere testifies before a House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee hearing in Washington, February 13, 2019.
Erin Scott | Reuters
Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Amazon, T-Mobile, Beyond Meat, Dish & more Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, energy, washington, scott, analyst, biggest, house, calls, meat, testifies, day, subcommittee, legere, dish, john, amazon, hearing, tmobile


Here are the biggest analyst calls of the day: Amazon, T-Mobile, Beyond Meat, Dish & more

T-Mobile US CEO John Legere testifies before a House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee hearing in Washington, February 13, 2019.

Erin Scott | Reuters


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-16  Authors: michael bloom
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, energy, washington, scott, analyst, biggest, house, calls, meat, testifies, day, subcommittee, legere, dish, john, amazon, hearing, tmobile


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Geothermal project gets green light in UK after securing $21 million in funding

A geothermal heat and power project in the southwest of England has secured £16.8 million ($21.23 million) in funding. The DOE adds that geothermal energy “supplies renewable power around the clock” but emits “little or no greenhouse gases.” In terms of geothermal energy sites the U.S. boasts the Geysers, which power producer Calpine describes as “the largest complex of geothermal power plants in the world.” European Union funding, via the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), amounts to £9


A geothermal heat and power project in the southwest of England has secured £16.8 million ($21.23 million) in funding. The DOE adds that geothermal energy “supplies renewable power around the clock” but emits “little or no greenhouse gases.” In terms of geothermal energy sites the U.S. boasts the Geysers, which power producer Calpine describes as “the largest complex of geothermal power plants in the world.” European Union funding, via the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), amounts to £9
Geothermal project gets green light in UK after securing $21 million in funding Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eden, light, securing, green, heat, project, earths, power, geothermal, funding, cornwall, million, energy, drilling, gets


Geothermal project gets green light in UK after securing $21 million in funding

A geothermal heat and power project in the southwest of England has secured £16.8 million ($21.23 million) in funding.

In an announcement Monday, educational charity the Eden Project and EGS Energy Limited said the money would enable the first phase of the scheme, which includes the drilling of a 4.5 kilometer-deep well and a research program, to start.

The well will be used to provide heat to parts of the Eden Project site, which is built in an old china clay pit in Cornwall and home to attractions including an indoor rainforest. Drilling will start next year.

The Eden Project said it hoped the first well would “pave the way” for the project’s second phase: the drilling of another well and creation of an electricity plant.

Described by the U.S. Department of Energy as a “vital, clean energy resource,” geothermal energy refers to heat from under the Earth’s surface which can be used to produce renewable energy.

The DOE adds that geothermal energy “supplies renewable power around the clock” but emits “little or no greenhouse gases.” In terms of geothermal energy sites the U.S. boasts the Geysers, which power producer Calpine describes as “the largest complex of geothermal power plants in the world.”

The cash for the Cornwall project comes from a range of sources. European Union funding, via the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), amounts to £9.9 million, while Cornwall Council has contributed £1.4 million. The final £5.5 million comes from institutional investors. The U.K.’s Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government administers the ERDF funding.

Cornwall is already home to a geothermal energy scheme in the shape of the United Downs Deep Geothermal Power project, which has seen two wells drilled near the town of Redruth. If testing there is successful, a power plant will be constructed to “demonstrate the technical and commercial viability” of providing heat and electricity.

“Perhaps the most obvious way that the Earth’s materials can contribute to low-carbon energy is through provision of geothermal energy,” M H Stephenson, the British Geological Survey’s executive chief scientist, said in a statement sent to CNBC via email.

“The U.K. has often been considered to have a rather modest geothermal resource, being far away from volcanoes or the Earth’s plate boundaries,” Stephenson added.

“However, research by the British Geological Survey has revealed that by developing more efficient methods of extracting heat, even a relatively tepid underground like that of the U.K. could yield significant heat.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, eden, light, securing, green, heat, project, earths, power, geothermal, funding, cornwall, million, energy, drilling, gets


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Researchers develop ‘fully autonomous’ drones that can inspect and fix wind turbines

Researchers in the U.K. have developed autonomous drones that can inspect offshore energy sites. The drones were developed by the Offshore Robotics for the Certification of Assets (ORCA) Hub. In a statement Monday, Imperial College London’s Mirko Kovac said that drones were currently used to inspect offshore wind turbines, but that such inspections were “remotely controlled by people on-site at the offshore location.” Kovac explained that the autonomous drones could remove the need for humans to


Researchers in the U.K. have developed autonomous drones that can inspect offshore energy sites. The drones were developed by the Offshore Robotics for the Certification of Assets (ORCA) Hub. In a statement Monday, Imperial College London’s Mirko Kovac said that drones were currently used to inspect offshore wind turbines, but that such inspections were “remotely controlled by people on-site at the offshore location.” Kovac explained that the autonomous drones could remove the need for humans to
Researchers develop ‘fully autonomous’ drones that can inspect and fix wind turbines Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fix, wind, fully, drones, autonomous, university, used, inspect, turbines, drone, technology, energy, robotics, offshore, develop, researchers


Researchers develop 'fully autonomous' drones that can inspect and fix wind turbines

Researchers in the U.K. have developed autonomous drones that can inspect offshore energy sites.

The drones were developed by the Offshore Robotics for the Certification of Assets (ORCA) Hub.

Launched in 2017, the ORCA Hub is a consortium of five universities working with partners from industry sectors such as energy and technology.

It’s led by the Edinburgh Centre for Robotics, which is in itself a partnership between the University of Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt University. Imperial College London, the University of Liverpool and University of Oxford are also involved.

In a statement Monday, Imperial College London’s Mirko Kovac said that drones were currently used to inspect offshore wind turbines, but that such inspections were “remotely controlled by people on-site at the offshore location.”

“Should an area of concern be found, technicians are required to carry out further inspection, maintenance or repair, often at great heights and therefore in high-risk environments,” Kovac, who is director of Imperial’s aerial robotics laboratory, added.

“Our drones are fully autonomous. As well as visually inspecting a turbine for integrity concerns, ours make contact, placing sensors on the infrastructure, or acting as a sensor itself, to assess the health of each asset. Our technology could even deposit repair material for certain types of damage.”

Kovac explained that the autonomous drones could remove the need for humans to carry out dangerous and costly tasks such as abseiling down wind turbines and cut the number of ships going to and from wind farms.

As technology develops, drones are being deployed in a wide range of industries and locations. In the energy sector, Air Control Entech and the Oil & Gas Technology Centre launched three drones last year which can live stream offshore inspections and undertake three-dimensional laser scanning and ultrasonic testing.

Led by industry, the center describes itself as a “research and knowledge organisation” and is backed by the U.K. and Scottish governments.

In September 2019, autonomous drone technology was used to deliver diabetes medication to a location off the west coast of Ireland. The contents of the delivery were insulin and glucagon, while the drone also collected a patient’s blood sample.

The National University of Ireland in Galway said the drone’s journey between Connemara Airport and Inis Mór, which is part of the Aran Islands, showed “the possibility of future deliveries of this kind within planned drone corridors.”


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-15  Authors: anmar frangoul
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, fix, wind, fully, drones, autonomous, university, used, inspect, turbines, drone, technology, energy, robotics, offshore, develop, researchers


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How a massive Amazon wind farm will change a rural town in America

In April, Amazon announced three new wind farm projects — two overseas, and one in the Tehachapi (teh-HATCH-ah-pee) Mountains, located in southern California. Farther north is the Altamont Pass wind farm, which helps power another tech giant: Alphabet’s Google. “The good news for us is obviously we have the economic impact,” said Tehachapi economic development coordinator Corey Costelloe. Keeping jobs localAccording to estimates from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the construction of


In April, Amazon announced three new wind farm projects — two overseas, and one in the Tehachapi (teh-HATCH-ah-pee) Mountains, located in southern California. Farther north is the Altamont Pass wind farm, which helps power another tech giant: Alphabet’s Google. “The good news for us is obviously we have the economic impact,” said Tehachapi economic development coordinator Corey Costelloe. Keeping jobs localAccording to estimates from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the construction of
How a massive Amazon wind farm will change a rural town in America Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: jacob douglas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, change, energy, turbines, massive, rural, america, economic, tehachapi, cummings, renewable, wind, company, solar, town, farm


How a massive Amazon wind farm will change a rural town in America

The Tehachapi Mountain Range is home to around 4,731 wind turbines that generate about 3,200 megawatts of energy. City of Tehachapi

Buried in the mountains of southern California lies a field of white. It’s not your typical farm: It produces renewable energy. The Tehachapi Pass is home to one of the largest wind farms in the world. Now a huge tech company is bringing more turbines to the area, and it is going to have an impact on a nearby community. In April, Amazon announced three new wind farm projects — two overseas, and one in the Tehachapi (teh-HATCH-ah-pee) Mountains, located in southern California. The farms will help contribute to Amazon’s goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2040 and 100% renewables by 2030. The mountain range is a hub for the wind industry, with around 4,731 turbines that produce about 3,200 megawatts of electricity along the mountain range, according to the Center for Land Use Interpretation, with private companies flocking to the area because of the high wind speeds. Farther north is the Altamont Pass wind farm, which helps power another tech giant: Alphabet’s Google. Located just northeast of the mountain range is the town of Tehachapi. With a population of about 12,000, Tehachapi Mayor Pro-Tem Phil Smith called it a nice little mountain town, and while the power being produced from wind only comes to the town indirectly through the grid, Tehachapi gets something else directly as a result of the big renewable energy investments. “The good news for us is obviously we have the economic impact,” said Tehachapi economic development coordinator Corey Costelloe. Outside contractors come in to work on the wind turbines, staying in the town’s hotels and eating at its restaurants, like Kohnen’s Country Bakery, one of the town’s more popular local eateries. Family owned by Colleen and Thomas Kohnen, the bakery has been around since 2004. Colleen says the bakery is growing, but it’s hard to tell how much of that is because of the wind industry. Though she says that she does get customers who come from out of the city to work on the windmills. “I had one guy come in last week, and I guess he was staying in a hotel during the week or something,” Khonen said. “And his wife and daughter came up to visit him. That just introduces people (to the bakery).” Stephen Abbott, city renewables accelerator manager at Rocky Mountain Institute, says that small businesses seeing an increase in revenue is part of the initial economic boom that follows a renewable energy farm.

Keeping jobs local

According to estimates from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the construction of a 47 megawatt (the size of Amazon’s new farm) renewable energy farm could produce around 50 new jobs. One company wants to keep those jobs in Tehachapi. World Wind and Solar is a renewable energy maintenance company that moved its headquarters to Tehachapi in 2019. WWS CEO Buddy Cummings has deep ties to Tehachapi. His father, Steve Cummings, installed some of the first wind turbines in the town. Cummings feels moving the company to Tehachapi is a homecoming of sorts. “The relationships that got us into the renewables market are the relationships we grew up with,” Cummings said. “Tehachapi just feels like home.” WWS has a goal of keeping their work local. Cummings says that he tries to hire Tehachapi residents, and use word of mouth marketing. “We grow by people telling their friends and family,” Cummings said. The company, which started in wind but has diversified into solar, requires workers to do general labor maintaining solar panels — cleaning and upkeep. The company hires workers to do that work for 60 to 90 days, and if they perform well, the company brings them back to Tehachapi for two to three weeks of training, teaching them how to do more technical maintenance on wind turbines and solar arrays. After the training they can become full-time technicians. “It’s a quick and healthy way to get people work,” Cummings said. “It has such an opportunity to grow a career so fast.” The workers coming in to train are spending their dollars at local businesses, like Kohnen’s Bakery, which cited the World Wind and Solar training period as a profitable time because the renewable energy company recommends it to trainees. “The wind farms have generated quite a number of very good technical, good-paying jobs that can sustain a family and the employers have benefits,” Mayor Pro-Tem Smith said. “So the people in the workforce can look forward to actually a career in the industry if they want, and the pay is good enough where they can afford a home and stay here.” Wind turbine technicians are making just over $54,000 a year ($26.14 per hour), according to The Bureau of Labor Statistics. It forecast employment growth of 57% for wind turbine technicians from 2018 to 2028. In 2018, there were 6,600 wind turbine technician jobs in the U.S., according to BLS data.

Tehachapi isn’t the only area that has seen an economic updraft from the wind industry. Benton County, Indiana (pop. 8,700) has multiple wind projects developed over the past decade, one operated by Pattern Energy which supports electricity needs for an Amazon Web Services data center. The AWS farm, its first major renewables project, went into operation in early 2016, and Paul Jackson, director of economic development for Benton County says the area has seen gradual growth after big, initial booms from its wind farm projects. “Everything kind of flattens out,” Jackson said. “The big boom is over, and you get into the reality of it.” The Amazon Wind Farm Fowler Ridge project is expected to make $5 million in economic development payments to Benton County over a period of 17 years. The project is entitled to 100% property tax abatements for a 10-year period, after which property tax revenue for the county will start being generated as well. “Once wind farms came off of abatement, we are getting tax dollars. The tax money is fantastic,” Jackson said. Between 2008 and 2018, taxes on Benton County wind farms have permitted the county to allocate an additional $3 million to schools, additional money to medical services, $35 million to new roads — upgraded roads were required to transport giant wind turbines to sites — and a total of $31 million in economic development payments to be made to the county through 2038. A September article from the Wall Street Journal highlighted that farmers in the U.S. are leasing land out for renewable energy farms to help themselves in a difficult financial time. “I think one thing we shouldn’t lose sight of is that a lot of farmers in the middle of the country are relatively strapped economically,” Abbott said. “Wind or solar can be a really useful additional revenue stream for people and those communities, particularly if it helps them get through a particular commodity down cycle.”

Facebook’s solar power projects


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-12  Authors: jacob douglas
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, amazon, change, energy, turbines, massive, rural, america, economic, tehachapi, cummings, renewable, wind, company, solar, town, farm


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Fighting fire: If PG&E now has power to shut you down, it’s time to take control of your energy needs

And the other ones that are bright pink on our map remain vulnerable in the future,” Lewis McDonald said in an interview with CNBC earlier this year. “These events are going to be more prevalent in future across the West,” Lewis McDonald said. Larry Dale, an energy economist with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who worked on studies with Lewis McDonald, said he has “a little sympathy for PG&E.” “In fire research it is a big buzzword,” said Lewis McDonald. That may help California reach its


And the other ones that are bright pink on our map remain vulnerable in the future,” Lewis McDonald said in an interview with CNBC earlier this year. “These events are going to be more prevalent in future across the West,” Lewis McDonald said. Larry Dale, an energy economist with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who worked on studies with Lewis McDonald, said he has “a little sympathy for PG&E.” “In fire research it is a big buzzword,” said Lewis McDonald. That may help California reach its
Fighting fire: If PG&E now has power to shut you down, it’s time to take control of your energy needs Cached Page below :
Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: eric rosenbaum, valentina sanchez, stephanie maier, director of responsible investment at hsbc global asset mana
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pge, wildfires, fighting, wildfire, mcdonald, risk, shut, california, lewis, control, utility, energy, power, lines, needs


Fighting fire: If PG&E now has power to shut you down, it's time to take control of your energy needs

PG&E workers install conduit in trenches for underground electric lines in Paradise, California on October 1, 2019. The utility company started switching off power to an unprecedented number of households in the face of hot, windy weather that raises the risk of wildfires. ROBYN BECK | AFP | Getty Images

Another season of big wildfire risks in California was never an if, always a when. And so here we are again. Whatever you think of PG&E’s management before last year’s fires and its fire mitigation plans since it entered into bankruptcy proceedings, many experts assumed at some point PG&E would need to shut down portions of the grid to remove the risk of power lines being taken down by high winds and sparking a wildfire like the one that devastated towns like Paradise in 2018. So now that, too, is happening. But being angry or feeling helpless against a giant utility won’t help anything. PG&E has gotten plenty wrong in the past and may get wrong the decision to shut down power when and where it turns out not to be needed, but the message to Californians — and everyone living in areas at risk of natural disasters — is that it’s time to take control of as much power generation as you can. The fires will keep coming. That’s the opinion of wildfire experts from Leroy Westerling, who studies wildfires and climate at the University of California, Merced, to Sarah Lewis McDonald, principal at Envision Geo, a geospatial technology firm that has worked on studies of wildfire risk in California. When she looked back at one forecast map she helped to create before last year’s devastating wildfires, what the technology had provided as its best guess turned out to be reality. “We looked back and said, ‘Oh my God.’ Here it was, bright on our map.’ Bright pink. Paradise. And the other ones that are bright pink on our map remain vulnerable in the future,” Lewis McDonald said in an interview with CNBC earlier this year. The zones of high risk that she called “disproportionately dire” across northern California are not going away, and people who assume that these events are once-in-a-lifetime weather scenarios are making a big gamble. “These events are going to be more prevalent in future across the West,” Lewis McDonald said. She said the previous wildfire season in northern California was “a perfect storm of events of extremes, but with climate change that is going to be case.”

Larry Dale, an energy economist with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who worked on studies with Lewis McDonald, said he has “a little sympathy for PG&E.” “They don’t have control over where people go or managing the forest, and the weather is changing and they are required to serve everyone.” But he said the issue of drier weather creating more fuel for fires, and high wind events that can cause power lines to come down “seems to be happening a lot more frequently now.” These kinds of wildfires have always occurred, with two new significant changes: wildfires moving into areas that are densely populated and had not previously been seen as high risk and with northern California real estate among the world’s most expensive, more people are being pushed farther and farther into communities on what is called the wild-urban interface (known as the WUI by experts). “In fire research it is a big buzzword,” said Lewis McDonald. “Also known as the urban fringe, human population and settlements abutting forest. Humans are moving into the history of fire.” Fire models have been constructed based on the constraints of fire history, or as one expert who builds these models put it, “I can’t let the fire burn more crazily than anything we’ve ever seen,” but that level of burn has now become reality. “I can’t clamp the model to not be larger than the largest observed fire ever, but by the time we’re finished building a model, the biggest observable fire has doubled in size.”

Life in high-risk fire zones

One option that is not an option: forcing people to move. The socioeconomics of wildfire are already at issue with more communities forced to the fringe of one of the nation’s most expensive states. While PG&E is employing new wildfire prevention methods, including the laying of underground power lines, there is no perfect solution and there is realistically no mass migration option, either. “You’re not going to tell a population to leave or bear the full cost of living there,” said one utility expert in California who spoke with me earlier this year about the situation as PG&E entered bankruptcy. The expert could not be named, as he was being called to testify as an expert in the bankruptcy proceedings. “We have 2 million homes in high- and severe-risk wildfire areas, according to insurance industry estimates. You can’t tell 2 million people to leave and while some are very rich, lots of them are low-income, like in Paradise,” the expert said. Lewis McDonald said when she was in the market for a home, she was thinking about locations in terms of putting her family in a vulnerable situation. She said homeowners living in areas at risk of wildfires now need to think about “defensible space,” because when you look at the structures that burned versus the structures that remained, having landscaped properly to remove fuel for the fire and using building materials that are fire-resistant made a big difference. In fact, she said if firefighters see a home that does not appear to be defensible these days, “they won’t even try; they move onto the next house.” And that goes for the utility, too. “You can’t just ask PG&E to do it for you,” she said. So what can you do? One thing people are doing is lining up at gas stations to get every last drop of fossil fuel to power their emergency generators. That works, but will become a perverse option in a world in which increasing natural disasters caused by climate change, which is caused by burning carbon, are occurring. California is the bleeding edge of how communities defend themselves from natural disasters and climate risks. Many methods of response are being tested in communities, from heat sensors being installed in open spaces between likely ignition spots to the construction of huge water tanks at key building locations.

When I look at the root cause of fires sparked by transmission lines, I don’t see solutions out there other than distributed generation. Adam Browning executive director of Vote Solar

PG&E has said during the bankruptcy process that it understands it must play a leading role in implementing change that will help mitigate the risk of wildfires. It also has noted that the threat of wildfire is a complex one, and will require comprehensive solutions from a wide range of stakeholders to fully address. Taking more control over power generation, and forcing legislators and regulators to offer more control over power generation through renewable energy sources like solar, battery storage and microgrids controlled within a community, should be priorities for Californians in the dark this week. A “Manhattan Project” for grid resiliency may or may not be an accomplishment that states like California and companies like PG&E can one day look back on as a success, but we are not there yet, and PG&E’s track record does not breed confidence. What’s more, the utility industry approach to renewable energy — fostered by state laws — has been to meet their carbon-neutral goals by building massive solar and wind projects that feed into their existing transmission lines. That may help California reach its renewable energy production targets, but when the power is shut off, it is not delivering on power to the utility ratepayers.

Solar installations fill a neighborhood in the southwestern United States. Sunrun

Utilities typically view the concept of distributed generation — power being sourced directly from individual, small-scale projects rather than generated by power plants they own or merchant generators from which they buy — as an existential threat. When the existential threat is your family, home and community, it’s time to push back against utility industry efforts to limited distributed generation like solar panels on your home. And at some point the rate increases utilities will try to push through to pay for grid resiliency may reach the breaking point where investing in your own power would be more cost-effective. That threshold is not necessarily near, and the biggest leap needs to be in how low-income energy would be delivered, experts noted. Today, affluent homeowners in areas where power was shut off have their home solar systems and battery storage to rely on. As one expert put it: “If you are on the tracks and the train is coming, you need to get off the tracks. Don’t just say the train is coming at me.”

Defending in space


Company: cnbc, Activity: cnbc, Date: 2019-10-10  Authors: eric rosenbaum, valentina sanchez, stephanie maier, director of responsible investment at hsbc global asset mana
Keywords: news, cnbc, companies, pge, wildfires, fighting, wildfire, mcdonald, risk, shut, california, lewis, control, utility, energy, power, lines, needs


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